Terminal Evaluation of National Capacity Development for Implementing Rio Conventions through Environmental Governance

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Evaluation Plan:
2017-2021, Bangladesh
Evaluation Type:
Final Project
Planned End Date:
12/2019
Completion Date:
12/2019
Status:
Completed
Management Response:
Yes
Evaluation Budget(US $):
30,000

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Title Terminal Evaluation of National Capacity Development for Implementing Rio Conventions through Environmental Governance
Atlas Project Number: 00079684
Evaluation Plan: 2017-2021, Bangladesh
Evaluation Type: Final Project
Status: Completed
Completion Date: 12/2019
Planned End Date: 12/2019
Management Response: Yes
UNDP Signature Solution:
  • 1. Sustainable
Corporate Outcome and Output (UNDP Strategic Plan 2018-2021)
  • 1. Output 1.4.1 Solutions scaled up for sustainable management of natural resources, including sustainable commodities and green and inclusive value chains
SDG Goal
  • Goal 13. Take urgent action to combat climate change and its impacts
  • Goal 14. Conserve and sustainably use the oceans, seas and marine resources for sustainable development
SDG Target
  • 13.2 Integrate climate change measures into national policies, strategies and planning
  • 14.3 Minimize and address the impacts of ocean acidification, including through enhanced scientific cooperation at all levels
Evaluation Budget(US $): 30,000
Source of Funding: Project budget (GEF funded)
Evaluation Expenditure(US $): 20,000
Joint Programme: No
Joint Evaluation: No
Evaluation Team members:
Name Title Email Nationality
Amal Aldababseh International Consultant
GEF Evaluation: Yes
GEF Project Title: National Capacity Development for Implementing Rio Conventions through Environmental Governance
Evaluation Type: Terminal Evaluation
Focal Area: Multifocal Areas
Project Type: MSP
GEF Phase: GEF-5
GEF Project ID: 5106
PIMS Number: 4884
Key Stakeholders:
Countries: BANGLADESH
Lessons
1.

As a CCCD Project, that is a multi-focal and multi-sectoral, it needs special attention during the project design, implementation and monitoring, and evaluation. UNDP and UNDP/GEF should provide a lot of support at the project development and inception phases to ensure the proper design of the project and then a proper launching during the inception phase. For example, the project's outputs are not well articulated, as many of them are basically activities, not outputs. This should have been detected by UNDP and/or UNDP/GEF during the project’s formulation stage. Many of the CCCD projects at the global level have a similar focus and had developed sets of tools, frameworks, legislation, and training manuals and materials. Countries could benefit from these developed materials and hence knowledge sharing between countries and study tours/exchange are very much recommended.


2.

Despite the project size, it demanded a lot of work from the Government and UNDP officials. Yet, its goal and objectives are very critical for the GoB and unique despite its small size.


3.

Capacity development at different levels (institutional, organizational, and individual) and for different groups; local communities, government officials, women organizations, is very crucial for achieving the project outcomes and to ensure its sustainability. This project shows the best practice in the role of well-trained and heavily involved government officials in project management and the importance of capacity development to ensure the successful implementation of a project.


4.

The project management strategy to include several local consultants with limited and specific tasks proved to be very effective. Many of the consultants worked in parallel and that led to finalize the project’s activities in less than three years (if we exclude the 13 months delay at the beginning of the project).


Findings
1.

4. Findings 

4.1 Project Design/ Formulation

The project design is considered very relevant to the Government’s global environmental obligations, national plans, and strategies. The Project is functioning in a policy framework that includes, among others: the National Adaptation Programme of Action (NAPA); the National Biodiversity Strategy and Action Plan (NBSAP); the National Action Plan (NAP); the Sixth Five Year Plan (SFP) of the Government of Bangladesh (FY 2011-FY 2015); the Bangladesh Climate Change Strategy Action Plan (BCCSAP); The Bangladesh Capacity Development Action Plan (CDAP)13 . The Perspective Plan of Bangladesh 2010-2021: Making Vision 2021, and the National Sustainable Development Strategy 2011-2021 (NSDS). 

