Evaluation of Governance focus areas of Regional Programme

Report Cover Image
Evaluation Plan:
2008-2013, RBAP
Evaluation Type:
Outcome
Planned End Date:
06/2012
Completion Date:
11/2012
Status:
Completed
Management Response:
Yes
Evaluation Budget(US $):
87,500

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Title Evaluation of Governance focus areas of Regional Programme
Atlas Project Number:
Evaluation Plan: 2008-2013, RBAP
Evaluation Type: Outcome
Status: Completed
Completion Date: 11/2012
Planned End Date: 06/2012
Management Response: Yes
Focus Area:
  • 1. Democratic Governance
Corporate Outcome and Output (UNDP Strategic Plan 2014-2017)
  • 1. Effective, responsive, accessible and fair justice systems promote the rule of law, including both formal and informal processes, with due consideration on the rights of the poor, women and vulnerable groups
  • 2. Focus areas - Governance of Regional Programme
Evaluation Budget(US $): 87,500
Source of Funding:
Joint Programme: No
Joint Evaluation: No
Evaluation Team members:
Name Title Email Nationality
Peter Hosking Evaluation Team Leader PeterHosking@xtra.co.nz
Minoli De Bresser Evaluation Specialist mambres09@yahoo.com
GEF Evaluation: No
Key Stakeholders:
Location of Evaluation: Regional
Countries:
Lessons
Findings
Recommendations
1 9.1 ?Regionality? 9.1.1 The current regional architecture (a regional office in Bangkok with a Sub-Regional Centre in Suva) should be retained. Although some of those consulted argued for other sub-regional centres (eg SAARC, ASEAN) to be established on the Pacific Centre model, the Pacific context (very low population bases, cultural, political and environmental similarities) is very different from Asia. Although there is a need for attention to be focussed at the sub-regional level, including the greater Mekong sub region, on some thematic issues, these can be and are being adequately addressed from Bangkok.
2 9.1.2 APRC DG should continue both its current roles: providing advisory and technical support services to country offices and providing regional public goods and services (building partnerships, promoting regional capacity building initiatives, knowledge products etc) since both are valued by COs and key stakeholders. However, the regional centre should become stronger as a ?centre of excellence? for regional knowledge management in thematic areas where UNDP?s comparative advantages (e.g. neutrality, ?trusted partner? of government, honest broker) can be put to benefit. Good examples are human rights, anti-corruption and aid effectiveness. This would bring a more even balance between APRC DG?s two roles than the present 70/30 emphasis on advisory services and technical support over regional public goods. Over-emphasis on the provision of advisory services to COs risks the loss of the institutional knowledge that is captured through effective knowledge management endeavours at the regional level.
3 9.1.3 Consistent with Rio+20 objectives, in terms of target groups the APRC DG programme should continue to focus on expanding human development opportunities for marginalised populations ? the poor, women, indigenous peoples and youth. Although there is reference to youth in the current programme, this group is not receiving the attention it warrants given the strong focus on youth in countries like Cambodia, Myanmar etc.). The emphasis on supporting MDG acceleration or its Rio+20 successors should also be maintained.
4 9.1.4 Advisory and other capacity building support should be provided in a continuous and reiterative way (as opposed to one-off or ad hoc activities) with a deliberate follow-up strategy. In this role, APRC would carry out more comparative policy research and studies, more systematic extraction and publication of best practices, publish more accessible materials such as fast factsheets, maintain a more robust roster of high quality experts and consultants and improve the dynamism and interactive role of the various COPs.
5 9.1.5 The APRC DG team should review the current thematic areas to determine the real advantages of addressing particular themes at the regional level (as opposed to the country level). A number of recent evaluations have concluded that regional programmes, including the APRC?s programme, are spread too thin. This may involve refining the Guiding Principles established by the COs which now have greater access to information and expertise through the internet, digital networks etc. Similar comments were made by COs and other stakeholders for the current evaluation. While this evaluation might still result in most of the current thematic areas being retained, it is not recommended that Public Administration Reform be continued. In the past, this been attached to the anti-corruption adviser?s role but there has been little demand, despite (or perhaps as a result of) several COs having PAR programmes. The two themes scoring lowest in the on-line survey were development aid effectiveness and climate change financing; and e-governance, access to information and media development. We would expect these to be retained despite their relatively low rating by COs. They are more innovative, at least some have more relevance at the regional level, and others, like access to information are important for other themes such as corruption.
6 9.1.6 Potential new themes proposed by COs in the on-line survey included the following: ? Governance and environment ? Governance and gender ? Inclusive democratic governance/rights-based/governance to address inequalities ? REDD and anti-corruption ? Security sector reform ? Poverty reduction ? Governance and crisis prevention/post-crisis ? Governance and disaster prevention/management ? Access to information A number of these issues are already being addressed in the regional programme, but the list demonstrates the cross-cutting nature of governance. Many of these themes are being or can be addressed through more-cross-practice collaboration ? see below.
