FINAL EVALUATION OF THE “JOINT PROGRAM ON SUPPORT TO MINISTRY OF DISASTER MANAGEMENT AND REFUGEE (MIDIMAR)”

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Evaluation Plan:
2013-2018, Rwanda
Evaluation Type:
Final Project
Planned End Date:
07/2018
Completion Date:
05/2018
Status:
Completed
Management Response:
Yes
Evaluation Budget(US $):
50,000

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Title FINAL EVALUATION OF THE “JOINT PROGRAM ON SUPPORT TO MINISTRY OF DISASTER MANAGEMENT AND REFUGEE (MIDIMAR)”
Atlas Project Number: 00075418
Evaluation Plan: 2013-2018, Rwanda
Evaluation Type: Final Project
Status: Completed
Completion Date: 05/2018
Planned End Date: 07/2018
Management Response: Yes
Focus Area:
  • 1. Others
Corporate Outcome and Output (UNDP Strategic Plan 2018-2021)
  • 1. Output 1.3.1 National capacities and evidence-based assessment and planning tools enable gender-responsive and risk-informed development investments, including for response to and recovery from crisis
SDG Goal
  • Goal 1. End poverty in all its forms everywhere
  • Goal 13. Take urgent action to combat climate change and its impacts
SDG Target
  • 1.5 By 2030, build the resilience of the poor and those in vulnerable situations and reduce their exposure and vulnerability to climate-related extreme events and other economic, social and environmental shocks and disasters
  • 13.2 Integrate climate change measures into national policies, strategies and planning
Evaluation Budget(US $): 50,000
Source of Funding: UNDP (project)
Evaluation Expenditure(US $): 3,189
Joint Programme: No
Joint Evaluation: No
Evaluation Team members:
Name Title Nationality
Mujyanama Pio Consultant RWANDA
GEF Evaluation: No
Key Stakeholders: Government, Development Partners, UN agencies, Civil Society
Countries: RWANDA
Comments:

Disaster Risk Reduction Evaluation is still ongoing to completion. The evaluation report is now available and only management responses are being done. So, we are requesting you to help in changing the end date till July 30th, 2018.

Lessons
Findings
1.

National and Local capacity building for Disaster Risk Management in Rwanda

The project evaluation was focusing on the following outputs: - Output 1: Enhanced capacities of national and local institutions to manage disaster risks and recover from disaster events; including improved national and local coordination mechanisms - Output 2: DRR mainstreamed into national/district/sectorial plans and policies; and capacities on DRM Planning enhanced. - Output 3: A functioning national disaster risk assessment and monitoring system (DRAMS) established. - Output 4: End-to-end early warning systems established and operational. - Output 5: Reduced community vulnerabilities and increased household resilience in selected high-risk districts and increased public awareness on DRR.


Tag: Disaster risk management Resilience building National Rural Capacity Building Coordination Vulnerable

2.

Interventions in Gakenke district Gakenke District is one of the most disaster-prone areas in Rwanda. The District is located generally is slopes and high inclined hills separated by rivers and marshlands. The area is made of high altitude area and an area characterized by lowly inclined hills of 1,700m. It geographical characteristics is one of the main causes of disasters in that area. This area is made of slopes where the occurrence of landslide and flooding is high. In May 2016, this District faced disaster caused by landslide and heavy rains. This affected the District in various aspects of life. Out of 19 administrative sectors of Gakenke District, only one sector was not affected, other 18 sectors were affected by the disaster. The assessment revealed that the District was affected in all aspects of life such as agriculture sector, housing, health, transportation and economic sectors. 34 people lost their lives, one was a pregnant woman who was about to deliver. 1,425 houses and 24 bridges were destroyed and a big number of crops were heavily affected. The damaged hectare of crops are 1,102.3 of beans, 11 of maize, 168 of rice, 5 of cassava, 72 of sugar cane, 208 of bananas, 1.5 of pineapple, 7 of coffee, 3.8 of geranium and 53 of forests. The number of livestock lost was 12 cows, 27 goats, 6 pigs, 10 sheep, 713 chickens and 9 rabbits.


Tag: Agriculture Livestock Crisis Response Natural Disaster Programme/Project Design Social Protection

3.

Construction and/or Rehabilitation of houses in Gakenke District

During the 2016 disasters, many houses were destroyed. Most of them were in high risks zone and others were constructed with poor materials. Through Central Emergency Response Fund, 1,333 houses were constructed for the victims to recover their living conditions.