The Project was relevant to UNDAF Outcome: vulnerable populations benefit from natural resource management; environmental governance and low- emission green development, and to UNDP Strategic Plan, mainly outcomes: Mainstreaming sustainable and equitable trends of environment and energy outcome, and Mechanisms for sustainable management of natural resources are created. It also conforms to Programme Framework 4 of the GEF-5 Cross-Cutting Capacity Development Strategy, which calls for calls “strengthening of capacities to implement the Rio Conventions through improved national environmental management.”14 The Project Document followed the standard UNDP/GEF Project document structure. It included 3 components/outcomes, 16 outputs, activities per output and defined targets and indicators. However, the majority of the outputs are in fact were written as activities.

The Project Document was successful in addressing five main cross-cutting capacity issues and barriers and defining the way to deliver sustainable impact by addressing the critical need to enhance the capacity of relevant policy and institutional stakeholders to enable compliance with the three Rio Conventions and other MEAs by developing institutional capacities for management of the global environmental conventions, developing human resources to mainstream Rio Conventions obligations, and raising awareness of the linkages between Rio Conventions and sustainable development. However, the Project document failed to make the appropriate link between the Project goal “strengthen information management and other support systems that contribute to policy development and improved implementation of the three Rio Conventions” and the Project’s outcomes and outputs. No outcomes would be related to enhancing knowledge management.

The Project Document included the required level of details concerning the project log-frame (LF). Yet, the project’s components and outputs were not well-written. The comprehensive public awareness programme made a proper link between the global environmental issues; climate change, biodiversity, and desertification and to the national socio-economic development priorities. The piloting site designed and implemented in Sylhet provided a good example of transferring high-level knowledge of global issues to local actions. These activities not only contributed to improving the implementation of the Rio Conventions in Bangladesh through the enhancement of capacities to provide sustainable alternative livelihood options to one of the vulnerable communities in northeast Bangladesh. 


Tag: Climate Change Adaptation Climate change governance Environmental impact assessment Relevance Global Environment Facility fund Government Cost-sharing Programme/Project Design Results-Based Management Theory of Change

2.

4.1.2 Assumptions and Risks

A few risks to the Project were identified during the project development phase. These include: “ensuring the coordination among different ministries/ divisions/ agencies/ stakeholders, largely due to their individual mandates to implement plans, policies, and programs under the rules of business”. The project proposed a mitigation measure to this risk by limiting the coordination under the project to “agreements on participation in the training and the subsequent learn-by-doing exercises”.

Another risk was inadequacy/uncertainty of long-term funding. However, the project addressed this risk under Project activity 1.7: by negotiating the financial sustainability of project activities that should continue once the project ends. The project was successful in institutionalized itself within key entities, such as the DoE. The project was built on two main assumptions. The first one assumed that the “training will be structured as high-quality courses that encourage critical thinking and that stakeholders will actively engage in the training”, and the second assumption suggested that “the skills learned by participants will be used in their daily work.” The assumptions were effectively managed. The Project was designed to respond to the capacity constraints and barriers defined in the NCSA assessment. The Project identified seven risks during the formulation stage and included risks and assumptions per each outcome and output. The risks included political, technical, operational, and financial risks. However, during project implementation, risk management does not reach an acceptable level. The TE consultants could not get access to the risks and issues logs. The project QPRs were not prepared and hence, it was not possible for the TE consultants to review and verify if the risks and issues logs have been updated quarterly by UNDP CO to its ATLAS system. The TE consultant considers the management of the project’s risks needs some improvement, as they needed more substance and concrete mitigation measures. 


Tag: Relevance Programme/Project Design Project and Programme management Risk Management Coordination

3.

