00101963 Enhancing The Role of Religious Education in Countering Violent Extremism

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Evaluation Plan:
2016-2020, Indonesia
Evaluation Type:
Mid Term Project
Planned End Date:
10/2019
Completion Date:
03/2019
Status:
Completed
Management Response:
Yes
Evaluation Budget(US $):
15,000

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Title 00101963 Enhancing The Role of Religious Education in Countering Violent Extremism
Atlas Project Number: 00101963
Evaluation Plan: 2016-2020, Indonesia
Evaluation Type: Mid Term Project
Status: Completed
Completion Date: 03/2019
Planned End Date: 10/2019
Management Response: Yes
UNDP Signature Solution:
  • 1. Governance
Corporate Outcome and Output (UNDP Strategic Plan 2018-2021)
  • 1. Output 3.2.1 National capacities strengthened for reintegration, reconciliation, peaceful management of conflict and prevention of violent extremism in response to national policies and priorities
SDG Goal
  • Goal 16. Promote peaceful and inclusive societies for sustainable development, provide access to justice for all and build effective, accountable and inclusive institutions at all levels
  • Goal 4. Ensure inclusive and equitable quality education and promote lifelong learning opportunities for all
SDG Target
  • 16.b Promote and enforce non-discriminatory laws and policies for sustainable development
  • 4.7 By 2030, ensure that all learners acquire the knowledge and skills needed to promote sustainable development, including, among others, through education for sustainable development and sustainable lifestyles, human rights, gender equality, promotion of a culture of peace and non-violence, global citizenship and appreciation of cultural diversity and of culture’s contribution to sustainable development
Evaluation Budget(US $): 15,000
Source of Funding:
Evaluation Expenditure(US $): 10,000
Joint Programme: No
Joint Evaluation: No
Evaluation Team members:
Name Title Email Nationality
GEF Evaluation: No
Key Stakeholders:
Countries: INDONESIA
Lessons
1.

The evaluation report elaborates results of the Enhancing the Role of the Religious Education in Preventing Violent Extremism in Indonesia (CONVEY) project from 2017-2019, implemented by the Centre Study of Islam and Society Center-Syarif Hidayatullah Islamic State University in Jakarta. The project’s aim to develop/built potential religious education institutions (schools and other channels) in Indonesia to promote peace, tolerance and prevention of violent extremism. Three main project components comprise research and advocacy, campaign and public awareness, and coordination & regional networking. Some learnings identified from implementation, are as follow;

1.       Credible research was produced  to encourage public exposure towards violent extremism issues and to increase public insight and debate towards those issues. However, policy improvement requires intensive engagement in policy dialogue and clarity on what should be changed, who must change them, by what means and through what measures that a problem must be addressed.

The project has proven that public campaign and awareness raising have been strong approaches to influence people, in disseminating peaceful narrative messages, especially to youth. 

2.       The content of the message conveyed by project aligned strongly with current government’s policy and program, and the researches conducted through this project are strategic to influence and binding commitment from government in promoting peace and against violent extremism. In other words, the research and advocacy activities have been able to provide basis for policy formulation towards prevention of violent extremism. However, more organize, systemic and intensive policy engagement needs to be improved and seriously discussed with policy makers. Detailed policy review is necessarily be conducted in next project ‘s phase

3.       The partnership with Islamic State University in the country, has institutionalized the platform of peacebuilding and efforts in countering violent extremism at education institution. This has been a good model in approaching youth and efforts to prevent radicalism and extremism ideology that has been indoctrinated in schools across grades/levels. Soft and andragogy approaches have succeeded in approaching youth, who are assumed as vulnerable group to be exposed by radicalism ideology.

4.       A clear and stronger Theory of Change with clear indicators of results and achievements is important to ensure Project’s direction and results. A sound monitoring and evaluation mechanism, both quantitative and qualitative, that was applied in project’s implementation has measured changes and to what extent the intervention gave benefit to target groups.  

5.       The sustainability of the project’s intervention build upon  the alignment of strategies with government programs, synergy with other P/CVE actors /stakeholders, particularly with organizations and individual champions with strong portfolio on peace building

6.       Integrating gender perspectives in the P/CVE Project has been conducted through various strategies. Women’s engagement in designing and implementation stages of project, have brought in gender perspective in research, workshops and knowledge products Project has learnt that gender mainstreaming is not only about engendering the policy document and research reports, but also in taking actions on engaging gender stakeholders in various project activities/approaches. Jakarta declaration is one of the project’s achievement in advocacy that put gender perspectives is mainstreamed on document.


Findings
1.

5.1 Project Relevance

5.1.1. Alignment with the UNDP Strategic Objective

The core UNDP documents such as, Country Program Development 2016-2020 (CPD), and United Nations Partnership for Development Framework 2016-2020 (UNPDF), basically have not made explicit statement with regard to the P/CVE as a part of the UNDP objectives and project achievement indicators within its 4-year Program in Indonesia. During the formulation process of the current CPD took place in 2014, PVE issue was not raised as an immediate and urgent issue to be addressed by UNDP4. However, in the last three years, violent extremism has rapidly evolved in Indonesia and there was no accurate data available yet, to show the comprehensive picture and magnitude of the problem. That is where UNDP found relevance to respond the needs of generating evidence-based knowledge and engaging with vulnerable population against violent extremism, such as youth. Therefore, this indicates UNDP has been responding flexibly to adjust the critical needs on the ground.

Up to this point, the closest alignment of the project to UNDP key documents can be recognized in several points: First, in Outcome 4 of the Country Program Document: Improved governance and equitable access to justice for all.5 This outcome aims to improve the governance and democracy quality, to encourage rights-based encourage approach in development process and increasing access to justice for marginalized people. In addition, in collaboration with Ministry of Law and Human Rights, the National Human Rights Commissions, and the Office of the Ombudsman, UNDP intended to support the development of Indonesia’s strategy, National Vision and Character Building for National Unity, to promote social cohesion, while supporting the removal of regulations and institutional practice that discriminate against marginalized groups.6 In this context, UNDP aims to encourages inclusiveness, equality, social cohesion, and national unity, through equitable access to justice, good governance, and right-based approach; Second is in the National Priority-Agenda 2: Building a Clean, Effective, Trusted and Democratic Governance; and the Outcome 2 of the UNDP Strategic Plan, related to the Citizen Expectation for Voice, Development, the rule of Law and Accountability are Met by Stronger System of Democratic Government7. Indicator 4.4 of the strategic plan mentions the decrease in violent social conflicts as the objective indicator. Within this indicator there are 4 indicative country project outputs, and one that has the closest alignment to the violence prevention, i.e. indicative output 4.3 - National policy frameworks and institutional mechanisms enhanced for the peaceful management of conflicts. The result indicator of this output, i.e. Extent to which targeted national/subnational governments and CSOs/community-based organizations have the technical capacities to address conflict. 8 Therefore in this context, despite that ‘violent extremism’ has not been explicitly mentioned, CONVEY project is substantially aligned with UNDP’s strategic vision and priority. It gave UNDP Indonesia the legitimacy to work on P/CVE, especially by developing institutional mechanism and policy framework related program to increase the technical capacity to address conflict;

Third, through cross-cutting issues that built upon five components: 1) human rights; 2) gender equality; 3) HIV/AIDs; 4) the youth; 5) Statistic and data management. Informed by United Nations global programming principles and common country assessment, these five cross-cutting issues support the inclusive development principle and indirectly aim to work in violence prevention.9 In a broader sense, this covers violence prevention in radicalism and violent extremism issues. In line with Outcome 110, with regard to youth development, the objective of UNDP is to ensure that the youth will receive appropriate capability as a new working force and geographic bonus that enable them to capitalize the economic opportunities.11 UNDP aims to increase the youth’s productivity, through support youth volunteer networks, implement innovative programs combining non-formal education and capacity building activities.12 According to UNDP the unemployment rate among youth reach 22% (15 million people). 13

Since poverty and unemployment are considered to be one of the push factors of violent extremism and radicalism, it is strategic to ensure that there are measures taken to provide job opportunities that target the youths. If successful, it will reduce the chance for them to embed non-productive or destructive activities, including violent extremism actions.