Rwanda House Authority and Gakenke district played a major role of selecting adequate sites responding to district land use master plan which is very crucial to reduce the probability of disaster occurrence. After the disasters, it was necessary for building back, and houses were offered to people without shelter. Project beneficiaries mentioned that they have been very satisfied because they received decent houses with durable materials. They said that many were so poor that they could not afford to construct such modern houses which are so different from previous ones with mostly wooden materials and other poor materials. The construction was supervised by engineers’ technical team endowed with sound construction skills. This emphasizes the appropriate decency for house received which standing out obviously when comparing to previous shelters.


Tag: Agriculture land resouces Economic Recovery Social Protection Urbanization Technical Support Vulnerable

4.

Construction and rehabilitation of bridges affected by disasters

After the disasters in Gakenke, the damaged bridges paralyzed movements of people, goods and services and limited trades. After a rapid assessment, 29 bridges were found affected. Out of 24 bridges strongly damaged, 18 were selected for reconstruction.

The evaluation showed that 19 bridges were reconstructed throughout affected areas to enable a smoother transition to long-term recovery, to restore livelihoods, and to allow free trading within Gakenke sectors and neighboring areas. The above photos show the reconstructed bridges which can resist to heavy rain and all water movement. The new constructed bridges are strong compared to the old ones due to different materials used and experts who rebuilt them.


Tag: Crisis Response Natural Disaster Infrastructure Jobs and Livelihoods

5.

Provision of Cash for work opportunities

During the recovery process following the aftermath of disasters, members of the affected communities were employed to rehabilitate and construct houses for casual labor, which provided them with temporary income. The number of people who benefited from cash for work was 749 where 349 were women-headed households and 400 were men, most of those vulnerable households being organized in saving and loan groups12 . Cash for work has been given out as daily compensation. 1,000 Rwf were paid for casual laborers per day, 2,000 Rwf for capitas (supervisors), 2500 Rwf for technicians and 10,000 Rwf for engineers. In addition to the payment of money, casual laborers were paid food (maize, beans, vegetable oil and salts). 7,314 disaster victims participated in the rehabilitation activities of 184 ha of Kagoma marshland, maintenance of 33 km of roads, plantation of 16,000 trees and progressive terracing of 101,4 Ha; this was tremendous contribution for households income generation. Some cash for work beneficiaries confirmed that they started small business where currently they are generating some incomes.


Tag: Crisis Response Cash Transfers Jobs and Livelihoods Vulnerable Women and gilrs

6.

Provision of assistance for replacement of productive assets

Disasters were cause the loss of household assets. When the disasters happened, many households had lost many items such blankets, utensils, etc. To restore normal life, the project provided assistance for replacement of productive assets for 300 individuals at $100 per each. The transfer was made to their account number opened in Umurenge SACCOs. The beneficiaries were selected from five sectors of Karambo, Gakenke, Muzo and Mataba. The cash helped them to get new productive assets used for daily life in the households.


Tag: Crisis Response Natural Disaster Cash Transfers Jobs and Livelihoods

7.

Supplies and commodities (agricultural inputs)

Disasters cause considerable damages to physical agricultural assets such as standing crops, irrigation systems, and post-production infrastructure. The decline in output from crop triggers considerable economic losses to farmers and often have a domino effect on the food value chain and sector growth. Because enhancing the resilience of agriculture-based livelihoods in the face of disasters was at the core of the project commitment to tackle hunger food insecurity, agriculture inputs were provided such fertilizers and seedlings to boost a rapid recovery.


Tag: Agriculture Food Security Jobs and Livelihoods Value Chain

8.

Strengthening material and sexual and reproductive health services in Gakenke District