4.1.4 Planned stakeholder participation

The Project’s main stakeholders and the direct beneficiaries – the government institutions – should be fully engaged and supportive of the project’s intervention. According to the ProDoc, “stakeholder involvement in this project began with the National Capacity Self-Assessment that took place between 2005 and 2007.” The NCSA was implemented by the IUCN, which was contracted to manage “an extensive consultation process that involved government ministries and agencies, local government, research organizations, academia, NGOs, civil society, local communities, media, development partners, and other relevant stakeholders. Although this crosscutting capacity development project comes several years after the NCSA, there is still institutional memory and commitment of stakeholders, many of whom were consulted in the development of the project during the project preparation phase”.

The project was developed based on intensive consultations with key stakeholders and has managed to develop some of the critical partnerships with stakeholders at the national mainly with the MoEFCC, DoE and national entities responsible for capacity development at the national and regional level. Relationships with these key stakeholders appeared to be pleasant and there is considerable support. The TE would have expected to see more evidence of partnerships with organizations involved in different fields in relation to the Rio Conventions, such as the academic sectors, private sectors, and national and international non-governmental organizations and development partners. The involvement of the project’s key stakeholders has been limited to attending various training workshops, meetings, project's technical committee, and public awareness events. A full list of these events organized by the project is presented inAnnex 7. The Project utilized these events to build a national database for concerned stakeholders and experts how have directly participated in project activities. 

During the TE mission, the consultant was able to meet with key stakeholders and project’s beneficiaries and it was noticeable their great involvement in the project’s implementation. It is to the TE consultant, the Project was able to correctly engage targeted groups “targeted groups were engaged in implementation and monitoring, with a priority focus on the discriminated and marginalized. Beneficiary feedback, which may be anecdotal, was collected regularly to ensure the project addressed local priorities. This information was used to inform project decision making”. The general conclusion, project management has achieved respectable partnerships with relevant stakeholders. The project management has successfully managed to engage key stakeholders listed in the project document.


Tag: Sustainability Knowledge management Partnership Strategic Positioning Capacity Building

4.

4.1.7 Linkages between the project and other interventions within the sector The project was hosted at the DoE. The DOE is managing several projects, and this has facilitated the work of the Project by sharing lessons learned, sharing financial and technical resources, and providing the needed logistical and technical support. These projects include “the Coastal and Wetland Biodiversity Management Project” and “the Community based adaptation in the ecologically critical area through biodiversity conservation and social projection project”. Also, the project was implemented under the UNDP Environment Portfolio which is responsible for implementing several ongoing projects and programs. The Project’s team members were collaborating with their colleagues from other projects. Overall, the Project had some cooperation with other key ongoing initiatives in the piloting site. For example, UNDP through its projects is funding several initiatives through community-based organizations close to the Hakaluki Haor piloting site in Sylhet. It was observed that several beneficiaries are fully aware of UNDP work in the region as they have benefited from other UNDP projects previously.


Tag: Biodiversity Implementation Modality Programme Synergy Project and Programme management Country Government Social Protection

5.

4.2 Project Implementation

The TE consultant has reviewed and assessed the project implementation arrangement and its adaptive management. The following aspects of project implementation have been assessed: the changes to the project design and project outputs during implementation- adaptive management; Partnership arrangements (with relevant stakeholders involved in the country); Feedback from M&E activities used for adaptive management; Project finance; Monitoring and evaluation; design at entry and implementation*, and UNDP and Implementation Partner Implementation/ execution coordination, and operational issues*. Achievements of project implementation and adaptive management have been rated in terms of the criteria above at a six-level scale20 . The following paragraphs provide a complete review and justifications for the rating of the results. The rating and a description of that rating are summarized in the TE Ratings & Achievements table 1, Page 6.