7 9.2 Partnership A more deliberate approach should be taken to strengthening partnerships across the region and globally. Partnerships enhance sustainability and the APRC DG team has developed an impressive array of partnerships across all its service lines within and beyond the UN family. Inside the region, there are some formal partnerships ? for example, the Capacity Assessment initiative on NHRI capacity self-assessments (APRC DG, APF, OHCHR) and the Pacific Centre?s on-going relationship with the PFIS ? and even more close working relationships, many of them built on individual relationships. Despite a range of agreements at the global level that encourage co-operation among, for example, UN agencies, and these being translated into ?values? for working at the regional level (?One UN? for example, or the MOU between UNDP and UNODC) the business models adopted by many agencies tend to result in cooperation being compromised by self-interest, ?brand? and ?patch? protection. When the team begins addressing a particular thematic area, a broad ?mapping exercise? should be carried out of the different potential partners (UN, development banks, bilateral agencies, civil society, regional networks, regional institutions) and networks working in the same area and formal strategic decisions be taken to identify which of these partnerships APRC DG should pursue for collaboration. At the regional level, it is at the same time easier and more necessary to work through partnerships and the APRC has everything to gain from expanding these and building on the ?soft leadership? it is already demonstrating. In Asia, more effort needs to be made to build up stronger partnerships with regional institutions such as ESCAP, ASEAN and SAARC. In a regional of expanding economies, some of them very large, there is significant resource mobilisation potential in strengthening regional partnerships ? which can go some way to offset the global reduction in resources being made available to multi-lateral organisations. Cooperation is more difficult at the global level (as the development of separate anti-corruption web portals by UNDP and UNODC, despite a MOU agreeing to build on their complementarity, demonstrates). All current initiatives should also be reviewed for the potential to co-operate with other stakeholders, including with those that are currently resistant to collaboration, in particular to move beyond information-sharing to programme co-operation.
8 9.3 Cross-Practice Collaboration There should be more emphasis on collaboration among APRC practices, led by the DG team. COs emphasised their need for multi-faceted advice for the development issues they are addressing and often may consult two or more APRC teams at one time. AGRP II emphasises integrated approaches, Although the practice teams report independently, there is increasing recognition of the need to work across teams (for example, in the 2012 Workplan), although this is not entirely new ? for example, the co-operation between the DG and Poverty teams in developing the 2008 resource ?Tackling Corruption, Transforming Lives? which has a strong poverty focus as a result. Essentially, democratic governance is cross-cutting for all other practices. Initiatives to reduce poverty and improve the environment will not be sustainable without the democratic institutions and systems to sustain them and effective monitoring by civil society. Equally, the containing the spread of HIV/AIDs and reducing its impact depends on adequate protection of the rights of people living with AIDS, women, and vulnerable populations. There is already a degree of cooperation across teams (described as ?interacting?) ? but no one team is accountable for ensuring that democratic governance principles and practices are addressed in the initiatives of other APRC practices. The DG team should formally assume this responsibility to maximise the synergies between DG interventions and the other components of the Regional Programme Document.
9 9.4 Gender Future joint work between the DG and gender teams should increasingly focus on the upstream, policy and political levels, where UNDP has a comparative advantage. There needs to be more systematic cross-practice interaction between DG and gender teams. The Six-Point Action Plan on Expanding Women?s Empowerment provides the opportunity for this, as does the next the Regional Human Development Report and other regional comparative studies. The gender team should be resourced to provide training in gender mainstreaming to all the thematic clusters in the APRC. Regarding CO support, efforts should be made to group gender mainstreaming training requests. A ?training of trainers approach? should be applied to improve sustainability so that CO staff themselves can take responsibility for future in-country training occurs at least yearly.
10 9.5 Case Studies 9.5.1 Human Rights (NHRI capacity self-assessments) The independent review of the capacity assessment process should examine: ? The need for an exit strategy; ? A more formalised follow-up process; ? Linkages between the APF and NANHRI processes(including merging the two processes to develop a global model for NHRI capacity self-assessments). The Universal Periodic Review should receive more attention as an effective vehicle for engagement with national authorities to advance human rights.
