Assessment of UNDP Libya results on resilience phase one

Report Cover Image
Evaluation Plan:
2019-2020, Libya
Evaluation Type:
Final Project
Planned End Date:
12/2019
Completion Date:
11/2019
Status:
Completed
Management Response:
Yes
Evaluation Budget(US $):
30,000

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Title Assessment of UNDP Libya results on resilience phase one
Atlas Project Number: 00104158
Evaluation Plan: 2019-2020, Libya
Evaluation Type: Final Project
Status: Completed
Completion Date: 11/2019
Planned End Date: 12/2019
Management Response: Yes
Focus Area:
  • 1. Others
Corporate Outcome and Output (UNDP Strategic Plan 2018-2021)
  • 1. Output 3.1.1 Core government functions and inclusive basic services4 restored post-crisis for stabilisation, durable solutions to displacement and return to sustainable development pathways within the framework of national policies and priorities
SDG Goal
  • Goal 1. End poverty in all its forms everywhere
SDG Target
  • 1.4 By 2030, ensure that all men and women, in particular the poor and the vulnerable, have equal rights to economic resources, as well as access to basic services, ownership and control over land and other forms of property, inheritance, natural resources, appropriate new technology and financial services, including microfinance
Evaluation Budget(US $): 30,000
Source of Funding: Project budget
Evaluation Expenditure(US $): 3,000
Joint Programme: No
Joint Evaluation: No
Evaluation Team members:
Name Title Nationality
GEF Evaluation: No
Key Stakeholders: European Union, project team as per the second phase
Countries: LIBYA
Comments:

By May 2019, this evaluation is reopening the call for applications to hire the international lead consultant.This, as per the previously selected candidate declined the offer for not been suitable to his agenda. The assumption is that the International and National evaluators will coordinate even if the international lead evaluator cannot be deployed to the ground . 

The CO will keep updating RBAS, in case there is a need to extend the evaluation due date. 

 

 

Lessons
Findings
1.

5 Findings

This section is structured along the evaluation criteria and in line with the key evaluation questions. Furthermore, the different outputs have been addressed individually, to the extent possible. Considering the security constraints linked to the field data collection phase, not all findings could be triangulated on the ground in Libya.

5.1 Relevance

The project is fully relevant in responding to the needs of the Government of Libya. Both the transition linked to the end of the Khadafi regime and the ensuing conflicts have taken a heavy toll on the economy and the social situation in the country. The on-going conflict between the GNA and the Haftar supporters is still claiming high social and economic costs, as the country and the municipalities remain divided in their allegiance to the different sides and security conditions remain very volatile. According to the MoLG, the country is divided in 117 municipalities, of which 80 to 85 are under the influence of the GNA. The project comes as a welcome support to fill the needs in terms of reconstruction of essential damaged infrastructure and facilitate essential service provision for recovery and stability. UNDP is one of the few actors able to work in municipalities which are both in the Government of National Accord (GNA) and outside of the GNA area of influence, which indicates it is seen as neutral and impartial, and can operate in the West, the South and the East of the country. The MoLG is grateful for the support and is looking forward to the third phase of the project to work more closely with UNDP in the selection of the target municipalities to be covered. (The current project covered the municipalities of Tripoli, Al Kufra, Murzuq, Sebratah, Sebha, and Benghazi as per the Description of the Action -DoA). MoLG indicated they have a limited budget which does not allow them to carry out close monitoring in the field and very high needs, so the support that UNDP is providing is essential to foster the recovery and stability in Libya. It was not clear, however, whether the MoLG has its own municipal priority plan, or whether the overall Libya 2020 Vision, produced by the Libyan Institute for Advanced Studies (LIAS) is still representing current government priorities. If so, the SLCRR project contributes directly to the LIBYA 2017– 2020 recovery and growth vision, which gives continued focus on economic, human development, and governance reforms for recovery and growth by scaling transformation projects.


Tag: Vulnerable Relevance Justice system Local Governance Rule of law Service delivery Country Government Displaced People Migration Refugees Security Capacity Building

2.