Inception Phase: According to the UNDP/GEF project management guidelines, the inception phase is considered as an opportunity to unite the project management team, to define the current and near-future status of the project, to discuss and review the project strategy with stakeholders, to put in place the necessary logistics, to develop the first Annual Work Plan (AWP) and to review and refine the Project Logical Framework (LF)21. The major output of the inception phase should be the Inception Report (IR)22 and the first AWP, which, on an agreement with the Project Board, should form a necessary flexible basis for implementation. The IW discussed the project’s log-frame, work-plan, and have proposed making the needed modifications to the LF, however, no changes were reflected in the IR or the project document. Also, the IR indicated that the PMU should organize another workshop called “initiation workshop” in order to involve all beneficiaries and stakeholders and discuss the work plan for the first year in details, however, this workshop was never organized. Therefore, the TE considers that the Inception Phase and the inception report could have been strengthened to benefit the project implementation. The project IR was a workshop proceeding report. It included the speeches of the highlevel officials who attended the workshop, listed the workshop agenda and indicated what has been discussed without providing a correct background story on the project’s delay, and the changes in the project LF. While these faults might have been detected by the project assurance or by UNDP/GEF, these are also possible to be detected by the PMU and the executing agency as the LF is a requirement for many donors and development partners. 


Tag: Government Cost-sharing Partnership Project and Programme management Civil Societies and NGOs Country Government

6.

4.2.2 Partnership arrangements

The Project has established several key partnerships with the main stakeholders (MoEFCC/ DOE, and other key partners like Arannayak Foundation, Forum of Environmental Journalists of Bangladesh (FEJB), BRAC, Center for Natural Resource Studies (CNRS), International Centre for Climate Change and Development (ICCCAD), Planning Commission, Dhaka University and Palli Karma Sahayak Foundation (PKSF). The project was hosted at the DOE, this has helped the project to be very close to other projects and initiatives led by the MOEFCC. As a result, the Project was able to closely monitor the implementation of other initiatives developed/ supported by key international donors including other UNDP/GEF projects. Furthermore, for the piloting, the project management entered into an implementing partnership agreement with a local NGO – NACOM - to develop and pilot test the three RIO Conventions sustainable livelihood initiatives.

The Project Document made a clear reference to the role of key project stakeholders in project implementation, these “stakeholder representatives will participate in activities to collaborate the improved inclusion of environmental and natural resource considerations into training curricula.” Accordingly, the Project should cooperate with a wide range of stakeholders as listed in the project document. These include government agencies, non-governmental organizations, international development partners, donors, local and national non-governmental organizations and communitybased organizations, and academia. The project managed to include many stakeholders in the project’s technical working groups and committees as well as in the comprehensive training program is implemented. The overall conclusion is that project management has achieved an acceptable level of partnership with the relevant national stakeholders, but the established partnership could have been stronger. 


Tag: Monitoring and Evaluation Partnership Quality Assurance

7.

4.2.4 Project Finance

In line with the UNDP/GEF TE guide, the TE has assessed the differences between the actual expenditure and the leveraged financing and co-financing during the TE mission presented in Table 4, which provides an overview of the budgeted expenditures of the GEF Project of US$660,000. As of July 2019, US$ 579,397.04 about (86.17%) of the project total budget, has been dispersed. However, the remaining budget is committed to being disbursed during the period of August 2019 (encumbrance). This amount will be used to finalize the work of the project TE and the production of the project’s deliverables. 

The project budget includes US$ 460,000 from the Government of Bangladesh as an in-kind contribution. As of July 2019, the confirmed Project co-financing from the Government has reached 100% of the planned co-financing with details provided in Table 4. Furthermore, the local communities and beneficiaries/Village Conservation Group (VCG) have provided an additional US$13,856. The high co-financing from the Government and the VCG to the piloting site shows the high-level interest in, and commitments to the project. UNDP provided more than the planned financial support. As of July 2019, the confirmed UNDP co-financing amounted to an estimated US$217,352.96 (108.67%). In addition to financial support, UNDP provided financial oversight of the project in a manner consistent with the UNDP/GEF financial guidelines. The GEF grant and UNDP contribution have been monitored through the UNDP’s Atlas system. (See Table 3: Project Budget and Expenditures (US$))


Tag: Efficiency Global Environment Facility fund Government Cost-sharing

8.