2.

5.1.2. Alignment with the Government Program

The Project of Enhancing the Role of Religious Education in Preventing Violent Extremism in Indonesia is in line with the P/CVE program carried out by the Indonesian Government through different ministries and institutions. In Indonesian Mid-Term National Development Plan for 2015–2020, the prevention of extremism and radicalism is said as apart of strategic issue of the National Insight and Character Building in order to Strengthen the Nation’s Unity. The objective is to increase community’s capacity to overcome disturbances that affect the community security and order, which are caused by terrorism threat that uses religion theorems to justify them for committing crimes. Along with that circumstance, there are still separatism parties who use injustice issues and discrepancy among regions in the country to secede themselves, including rallying for external supports.14

On the other part, the prevention of extremism and radicalism can also be recognized as a part of the education program to revitalize National Insight. This is included in the point 1.2.3.3 The Direction of the Development Policy and Strategy, on the issue of Increasing Education Revitalization on the National Insight and Nation’s Character by Encouraging Stronger Institutions Coordination. The objective is to enhance the early detection and prevention by the state apparatus, in regard to national vigilance and country’s defense15, towards the radical ideology that aim to replace Pancasila (The Five Principle) with other ideology.

There are a lot of anti-radicalism programs in place under the Education Ministry, including cooperation with BNPT and other related-Ministries/Institutions. Aside from school subjects, anti-radicalism program strengthening can go through the Research and Development Agency under the Ministry of Education and Culture, especially through the Curriculum Center or Schooling Director. Through this Curriculum Center, the government has developed a curriculum and modules to serve the character education and national personality education that teach diversity, inclusiveness, nationalism, tolerance, and spirit of nationality and love of homeland. Religious education also plays the same role by addressing a large number of morals issues and religiosity values to encourage inter-religion harmony.16

The integration is also carried on through non-formal and extracurricular activities such as Pramuka (Scout). The delivery of these activities may take place as a cooperation result with the Ministry of Youth and Sport that facilitates a lot of youth exchange program


3.

5.1.3. Relevance of the Project Approach to Fostering Tolerant Education for P/CVE among Youth

This project was using soft approaches such as (a) education; (b) networking; (c) advocacy; and (d) public campaign to foster an open and tolerant education, to increase community resilience, especially the youth against the penetration of radicalism and violent extremism ideology. Those approaches are relevant because during last 10 years, the youth have been targeted in campaign and penetration of the radical ideology. The research conducted by the Institute of Islamic Study and Peace (LaKIP) in 2019 indicated that 48.9% students in Jakarta-Bogor-Depok-Tangerang-Bekasi (Jabodetabek) stated they agree towards radicalism.17 In 2017, Wahid foundation stated that 60% of 1,626 Rohis (mosque family board) activist respondents were willing to do jihad in conflict areas such as Poso and Syria. 10% of the figure supported the Sarinah bombing attack and 6% supported ISIS. 68% supported future jihad and 6% supported ISIS.18

In PPIM research itself, the radicalism penetration was found out to be manifested in different things, such as (a) through education institutions: elementary school, senior high school, and university; (b) education actors such as teachers, lecturers, Rohis19, Islamic scholars; (c) textbooks, bulletin, popular books, preaches; and (d) social media and internet. All of these measures target the youth. Below are some data about penetration of radicalism in educational activities which show the urgency (so relevance) of project interventions for the youth through educational activities.


4.

5.1.4. Relevance and the Accuracy of Theory of Change as Basis for the Project Initiative

Overall the Project’s theory of change is relevant and it is able to become an appropriate vision as a basis for P/CVE initiative. As explained above, many of the ideology penetration or radical violent extremism dissemination have done through religious education or by using the education facilities/tools and public campaign. Therefore, the project objective to increase the religious education role in promoting peace, tolerance, and inclusiveness, and to prevent or countering violent extremism is relevant. Nevertheless, the project strategy to strengthen the religious education role to prevent violent extremism needs further clarification. In current understanding, CONVEY perceives the religious education in a quite broad perspective, including formal education, non-formal education, internet, etc. Regardless of its relevance, after two years of project implementation, CONVEY certainly needs to sharpen its reflection on area of works where it will be more relevant, strategic, and in line with the capacity as well as work experience of CONVEY, especially PPIM as the initiator of the Project. This includes, a critical reflection to sharpen who the beneficiaries or target groups of CONVEY are and how they will be reached. Critical discussion could be raised for certain aspects as follow: (See table 6)

Similarly, although CONVEY’s Theory of Change is appropriate, it is still very broad with various beneficiaries or targets, such as, (a) Ministries or government institutions, formal education stakeholders for the Output 1; (b) Youth/millennial group, public community, education institutions, and educators for Output 2; (c) Community of practice for Output 3. (See the project’s theory of change Chart 1 above). During CONVEY 1, when the Project’s theory of change was not sufficient to provide a logic model for the project, the project activities were even broader as it included measures to address deradicalization in prisons and reintegration of ex-terrorist detainees. Hence a more solid Theory of Change was developed in Convey 2. The three project outputs under CONVEY 2 are certainly relevant to become entry points for religious education in a general perspective, yet, the clarity on project’s targets or beneficiaries that in conjunction with the CONVEY’s core competency still needs to be undertaken. The Output 1–research and advocacy–principally is relevant and compatible with the capacity, experience and working areas of PPIM. The same also applies for Output 3: Cooperation and Networking at the regional level. However, it seems27 that the Project requires a lot of adjustments to keep relevant and effective while working on Output 2. The campaign and public engagement activity targets and beneficiaries were the youth and public in general. But the question then arises, how will CONVEY manage different activities in this output, when its partners working on that area phased out? Are campaign materials (online content) still relevant now, and how to respond to the public response towards those campaign materials? How to manage the knowledge products (research, policy briefs, essays, campaign tools) which are plenty in order to be still relevant and effective to support the project objective: promoting the role of religious education for P/CVE? With a quite a lot of funding availability during the first two years of the project (CONVEY 1 and CONVEY 2), CONVEY had flexibility and capability to deliver its project activities with the above-mentioned theory of change. However, when the project’s financial support was decreasing, thus some project outputs (Output 2 and 3 – CONVEY 2), need to be adjusted. Definitely, CONVEY needed to improve its project’s theory of change in order to be more relevant and in line with the core competency of CONVEY (PPIM and UNDP).


5.