11 9.5.2 Anti-corruption Follow-up of regional events should be formalised as APRC DG practice and indicators developed accordingly. More specific indicators should be developed for the Outcomes. However, it is rarely possible to design as specific indicators as have been developed for anti-corruption initiatives, which involve normative activities. Efforts should be made to move co-operation with key partners in the region, particularly IFIs such as the World Bank, beyond information sharing to joint action. This is likely to be more achievable at the regional level, where closer relationships exist, than at the global level. In the case of the World Bank, this would likely first involve the development of an MOU at the global level.
12 9.5.3 Aid Effectiveness CDDE should build on its highly innovative work in this area and continue to ensure that its regional approach is embedded in a global or international framework that sets international principles, norms and standards for engagement and actions. A regional approach that is country demand-driven will ensure a higher level of political commitment, ownership and generates greater chances for sustainability. Increased engagement at the political level ? parliamentarians, politicians, high-level decision-makers, etc is likely to improve the impact of the CDDE facility?s work. There is a need to build alliances and networks with emerging MICs (e.g. India, China, South Korea), given the emerging new context for development cooperation in the Asia-Pacific region. Since UNDP will now be co-organising the high-level forum process with OECD/DAC, UNDP corporate should make concerted efforts to ensure long-term funding support of the CDDE facility. The CDDE model that provides a menu of service lines ? peer-to-peer learning exchanges, analytical work, guides and tool kits, capacity development support, e-knowledge exchanges and platforms has proved highly appropriate to COs? needs and warrants examination by other thematic and practice areas.
13 9.6 Regional Programme on Indigenous Peoples Rights and Development (RIPP) Assuming that it is not now realistic to reinstate RIPP itself, further work on IPs should be part of a substantial regional programme with adequate funding and human resources ? not a ?piecemeal approach? ? and including the development of a mainstreaming mechanism. One of the greatest challenges for the Asia-Pacific region in coming decades will be to pursue equitable and sustainable economic growth that will benefit all population groups, especially the most vulnerable. There is a strong rationale for APRC to continue raising awareness about and to support programmes that will benefit marginalised populations, especially the poorest, IPs, women and, youth. If this is not feasible, IP rights should be incorporated into the Human Rights thematic area ? and the new human rights and justice adviser should have expertise in this area. Any future regional work on IPs should build a deeper engagement with government policy-and decision-makers and given likely resource constraints, work needs to concentrate on regional interventions and activities. Finally, any future work on IPs needs to strengthen and expand partnerships with other UN agencies, development partners, CSO networks, not only for resource mobilisation purposes, but also for synergy, coordination, wider impact and greater visibility.
14 9.7 Modality for Delivering Services to COs 9.7.1 The RPDG should continue to offer a menu of modalities for delivering its technical and other advisory, capacity building and knowledge management services - through its technical advisers, its regional and south-south training/exchange activities, its facilitation of COPs and other virtual networks, and its generation of knowledge products. This will allow COs to select the intervention that best suits their country context.
15 9.7.2 To strengthen the responsiveness of advisory services and to support the COPs and e-networks, it is proposed that the thematic team includes one senior adviser (as it is now) and a junior programme specialist. The two reasons for this recommendation are, first, that some CO staff expressed concern about the availability of RPDG advisers, mentioning how ?busy? they seem to be and ?how much they travel?. Secondly, several CO staff also mentioned the need to make the COPs and e-networks more effective and interactive as a key component of the RPDG?s regional knowledge management function. Given the current funding limitations, such a junior specialist should have a strong communications background and experience in the use of social media, and could be recruited from the JPO or UNV schemes.
16 9.7.3 It would be advantageous for advisers to have some programme or project implementation experience. Several CO staff considered that this would improve the applicability of the advice they receive.
17 9.7.4 Consideration should also be given to increasing the translation of resources into regional languages ? Chinese, Hindi, Bahasa, Vietnamese, Urdu etc.
1. Recommendation: 9.1 ?Regionality? 9.1.1 The current regional architecture (a regional office in Bangkok with a Sub-Regional Centre in Suva) should be retained. Although some of those consulted argued for other sub-regional centres (eg SAARC, ASEAN) to be established on the Pacific Centre model, the Pacific context (very low population bases, cultural, political and environmental similarities) is very different from Asia. Although there is a need for attention to be focussed at the sub-regional level, including the greater Mekong sub region, on some thematic issues, these can be and are being adequately addressed from Bangkok.
Management Response: [Added: 2014/02/27]