After protracted disaster effects, the priority was the provision of humanitarian relief. For the health sector in affected areas, the focus was on life saving actions and activities to strengthen the health system. The following items were provided: - Dignity kits for 1,500 Affected pregnant women, lactating mothers and adolescent girl; - Lifesaving maternal health commodities and others supplies for the 3 health facilities; - Material health equipment for Mataba health centre maternity ward; - Two Inter-Agency Emergency Health kit - IEHK 2006 – Complete Kit – to the health facilities in Gakenke and Muhanga; - Three DDK kits to health facilities located in Gakenke, Muhanga and Ngororero; The dignity kits and health equipment were provided by UNFPA in three health centers of Mataba (200 dignity kits), Naganzo (250 dignity kits) and Minazi (150 dignity Kits). The provided kits were bucket of 16 liters, 600 basins, 600 towels with UNFPA logo, 600, 2 pieces in 1 of African fabric (Kitenge) JAVA, 600 baby tissue (flannel/Ikigoma), 1,200 hygienic Pads (Cotex), 1,800 maternity sanitary pads, 1200 soaps, 1,200 baby body lotion (Vaseline of 500 mg), 600 women underwear, 1200 blankets, 600 baby pajamas (6 months), and 600 bag with UNFPA Logo 60013 .


Tag: Crisis Mitigation Crisis Response Natural Disaster Health Sector Reproductive Health Women and gilrs

9.

Emergency food assistance to people affected by landslide and floods

During Disasters recovery, food assistance were also focused to reduce hunger and malnutrition using all available means to respond quickly in emergencies and ensure that people affected by crises have access to sufficient, nutritious food. After the disaster, many people worked to provide project services, and they received food in return. Food was provided by WFP to 11,517 households victims of disasters through food for work program. The number of people who participated in food for work are 11,157 able bodied plus 358 vulnerable people which total 11,517. The following are the provided food commodities in tons: maize: 708.30, beans: 207.31, vegetable oil: 51.83, salt: 8. 64 total: 976.0714


Tag: Food Security Crisis Response Natural Disaster Vulnerable

10.

Provision of emergency start-up cash grant to most vulnerable population

Cash grant of 100,000 Rwf was provided to 749 people, most of whom were women head of households. People were organized into 37 groups from different sectors of Gakenke District. They were trained and sensitized on how to use the emergency start-up cash grant efficiently and advised on developing a small business plan. The total amount of money for cash grant was 74,900,000 Rwf. This was transferred to their accounts opened by Umurenge SACCO. The cash grant was used to start farming. People who benefited from start-up cash grant are now gradually improving their socioeconomic status. From the emergency start-up cash grant provided especially to head of households women (most vulnerable population), VSLAs were formed. Majority of them started farming activities such as livestock. From the interviews with project beneficiaries, some of them have cows, pigs, sheep and goats. “Through start-up cash grant, I started farming activity with only two pigs, now I have 17. I’m able to feed my family and to pay education fees of my children” said project beneficiary. “I got 100,000 Rwf from UNDP/One UN, as my children were facing malnutrition problem, I decided to buy a cow, today I have free manure to fertilize my farm and I expect soon to get milk from my cow” said a respondents during the meeting with project beneficiaries.


Tag: Agriculture Livestock Crisis Response Cash Transfers Jobs and Livelihoods Vulnerable Women and gilrs

11.

Provision of emergency shelter and Non-Food Items

The Shelter and Non-Food Items were needed by every affected individual. District partner organizations worked to provide life-saving households items and shelter materials to disaster affected people in Gakenke district. 1,139 out of 1,264 destroyed houses have been rehabilitated. The provided materials are as follow: 2,528 doors, 5,056 windows , 2,128 kilos of nails, 12640 cement bags, 19,125 iron sheets, 1,000 truck full of sand , 2,528 jerrycans , 3,792 soaps , were given to beneficiaries while 2400 iron sheets and 3600 tube were provided for schools rehabilitation15 .


Tag: Crisis Response Disaster risk management Infrastructure Jobs and Livelihoods Operational Services

12.

FAO Safety net intervention program

Safety net interventions had been availed to mitigate the effects of poverty and other risks on vulnerable households. Various safety nets actions tackled divers risks facing households and support them through hard times with cash, food, or labor. This was done through project activities run by humanitarian community aiming to provide additional income or in-kind help to vulnerable households. Through contractual services, beneficiaries were organized into groups able to provide services, and received cash for work produced agricultural inputs. To reduce disaster risk, 497 hectares of marshland and mountain from Karambo, Gashenyi and Nemba sectors were protected and restored by adjacent communities where they worked for cash, household assets and other commodities. 4, 317 disasters victims received cash for work and received food for work, 4317 disaster victims received 192.9 tons of fertilizer such as: DAP 142.9 tons, UREA: 50 tons.


Tag: Agriculture Food Security Crisis Response Cash Transfers Jobs and Livelihoods Operational Services Vulnerable

13.