3.1.5. Accommodation and synergy with other stakeholders’ perspective

This project has had a number of mechanisms to taking into account the perspective of different stakeholders to increase the project’s relevance, quality, and effectiveness. This can be recognized from several things. First, through the selection process of project partners. A big number of project partners were selected through a limited bidding process. CONVEY developed a TOR and called for proposal to certain CSOs or Nongovernment organization which had been assessed earlier on their capacities and experiences in delivering the works that would be implemented/offered. The partner candidates who were interested in the project then submitted their proposals to PMU and these proposals became the basis for PMU to continue the selection process further. This means that the project supported by CONVEY, basically was based on the inputs from its partners, with improvements to accommodate critical things related to the entire project direction and required quality. Second, through project design workshop. The selected partner organizations were facilitated to present their project designs in discussion sessions with the PMU project team and other stakeholders. CONVEY encouraged its partners to engage government representatives since the beginning, since the project design workshop stage up to the activity implementation. The discussion aimed to talk about the whole project activity design and took into account inputs that came out during the discussion. Therefore, the project activities quality were able to be more assured, and opinions from different stakeholders that may influence the project outcome or who would become the project beneficiaries or users were able to be considered. Third, through discussions among project partners, such as the coordinator consolidation meetings and round-table discussions that aimed to share the project activities and progress to broader stakeholders, including the government. The sharing during those discussions were beneficial to open a space for project quality improvement and performance. Fourth, through the Project Board Meetings. During these meetings, PMU asked for inputs and guidance from the Project Board members for the project implementation. This facilitated integration and improve project relevance towards the macro needs in relation to government policies and programs.


6.

5.2. Project Effectiveness

5.2.1. Strategy and Approach

CONVEY project was implemented by using four main strategies. First, develop gender sensitive evidence-based knowledge through research and survey to prevent violent extremism; Second, strengthen advocacy and policy engagement to prevent violent extremism through lobby, advocacy, and development of a series of the policy briefs; Third, increase awareness and public knowledge on violent extremism prevention through online and offline campaigns and engage young leaders across Indonesia to disseminate religious values that are tolerant, open and peaceful to strengthen the moreinclusive community; Fourth, secure the quality of the project implementation and develop project coordination mechanism with relevant stakeholders. In the beginning, the project planned to use research as the main basis for the project to initiate the activities on the subsequent project approach, such as advocacy and critical engagement in the policy advocacy, public campaign to raise awareness and public knowledge on violent extremism prevention, etc. According to the key resource person of PPIM, the current policies and sub-sequent programs on P/CVE haven’t been based on the comprehensive mapping on the problems, actors, and policies. This affects the quality of policy formulation and its sub-sequent program. Against this background CONVEY intent to strengthen the research works in one or two years of the project, before proceed on to the other Project activities.28

Unfortunately, the initial design to implement the project in sequential way,29could not be fully implemented. The ideal process of doing a comprehensive and detailed mapping on the radicalism and violent extremism problems through research prior to the other project output activities was not compatible with the funding characteristic and requirement. The funding required the project to be delivered within one year. To be eligible for the funding of the following year, the project needed to reapply a new proposal to the donor. This means the project activity plans are subject to annual review to adjust with annual-funding availability. The campaign and public awareness activities (Output 3 of CONVEY 1), were also delivered in parallel way, along with research and advocacy/policy engagement works; not in sequential way as planned. Regardless of the challenge, the project has utilized existing researches on violent extremism in educational setting conducted by PPIM in previous years and many of them were used to inform the project activities in the beginning of CONVEY 1. These changes, somehow have some of logical and practical consequences to the project implementation, as explained below.


7.

5.2.2. Project Achievements and Results

CONVEY Project had some outputs: four outputs in CONVEY I and three outputs in CONVEY 2. Each of the output in Convey 1 has a different focus as follows:

  • Output 1: Development of evidence-based knowledge through research and survey on Countering Violent Extremism in a gender sensitive approach.
  • Output 2: Strengthened Advocacy and Policy Engagement on Countering Violent Extremism.
  • Output 3: Increased public awareness and knowledge on Countering Violent Extremism
  • Output 4: Project implementation quality is assured and proper coordination mechanism established among relevant stakeholders

In CONVEY 2 project, the Output 1 (research) and Output 2 (policy advocacy) under CONVEY 1 were merged into one output. Therefore, the Output 3 – CONVEY 1: related to the public campaign and Output 4 – CONVEY 1: related to increasing project quality, each became Output 2 and Output 3 under CONVEY 2. The project results based on the category in CONVEY 2 are presented below


8.

B. Increasing Public Knowledge and Awareness on Violent Extremism Prevention

The expected results from this output consist of two main elements. First, the improvement in youth’s capacity to become resilient against the threat of violent extremism in both individual and community level. Second, the development of an enabling environment that encourages peaceful religious education exist in schools and universities. This is facilitated through two activities, such as (a) holding eight capacity building activities through training, including 3 youth camp activities and (b) eight public campaign activities. The main achievement from the various activities in Output 2 (of CONVEY II) or Output 3 (of Convey 1) is the high number of youth participation in the radicalism and violent extremism prevention campaign. It is also accompanied by the wide media coverage, the spread of extremism as well as radicalism prevention in various off-line and on-line media. The main achievement from the various activities in Output 2 (for CONVEY II) or Output 3 (Convey 1) is the high number of youth participation in the radicalism and violent extremism prevention campaign. It is also accompanied by the wide media coverage, the spread of extremism as well as radicalism prevention in various off-line and on-line media.

 


9.

B.3. Developing the youth capacity to become resilient against the threat of violent extremism

CONVEY’s mid-term review on December 2018 recorded at least six significant achievements in developing youth’s resilient capacity in both individual and community level. First, the availability of tolerant Islamic books packed in popular literature, increasing reading interest of young Moslems.47 Second, religious literacy among youth are increasing, resulting in a better understanding on religious diversity in Indonesia. Third, millennial participate in promoting moderate Islamic values from religious figures through social media. This is facilitated by various activities such as (a) Islamic Millennial Social Media competition; (b) Post trainings by Imams & Takhmirs through the #dakwahsejuk hashtag; (c) #MeyakiniMenghargai campaign; (d) Post the Islam Love Movement on social media; Fourth, millennial knowledge on alternative narrative (Peaceful, Inclusive, and Tolerant Islam) is increasing. This is due to their involvement in activities such as (a) Muslim Youth Camp in Lombok (b) International Youth Camp on Islam Rahmatan lil Alamin (CONVEY I) Fifth, the increase in public as well as the government's awareness and courage to openly discuss about violent extremism/radicalism through religion or religious education, through research about (a) The Perception of Scholars, (b) Islamic Literature Research (c) Student Council and Islamic Study Research. Sixth, society’s knowledge and awareness on religious thoughts that tend to promote violence and extremism in Islamic education have improved. Using the logic model scheme (see Chart 2 in methodology part above) the six achievements mentioned above can be categorized into 2 important sections. First, the increase in knowledge and understanding, either on Islam as a godsend for the universe or about alternative narratives to fight against narratives that promote radicalism and violent extremism. Second, there is an awareness to act, especially in two things: (a) to hold an open discussion regarding the strengthened discourse and penetration of radicalism and violent extremism in various groups; (b) to participate in promoting peaceful and moderate Islamic narrative through online media. Meanwhile, individual and collective interviews during the final evaluation found several other important changes related to the activities carried out, as explained below

 


10.

