Terminal Evaluation of 'Nagaland Sustainable Land and Ecocystem Management'

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Evaluation Plan:
2013-2017, India
Evaluation Type:
Final Project
Planned End Date:
10/2015
Completion Date:
03/2016
Status:
Completed
Management Response:
Yes
Evaluation Budget(US $):
20,000

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Title Terminal Evaluation of 'Nagaland Sustainable Land and Ecocystem Management'
Atlas Project Number:
Evaluation Plan: 2013-2017, India
Evaluation Type: Final Project
Status: Completed
Completion Date: 03/2016
Planned End Date: 10/2015
Management Response: Yes
Focus Area:
  • 1. Others
Corporate Outcome and Output (UNDP Strategic Plan 2014-2017)
  • 1. Output 5.5. Policy frameworks and institutional mechanisms enabled at the national and sub-national levels for the peaceful management of emerging and recurring conflicts and tensions
Evaluation Budget(US $): 20,000
Source of Funding:
Evaluation Expenditure(US $): 20,000
Joint Programme: No
Joint Evaluation: No
Evaluation Team members:
Name Title Email Nationality
J B Green Mr.
Joy Dasgupta Mr. INDIA
GEF Evaluation: Yes
GEF Project Title:
Evaluation Type: Terminal Evaluation
Focal Area: Land Degradation
Project Type: FSP
GEF Phase: GEF-4
GEF Project ID: 3469
PIMS Number: 4073
Key Stakeholders:
Countries: INDIA
Lessons
1.

The North Eastern Region (NER) of India, within which lies Nagaland, is endowed with high plant and animal species diversity and endemism due to its location that embraces the confluence of the Indo-China, Indo-Myanmar and Indian biogeographical zones. It forms part of the Indo-Burma hotspot, one of 34 globally important centres of biodiversity. 73% of the population is engaged in agriculture and, being largely tribal, the production system retains traditional proto-agricultural practices of assisting the growth of wild plants. Shifting cultivation, locally known as jhum cultivation, continues to dominate agricultural practices in Nagaland and covers approximately 917,087 hectares (55% of total land area) and involves some 116,050 families. The annual cultivated area under jhum is 131,349 hectares (8% of total land area), which alone accounts for 59% of the total net cultivated area. The basic principle of jhum cultivation is the alternation of short cropping phases (usually of one or two years’ duration) with phases of natural (or slightly modified) fallow vegetation


Findings
1.

While jhum is the socially preferred practice in the region and often the most suitable form of agriculture for the agro-climatic conditions and steep terrain, changing socio-economic scenarios are resulting in an increasing area of land being brought under jhum within a shortened rotational cycle. At any given time, it is estimated that one-sixth of total jhum land is under cultivation. The jhum cycle that was once 14 years or more has been reduced to 6 years or less in many places, leaving insufficient time for regeneration and resulting in accelerated soil erosion and disruption of the hydrology of the area. It is estimated that 70% of topsoil loss, land degradation and water source deterioration is attributable to the practice of shifting cultivation. This system of cultivation coupled with high rainfall causes heavy erosion to the extent of removing up to 40 tonnes of top soil per hectare per year.

 

The terminal evaluation evaluated the project as Satisfactory/Moderately Satisfactory with respect to the achievement of its objective


Recommendations
1

Continue to provide technical support to existing target villages to enable them to monitor and deliver their LUPs and action plans

2

The policy and regulatory framework in support of jhum agroforestry is in the process of being established, following pioneering inputs from the project, and needs to be fast tracked by government so that the enabling environment is in place ahead of mainstreaming

3

Building on the establishment of multi-sector district platforms for improved planning and management of jhum lands for provisioning of ecosystem services to benefit local livelihoods, public welfare and biodiversity, establish equivalent platforms at the level of Community Development Blocks on which LUCs are to be represented. This completes the infrastructure necessary for subsequent mainstreaming of jhum agroforestry

4

Comprehensively document the project’s experience, providing guidelines on the concept, policies and practices for improvement of jhum agroforestry systems within an ecosystem services and landscape context, and translate them into relevant tribal languages. Distribute widely using multi-media, including the project’s website currently hosted by UNDP

5

The role of selected farm schools/demonstrations (at least one per district) will be enhanced and include monitoring and experimental research functions to complement their educational/demonstration role. Such research will validate and enhance improvements in jhum agroforestry through monitoring and experiment in the field (jhum lands). UNDP is encouraged to introduce reflective practice into these farm schools, both for their own benefit and also for them to use as a tool with visiting LUCs and jhumias to train others in such good practice

6

Pilot the organisation of producer companies, one per district, to realise the high potential for marketing such products as ginger, cardamom, Naga chilli and vegetables, as recommended in the 2014 Market Development Assessment for Organic Agri-Horticultural Produce commissioned by the project. Focus on securing higher returns by setting up sorting, processing, packaging and marketing (including branding) systems in consultation with the Central Institute of Horticulture (CIH), School of Agricultural Sciences (SASRD) and the Agricultural Department.