Accepted. UNDP has maintained the current regional architecture ? having one regional centre to cover the Asian region; and one regional centre to cover the Pacific region. The Regional Centre in Bangkok continues to engage with ASEAN and SAARC, the Regional Centre in Suva works closely with key Pacific Island regional organizations. The same architecture will be used for the new Regional Programme (2014-2017).

Key Actions:

2. Recommendation: 9.1.2 APRC DG should continue both its current roles: providing advisory and technical support services to country offices and providing regional public goods and services (building partnerships, promoting regional capacity building initiatives, knowledge products etc) since both are valued by COs and key stakeholders. However, the regional centre should become stronger as a ?centre of excellence? for regional knowledge management in thematic areas where UNDP?s comparative advantages (e.g. neutrality, ?trusted partner? of government, honest broker) can be put to benefit. Good examples are human rights, anti-corruption and aid effectiveness. This would bring a more even balance between APRC DG?s two roles than the present 70/30 emphasis on advisory services and technical support over regional public goods. Over-emphasis on the provision of advisory services to COs risks the loss of the institutional knowledge that is captured through effective knowledge management endeavours at the regional level.
Management Response: [Added: 2014/02/27]

Partially accepted. Under the new Regional Programme, APRC DG will continue to balance their roles between providing advisory and technical support services to country offices and providing regional public goods and services. Both roles are equally important, especially in view of the fact that development results take place at the country level and that with shrinking financial and human resources at the country offices, the Regional Centres will have to play even more strategic roles in filling the technical gaps at the country offices. On becoming stronger as a ?centre of excellence? for regional knowledge management, this aspect has been well-recognized and featured quite prominently in the new Regional Programme Document. Knowledge management and innovation is a key aspect of UNDP work at the regional level.

Key Actions:

3. Recommendation: 9.1.3 Consistent with Rio+20 objectives, in terms of target groups the APRC DG programme should continue to focus on expanding human development opportunities for marginalised populations ? the poor, women, indigenous peoples and youth. Although there is reference to youth in the current programme, this group is not receiving the attention it warrants given the strong focus on youth in countries like Cambodia, Myanmar etc.). The emphasis on supporting MDG acceleration or its Rio+20 successors should also be maintained.
Management Response: [Added: 2014/02/27]

Accepted. UNDP continues to focus its work on marginalized populations. Its new Strategic Plan (2014-2017) explicitly spells out specific population groups on which UNDP will place particular emphasis: 1) those who are living in poverty and 2) those who are experiencing the greatest inequalities and exclusion especially women, female-headed households, and youth. This approach is also reflected in the new Asia-Pacific Regional Programme (2014-2017). Particularly for APRC DG, its strategy recognizes that deepening democratic governance across the region will require addressing issues of voice and accountability for women and excluded groups including youth. On specific governance-related issues, APRC DG will work with the excluded groups including in the areas of inclusive decision-making and transparency, revenue management, extractive resource management, access to justice, legal and administrative reforms, human rights, gender-based violence, and service delivery.