C. Partnership and Network on Regional Level

The main objective of this third output is to establish a practical community involving 402 practitioners, academicians, and public figures who will be engaged as the focal points or cross country actors to promote violent extremism prevention in several countries across South-East Asia. Radicalism and violent extremism does not only occur in Indonesia but also several other countries in South-East Asia, such as Malaysia, Thailand, the Philippines, Myanmar, and Singapore. Therefore, the fight against radicalism could also become a joint effort from the practical community actors’ network through various activities. So far, the main activity from this regional network is still discursive. Beside the regional discussions and workshop, a research on state policy on religious education and violent extremism prevention in South-East Asia has been started. The research report is basically an anthology of writings from several researchers through FGDs and comprehensive interviews with key informants in several countries. Through that process, the policy issue in religious education was revealed and recommendations on actions that have to be taken to promote religious education in each country as means to prevent violent extremism can be encouraged. Although the results of the research already exist, a number of key informants considered that the current achievements were still not optimal so that they needed further development. The initial plan was that the book was expected to become a new breakthrough in religious studies especially in the context of the religious education policies of South East Asian countries as well as how religion should play a role in overcoming violent extremism. There was an 'ambition' at the outset that this kind of activity could be a means to elevate the work of researchers in religious studies in Southeast Asia to the international arena. Unfortunately, there is no clarity at this time how this will be done further. Besides that, the community members commitment of practice also still needs proof. Proceedings from the regional workshop on Religious Education and PVE held in Jakarta until now have not been completed. A bi-monthly bulletin has been published, and has been distributed in January and February 2019 to 600 network members in Indonesia and Southeast Asia; but there is no continuation after that. The bulletin is certainly important, both as a means of communication and information sharing between members of the community of practice, as well as evidence that they are active. Another important achievement is the Jakarta Declaration on Violence Extremism and Religious Education. The declaration was intended to encourage the government and wider community to promote peace, provide protection to minorities, and prevent violent extremism. The challenge is how to use the results of the research to review policies or programs in their respective countries? What are the regional activities to encourage follow-up of these recommendations? Does the collaboration continue after the Project?


11.

D. Contribution to Gender Equality, Women Empowerment, and Realization of Human Rights

This project has provided a significant contribution to gender equality and women's empowerment in P / CVE activities through different ways. In survey and research activities, for example, the project has prepared quite rigid approaches and methods so that information about women's perspectives on violent extremism issues can be explored in detail. This was done for example by involving women as enumerators and researches assistants in quantitative and qualitative research respectively, so they were more sensitive and gender conscious in collecting data. Equally the project partners also involved women as key informants or respondents in their research activities. This is certainly useful to get information on the attitudes and responses of women to violent extremism and how radical actions or violent extremism affect women and men differently, which has not been well known to the wider community, including policy makers.

PPIM survey results show that female teachers, either from schools under the Ministry of Education and Culture or Islamic schools under the Ministry of Religious Affairs, have more radical viewpoint/opinion (54,1%) compared to male teachers (34,0%). This is more or less related to the inclining female Tak’lim Assembly trend, and often become the “target” of dak’wah by intolerant/exclusive groups.59 In term of intention to conduct radical/intolerant actions, the survey show that the percentage is higher in female teachers (48,8%) compared to male teachers (30,0%).60 This means that the school and government need to provide serious attention towards female teachers in relation to the spread of radicalism and violent extremism, hence, it is necessary for them to provide relevant program to prevent women to get trapped into violent extremist attitudes or actions.

In campaign activities and public engagement, each Project partner has also involved women proportionally in their activities, at least in the range of 30% female and 70% male. Women were also involved as resources person, in addition to being active participants, organizing committee members, or as editors or layouters in the book publication activity of GIC (Gerakan Islam Cinta). 61 This certainly has an impact on women's empowerment, because it provides an opportunity for them to take active role in various P/CVE activities, discuss women's perspectives on violent extremism, understand the push and pulling factors that encourage their involvement, as well as identify different impact of radicalism and violent extremism on women and men. This also has eventually ensured that women voice in developing the strategy to address violent extremism and radicalism in their respective places get heard.

The involvement of women in public involvement campaign of some partners, according to former event participants are on a “high” (47%) and “very high” (31%) levels, while some believe it is on a “moderate” (20%) and “less” (6.2%) levels. This enables women’s perspective in these events to be represented, facilitated, and explored deeper. That way, the role and contribution of women radicalism and violent extremism can be explored better especially in campaigns and public awareness events. Partners have also allocated their time to discuss women’s role in radicalism and violent extremism prevention. Online surveys toward former participants of some campaign events, show that 82.4% 62 agree that partner events have already discussed women’s role in radicalism and violent extremism prevention. Only 12.3% disagrees, 1.6% are not sure, and 3.7% did not answer. Meanwhile, regarding discussions on the differences impact of radicalism and violent extremism towards men and women, 76.6% agreed that it has been discussed. Only 9.4% disagreed, 9.3% are not sure, and 4.6% did not answer.63 This can be seen in the discussion materials, as well as in recommended follow-ups that also include concrete ideas on what to do by different parties including women in dealing with violent extremism and radicalism issues. Therefore, programs to empower women in encouraging peace and tolerance can be carried out better.

Equally, through this process the Project’s activities also encourage the implementation of human rights, especially in weaving individual and community groups-religious freedom and the freedom of self-expression.


12.

5.3. Project Efficiency

5.3.1. Project Management Structure

This project management was built upon a partnership between PPIM and UNDP, and formalized in a formal partnership called Project Management Unit (PMU) – where the management team consisted of staffs from both institutions. PPIM was mainly responsible for the project substance, whereas UNDP was responsible for project management support, quality assurance, including monitoring and reporting as well as coordination.

Recognizing the institutional difference in nature between PPIM and UNDP, it wasn’t easy, however, this type of partnership worked quite smoothly and effectively. Through this system, decisions were able to be consulted with smooth coordination between two organizations and the project progress were monitored by both institutions. The project was benefited by two different areas of organizational capacity of both organizations at the same time. First, a well-maintained project substance because of PPIM’s strong capacity and rich experience in the fields of education and research on violent extremism; Second, the project quality, in terms of project management were well-maintained as UNDP is a reputable institution in both project and financial management. The combination of the strength of both institutions was proven to be beneficial. First, PPIM was able to improve its project management system, especially related to the supporting mechanism for the procurement process which was deemed necessary in managing the Project’ sub-grantee. It was true that PPIM hasn’t owned broad experience in regard to this matter. Whereas, under the CONVEY project, they had to manage more or less 19 project partners who were universities and CSOs, who each of them had different capacity. In regard to grant management, the scale of grant that they managed earlier was not as high as the CONVEY Project. Certainly, it wasn’t easy for the organization to manage a big-scale grant as it required strong management supporting instrument, in addition to the staff experience and capacity to manage the project. In the initial stage of the project, for example, the sub-contract grant disbursed to the partners was done slowly and it was delayed until 2 months. This was the consequence of not having a supporting system and experience in the procurement area, such as a bidding matrix, a request for proposal form, contract templates, etc.64 UNDP provided its support and this kind of problems were resolved.