Rehabilitation of water supply system

Water is the most important resources needed by all the community around the world. Once it is not available or dirty, the human health is affected. The 2016 disaster in Gakenke District affected entire life of residing community including water-supply. The occurred disaster in Gakeneke District destroyed water sources such as Water tape/ WASAC, dug well spring, hand pump/borehole/tube well, etc. During the Post Disaster Needs Assessment, water was a priority. During the recovery period, water supply was rehabilitated. This task concerns the restoration of water supply service which had been damaged and stopped when disaster struck the water supply system in Gakenke district. Stable and safe water supply have been essential to the improvement of people’s living and economic activities. Therefore, restoration and reconstruction of water facilities had been paramount to prevent people from unhygienic living conditions and health problems. In Gakenke District, 22 water supply systems were rehabilitated from Karambo, Nemba Gakenke, Muzo, Mugunga, Janja, Muhondo, Muyongwe and Ruli. The rehabilitation of water supply systems was satisfactory to the project beneficiaries. “We are very happy with the rehabilitated water sources which are better than the previous ones. We are now enjoying to use it for drinking, cooking and bathing as it is very clean and safe” said respondents.


Tag: Crisis Mitigation Crisis Response Water resources Sanitation

14.

Interventions in Ngororero district

Ngororero District is among disaster prone area at national level. During the project implementation through United Nations, the interventions were focused on strengthening human security, enhancing resilience and improving disaster risk management of high-risk communities and most vulnerable populations. The interventions focused on disaster preparedness in Ngororero district. The interventions were mainly the construction of houses to poor people in high risk zones, vocational trainings, bridge construction, upgrading a health post to health center, construction of maternity and water supply for 27 kilometers.


Tag: Disaster risk management Local Governance Sanitation Implementation Modality Vulnerable

15.

Resilient housing constructed

For preparedness and resilience purpose, among 21 houses which are supposed to be built, eleven (11) resilient houses were constructed to relocate people in high risks zone where 8 houses were given to single female parents. The constructed followed housing regulations in Rwanda starting by selecting adequate sites and land use master plan of the District. This was also supervised by qualified engineers from District and Rwanda Housing Authority with necessary skills and technologies in housing. Various risks based on geographic areas were taken in account as indicated in National Risk Atlas. The completed 11 houses were equipped with solar panel, water tank, TV and decoder. Ten out of twenty-one (21) houses to host people who will move out from high risk zones are still under construction; it is expected that other remaining ten (10) will be completed by March 2018. The selection of beneficiaries was carried out by local communities under the supervision of district council and man power was also selected from neighboring community focusing on poor people.

High risk zones prone to landslide and floods were identified for effective disaster prevention, preparedness and planning. Ngororero district did show the dangerous zone, and identified difficulties from the community to cope with natural disasters. Thereafter, beneficiaries were identified to receive decent houses with improved quality of housing in the owner-occupied. “Privately owned home beneficiaries in Ngororero district which for many people is their most valuable asset, safer, healthier and more durable, will be protected’’, said one of the beneficiaries.


Tag: Disaster risk management Natural Disaster Resilience building Infrastructure Women and gilrs

16.

Construction of a bridge

It has been emphasized that a bridge to connect two sectors which are Sovu and Bwira is very crucial for Ngororero District. This bridge is under construction for a total expense cost of 70,000,000 Rwf. The procurement process has been completed and it is supposed to be completed by the end of May 2018.


Tag: Disaster risk management Procurement Infrastructure

17.

Upgrading a health post to a health center

Through the project intervention of One UN, a health post has been upgraded to a health center for a total cost of 48,000,000 Rwf. The construction of this health center increased accessibility to health care facilities. The health center surrounding community are happy to access health services. As the health post has been upgraded into health center that will satisfy women needs related to pregnancy, childbirth, and children immunization. Current, a maternity ward is under construction process. This will facilitate women to deliver without getting long distance.


Tag: Health Sector Reproductive Health Women and gilrs

18.

Vocational trainings

Many people have been empowered in vocational skills where 220 people benefited various skills from vocational trainings. 120 women and 100 men learned various skills in 8 different fields namely welding, construction, food processing (juices and breads), mechanics, tailoring, knitting, catering and shoes making. The trainees earned tool kits useful in their respective activities, and have been grouped in cooperatives that Ngororero district have supported financially. Based on the information from the vocational trainings graduates, some of them started working and they are earning some income; meaning that the acquired skills are contributing to the improvement of living conditions of project beneficiaries.