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
Ensure targeting of excluded groups in the new RPD
[Added: 2014/02/27]
Democratic Governance Team 2014/01 Completed
4. Recommendation: 9.1.4 Advisory and other capacity building support should be provided in a continuous and reiterative way (as opposed to one-off or ad hoc activities) with a deliberate follow-up strategy. In this role, APRC would carry out more comparative policy research and studies, more systematic extraction and publication of best practices, publish more accessible materials such as fast factsheets, maintain a more robust roster of high quality experts and consultants and improve the dynamism and interactive role of the various COPs.
Management Response: [Added: 2014/02/27]

Accepted. This is in line with APRC?s strategy on knowledge management and innovation under the new Regional Programme. APRC DG will pay particular attention to the development and promotion of best practice standards within and across the regions related to enabling equitable, accountable and effective service delivery to excluded groups and, in particular, to people living with HIV and those affected by HIV. It will strengthen regional collaboration and exchange of experience on governance and management of extractive industries, especially with regard to impact assessments; inclusive decision-making and transparency; and revenue management (the use of revenues and distribution of benefits and economic diversification strategies to generate employment and livelihood opportunities for the poor, including indigenous peoples and other excluded groups). By compiling and sharing regional and global best practices, it will help countries in the region to address more effectively the challenges and potential benefits of well-managed extractive resource development. Using regional networks, it will document good experiences and promote transparent and accountable negotiations, in collaboration, for example, with the ASEAN Minerals Cooperation Action Plan process.

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
Identify key themes for the comparative policy research and study through on-going operationalization of the new RPD and a series of discussions with APRC management board (Nov 2013 and March 2014). Through the process of the APRC realignment, capacity development skills were ensured across all advisors in the APRC.
[Added: 2014/02/27] [Last Updated: 2017/12/27]
Democratic Governance team 2015/12 No Longer Applicable [Justification: Project ended]
History
5. Recommendation: 9.1.5 The APRC DG team should review the current thematic areas to determine the real advantages of addressing particular themes at the regional level (as opposed to the country level). A number of recent evaluations have concluded that regional programmes, including the APRC?s programme, are spread too thin. This may involve refining the Guiding Principles established by the COs which now have greater access to information and expertise through the internet, digital networks etc. Similar comments were made by COs and other stakeholders for the current evaluation. While this evaluation might still result in most of the current thematic areas being retained, it is not recommended that Public Administration Reform be continued. In the past, this been attached to the anti-corruption adviser?s role but there has been little demand, despite (or perhaps as a result of) several COs having PAR programmes. The two themes scoring lowest in the on-line survey were development aid effectiveness and climate change financing; and e-governance, access to information and media development. We would expect these to be retained despite their relatively low rating by COs. They are more innovative, at least some have more relevance at the regional level, and others, like access to information are important for other themes such as corruption.
Management Response: [Added: 2014/02/27]

Partially accepted. The areas for APRC DG to focus on in the new Regional Programme have been carefully strategized taking into account the development needs in the region, demands from UNDP country offices and governments, comparative strengths of the Regional Centres, and lessons from the past. Given its comparative advantage, the Regional Centre will be both demand- and supply-driven bearing in mind that it should be in a position to take the lead in advancing awareness, dialogue, and action on sensitive and/or emerging development issues, which may not yet become demands from countries.

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
Review the CO demands and requests as the basis to drive establishment of the right balance between the truly regional and multi-country initiatives. The first round of prioritisation took place at the stage of RPD formulation. On annual basis, this will be reassessed and determined through the CO engagement calls.
[Added: 2014/02/27]
Democratic Governance Team 2014/02 Completed
6. Recommendation: 9.1.6 Potential new themes proposed by COs in the on-line survey included the following: ? Governance and environment ? Governance and gender ? Inclusive democratic governance/rights-based/governance to address inequalities ? REDD and anti-corruption ? Security sector reform ? Poverty reduction ? Governance and crisis prevention/post-crisis ? Governance and disaster prevention/management ? Access to information A number of these issues are already being addressed in the regional programme, but the list demonstrates the cross-cutting nature of governance. Many of these themes are being or can be addressed through more-cross-practice collaboration ? see below.
Management Response: [Added: 2014/02/27]

Accepted. Under the new Regional Programme (and also the new Strategic Plan), APRC adopts an issue-based approach (as opposed to practice-based approach), which will foster cross-practice interventions.