Second, the project technical business, such as administration and finance, monitoring and project reporting were managed by UNDP who has a broad experience in this field of expertise. Meanwhile, the PPIM staff concentrated on project substance. The assignment of UNDP staffs inside PMU indeed contributed to smoothen the technical business, however, the most significant roles they supported were in the areas of monitoring and activity quality assurance. For example, the monitoring and reporting placement staff has highly supported the project in preparing crucial reports to inform project progress to PMU, UNDP, and Japanese Embassy. The project also developed monitoring and evaluation system which was simple such as an activity progress report for each partner on a monthly, quarterly and a six-month-basis, completed with an explanation on what has been implemented and what haven’t been. This mechanism helped the Team Leader and Project Manager to know what has been delivered by the partners. Such achievement may happen because of good management and sound operating procedure availability in place that were established since the beginning of the project and absolutely the commitment of both parties.

 


13.

5.3.2. Staffing and Project Management

The UNDP staffs basically managed the administration and finance, also monitoring and reporting. One of the Project Coordinators under UNDP was also assigned to coordinate the project implementation and served to bridge project discussions in the context of PPIM-UNDP relation. Meanwhile, the project substance and project partner’s organizations management basically fell under the responsibility of PMU. This included among others pre-assessment of the project partners candidates under CONVEY I, calling for proposal, project TOR development, proposal selection and approval, and further discussions on project design. These activities involved Team Leader, Project Manager, Deputy Project Manager, as well as the Consultants and Project Officers. Consultation and coordination meeting were frequently organized between the UNDP Senior staffs, such as Technical Advisor cum Program Manager for Peace Building, Access to Justice, Democracy and Human Rights, as well as Program Analyst, and PPIM management team on the agreed time.

The project core team of PPIM for the PMU65 were all recruited from the PPIM internal staff. PPIM intends to empower its own internal staff, wherever possible, through its project activities. Moreover, when the required capacity was available internally, or the available staff capacity was still appropriate, or they can be developed in a short period of time to meet the project interest. External recruitment was held when there was no internal capacity at all or the capacity didn’t truly fit the project needs. This indeed brought a benefit for PPIM because it enabled an easy internal control and coordination. The Project Officers (PO) and Project Consultants were also the lecturers or researchers in PPIM, therefore, they have more than sufficient understanding on internal mechanism, culture, and working principles in PPIM and its thorough relation with the vision and mission of PPIM and UIN itself. With this, PMU didn’t require significant time to organize the induction section to introduce PPIM and the project to POs or Consultants who would work under the project. In a relatively short period project duration –it was only one year for one phase- a long induction phase (orientation on the organization, ways of working, capacity adjustment, etc.) would not be efficient. In CONVEY 1, all POs were lecturers at the University as well as researchers at PPM; while in CONVEY 2, lecturer was only one person and the rest were PPIM researchers themselves. To manage this, PMU implemented an output-based performance system in managing PO and Consultants work. This applies to all Project collaborations with outside parties. In this case, management places more emphasis on work output, not just a fulltime presence like general office systems. Such a system of work does not have a detrimental effect on the Project. At least because the deliverables / output of the Project are achieved.

The role of Project Officers and Consultants in project management have been maximum. This was reflected in succeeded deliverables until the end of the project. The decision-making process did not totally apply a top-down process. Through a series of discussion meeting and a project design workshop, CONVEY did some adjustments from what was established in the earlier TOR in order to fit into the actual situation on the ground.

 


14.

5.3.3. Project Coordination

Project coordination was done in some different ways. First, in internal PMU. This was done on a monthly basis and PMU management team, POs and Consultants, and PMUUNDP staffs were involved in it. In between two monthly meetings, there were weekly meetings attended by POs-Consultants-Line Managers and PMU-UNDP to discuss project progress under each output. In addition for coordination and project progress, the weekly and monthly meetings also discussed activities across outputs and coordinated how to synergize across-outputs activities. Sharing on the partners’ activity design proposals, including the ones who worked on the campaign and public engagement were frequently carried on in those meetings. At partner’s proposal finalization phase, PMU usually provided numerous input to partners in order to ensure that their activity designs were in line with the project approach and objectives. Most of the feedbacks are related to the substance and technical aspects, including the themes that needed to be covered in each of the partners’ activities. However when it has moved to the implementation phase, PMU provided limited input as it was assumed that partners will implement the project’s activities in accordance to the agreed design. However, if there was any shortcomings partners usually consulted with PMU should any adjustments be made to the design.

Second, the coordination meeting with stakeholders and/or the Project Board members was held on based on project’s needs to share project progress, obstacles faced and also to gather thoughts from different stakeholders on what should be implemented under the project. Third, Project Coordinator Consolidation Workshop – during this workshop, project coordinator of each of CONVEY partners shared information on its respective project and provided input. This was done in the beginning and in the middle of the project implementation. Other than the above-mentioned activities, the coordination among partners was also done at any time based on the project need by using the available different meeting opportunities. For example, through a quarterly round table discussion among Countering Violent Extremism (CVE) actors in Indonesia was held once every four months. The round table discussions were successfully organized four times during the project. These discussions aimed to share information and to do platform coordination among actors on how to implement Preventing/Countering Violent Extremism (P/CVE). The discussions didn’t specifically aim to coordinate on project technique and substance for each output among partners. The direct effect resulted from those discussions was the partners’ project management improvement, however, according to some partners, project renewal, review or revision were less discussed on these discussions because the activities’ substance was discussed already during the initial design workshop with PMU. Somehow, the project duration was short enough, it was around 4-6 months, therefore, the opportunity to do project revision in the middle of project implementation was limited.


15.

5.3.4. Project Monitoring and Quality Assurance

This was done through different activities such as field visits that involved the Project Board members, in order to see the activities implemented by partners. This way enabled the Project Board members to observe the project implementation on the ground and provided inputs to partners and the project’s direct beneficiaries. It was assumed that Project Board members would inform their observation result to their respective offices. It would be interesting though to know the result, however, it was not too obvious how the Project Board members who came from different ministries/institutions use their observation results for the interest of their programs in each ministry/institution. Nevertheless, the information on how their involvement and inputs in the project had improved partners’ activities implementation was not in place. The most obvious effect was the information sharing and exchange among participants, and the availability of broader relation and network in this P/CVE work.

Project monitoring was also conducted through data and information collection on the project progress and challenges faced. Those data and information were compiled by UNDP and served as a Quarterly Monitoring Report. There were 4 Quarterly Monitoring Report during the project life and now the final project report is being prepared. The Quarterly Monitoring Report was very useful to inform the project development regularly either to internal PMU or to UNDP. Meanwhile, for the Japanese Embassy, the project submitted Mid-Term Progress Report (after 6-month project delivery) and later would submit the Final Report. Basically, the Quarterly Monitoring Report was based on the project outputs. It covered the information on the number of participants involved in the activities held, the number of products produced (books, reports, policy briefs, number of media coverage either offline or online), lessons learned, etc. The summary of this report was discussed during a special meeting between PMU and UNDP Indonesia Office as a part of the coordination meeting with UNDP Indonesia. This monitoring report was an activity-based report, therefore, it didn’t cover the details of the results or changes happened in the project targets or beneficiaries level.

 


16.