4.2.5 Monitoring and evaluation: design at entry and implementation (*)

M&E Design at Entry

The project document included the standard UNDP/GEF budgeted monitoring and evaluation plan with a specific budget, timeframe, and responsible parties. UNDP holds the responsibility of following up on the M&E plan which is supposed to be conducted in accordance with the established UNDP and GEF procedures. A total of US$ 39,000, about 5.9% of the total GEF grant was allocated for the M&E activities. Evidently, this amount is enough to conduct the proposed M&E plan. The TE consultant reviewed three M&E plans for 2017, 2018 and 2019. The Plans were very detailed and included budget per activity. However, the TE consultant could not get an update on the total budget utilized for the M&E activities and hence is unable to define if the originally planned budget was enough or not. 

In addition to the standard M&E plan, all standard UNDP/GEF M&E tools were included in the project document, including the log-frame, indicators, targets, inception workshop, an inception report, terminal evaluation, learning and knowledge sharing, project’s audit, the quarterly and annual progress reports and board meetings. The MTR was also planned in the Project Document although it is not required for this project. 

Implementation of M&E The TE reviews the UNDP role as project assurance and considers that it has been correctly and effectively applied to this project, due to the following observations:

- The UNDP CO has been very active in (i) preparing project annual progress reports, (ii) preparing, discussing, and finalizing annual work plans in line with the UNDP/GEF guidelines, (iii) following up in financial payments and transactions, and (iv) providing crucial support to mobilize international consultants/advisors to support project implementation. - The UNDP CO has helped the PMU in recruiting international consultants in line with the established Rules and Regulations of the United Nations. - The project’s M&E activities followed the UNDP/GEF established procedures as the UNDP CO team as well as the Project Team and the NPD have conducted several monitoring exercises including preparation and review of the project progress reports, participation in the project board meetings, and visiting the project’s piloting sites. - The UNDP Bangladesh’s provisions of financial resources have also been in accordance with project norms and in the timeframe. The UNDP/GEF Regional Unit has also provided the needed review and support to prepare the project’s annual work plan, issuing of the project authorized spending limits and following up on the project’s annual reporting.  


Tag: Effectiveness Efficiency Global Environment Facility fund Monitoring and Evaluation Programme/Project Design

9.

4.2.6 UNDP and Implementing Partner implementation/execution coordination, and operational issues (*) UNDP implementation  

The Senior Supplier is UNDP as GEF Implementing Agency. UNDP has the Project Assurance role, which supports the Project by carrying out objective and independent project oversight and monitoring functions. The key aspects of the UNDP implementation are as follows: 

 - The UNDP support to the PMU is regarded by the project team and the Government officials as highly satisfactory and timely:

• There have been a significant number of monitoring and review exercises conducted by the UNDP Bangladesh including preparation of the Annual Project Review /Project Review reports, and production of the Combined Delivery Report. 

• The UNDP has also been very active in reviewing and following up on the project’s financial reports, and project AWPS.

• The UNDP Bangladesh provision of financial resources has also been in accordance with project norms and in a timeframe that is supportive of covering the costs of project activities

• The UNDP CO has facilitated the recruitment and engagement of several consultants (national and international) in the implementation.

• UNDP Country Office Bangladesh has offered full support to project implementation, including administrative support as well as high-level support by the participation of the UNDP senior management in project’s meetings and activities.

• UNDP followed up on the Project and continuously examined if it is being implemented with a focus on project activities.

UNDP is recognized as a very supportive partner and the Government of Bangladesh could see the UNDP comparative advantages mainly in mobilizing international consultants/advisors as well as providing the needed technical support and share best practices. From the different verification tools, it was evident that UNDP fulfilled its oversight and supervision responsibilities, with strong communication with the executing partners and the PMU. The Project is considered as well managed according to the UNDP and the GEF guidelines. Furthermore, UNDP CO has allocated more track money to support the implementation of the project’s activities. This was highly appreciated by the Government officials. 


Tag: Effectiveness Efficiency Global Environment Facility fund Government Cost-sharing Implementation Modality Project and Programme management Strategic Positioning

10.