Relevance (continuation)

Output 3: Support local economic recovery/development, including job creation and livelihoods

Conflict exerts a strong toll in terms of economic and social costs, with population displacement, loss of assets, insecurity and lack of personal safety. The loss of assets and of formally steady jobs means that a number of citizens have had to resort to other forms of income to make ends meet. The efforts to develop economic activities and create jobs, through the partnership established with Tatweer Research, is an essential effort to attempt to address the needs, and in particular of the vulnerable population, in a context of high volatility and insecurity. The output 3 is fully aligned to the needs of the population, and in particular of the vulnerable groups who are most affected by the conflict and the declining standard ofliving.


Tag: Vulnerable Relevance Multi Donor Trust Funds Local Governance Partnership Displaced People Refugees Security Inclusive economic growth Jobs and Livelihoods

3.

5.2 Efficiency

K.Q.2.1 Did communication amongst the different stakeholders (Libyan Authorities, UNDP, EU) contribute to project efficiency? The SLCRR project was found to be highly efficient in communicating with the key stakeholders. Initially the project was in contact with the EU and developed the DoA in close collaboration with the EU. A few months later the communication and coordination were extended to the MoLG as initially the Ministry was also undergoing some structural changes and some 13 people were involved in the initial communication setup, which led to some bureaucratic delays. At present two people are the focal points for the project and are in close communication with UNDP. The EU indicated that the communication with UNDP was good, and the they were delivering more quickly than some of the other partners (the total programme for the North Africa Window is EUR 90 million amongst five actors), and therefore the EU has been keen to provide additional funds to UNDP.


Tag: Efficiency Local Governance Donor relations Project and Programme management Service delivery Country Government

4.

Efficency (continuation)

K.Q.2.3. How well was the project designed? The project made great efforts to include a complete and comprehensive assessment of the situation in the country. Part of the original design was based on the earlier “Rapid Diagnostic Assessment of Local Governance in Libya 2015” which presents detailed findings regarding local governance. At the same time, the deadline to present the project document was short and this means that the project development process had to be rushed. While some parts were able to include relevant information about the needs and develop a phased and gradual approach starting from six municipalities (Tripoli, Benghazi, Al Kufra, Murzuq, Sebratah, Sebha), other aspects were not fully developed. Two aspects in particular were not sufficiently elaborated at the project development stage, but they did not fully integrate at a later date the knowledge gained through the project implementation: one is related to conflict analysis, the other is related to the development of the results framework and more generally for the M&E system at the outcome level. 


Tag: Efficiency Relevance Local Governance Rule of law Human and Financial resources Monitoring and Evaluation Conflict resolution Resilience

5.

Efficency (continuation)

3. The project developed a succinct Theory of Change, which is reproduced as part of the evaluation title page. In line with UNDG and UNDP guidance, a results framework containing both outputs and outcome results, with the corresponding indicators, should be developed and used for the monitoring of the project. The initial framework under the DoA (p. 19 V. Results Framework) is confusing, as it mentions the intended outcomeas stated in the Programme Results and Resource Framework as: “support local authorities in Libya to respond to the many conflict and human mobility induced challenges by strengthening the local resilience and recovery mechanisms”. A first problem is that this statement is technically not an outcome statement. Furthermore, the outcome indicators referred to are SP Outcome 6: early recovery and rapid return to sustainable development pathways are achieved in post-conflict (sic) and post-disaster settings – indicators 6.1.1., 6.1.2, 6.2.1, 6.4.2. The focus of the Results Framework is therefore essentially focusing on the output level. It is understood and mentioned in the documentation provided that a refined results framework should have been developed during the project implementation, in line with the lessons learned. As a result of the ROM mission that was undertaken in December 2018, a Results and Resource Framework was established by the UNDP together with the EU, adding two columns with specific inputs, statements and indicators. However, the logframe remains at the output level for the UNDP, while it mentions EUTF NOA overall objective and the specific objective. This means that the project seems to align with the EU and to a lesser extent with the UN instruments and tools, such as the CPD (Country Programme Document) or wider planning frameworks. The heading of the revised results framework reads as follows: While the ToC designed for the project, which was not revised along with the results framework, indicates an outcome that is mentioned as “The population groups caneffectively cope with and mitigate the risks of irregular migration and be strong drivers of resilience-building and development efforts”. While there is some similarity in the wording of the two statements (EUTF NOA overall objective and UNDP project ToC), there are also significant differences. It would be very important for UNDP to discuss with the EU a revision of the project ToC and identify technically realistic and feasible indicators for the outcome level. From a technical M&E perspective, the suggested overall objective indicator does not appear to be very realistic: measuring the average degree of resilience of individuals requires a complicated set of data and should be a composite indicator which is unlikely to be applicable in the Libyan context.