5.4. Program Sustainability

The prospect for CONVEY’s sustainability is quite high, as can be seen in the following points

5.4.1. On PPIM and research-related partners

It cannot be denied that this Project, Enhancing the Role of Religious Education in Preventing Violent Extremism among Youth, have a high sustainability potential. Besides having high relevance with problematic situations involving various parties, the Project follow up recommendations have a close alignment with current government programs. For example, recommendations to review the religious education curriculum in primary and secondary schools are currently one of key focuses for the Ministry of Religious Affairs. 66 Religious and civic education are also mandatory subjects in every school and college, so proposals to improve educational curriculum can be carried out right away if the technical and policy directorate can be convinced to do it. The government’s interest towards character, manners, tolerance, and diversity education is very high, both formal and informal. So messages from P/CVE actors as recommendations from the research result can be linked into the government agendas.67 Public campaign contents could also be synergized with the deradicalization and P/CVE campaign carried out by BNPT. Other than giving attention to increasing the awareness towards inmates and former terrorist convicts in penitentiaries, BNPT also held public awareness programs through discussions, seminars, and workshops in various higher and secondary education institutions on the threat of radicalism and terrorism68 as well as hospitality visits to Islamic boarding schools69 and outreaching youths. 70 This is in line with the recommendation from the CONVEY (PPIM, PUSPIDEP, Maarif Institute) research results on the necessity of developing pluralism discourse and promote religious moderation in colleges as well as in religious education institutions such as Islamic boarding schools, Madrasah Tsanawiyah and Madrasah Aliyah , etc.

At secondary and senior high school level, the Ministry of Education and Culture has also established a national literacy movement that includes reading and writing, financial, digital, enumeration, science, as well as cultural and citizenship literacy71. The School Council has become one of the role models in this literacy movement. The goal is to educate students to become wiser in using social media, and also having an understanding on the diversity in Indonesia, from the cultural, ethnic, language, and religious aspect, hence they must have an open, nationalist, tolerant, and inclusive attitudes. This movement can become the entry point to integrate P/CVE programs in relevant activities, and make use of current contents produced by CONVEY and its partners to promote diversity and countering contents containing radicalism and extremism among youth. 72

Nevertheless, CONVEY needs to have an improved plan to manage the current research products and campaign tools or content to ensure that they would be sustainably used by wider public for P/CVE campaign. Equally, CONVEY still needs to have a more systematic policy review discussion with the relevant directorates or departments in related-Ministries or Institutions. If CONVEY pledges to advocate for policy and curriculum review, for instance, then it needs to do intensive engagement with relevant departments within Ministry of Education and Culture using integrated and comprehensive approach. From the Ministry of Education and Culture’s side, this requires a wide involvement from various related Directorates, Bodies or Centers in the Ministry of Education and Culture, such as the Curriculum Center to review contents from religious education subject; or the Teachers Directorate who is in charge of increasing the capacity of teachers in organizing education at schools.73

Intensive intervention can also be carried out at school level. According to Maarif Institute, radicalism infiltration can enter from three paths: alumni, teachers, and school policy; 74 or through various Islamic Literatures used in schools, extra-curricular activities, and other printed materials available market, as found by PUSPIEDEP research. 75 Therefore there is a need to conduct text-book review or develop better policy to improve the quality of education management in Primary and Secondary school. Currently the School Based Management approach has been practised extensively, in which school policies, programs, and development really depend on the elements that are working on school level such as the Headmaster and School Committee. The Headmaster and School Committee has become the decisive element in student quality improvement programs, including activities to prevent radicalism and extremism. By coordinating with Agencies at Districts, the Headmaster along with the School Committee can decide on which projects that they can develop to battle against the threats toward students such as LGBT, Drugs, Radicalism, and Extremism.76 The socio-political risk towards CONVEY’s achievements (PPIM and other researchrelated partners) especially in research is actually very insignificant. The launching of research products gained positive feedbacks from various media, both online and offline, through coverage as well as a broad response towards the research results. Research results and campaigns can also increase public awareness on the urgency of P/CVE, and bringing up the discourse on the importance of renewing educational strategy, especially to the available curriculum and teachers, lecturers, counsellor staffs (Islamic studies). Critiques and small resistance came from the Ministry of Education and Culture, on the magnitude and scale of the radicalism expansion in educational institutes, but this does not attract socio-political risk on achievement. Instead it encourages discussion and further discourse on the importance of a more comprehensive research with various scales and methods (also using qualitative method).77

The socio-political risk towards CONVEY’s (PPIM) achievements especially in research is actually very insignificant. The launchings of research results gained positive feedbacks from various media, both online and offline, through coverage as well as a broad response towards the research results. Research results and campaigns can also increase the public awareness on the urgency of P/CVE, and bringing up the discourse on the importance of renewing educational strategy, especially to the existing curriculum and teachers, lecturers, or counsellor. Critiques and small resistance came from the Ministry of Education and Culture, on the magnitude and scale of the radicalism expansion in educational institutions, but this does not attract sociopolitical risk on achievement. Instead it encourages discussion and further discourse on the importance of a more comprehensive research with various scales and methods (also using qualitative method).

P/CVE’s agenda is also not affected by the regime, because it is still going to be relevant for various parties regardless of the running government. Since 2014, BNPT’s status has been raised in par with Ministries and responsible directly to the President. This indicates the urgency on radicalism and terrorism prevention activities and programs is not affected by regime politics. Public campaigns also bring up counter-narratives and strengthening the stance and action of moderate groups to detect the spread of radicalism, but this does not cause any disturbance or even social conflict. The informants saw this as a part of the dynamics to strengthen P/CVE in Indonesia.

 


17.

5.4.2. Sustainability on Public Campaign-related Partners

The potential of sustainability of Project achievements on the partner level is also quite high. The reason is that project partners78 especially during CONVEY 2, are organizations that are actively involved in campaigns for diversity, inter-religious and ethnicity tolerance, inclusiveness, promotion, and P/CVE issues. These organizations have a strong portfolio for peace and inclusiveness promotion programs. Their exit strategy towards CONVEY does not really affect their program’s sustainability. In the Islamic Millennial Islamic Event (Sabang Merauke), the interest towards moderate Islamic content was quite high in which 1,100 people visited the website and at least 9500 used the hashtag #MeyakiniMenghargai in their posts. Overall, more than 10,000 people were involved with CONVEY from their online posts. There were also reflections from participants such as “Jihad is not only about raising your weapons”, “the cure for hatred is to gather and to love”, etc. Initiatives from former participants in creating their own WhatsApp group and Instagram account has developed through posting contents that they learned from workshops. In short, the follow up from the movement exists and is currently ongoing.79

The Islam Sejuk Ambassadors, consisting of takmirs, imams, and clerics, kept on networking and producing moderate and peaceful Islamic contents after the road-shows to schools, universities, and other public events. So they can share information and receive feedbacks in the form of likes and such. What is interesting is that the content of the group discussion is not about religion (similar to sermons) but more about sharing the positive activities that they did to promote diversity and peace.80 In Maarif Institute, a discussion forum has been formed to discuss issues on P/CVE and write down a simple pamphlet for youth. The result of the Youth Congress that was held in Jakarta on October 2018 inspired some former participants such as from Nagawati Limantara, Banjarmasin, with the initiative to hold a similar Declaration that they have done in Jakarta.81 In Makassar the Lingkar Pena activists (who are based in campuses) socialized the danger of radicalism and intolerance in several secondary and senior high schools. In Ambon, the former participants held the Jelaja Bhinneka event, in which they visited religious leaders and society. They are also planning to hold an event similar to the Youth Congress in Jakarta, accompanied by visits to places of worship.82

While the Institute for Political Literacy kept planning to publish the Muslim Muda Indonesia bulletin. Even though the bulletin distribution is declining due to reduced funds, but the creative team has already prepared the digital version in the forms of PDF format, short video, as well as clips, and will distribute them via social media such as Facebook, Twitter, website, and WhatsApp groups. 83 Moreover, Political Literacy has also started partnering with student discussion circles to discuss and distribute this bulletin through their network, and also put them up on Mosque wall-boards. This is to anticipate if the bulletin distribution has been reduced. On December last year the Muslim Muda Indonesia bulletin synergized with the student discussion circle from the Faculty of Daqwa and Communication of UIN Jakarta. Previously they have partnered with students from the Faculty of Medicine and Faculty of Dirasat Islamiyah of UIN Jakarta. There are plans to continue partnering with other discussion circles from campuses in the Jabodetabek area.84

 

 


18.