4.3 Project Results

4.3.1 Overall Results (attainment of objectives) (*) 

The achievements of expected project results were evaluated in terms of attainment of the overall objective as well as identified project’s outcomes and outputs, according to the UNDP/GEF evaluation guidelines. For this the performance by outcome/component is analyzed by looking at (i) general progress towards the established baseline level of the indicators; (ii) actual values of indicators by the end of the Project vs. designed ones; (iii) evidences of relevance, effectiveness, and efficiency of the results as well as how this evidence was documented.

The summary of an evaluation of the attainment of objectives and outcomes of the Project are presented in Table 5. The assessment of progress is based on observations, findings, and data collected during the field mission in Bangladesh, interviews with key stakeholders, data provided in the annual reports, technical reports reviewed. The Capacity Development Monitoring and Evaluation Scorecard was developed during the project’s formulation stage. The results of the assessment were considered as a baseline in the revised Log-Frame. The rating of the assessment of achievement of the capacity development program at the time of the TE is presented in Annex 8. The scorecard shows considerable progress in capacity development as the score moved from 21 at the time of the project development to 36 at the time of the TE. Overall results of the Project are rated as Highly (See Table 5: Matrix for rating the Achievement of Outcomes).


Tag: Climate Change Adaptation Climate change governance Biodiversity Natural Resouce management Relevance Country Government Capacity Building Advocacy

11.

4.3.3 Effectiveness and efficiency (*)

Effectiveness

The Project has made tangible progress towards the achievements of its overall objective “enhance the capacity of relevant policy and institutional stakeholders to enable compliance with the three Rio Conventions and other MEAs” . It specifically helped in “by targeting and training government staff at the local, regional and national levels on the specific interpretation of Rio Convention provisions as they apply to their respective roles and responsibilities to implement associated development policies.” The Project objective and main outputs have been achieved; the most of established targets have been met with some delays. Considering the above-mentioned facts, Effectiveness was rated Satisfactory. 

 


Tag: Effectiveness Efficiency Gender Equality Results-Based Management Country Government Capacity Building

12.

4.3.4 Country Ownership

As per the project document, “Bangladesh ratified the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD) on 3 May 1994; the Convention to Combat Desertification and Drought (CCD) on 26 January 1996; and the Framework Convention on Climate Change (FCCC) on 16 February 1994.” 30 Furthermore, Bangladesh ratified other important protocols in later years, namely “Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Flora and Fauna, accession on 18 February 1982; Vienna Convention on the Substances that Deplete the Ozone Layer (Ratified on 2 August 1990), Ramsar Convention on Wetlands of International Importance, especially Waterfowl Habitats, accepted on 21 May 1992; Basel Convention on the Control of Transboundary Movements of Hazardous Waste and their Disposal (Ratified on 1 April 1993); Convention on the Conservation of Migratory Species of Wild Animals, ratified on 1 December 2005; and Stockholm Convention on Persistent Organic Pollutants (Ratified on 3 December 2007).

Bangladesh is eligible to receive technical assistance from UNDP and is thus eligible for support under the Global Environment Facility. It obtained a UNDP-GEF grant to conduct its National Capacity Self-Assessment (NCSA), which was concluded in 2007. The country ownership is evident in the strong interest and participation of high-level government officials in the project’s implementation meetings, project review meetings, and project steering committee meetings. It is also evident by appointing a high-level official as the Project’s NPD. As a result, all project’s activities were approved by all authorized parties presented in the Project committees. The project was considered strategic as it helped Bangladesh in responding to a targeted set of underlying barriers to environmental management towards the goal of meeting and sustaining global environmental outcomes. Precisely, the project facilitated the proactive and constructive engagement of decision-makers across environmental focal areas and socio-economic sectors. 


Tag: Environment Policy Global Environment Facility fund Gender Mainstreaming Women's Empowerment Ownership Capacity Building

13.