Tag: Efficiency Monitoring and Evaluation Programme/Project Design Results-Based Management Theory of Change Donor Resilience

6.

5.3 Effectiveness

K.Q.3.1. What are the key results of the project? The project was effective in achieving its outputs in a difficult context with limited security in many of the targeted areas. This means that results that may appear to be normal in a stable context are actually much more difficult to achieve in a conflict environment. Some municipalities, such as Tripoli, have seen recurrent conflict and armed strife, and this has led to many additional efforts by the staff and contractors to be able to provide the services and carry out the activities as planned, although in some cases work had to be reprogrammed given the persisting insecurity. Despite very constraining working conditions, UNDP has been able to deliver significant results in Libya through the project. Not one of the interviewers met in Tunis or in Libya had negative remarks about UNDP, and many showed their understanding for some of the delays given the security conditions in the country. That said, UNDP achieved the following key results through the project, presented under the relevant outputs that made the outcome level results possible: 

Output 1: Enhancing the quality of the services for women and men in the target localities by rehabilitating critical infrastructure and delivering equipment 

The key result under output 1 has been the provision of critical infrastructure construction, rehabilitation, repair and equipment, with a prominent investment in health and educational infrastructure, that has allowed the local population and vulnerable groups to benefit from the health, education and other essential services in areas where public services were no longer available, damaged or deficient. As indicated in the December 2018 progress report, no less than 11 works sites were finalised, and 20 sets of equipment were delivered. The field data collection in target municipalities showed that the general public was very pleased with the access to health services and schools, and that the services were being used. Municipalities were equally grateful and supportive of the works undertaken by the UNDP under the project. There was clearly an increase in public service provision as a result of the project, which benefited the vulnerable groups and the general population, with an estimated 1.7 million people having improved access to basic services in the six target municipalities (Tripoli, Benghazi, Sebratah, Sebha, Al Kufra, Murzuq).

Output indicators show that the project is on track, with five (out of six) planned coordination mechanisms established (except for Tripoli), 100% of Tier 1 priorities completed in Benghazi and Murzuq, work tendered for Al Kufra, Sebratah and Ajdabiya, work on bill of quantities completed for Sebha, and prioritisation for six municipalities inTripoli pending. The work on capacity development for local municipalities was expected to unfold in 2019. Under Output 1, PCI was hired as partner to provide support to municipalities for community mobilisation and conflict sensitivity. Social Peace and Local Development (SPLD) partnerships were established in five municipalities (all except in Tripoli) with a total of 159 members as of 15/8/2019.15 This work was coupled with 7 workshops of one-day community consultations with a total of 326 participants (of which 64 female and 262 male), five two-day training on conflict management in the same five municipalities for a total of 124 participants (40 female and 84 male), the development of Social Accountability Mechanisms (SAM) for six one-day training to develop inception meetings (with 152 participants and 53 female and 99 male), and five grants as follows, based on the information received from PCI:

An interview with an advisor (and also PCI mentor) to the Sebha mayor in Tunis during the scoping mission provided further feedback on the process. According to him PCI started working successfully for six months and then stopped. The president or head of the Partnership (SPLD), who is elected, had to quit and the Partnership died. At the beginning there were 65 people in the SPLD, 3 from each of the 14 areas, including women. But after two or three meetings, attendance dropped to 25 as expectations did not materialize, and then the president left and the whole thing collapsed. Initially it was expected that the PCI partnership would be involved across all development issues in the community, and provide support between and amongst government bodies, even outside of the SLCRR project. At the same time, UNDP staff reportedly never went to Sebha, only a UNDP engineer once with the UN delegation, but there is no project officer in the municipality. The above information is from a single source and not triangulated.


Tag: Effectiveness Gender Equality Gender Mainstreaming Women's Empowerment Local Governance Partnership Results-Based Management Risk Management Service delivery Conflict resolution Capacity Building Urbanization

7.