Tag: Disaster Recovery Jobs and Livelihoods Women and gilrs

19.

Relevance

Alignment with national priorities

Among EDPRS II priorities, there is building a “disaster resilient nation” related to mainstreaming across a wide expanse of priority sectors ranging from agriculture to education to environment and natural resources, and infrastructure, among others16. The National Disaster Management Policy priority is also to build the resilience of communities, infrastructures and service providers to disasters by reducing their vulnerability and increasing their ability to withstand and minimize the effects of disasters and complex emergencies through adaptation to climate change by enhancing preparedness17. The policy aimed at ensuring timely recovery from disasters and complex emergencies, and leaving communities and families in a better position to withstand future hazards as well as building back better. This means that the project interventions were aligned with national priorities.


Tag: Climate Change Adaptation Disaster risk management Relevance National

20.

Relevance

Alignment with national priorities

Among EDPRS II priorities, there is building a “disaster resilient nation” related to mainstreaming across a wide expanse of priority sectors ranging from agriculture to education to environment and natural resources, and infrastructure, among others16. The National Disaster Management Policy priority is also to build the resilience of communities, infrastructures and service providers to disasters by reducing their vulnerability and increasing their ability to withstand and minimize the effects of disasters and complex emergencies through adaptation to climate change by enhancing preparedness17. The policy aimed at ensuring timely recovery from disasters and complex emergencies, and leaving communities and families in a better position to withstand future hazards as well as building back better. This means that the project interventions were aligned with national priorities.


Tag: Climate Change Adaptation Disaster risk management Disaster Risk Reduction Sendai Relevance National Local Governance Strategic Positioning Agenda 2030

21.

Gender equality and women empowerment

During project design, gender was not clearly considered. However, in the project implementation, gender sensitivity has been observed whereby women were participating in the project activities generating incomes and benefiting from the produced products (constructed houses) based on the most vulnerable and women headed households. In eleven constructed houses in Ngororero district, eight were handed to women headed household. This is followed by large number women who benefited from cash grant in Gakenke District.


Tag: Relevance Gender Equality Women's Empowerment Programme/Project Design

22.

Providing normative policy support

Building Local and National Capacities for Disaster Risk Reduction project which has been operated and implemented by the Government of Rwanda through MIDIMAR, has provided normative policy support in the implementation of global agreements, norms and standards, such as the Hyogo Framework for Action, MDGs with target to implement the indicators of Sendai framework for Disaster Risk Reduction. As main partner of government, UNDP has become fully involved in climate change and put resilience and human protection at the heart of the development program.


Tag: Disaster Risk Reduction Sendai National Local Governance

23.

Consideration of vulnerable groups

The project interventions were based on socio-economic status such as people who received houses and vocation skills in Ngororero District were from vulnerable groups. In Gakenke district, the socio-economic status was selected as criteria to get cash grant, cash for work, replacement of productive assets, etc. The assistance targeted people in class 1 and 2 of socioeconomic status (Ubudehe).


Tag: Cash Transfers Economic Recovery Jobs and Livelihoods Vulnerable

24.

Balance of upstream/downstream activities

The said project was implemented through the synergies across the development and humanitarian partners. The disaster risk reduction was focused on building community resilience, sustaining and preventing the reversal of development gains. This was done through provided support at national and decentralized levels. The upstream activities are conducted at national level especially by MIDIMAR and National Platform for Disaster Risk Reduction while downstream activities are the initiatives from decentralized levels. The disaster management was mainstreamed in 28 districts.

Assimilated Rwanda’s “homegrown solutions”

Homegrown solutions are a current slogan in Rwanda. It has been identified among the best channels to resolve Rwanda’s problems. During the project implementation period, three homegrown solutions were applied such as community works (Umuganda), performance contract (Imihigo) and Ubudehe (socio-economic status). Umuganda played multipurpose roles in the implementation of the project. It has been used for public awareness, and it also played a key role in the construction of houses for poor and vulnerability people especially those with limited physical capacities. For the case of Imihigo, the development project


Tag: Relevance National Local Governance Partnership Programme Synergy Awareness raising Vulnerable

25.