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
Include these to the extent possible in the new RPD.
[Added: 2014/02/27]
Democratic Governance Team 2014/01 Completed
7. Recommendation: 9.2 Partnership A more deliberate approach should be taken to strengthening partnerships across the region and globally. Partnerships enhance sustainability and the APRC DG team has developed an impressive array of partnerships across all its service lines within and beyond the UN family. Inside the region, there are some formal partnerships ? for example, the Capacity Assessment initiative on NHRI capacity self-assessments (APRC DG, APF, OHCHR) and the Pacific Centre?s on-going relationship with the PFIS ? and even more close working relationships, many of them built on individual relationships. Despite a range of agreements at the global level that encourage co-operation among, for example, UN agencies, and these being translated into ?values? for working at the regional level (?One UN? for example, or the MOU between UNDP and UNODC) the business models adopted by many agencies tend to result in cooperation being compromised by self-interest, ?brand? and ?patch? protection. When the team begins addressing a particular thematic area, a broad ?mapping exercise? should be carried out of the different potential partners (UN, development banks, bilateral agencies, civil society, regional networks, regional institutions) and networks working in the same area and formal strategic decisions be taken to identify which of these partnerships APRC DG should pursue for collaboration. At the regional level, it is at the same time easier and more necessary to work through partnerships and the APRC has everything to gain from expanding these and building on the ?soft leadership? it is already demonstrating. In Asia, more effort needs to be made to build up stronger partnerships with regional institutions such as ESCAP, ASEAN and SAARC. In a regional of expanding economies, some of them very large, there is significant resource mobilisation potential in strengthening regional partnerships ? which can go some way to offset the global reduction in resources being made available to multi-lateral organisations. Cooperation is more difficult at the global level (as the development of separate anti-corruption web portals by UNDP and UNODC, despite a MOU agreeing to build on their complementarity, demonstrates). All current initiatives should also be reviewed for the potential to co-operate with other stakeholders, including with those that are currently resistant to collaboration, in particular to move beyond information-sharing to programme co-operation.
Management Response: [Added: 2014/02/27]

Accepted. Under the new regional programme, APRC will nurture longstanding partnership with regional and sub-regional intergovernmental institutions, namely SAARC, ASEAN, Pacific Islands Forum, and Secretariat of the Pacific Community. It will explore new partnerships with other relevant regional and sub-regional organizations such as the Pacific Islands Development Forum and the Bay of Bengal Initiative for Multi-Sectoral Technical and Economic Cooperation. APRC is also developing strategic partnerships with several programme countries ? initially China, India and Indonesia ? which plan to work with the United Nations beyond their own immediate development needs to share experience and promote supportive collaboration with other programme countries.

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
Conduct a comprehensive mapping of key partners
[Added: 2014/02/27] [Last Updated: 2017/12/27]
Democratic Governance Team 2014/06 No Longer Applicable [Justification: Project ended]
History
8. Recommendation: 9.3 Cross-Practice Collaboration There should be more emphasis on collaboration among APRC practices, led by the DG team. COs emphasised their need for multi-faceted advice for the development issues they are addressing and often may consult two or more APRC teams at one time. AGRP II emphasises integrated approaches, Although the practice teams report independently, there is increasing recognition of the need to work across teams (for example, in the 2012 Workplan), although this is not entirely new ? for example, the co-operation between the DG and Poverty teams in developing the 2008 resource ?Tackling Corruption, Transforming Lives? which has a strong poverty focus as a result. Essentially, democratic governance is cross-cutting for all other practices. Initiatives to reduce poverty and improve the environment will not be sustainable without the democratic institutions and systems to sustain them and effective monitoring by civil society. Equally, the containing the spread of HIV/AIDs and reducing its impact depends on adequate protection of the rights of people living with AIDS, women, and vulnerable populations. There is already a degree of cooperation across teams (described as ?interacting?) ? but no one team is accountable for ensuring that democratic governance principles and practices are addressed in the initiatives of other APRC practices. The DG team should formally assume this responsibility to maximise the synergies between DG interventions and the other components of the Regional Programme Document.
Management Response: [Added: 2014/02/27]