5.3 Effectiveness

Output 2: Support local authorities and administrations in fulfilling their role and responsibilities with a focus on enforcing local stability and community security.

Under this output two key results were achieved, none of which can be considered “outcome” results in the sense that it has not yet contributed to a change of behaviour or of institutional capacity. Firstly, a total of 75 RoL staff were involved in the consultative workshops conducted by Aktis Strategy for Tripoli and Sebha. As the RoL assessment were expected to cover three municipalities, an additional RoL assessment was to be carried out by Aktis Strategy. However, the company went bankrupt and as a result there were delays in obtaining the RoL assessment for Benghazi. UNDP indicated that the consultant who is actually conducting the assessment in Benghazi is the same person that did the RoL assessment in Sebha. As the company was bankrupt, he was contracted on an individual basis to carry out the assessment using the same methodology.


Tag: Coherence Effectiveness Justice system Local Governance Rule of law Results-Based Management Country Government Security Capacity Building

8.

5.3 Effectiveness

Output 3: Support local economic recovery/development, including job creation and livelihoods.

While for output 1 PCI was the key partner for conflict analysis through a responsible party agreement with UNDP, for output 3 it is Tatweer Research through the TEC (Tatweer Entrepreneurship Campus) that was the main actor in providing business development, implementing livelihood programmes, setting up business incubators, providing grant funding to start-up business community, through the impact fund. A substantial effort was undertaken, primarily in Benghazi where the TEC is located, to develop the business capacity through a series of concrete measures. Key results obtained were the capacity through the TEC programme to actively contribute to solidifying the entrepreneurship culture in Libya through several activities and services. Up to June 2019, the Tatweer Entrepreneurship Campus community grew to 520 entrepreneurs who received training and over 240 start-up ideas from all over the country that applied to either TEC incubator or the Impact Fund. 49 start-ups applied to TEC Incubator in Benghazi. As for the Impact Fund, 198 start-ups applied for grant funding in two rounds. In the first round, out of 109 applications to the Impact Fund, six start-ups were selected and received grants from theImpact Fund. In the second round, 83 start-ups applied for funding, out of which additional six start-ups started to receive grant funding for a total of over 400,000 Libyan Dinars. Furthermore, despite security challenges, the TEC programme became operational and started implementing community programs in Sebha and Tripoli. There are currently 54 entrepreneurs participating in on-going trainings in business management and web and mobile app development. These entrepreneurs are the nucleus of TEC community in Tripoli and Sebha and TEC wants to make it grow. As for Benghazi, TEC continued to support entrepreneurs and solidify the entrepreneurship culture and ecosystem in the country through their community programs such as TEC Talks and TEC University Roadshows. Also, during a visit to Benghazi, Ghassan Salame, SRSG and the Head of the UN Support Mission in Libya, visited Tatweer’s office and got introduced to the work that Tatweer is doing on the ground and met with entrepreneurs in TEC Space. 

During this period, TEC Incubator continued to provide its services to the incubated projects. However, the number of incubated start-ups in Benghazi dropped from 13 to 11 start-ups. Furthermore, TEC Incubator teams in Tripoli and Sebha started identifying potential start-ups to join the incubator. From January 2019, TEC started the second phase and recruited staff in Tripoli and Sebha until the end of the projects in March 2020. TEC does not possess physical facilities in Tripoli and Sebha for training, which is one of its limitations. The partnership with Tatweer seems to be leveraging promising results based on the progress to date, particularly in three of the project municipalities (Benghazi, where Tatweer has its headquarters, Sebha, and Tripoli), while there are additional challenges, including lack of security, to extending the services to other municipalities. The applications for the Impact Fund were numerous, with 197 applications in the two rounds (including 31% of women led start- ups) and 48% from Benghazi, 26% from Tripoli, 7% from Sebha and the rest from other cities. However, the partnership is clearly serving its role to create enabling conditions for the development of business and livelihoods and is also mindful of the gender dimension and the need to support women led start-up businesses.


Tag: Effectiveness Sustainability Resource mobilization Local Governance Partnership Results-Based Management Inclusive economic growth Jobs and Livelihoods Micro-credit

9.