Balance of upstream/downstream activities

The said project was implemented through the synergies across the development and humanitarian partners. The disaster risk reduction was focused on building community resilience, sustaining and preventing the reversal of development gains. This was done through provided support at national and decentralized levels. The upstream activities are conducted at national level especially by MIDIMAR and National Platform for Disaster Risk Reduction while downstream activities are the initiatives from decentralized levels. The disaster management was mainstreamed in 28 districts.


Tag: Relevance National Local Governance Partnership Programme Synergy Cash Transfers Jobs and Livelihoods Awareness raising Vulnerable

26.

Child protection consideration

Child protection refers to preventing and responding to violence, exploitation and abuse against children including commercial sexual exploitation, trafficking, child labour and harmful traditional practices, such as female genital mutilation/cutting and child marriage. Child Protection addresses every child’s right not to be subjected to harm and it complements other rights that, inter alia, ensure that children receive that which they need in order to survive, develop and thrive23. In Rwanda, child protection policy states that a working age is sixteen (16) old and is prohibited to use people under sixteen at work. Measures to avoid using child under working age were taken. All of them were paid through bank account and a child under 16 years old cannot access bank services.


Tag: Human rights Youth

27.

Human-rights based approach

During project design and implementation, there was no clear strategies for human rights approach. Here we can mention lack of strategies to involve people with disabilities to access some work which match with physical fitness and capabilities as well as women lactating and other vulnerability groups of people to meet their rights.


Tag: Human rights Vulnerable

28.

Theory of change

Theory of Change is essentially a comprehensive description and illustration of how and why a desired change is expected to happen in a particular context. It is focused particularly on mapping out or “filling in” what has been described as the “missing middle” between what a program or change initiative does (its activities or interventions) and how these lead to desired goals being achieved24. In this project, theory of change was not so much considered as community participation and involvement were not worthy to provoke a change. This was verified through implementation of the project whereby the community was not involved in the decision making and project design. However, currently the community ownership is increasing. Here we can mention the case of some created clubs at secondary schools and a strong commitment of local and opinion leaders in disaster management.

Relevance of indicators and means of verification From the project design, the outputs were formulated. However, some indicators were not clear enough to facilitate performance evaluation. The project objectives were fully achieved as indicated in the annex 1 of evaluation matrix. The factors influencing the achievements are many including synergy of the stakeholders.


Tag: Civic Engagement Monitoring and Evaluation Programme/Project Design Theory of Change

29.

Effectiveness

Based on the information from desk review and interviews with UNDP and all other partners including local community, the project objectives were highly achieved as indicated in annex 1. The major factors influencing the achievement are many including strong partnership in disaster management from Government institutions and development partners; and the existing institutional framework such as the disaster committees from national to decentralized levels. The implementation of planned activities contributed to the achievement of the planned outputs and outcomes.


Tag: Disaster risk management National Local Governance Implementation Modality Partnership Capacity Building Technical Support

30.

Efficiency

The project efficiency was observed especially in financial and human resources management. The budget has been used as budgeted, the timeframe was respected and the cost was efficient. The efficiency has been observed in the project implementation period as clearly indicated in annex 1. This has been facilitated by the existing Rwandan laws and policies on financial management especially Rwanda Public Procurement laws. Purchase and other provisions were made through procurement procedures which is most transparent. The rate of available budget execution is very high at 100%. The funds were used efficiently; this is evidenced by the houses built in Ngororero District costing 6,000,000Rwf (a house with TV, water tank, solar and decoder) based on market price.


Tag: Efficiency Human and Financial resources Policies & Procedures Procurement Project and Programme management

31.

UNDP has been successful in recruiting and position high caliber technical staff

Since the establishment of MIDIMAR, there was a need to build the capacity of the staff in place to tackle the assigned mission and mandate of the ministry. UNDP hired an expert in Disaster Risk technical adviser who provided technical support in capacity building (institutional, organizational and individual) and in funds mobilization. UNDPprovided other staff with high caliber and skills on disaster management component.

Level of funds raised

UNDP/ The One UN managed to mobilize the total funds of USD 10,081,350. This facilitated the implementation of planned activities. The available funds covered the planned key activities including capacity development, disaster response in Gakenke District and preparedness and resilience in Ngororero District. The funds were mobilized as follow:


Tag: Efficiency Human and Financial resources Operational Efficiency Capacity Building Technical Support

32.

Project implementation sequence

The sequence of project implementation was not respected as planned. As the main part of this project was centered around capacity building, capacity needs assessment was supposed to be conducted before all project implementation. The interventions were done without baseline indicators and the needs were not clearly known.