5.4.3. On Volunteer or former public campaign event participant level

Interest and motivation from former participants towards P/CVE and anti-radicalization are excessive. From online surveys it can be seen that 85% of former participants from events that were organized by CONVEY partners working in Output 2 (CONVEY 2), are still interested in getting involved in activities related to violent extremism prevention and promoting tolerance in religious life. They participated through various relevant activities as seen in Table 10 below.

As can be seen in the table above, the highest number of participations were done through their involvement in activities held by other institutions which has reached 27.9%; even though there are more active involvement representation such as through writings on online media reaching 21,9% or holding socio-youth activities to promote tolerance and pro-diversity. This high number of interest must be directed and facilitated so that it is connected to two things. First, government programs that are relevant with the field. Second, their own institutions’ activities in related field.


Recommendations
1

Integrating and including the P/CVE issue in UNDP strategic plan documents, such as, CPD Output/Outcome, UNPDF document with clear indicators of results and achievements in each.

2

Accelerating efforts in gathering international support and engagement for the implementation of Prevention/Countering Violent Extremism program in Indonesia, in form of financial support as well as dialogues or networks establishment.

3

Providing further support for PPIM , partner of CONVEY project,  to strengthen their strategic position and branding of CONVEY (Countering Violent Extremism) that held by religious education.

4

Continuing administrative's support and financial arrangement of CONVEY program .

5

Re-clarify the P/CVE vision and strategy in increasing religious education role in promoting peace, tolerance and inclusiveness, by taking into account the capacity, areas of strength, experience, funding availability, and competitive area where CONVEY, in particular, PPIM, is able to be more strategic to implement its intervention. This can be done by organizing a workshop on Strategic Planning to formulate some critical things:

a.         Who would be the direct beneficiaries of this project in the future, what changes are expected to them, how to reach them: through which ways?

b.         What are the strategic issues and programs for CONVEY to achieve its objective? What would be CONVEY’s strategy to increase the role or religious education in promoting peace, tolerance, and inclusiveness? What are the indicators for achievements/results?

c.          What are resources needed, including staff, funding, institutional arrangement, etc.

What would be the suitable Theory of Changes of the Project that in line with this strategic direction changes.

6

 

Strengthen the knowledge management strategy to make use the existing information, research products, and other campaign content/material for the higher use. This would be useful and may become a strong foundation for further knowledge mobilization process. Some measures that can be carried on to support this initiative will include, but not limited,:

a.         To manage further CONVEY Indonesia website as one of the tools for the knowledge management project, for example, by recruiting a dedicated staff for this work.

To recruit a communication specialist to develop a communication strategy to further promote the current CONVEY knowledge products and results to the public. 

7

Strengthening the advocacy strategy of the Project by conducting a number of things,

a.         To develop prioritized issues that will be the focused-advocacy issues in the next CONVEY Project and also devise strategy to implement them.

b.         To conduct policy study/review to determine what policies or programs that could be changed/revised/used, to ensure that the recommendations from previous CONVEY researches/surveys related with the enhancement of the role of religious education in promoting tolerance, diversity, inclusiveness and peace, can be executed.

c.          To conduct intensive advocacy and policy engagements with relevant Ministries/Institutions that are responsible for the policies/programs review as well as implementation.

Managing further the role of Project Board’s for the project, to help in: building a stronger and intensive engagement with the relevant-actors within their respective Ministries/Institutions for policy discussion/advocacy;

1. Recommendation:

Integrating and including the P/CVE issue in UNDP strategic plan documents, such as, CPD Output/Outcome, UNPDF document with clear indicators of results and achievements in each.

Management Response: [Added: 2019/09/19]

During the formulation process of the current CPD which took place in 2014, PVE issue was not raised as an immediate and urgent issue to be addressed by UNDP, hence there was no explicit statements about violent extremism in UNDP core documents such as CPD 2016-2020 and UNPDF 2016-2020, However, in the last three years, violent extremism has rapidly evolved in Indonesia and there was no accurate data available yet to show the comprehensive picture and magnitude of the problem. That is where UNDP found relevance to respond to the evolving dynamics. Therefore, this indicates UNDP has been responding flexibly to adjust the critical needs on the ground.

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
During the consultation process, the unit to suggest P/CVE to be included as one of the priorities in the new Country Programme Document 2021-2025.
[Added: 2019/09/19] [Last Updated: 2020/04/01]
The DGPRU Programme Team 2020/03 Completed The P/CVE has been considered in the development of new CPD 2021-2025 , marked in situational analysis and one of indicator output History
2. Recommendation:

Accelerating efforts in gathering international support and engagement for the implementation of Prevention/Countering Violent Extremism program in Indonesia, in form of financial support as well as dialogues or networks establishment.

Management Response: [Added: 2019/09/19]

UNDP will expand P/CVE portfolio and seeking International support opportunity for the implementation of Countering Violent Extremism in Indonesia 

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
Developing strategic document to reserve continuation of Prevention/Countering Violent Extremism in Indonesia and enhancing partnerships with CSOs including for their capacity building and sharing best practices in form of roundtable discussion.
[Added: 2019/09/19] [Last Updated: 2020/04/01]
The DGPRU Programme Team-UNDP 2020/03 Completed Strategic recommendation has been developed as the basis for the continuation o PVE intervention Indonesia. The networking with CSOs has been maintained as well as in advancing their capacity. History
3. Recommendation:

Providing further support for PPIM , partner of CONVEY project,  to strengthen their strategic position and branding of CONVEY (Countering Violent Extremism) that held by religious education.

Management Response: [Added: 2019/09/19]

 UNDP has intensivey engaging PPIM, as partners of CONVEY , since project planning and design stages (Concept Note Development, Annual Work Plan, ToR development , etc.) 

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
UNDP will provide technical assistance to build capacity on communication of PPIM . When required, UNDP Indonesia Communication unit will help project to assist PPIM
[Added: 2019/09/19] [Last Updated: 2020/09/28]
DGPRU Team-UNDP 2020/08 Completed The technical assistance has been provided History
4. Recommendation:

Continuing administrative's support and financial arrangement of CONVEY program .

Management Response: [Added: 2019/09/19]

UNDP will continue to support PPIM as well as CSOs networking for CONVEY program

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
Conduct trainings and technical assistances to PPIM and CSOs Networks
[Added: 2019/09/19] [Last Updated: 2020/09/28]
DGPRU programme team-UNDP 2020/11 Completed The activities were conducted to target groups (PPIM and CSO networks) History
5. Recommendation:

Re-clarify the P/CVE vision and strategy in increasing religious education role in promoting peace, tolerance and inclusiveness, by taking into account the capacity, areas of strength, experience, funding availability, and competitive area where CONVEY, in particular, PPIM, is able to be more strategic to implement its intervention. This can be done by organizing a workshop on Strategic Planning to formulate some critical things:

a.         Who would be the direct beneficiaries of this project in the future, what changes are expected to them, how to reach them: through which ways?

b.         What are the strategic issues and programs for CONVEY to achieve its objective? What would be CONVEY’s strategy to increase the role or religious education in promoting peace, tolerance, and inclusiveness? What are the indicators for achievements/results?

c.          What are resources needed, including staff, funding, institutional arrangement, etc.