5.3 Effectiveness

Output 3: Support local economic recovery/development, including job creation and livelihoods. (Continuation)

K.Q.3.2. To what extent has the projected contributed to enhancing resilience capacity in target municipalities? The question requires a differentiated response as not all municipalities have been involved to the same degree in the project activities or its outputs, particularly for the activities undertaken by PCI and TEC and Aktis Strategy. It is difficult to appraise the results of the project in terms of enhancing resilience when the term has not been defined in the project document. The term of resilience was first used in relation to the risk of disasters and has gradually become used in other contexts such as countries suffering from conflict. According to the United Nations, “Resilience is the ability of a system, community or society exposed to hazards to resist, absorb, accommodate to and recover from the effects of a hazard in a timely and efficient manner, including through the preservation and restoration of its essential basic structures and functions.”

It can therefore be confirmed that the rebuilding of basic infrastructure and the restoration of public services, as undertaken under output 1 of the project, directly support the definition of resilience for the communities who benefitted from the project activities in the six municipalities. It is more difficult to appraise whether the partnership with PCI is found to support community resilience. While it appeared at the beginning of the project to be building towards such a result, the data collected during the field interviews seem to indicate otherwise. At present, the PCI partnership is run as a stand-alone component of output 1, with little coordination with UNDP in the field in Libya, and even municipal authorities interviewed did not make a clear connection between the work of the PCI and UNDP. This undermines the potential of the PCI partnership as it is a single component of a wider programme, with more funding targeting the construction and rehabilitation of essential public services. For output 2, it is unlikely that the RoL assessment will be enough to develop the resilience of the community or restore essential functions of the rule of law. The construction of one “model” police station may serve such a purpose, provided the building is manned, equipped, and maintained fully functional with a commitment from the MoI to ensure all running costs. Under output 3, the creation of business opportunities clearly has the potential to enhance the resilience of the target beneficiaries, if such opportunities are successful and are coupled with increased gains and income generation from the activities. Similarly, the vocational training can be useful (Toyota partnership) if the training leads to employment. According to a phone interview with Toyota, 18% of graduates work with dealers, 13% work in the government sector, 60% are unemployed and the rest are not reachable (9%). Applying a similar ratio to the 20 apprentices financed under the SLCRR brings a total of 6 persons employed from the number of initial participants, which may not be the most cost-effective manner to provide employment to the target beneficiaries. 


Tag: Effectiveness Sustainability Local Governance Rule of law Ownership Results-Based Management Service delivery Resilience Inclusive economic growth Jobs and Livelihoods Micro-credit Urbanization Coordination

10.

5.4 Sustainability

K.Q.4.1. How much of the project benefits are expected to continue beyond the period of implementation? The sustainability of the project is very much linked to the funding allocated by the MoLG or the municipalities (which reportedly have limited funds) in order to ensure the continued provision of basic services and ensuring the running costs of the staff and facilities. It is not known whether UNDP has developed a formal agreement with municipalities that guarantee commitment from municipalities to fund essential services and the maintenance of equipment and infrastructure. What appears clear from the field visits to three municipalities is that there is a strong interest amongst the municipalities to preserve the achievements made under the output, particularly the infrastructure component undertaken by UNDP directly though tenders and construction service providers and suppliers. PCI has documented a number of grants under the Social Accountability Mechanism, some reportedly with clear success (Sebratah, Benghazi), other with different outcomes than those anticipated (Sebha).

The two major constraints to sustainability are: 1) the shifting allegiance of municipalities. Depending where UNDP is working (GNA or non-GNA municipalities) the funding that is allocated to the municipalities differ. While MoLG logically wants most of the support to be targeting GNA municipalities, the field work in Libya has also shown that other municipalities can be good practice examples, regardless of their political alignment (such as Sebratah). This means that UNDP must ensure strong targeting criteria for all municipalities in phase 3 as they cannot solely be informed by the MoLG priorities but should reflect a needs-based approach. 2) Up-scaling capacity from the current phase. It is recommended that to gradually create a critical mass of functional public services in core municipalities, UNDP uses an area-based approach sothat the neighbouring municipalities are gradually covered in the six regions where they operate. Obviously, security conditions remain the key limiting factor and a thorough risk analysis should also be part of the targeting process for phase 3.


Tag: Challenges Sustainability Resource mobilization Local Governance Partnership Bilateral partners Conflict resolution Inclusive economic growth

11.