4.3.6 Sustainability (*)

The Project’s main approach to sustainability is the “establishment of the consortium of training institutes (see Output 1.1) and the subsequent development of a national education program focused on the global environment”.

The project’s critical feature of sustainability is “the project’s cost-effective strategy.” The Project was designed to “use existing environmental and natural resource management legislation to implement Rio Convention obligations targeting current weaknesses in monitoring and compliance, this project builds upon an existing baseline of legislation and institutional capacities. The key to success will be in reducing bureaucratic inefficiencies by improving coordination amongst line ministries”. The final feature of the project’s strategy is through the “project implementation arrangement”. The majority of the project activities were constructed as “learn-bydoing activities, the rationale being that government and other stakeholders responsible for environmental planning, decision-making, monitoring, and enforcement are the stakeholders that collaborate on the improved interpretation of environmental and natural resource management legislation from a heightened Rio Convention perspective.”

The main benefit of having the government executing this project directly is to build their capacities for the long-term implementation of appropriate project activities, and indeed that contributed to their institutionalization. Thus, the project’s sustainability rests on the success and replicability of the pilots and demonstrations. An exit strategy was prepared and is supposed to be discussed during the project’s terminal meeting. The exit strategy provides the needed details concerning the project’s closure, the follow-up actions, and the next steps. It provides a clear commitment from the GoB to continue the work to ensure long-term sustainability and the upscaling of project achievements to other parts of Bangladesh. 


Tag: Natural Resouce management Efficiency Sustainability Implementation Modality Risk Management Capacity Building Education

14.

4.3.7 Impact

The successful impact of the project is evident through;

- The establishment of the Ecosystem Management Fund within the Department of Environment which would ensure the sustainability of the project’s impacts.

- Mainstreaming of the ‘Training modules on three Rio Conventions’ and the ‘Identified Good Practices and Innovations of Rio Conventions’ into the regular course curriculum of key public training institutes is reached.

- BPATC, National Academy for Planning and Development (NAPD) and Bangladesh Civil Service Administration Academy (BCSAA) have started taking sessions on the Rio Conventions into training. - Training modules will be mainstreamed in the capacity development influx of department of Environment (DoE).

- The training module on Rio Conventions is being disseminated through the Training of Trainers (ToT) programs being organized in collaboration with key public training institutes with BPATC, BCSAA, BIAM, NAPD, NATA, NAEM, BARD, NILG, and RDA - About 400 government officials and 100 media representatives are sensitized through the training workshops on Rio Conventions, mostly organized jointly with the DoE and public training institutes.

- Mass awareness is created on obligations, the status of implementation and current issues of three Rio Conventions through roundtable discussions which were aired on a national television channel – 71. More than 10K views were recorded during the TV roundtable discussions.

- A comprehensive training module and the manual have been developed for Training of Trainers (ToT) on three Rio Conventions. Public training institutes supported mainstreaming the ToT into respective institutes. - Bangladesh Civil Service Administration Academy (BCSAA), the eminent public training institute of Bangladesh, has incorporated the Training Module on Rio Conventions into 107th, 108th, 109th, 110th, 111th, and 112th Law and Administration courses of the Academy.

- Total 108 government officials from 10 Ministries, 06 Departments, and 10 Public Training Institutes received this diligent training of trainers on Rio Conventions.  

- Total 116 young civil servants gained fundamental knowledge on environmental governance through 107th, 108th, 109th Law and Administration courses provided by Bangladesh Civil Service Administration Academy.

- Community-based adaptation practices are piloted in Hakaluki Haor.


Tag: Impact Knowledge management Capacity Building

Recommendations
1

The Project managed to produce a set of valued training programs and public awareness products on the Rio Conventions.  It is recommended to develop a dissemination plan for those public awareness and outreach tools as well as for the training manuals developed to ensure that future initiatives would build on the Project activities and results and will incorporate the project’s products in its work. (UNDP, DoE).