What would be the suitable Theory of Changes of the Project that in line with this strategic direction changes.

Management Response: [Added: 2019/09/19]

PMU CONVEY has sharpened CONVEY’s strategic position as the front-runner in PVE through religious education. The project will be continually evolved in strengtheining their strategies and results through next phase of CONVEY 3 and 4. We will encourage the optimum performance in capacity and taking actions for more improvements and amplifying the achievements and impacts.  

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
To conduct strategic mapping of current results/achievements/strength, and weaknesses of which the project needs to improve, and utilize the map to improve activities in CONVEY 3 as well as to design CONVEY 4 activities.
[Added: 2019/09/19] [Last Updated: 2020/03/09]
DGPRU programme team-UNDP 2020/02 Completed Project completed the strategic mapping to recommend the improvement of implementation for PVE. History
PMU CONVEY acknowledges that research is our competitive advantage, when compared to advocacy and campaign. Hence we will remain to identify knowledge gaps that need to be researched.
[Added: 2019/09/19] [Last Updated: 2020/09/28]
DGRPU programme team -UNDP 2020/07 Completed The research are all published. History
In the next phase (CONVEY 3) we will strengthen our campaign by developing a more comprehensive communication strategy. We have mapped out the main targets of our campaign, namely the millennial youth, representative of ministries, and Asia regional network. In CONVEY 3, we will implement communication strategy based on the main targets of campaign
[Added: 2019/09/19] [Last Updated: 2020/03/09]
DGPRU Programme Team -UNDP 2020/07 Completed Map of target audience of the campaign has been identified History
To develop more innovative strategies and contents to ensure that our key message is well received effectively by the targets, e.g. online quizzes and competitions with interesting prizes.
[Added: 2019/09/19] [Last Updated: 2020/03/09]
PMU 2020/02 Completed Innovative strategies were identified and implemented History
To ensure that our knowledge products continue to be used either the base of policy-making or to raise awareness of the public, CONVEY has consistently and will continue to disseminate our knowledge products through various channels in social media and meetings with external entities.
[Added: 2019/09/19] [Last Updated: 2020/03/09]
PMU – Communication/PSA Team and Policy Forum Team 2020/02 Completed the use of knowledge products for advocacy benefits the impact of project implementation. Dissemination of knowledge products through various channels and strategies will be continued for advocacy. History
We acknowledge that the #MeyakiniMenghargai hashtag has been one of our competitive advantage, therefore we will continue to maintain and even increase the use of the hashtag by promoting it during networking events with other CSOs and build collaboration with other organizations.
[Added: 2019/09/19] [Last Updated: 2020/09/28]
PMU – Communication/PSA Team 2020/07 Completed The use of hastags and other related campaign are still maintained . History
6. Recommendation:

 

Strengthen the knowledge management strategy to make use the existing information, research products, and other campaign content/material for the higher use. This would be useful and may become a strong foundation for further knowledge mobilization process. Some measures that can be carried on to support this initiative will include, but not limited,:

a.         To manage further CONVEY Indonesia website as one of the tools for the knowledge management project, for example, by recruiting a dedicated staff for this work.

To recruit a communication specialist to develop a communication strategy to further promote the current CONVEY knowledge products and results to the public. 

Management Response: [Added: 2019/09/19]

PMU acknowledges that the project still needs to strengthen the knowledge management strategy to use existing information, research products and other material for better use.

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
To be more frequent in attending external forums to promote CONVEY to other CSO/stakeholders so that the research products and other campaign materials can be of higher use, including the Convey’s websites as a hub to learn more about religious education and P/CVE.
[Added: 2019/09/19] [Last Updated: 2020/03/09]
PMU 2020/02 Completed Promotion of CVE to other stakeholders/CSO were implemented. History
To make CONVEY infographic videos (especially those in CONVEY 2) viral, by spreading it through various WAGs in PPIM and CONVEY’s networks and beyond, by using the ‘riding the wave’ strategy.
[Added: 2019/09/19] [Last Updated: 2021/07/13]
PMU – Communication team 2021/07 Completed The activity is completed. The CONVEY's communication products have been spread widely in PPIM and CONVEY's networks , as planned. History
Sharing beneficiaries database to partners so that the database can be useful and consider in analysing next stratetgy and area of improvement. .
[Added: 2019/09/19]
PMU 2019/08 Completed The beneficiaries data base have been shared to partners and utilized to build the initiation of continuing next phase of CONVEY History
Potentially hire staff(s) to manage CONVEY’s website which has been an effective platform to showcase knowledge products to the public.
[Added: 2019/09/19] [Last Updated: 2020/06/09]
PMU 2020/04 Completed One staff has been hired to manage CONVEY website. The published website has effectively impacted the project performance, where knowledge products are now shared to wide audience using this channel. History
7. Recommendation:

Strengthening the advocacy strategy of the Project by conducting a number of things,

a.         To develop prioritized issues that will be the focused-advocacy issues in the next CONVEY Project and also devise strategy to implement them.

b.         To conduct policy study/review to determine what policies or programs that could be changed/revised/used, to ensure that the recommendations from previous CONVEY researches/surveys related with the enhancement of the role of religious education in promoting tolerance, diversity, inclusiveness and peace, can be executed.

c.          To conduct intensive advocacy and policy engagements with relevant Ministries/Institutions that are responsible for the policies/programs review as well as implementation.

Managing further the role of Project Board’s for the project, to help in: building a stronger and intensive engagement with the relevant-actors within their respective Ministries/Institutions for policy discussion/advocacy;

Management Response: [Added: 2019/09/19]

In the beginning of next phase of CONVEY (CONVEY 3), PMU actually have made several adjustments/improvement to ensure that our advocacy is effective. Nevertheless, PMU acknowledges that there are some room for improvements in order to ensure that our policy advocacy works.

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
Measuring and Monitoring impacts from our influence in policies formulation related to P/CVE and religious education , using several platforms such as the Policy Forum FGDs or through media monitoring.
[Added: 2019/09/19] [Last Updated: 2020/03/09]
PMU 2020/02 Completed Link for monitoring the impacts was developed. History
In the beginning of CONVEY 3, we have added one output that is fully dedicated to design and implement the policy advocacy to the governments.
[Added: 2019/09/19]
PMU 2019/08 Completed
In the beginning of CONVEY 3, We have developed 5 priority issues e.g. religious moderation, religious education reform, religious education textbooks, that will be advocated to the relevant ministries, based on the newly devised advocacy strategy;
[Added: 2019/09/19]
PMU 2019/08 Completed
To engage the relevant ministries since the very beginning of the research, at least by inviting authoritative representative to the research design workshop
[Added: 2019/09/19]
PMU 2019/08 Completed
To invite more authoritative and relevant government representatives to the Project Board meeting;
[Added: 2019/09/19]
PMU 2019/08 Completed It has been completed during the initiation of document writing of CONVEY 3 History

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