5.5 Cross-cutting themes

K.Q.5.1. To what extent was gender mainstreamed in the project? The project did not contain a gender analysis as part of the Description of the Action. Despite the lack of gender analysis, the different components of the project and their outputs have been mindful to include a specific quota for women participation in all activities (including those of PCI, Tatweer, Atkis Strategy) and of course of UNDP. Although the percentages mentioned in the gender-disaggregated numbers are smaller than parity, this is due to cultural and contextual conditions. The important aspect here is that gender sensitivity is being implemented in the activities, although a gender streamlining strategy was not included in the project document.

K.Q.5.2. To what extent were human rights addressed within the project? The project has a clear strategy targeting vulnerable groups. Activities under outputs 1 and 3 are clearly designed to support vulnerable groups. Evidence of the incorporation of vulnerable target groups is contained in PCI and Tatweer reports, particularly for those who are former combatants, women, IDPs. It is much more difficult to find evidence of human rights protection of migrants, since the term “migrant” or “migration” is not used in Libya. To talk of migration is like opening the Pandora’s box given that human smuggling and trafficking is a big business that involves many people. While it is expected that migrants also benefit from basic services provision in the targeted municipalities, there is limited evidence showing to what extent the protection of human rights for migrants has increased under this project, and indeed whether it is capable of doing so. 


Tag: Vulnerable Effectiveness Gender Equality Gender Mainstreaming Human rights Local Governance Displaced People Migration Security

Recommendations
1

Recruit a peace and conflict advisor to ensure conflict analysis and sensitivity is streamlined across the project and not as a separate component of one of the outputs, and closely guide and supervise the work of the PCI in line with UNDP conflict related guidance and DAC guidance. 

2

 Request support from the Regional Peace and Conflict advisor in Amman to review and improve the phase 3 design in line with the need to better integrate conflict and improve risk management

3

 Draw experience from other UNDP risk mapping tools and risk management strategies (such as in Lebanon), and consider developing a dynamic conflict mapping in Libya 

4

 Consider training all the UNDP staff (and EU staff if willing) on RBM and the development of RBM results hierarchies, in order to develop a joint vision at the higher level of the project outcome and the relevant indicators to measure the effects generated by the project (beyond output level)

5

 Improve the reporting capacity of the outcome level results (higher level results) and identify the relevant approaches (including satisfaction survey, perception surveys, etc.) for the intangible elements of the project 

6

Discuss at senior management the bottlenecks in the procurement process in order to facilitate delivery and results

7

It would be preferable for future evaluations to have all the relevant documents placed in a shared drive for the evaluation team to have access to the complete documentation at the onset of the evaluation

1. Recommendation:

Recruit a peace and conflict advisor to ensure conflict analysis and sensitivity is streamlined across the project and not as a separate component of one of the outputs, and closely guide and supervise the work of the PCI in line with UNDP conflict related guidance and DAC guidance. 

Management Response: [Added: 2019/11/25] [Last Updated: 2020/11/14]

  • UNDP Libya is in the process of recruiting a Conflict and Strategy Advisor for the office to provide a continuous conflict analysis of the regions in Libya and advise management with a view to identifying appropriate ‘entry points’ and recommending appropriate strategic responses for UNDP. This function would serve all UNDP Libya projects, including the Resilience project.
  • In relation to the work of PCI, The Project Team lead by the PM ensures close supervision of the work undertaken by PCI in compliance with UNDP rules and regulations.

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
Complete and finalize recruitment process
[Added: 2019/12/02] [Last Updated: 2020/08/25]
Management and Service Center, supported by Resilience Project Teams 2020/06 Completed The project liased with RBAS to get special advisory for conflict analysis from experts at the Bureau. History
2. Recommendation:

 Request support from the Regional Peace and Conflict advisor in Amman to review and improve the phase 3 design in line with the need to better integrate conflict and improve risk management

Management Response: [Added: 2019/11/25] [Last Updated: 2020/11/14]

The phase 3 documents, including the description of action, have been shared with the Regional Peace and Conflict Advisor to provide guidance and comments that would help to further strengthen the conflict sensitivity approaches. 