7

Establish participatory monitoring systems for village jhum lands that are compatible with their respective LUPs and associated action plans. These should be based on a common framework with a view to being maintained in a centralised database system for maintaining an overview at block and district levels.

1. Recommendation:

Continue to provide technical support to existing target villages to enable them to monitor and deliver their LUPs and action plans

Management Response: [Added: 2016/09/07]

Noted. The technical support to the project villages will continue in the second phase of the project. Some components of the project will be scaled up or replicated to other districts during this phase.

Key Actions:

2. Recommendation:

The policy and regulatory framework in support of jhum agroforestry is in the process of being established, following pioneering inputs from the project, and needs to be fast tracked by government so that the enabling environment is in place ahead of mainstreaming

Management Response: [Added: 2016/09/07]

A legal firm was contracted to carry out a legal and policy analysis study during the project and the report and the recommendation have already been shared with the state government. Based on the recommendation, a draft land use policy has already been prepared and shared with the state government for comments.

Key Actions:

3. Recommendation:

Building on the establishment of multi-sector district platforms for improved planning and management of jhum lands for provisioning of ecosystem services to benefit local livelihoods, public welfare and biodiversity, establish equivalent platforms at the level of Community Development Blocks on which LUCs are to be represented. This completes the infrastructure necessary for subsequent mainstreaming of jhum agroforestry

Management Response: [Added: 2016/09/07]

Noted and recommended to the state government for the next phase of the project. This has been initiated under the leadership of the Agriculture Production Commissioner in the state who is overall in-charge of all agriculture and allied departments in the state

Key Actions:

4. Recommendation:

Comprehensively document the project’s experience, providing guidelines on the concept, policies and practices for improvement of jhum agroforestry systems within an ecosystem services and landscape context, and translate them into relevant tribal languages. Distribute widely using multi-media, including the project’s website currently hosted by UNDP

Management Response: [Added: 2016/09/07]

Noted for the next phase. This has been included in the Annual Work Plan of 2016. An expert will be hired for carrying out the comprehensive documentation in the next phase. Some documentation has already been completed. Lessons learnt from project have been included in curriculum of Zubza training centre. Manuals on PLUP have also been produced. All reports and manuals are already up on the UNDP project website.

Key Actions:

5. Recommendation:

The role of selected farm schools/demonstrations (at least one per district) will be enhanced and include monitoring and experimental research functions to complement their educational/demonstration role. Such research will validate and enhance improvements in jhum agroforestry through monitoring and experiment in the field (jhum lands). UNDP is encouraged to introduce reflective practice into these farm schools, both for their own benefit and also for them to use as a tool with visiting LUCs and jhumias to train others in such good practice

Management Response: [Added: 2016/09/07]

Noted and will be strengthened further in the next phase of the project. Same has been included in the Annual Work Plan of 2016.

There exists a collaboration with the project and the ATMAs which run the farm schools in the districts. This collaboration will be further strengthened and the farm schools used as best practice demonstration units within the state.

Key Actions:

6. Recommendation:

Pilot the organisation of producer companies, one per district, to realise the high potential for marketing such products as ginger, cardamom, Naga chilli and vegetables, as recommended in the 2014 Market Development Assessment for Organic Agri-Horticultural Produce commissioned by the project. Focus on securing higher returns by setting up sorting, processing, packaging and marketing (including branding) systems in consultation with the Central Institute of Horticulture (CIH), School of Agricultural Sciences (SASRD) and the Agricultural Department.

Management Response: [Added: 2016/09/07]

Noted. The market survey report was presented and submitted to the state government and recommendations for strengthening market linkages were provided. Marketing of agri-farm produce will be a key focus of the project in 2016, as has been indicated in the Annual Work Plan

Key Actions:

7. Recommendation:

Establish participatory monitoring systems for village jhum lands that are compatible with their respective LUPs and associated action plans. These should be based on a common framework with a view to being maintained in a centralised database system for maintaining an overview at block and district levels.

Management Response: [Added: 2016/09/07]

Noted and recommendations to be shared with the state government for the next phase of the project.

Key Actions:

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