Accepted. Under the new Regional Programme (and also the new Strategic Plan), APRC adopts an issue-based approach (as opposed to practice-based approach), which will foster cross-practice interventions. New cross-practice collaboration arrangements will be explored. This includes the use of ?Development Solution Teams,? a revamped version of existing substantive ?cross-practice tasks teams? to include an appropriate management and governance structure that will allow for more systematic establishment, monitoring, and implementation of initiatives.

Key Actions:

9. Recommendation: 9.4 Gender Future joint work between the DG and gender teams should increasingly focus on the upstream, policy and political levels, where UNDP has a comparative advantage. There needs to be more systematic cross-practice interaction between DG and gender teams. The Six-Point Action Plan on Expanding Women?s Empowerment provides the opportunity for this, as does the next the Regional Human Development Report and other regional comparative studies. The gender team should be resourced to provide training in gender mainstreaming to all the thematic clusters in the APRC. Regarding CO support, efforts should be made to group gender mainstreaming training requests. A ?training of trainers approach? should be applied to improve sustainability so that CO staff themselves can take responsibility for future in-country training occurs at least yearly.
Management Response: [Added: 2014/02/27]

Accepted. APRC DG will continue to work on promoting women?s leadership and women?s political participation in public office. As previously mentioned, women and other excluded populations will be the main focus for APRC under the new Regional Programme.

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
Incorporate the above-mentioned issues in the new RPD
[Added: 2014/02/27]
Democratic Governance Team 2014/01 Completed
10. Recommendation: 9.5 Case Studies 9.5.1 Human Rights (NHRI capacity self-assessments) The independent review of the capacity assessment process should examine: ? The need for an exit strategy; ? A more formalised follow-up process; ? Linkages between the APF and NANHRI processes(including merging the two processes to develop a global model for NHRI capacity self-assessments). The Universal Periodic Review should receive more attention as an effective vehicle for engagement with national authorities to advance human rights.
Management Response: [Added: 2014/02/27]

Accepted.

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
Further examine the areas suggested and incorporate in the regional project document(s)
[Added: 2014/02/27] [Last Updated: 2017/12/27]
Democratic Governance Team 2014/07 Completed Youth, SDGs Localisation and Financing for SDGs are now included in the RPD 2018-2021. History
11. Recommendation: 9.5.2 Anti-corruption Follow-up of regional events should be formalised as APRC DG practice and indicators developed accordingly. More specific indicators should be developed for the Outcomes. However, it is rarely possible to design as specific indicators as have been developed for anti-corruption initiatives, which involve normative activities. Efforts should be made to move co-operation with key partners in the region, particularly IFIs such as the World Bank, beyond information sharing to joint action. This is likely to be more achievable at the regional level, where closer relationships exist, than at the global level. In the case of the World Bank, this would likely first involve the development of an MOU at the global level.
Management Response: [Added: 2014/02/27]

Accepted.

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
Actively explore the opportunities for a more strategic and systematic cooperation with IFIs in the areas of joint interest; in particular with ADB-OECD anti-corruption initiative. A more systematic approach will be also ensured by the arrival of the new regional anti-corruption advisor in November 2013.
[Added: 2014/02/27]
Democratic Governance Team 2014/01 Completed
12. Recommendation: 9.5.3 Aid Effectiveness CDDE should build on its highly innovative work in this area and continue to ensure that its regional approach is embedded in a global or international framework that sets international principles, norms and standards for engagement and actions. A regional approach that is country demand-driven will ensure a higher level of political commitment, ownership and generates greater chances for sustainability. Increased engagement at the political level ? parliamentarians, politicians, high-level decision-makers, etc is likely to improve the impact of the CDDE facility?s work. There is a need to build alliances and networks with emerging MICs (e.g. India, China, South Korea), given the emerging new context for development cooperation in the Asia-Pacific region. Since UNDP will now be co-organising the high-level forum process with OECD/DAC, UNDP corporate should make concerted efforts to ensure long-term funding support of the CDDE facility. The CDDE model that provides a menu of service lines ? peer-to-peer learning exchanges, analytical work, guides and tool kits, capacity development support, e-knowledge exchanges and platforms has proved highly appropriate to COs? needs and warrants examination by other thematic and practice areas.
Management Response: [Added: 2014/02/27]

Partially accepted. In the currently financially constrained environment, UNDP is not in a position to increase its funding for this initiative. Nevertheless, it will take active steps to mobilise external resources to fund the facility.