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
Seek support from Regional Office in Amman and integrate inputs in the final phase 3 Description of Action
[Added: 2019/12/02] [Last Updated: 2020/08/25]
Resilience Project Manager, and Project Specialist 2020/06 Completed The project liased with RBAS to get special advisory for conflict analysis from experts at the Bureau. There was an expert on Conflict managemet and reconciliation advisoring the project during March 2020. Further advisory could be needed after the covid crisis. Still TBC though. History
3. Recommendation:

 Draw experience from other UNDP risk mapping tools and risk management strategies (such as in Lebanon), and consider developing a dynamic conflict mapping in Libya 

Management Response: [Added: 2019/11/25] [Last Updated: 2020/11/14]

The example of Lebanon was received, and it was internally shared with relevant UNDP Libya PMs and Officers. It will be further discussed and assessed if it could fit the Libya situation, involving both the CO’s SM/relevant teams as well as other UNDP partners and actors in Libya.

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
Sharing highlighting the ‘Monthly Tension Update’ example of Lebanon during UNDP CO and other existing coordination meetings.
[Added: 2019/12/10] [Last Updated: 2020/02/04]
Project Manager, and Project Specialist 2020/01 Completed the team shared the mentioned document History
4. Recommendation:

 Consider training all the UNDP staff (and EU staff if willing) on RBM and the development of RBM results hierarchies, in order to develop a joint vision at the higher level of the project outcome and the relevant indicators to measure the effects generated by the project (beyond output level)

Management Response: [Added: 2019/11/25] [Last Updated: 2020/11/14]

The CO  M&E Specialist jointly worked with the project team to streamline the RBM approach in the project document. As a result of thiscollaboration, the project's  new phase includes RBM features such as triple tier indicators (impact, outcome, output) with identified baselines , targets and corresponding verification means. This log frame and indicators set were also aligned with the European Union  macro, outcome and output indicators accounting for their strategic planning documents.

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
Review the project log frame and indicators set to address the evaluation recommendations.
[Added: 2019/12/02]
Project Management and CO M&E Specialist. 2019/12 Completed
5. Recommendation:

 Improve the reporting capacity of the outcome level results (higher level results) and identify the relevant approaches (including satisfaction survey, perception surveys, etc.) for the intangible elements of the project 

Management Response: [Added: 2019/11/25] [Last Updated: 2020/11/14]

the project manager will ensure, with the support from the CO M&E Specialist, as well as the project’s national M&E officer and IUNV reporting specialist (yet to be recruited), to strengthen monitoring mechanisms as well as impact reporting. Important to highlight that improvements were already done with the review of the log frame and corresponding indicatos, as well as on the foreseen increase of project team’s capacity (M&E and Reporting)

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
review of indicators set for phase 3
[Added: 2019/12/10]
project managemnet and CO M&E Specialist 2019/12 Completed new log frame available History
recruitment of project’s national M&E officer and IUNV reporting specialist
[Added: 2019/12/10] [Last Updated: 2020/12/23]
Project Manager, and Project Specialist with CO M&E specialist technical advice on the recuritment 2020/11 Completed The project hired a new Project Officer who will be working on M&E and Reporting, among other things. Also, the project will launch TORs to hire a M&E specialist. History
6. Recommendation:

Discuss at senior management the bottlenecks in the procurement process in order to facilitate delivery and results

Management Response: [Added: 2019/11/25] [Last Updated: 2020/11/14]

Discussions are ongoing with management about related issues. The newly inaugurated CO Service Center Unit willl have a better staffing to speed up the procurement processes.   

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
update procurement process knowledge and corresponding SOPs
[Added: 2019/12/10] [Last Updated: 2020/12/23]
service center unit together with the program and operations teams 2020/12 Completed The project is renewed in process completion, including the procurement one. History
7. Recommendation:

It would be preferable for future evaluations to have all the relevant documents placed in a shared drive for the evaluation team to have access to the complete documentation at the onset of the evaluation

Management Response: [Added: 2019/11/25] [Last Updated: 2020/11/14]

Will be considered in future evaluation processes

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
the project will create an open library where every team member will post relevant information for reporting, montioring and evaluation processes.
[Added: 2019/12/10] [Last Updated: 2020/12/23]
programa manager and team members 2020/12 Completed In July 2020 the CO created a SharePoint repository including all the information for all the projects and CO units, History

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