2

The training materials developed by the project should be shared with all concerned agencies as soon as possible, including piloting the testing of the local sustainable livelihood initiatives in the Hakaluka Haor, that would help in disseminating knowledge and lessons learned from these two valuable project’s activities.

3

The work to enhancing the capacity of relevant policy and institutional stakeholders to enable compliance with the three Rio Conventions and other MEAs Bangladesh has just begun through this Project. It still at the early stages hence other UNDP and Government of Bangladesh initiatives and projects should continue working on the upgrading of the national capacity, the infrastructure, and project’s deliverables produced to ensure that the Country will build on the Project’s Objective and results. A second phase of the project is certainly needed (DoE, UNDP, development partners, and donor agencies).

1. Recommendation:

The Project managed to produce a set of valued training programs and public awareness products on the Rio Conventions.  It is recommended to develop a dissemination plan for those public awareness and outreach tools as well as for the training manuals developed to ensure that future initiatives would build on the Project activities and results and will incorporate the project’s products in its work. (UNDP, DoE).

Management Response: [Added: 2019/12/27] [Last Updated: 2020/11/11]

Agreed. Most of the training modules, public awareness materials and knowledge products have been published. Some of the materials are still in press and will be published by October 2019. The Department of Environment (DoE) will upload important training modules, knowledge products and awareness materials on their websites. The DoE and UNDP will jointly organize a dissemination workshop by November 2019. Moreover, important training modules and knowledge products will be sent to the relevant Ministries, line agencies, training institutions and other key stakeholders.

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
The Department of Environment (DoE) will upload important training modules, knowledge products and awareness materials on their websites
[Added: 2019/12/27] [Last Updated: 2020/12/30]
DoE 2021/06 Initiated History
The DoE and UNDP will jointly organize a dissemination workshop. Important training modules and knowledge products will be sent to the relevant Ministries, line agencies, training institutions and other key stakeholders.
[Added: 2019/12/27] [Last Updated: 2020/12/30]
DoE and UNDP 2021/06 Initiated History
2. Recommendation:

The training materials developed by the project should be shared with all concerned agencies as soon as possible, including piloting the testing of the local sustainable livelihood initiatives in the Hakaluka Haor, that would help in disseminating knowledge and lessons learned from these two valuable project’s activities.

Management Response: [Added: 2019/12/27] [Last Updated: 2020/11/11]

Agreed. The training materials developed by the project will be shared with all concerned agencies through a dissemination workshop. Moreover, important training modules and other knowledge products will be sent to the concerned agencies through hand delivery/courier service. Local sustainable livelihood initiatives in the Hakaluka Haor will also be disseminated through national and local newspaper and other social/electronic media.

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
The training materials developed by the project will be shared with all concerned agencies through a dissemination workshop
[Added: 2019/12/27] [Last Updated: 2020/12/30]
DoE 2021/06 Initiated History
Local sustainable livelihood initiatives in the Hakaluka Haor will also be disseminated through national and local newspaper and other social/electronic media
[Added: 2019/12/27] [Last Updated: 2020/12/30]
DoE and UNDP 2021/06 Initiated History
3. Recommendation:

The work to enhancing the capacity of relevant policy and institutional stakeholders to enable compliance with the three Rio Conventions and other MEAs Bangladesh has just begun through this Project. It still at the early stages hence other UNDP and Government of Bangladesh initiatives and projects should continue working on the upgrading of the national capacity, the infrastructure, and project’s deliverables produced to ensure that the Country will build on the Project’s Objective and results. A second phase of the project is certainly needed (DoE, UNDP, development partners, and donor agencies).

Management Response: [Added: 2019/12/27] [Last Updated: 2020/11/11]

Agreed. UNDP has already requested MoEFCC/DoE and drafted a concept note to formulate a follow-up project. DoE is currently formulating a follow-up project and the project will be implemented using government-owned revenue resources.

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
UNDP will follow up with DoE on formulation of a follow-up project and provide required guidance on it
[Added: 2019/12/27] [Last Updated: 2020/12/30]
DoE 2021/06 Initiated History

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