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
Continue resource mobilisation efforts and include the proposal among the APRC resource mobilisation pipeline.
[Added: 2014/02/27] [Last Updated: 2017/12/27]
Democratic Governance Team 2014/06 Completed History
13. Recommendation: 9.6 Regional Programme on Indigenous Peoples Rights and Development (RIPP) Assuming that it is not now realistic to reinstate RIPP itself, further work on IPs should be part of a substantial regional programme with adequate funding and human resources ? not a ?piecemeal approach? ? and including the development of a mainstreaming mechanism. One of the greatest challenges for the Asia-Pacific region in coming decades will be to pursue equitable and sustainable economic growth that will benefit all population groups, especially the most vulnerable. There is a strong rationale for APRC to continue raising awareness about and to support programmes that will benefit marginalised populations, especially the poorest, IPs, women and, youth. If this is not feasible, IP rights should be incorporated into the Human Rights thematic area ? and the new human rights and justice adviser should have expertise in this area. Any future regional work on IPs should build a deeper engagement with government policy-and decision-makers and given likely resource constraints, work needs to concentrate on regional interventions and activities. Finally, any future work on IPs needs to strengthen and expand partnerships with other UN agencies, development partners, CSO networks, not only for resource mobilisation purposes, but also for synergy, coordination, wider impact and greater visibility.
Management Response: [Added: 2014/02/27]

Accepted.

Key Actions:

14. Recommendation: 9.7 Modality for Delivering Services to COs 9.7.1 The RPDG should continue to offer a menu of modalities for delivering its technical and other advisory, capacity building and knowledge management services - through its technical advisers, its regional and south-south training/exchange activities, its facilitation of COPs and other virtual networks, and its generation of knowledge products. This will allow COs to select the intervention that best suits their country context.
Management Response: [Added: 2014/02/27]

Accepted. APRC already has a list of ?service lines?. With the new Regional Programme and changing development landscape, it will re-examine and revise the service lines as needed.

Key Actions:

15. Recommendation: 9.7.2 To strengthen the responsiveness of advisory services and to support the COPs and e-networks, it is proposed that the thematic team includes one senior adviser (as it is now) and a junior programme specialist. The two reasons for this recommendation are, first, that some CO staff expressed concern about the availability of RPDG advisers, mentioning how ?busy? they seem to be and ?how much they travel?. Secondly, several CO staff also mentioned the need to make the COPs and e-networks more effective and interactive as a key component of the RPDG?s regional knowledge management function. Given the current funding limitations, such a junior specialist should have a strong communications background and experience in the use of social media, and could be recruited from the JPO or UNV schemes.
Management Response: [Added: 2014/02/27]

Partially accepted.

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
Evaluate APRC?s approach to COPs across the board, and propose adjustments, including resources.
[Added: 2014/02/27] [Last Updated: 2017/12/27]
APRC 2014/06 Completed History
16. Recommendation: 9.7.3 It would be advantageous for advisers to have some programme or project implementation experience. Several CO staff considered that this would improve the applicability of the advice they receive.
Management Response: [Added: 2014/02/27]

Accepted.

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
The right skillset of the advisors will be addressed through the APRC realignment exercise.
[Added: 2014/02/27]
RBAP/APRC 2014/01 Completed
17. Recommendation: 9.7.4 Consideration should also be given to increasing the translation of resources into regional languages ? Chinese, Hindi, Bahasa, Vietnamese, Urdu etc.
Management Response: [Added: 2014/02/27]

Accepted.

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
Establish a translation fund, allowing COs to translate key materials into the local languages
[Added: 2014/02/27]
RBAP 2014/01 Completed

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