Tag: Challenges Monitoring and Evaluation Capacity Building

33.

Sustainability

The project supports are very crucial to the project beneficiaries. Much has been done where some of them are likely to be sustainable after the project phase out as evidenced by high level political will to support the existing initiatives. The project follows under Government agenda (disaster management, environment protection, creating and supporting VSLAs, etc). From the interviews with local leaders and local community, it is clear that many activities will sustain. This is the case of the created committees to manage rehabilitated water supply systems, the community willing to adhere the VSLAs, local leaders and local community determination to protect and maintain constructed bridges, the management of cash grant where project beneficiaries started small business especially farming (livestock), etc. The case of the formed and trained VSLAs and cooperatives through cash grant provided to Gakenke District disaster victims and the formed cooperatives for people who benefited from vocational skills in Ngororero District are also some of the examples influencing the sustainability. In all Districts, community-based organizations were trained in disaster resilience. At institutional level, key disaster management committees were established and supported. This is the case of National Platform for Disaster Management, District disaster management committees and Sector disaster management committees.


Tag: Disaster risk management Natural Disaster Sustainability Local Governance Jobs and Livelihoods Capacity Building

34.

Impact

During the Project implementation, the project beneficiaries were mainly MIDIMAR which benefited technical support especially capacity building, Gakeneke and Gororero Districts residents. After the disaster of 2016, Gakenke and Ngororero Districts were affected where they lose lives of people, houses, infrastructure, farm, livestock, etc were destroyed. In Gakenke District, the project beneficiaries were victims of disasters while in Ngororero District, the project beneficiaries were poorer people located in high risk zones who benefited houses and poorer people who benefited vocational skills. This project positively impacted the beneficiaries such as MIDIMAR capacity, Gakenke and Ngororero Districts as indicated in annex 1.


Tag: Agriculture Impact Infrastructure Jobs and Livelihoods Capacity Building Technical Support Vulnerable

Recommendations
1

Extend project for at least another five years, as some activities were not implemented as planned and capacity gap is still observed.

2

Focus on capacity building including trainings and simulation exercises related to disaster management (most of simulations are functional and table top, therefore, full scale is needed).

3

Strengthen coordination for disaster management.

4

Clearly indicate the theory of change and define the role of every stakeholder in the upcoming programmes

5

Conduct capacity needs assessment by UNDP/One UN in the areas related to disaster management

6

Support the operationalization of early warning system

7

Improve database (data management) as some of them are not available. This is the case especially of training where the data are not well organized.

1. Recommendation:

Extend project for at least another five years, as some activities were not implemented as planned and capacity gap is still observed.

Management Response: [Added: 2018/08/28] [Last Updated: 2021/02/01]

Accepted. This is aligned with the new UNDP CPD, the One UN UNDAP and the new National Strategy for transformation

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
LPAC organized on 27th June approved the new 5-year Strengthening National and Local Disaster Risk Management Capacity, Resilience and Enhancing Preparedness and Early Warning System in Rwanda project document. The new project document represents continuity, building on the work done under the previous Joint programme on Support to MIDIMAR to address disaster Management
[Added: 2018/08/28]
PEU 2018/06 Completed
2. Recommendation:

Focus on capacity building including trainings and simulation exercises related to disaster management (most of simulations are functional and table top, therefore, full scale is needed).

Management Response: [Added: 2018/08/28] [Last Updated: 2021/02/01]

Accepted. This is aligned with the new UNDP CPD and activities proposed under the new successor DRR programme

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
The CO will implement this recommendation through the new DRR project. It should be noted that Output 1 of the new project focuses on capacity building (Output 1: Institutions at national, district and community level have improved technical capacities to reduce risks, manage and respond to natural disasters and limit gender-differentiated impacts). Focus will be placed as well on conducting simulation exercises related to Disaster Management. For example, activity 3.2 of the new project document relates to conducting simulation exercises on major hazards to ensure readiness at the district level. Indicator 3.1 is on number of simulation exercises for disaster preparedness and response conducted at the national and district level.
[Added: 2018/08/28]
PEU 2023/06 Initiated History
3. Recommendation:

Strengthen coordination for disaster management.

Management Response: [Added: 2018/08/28] [Last Updated: 2021/02/01]

Accepted. This is aligned with the new UNDP CPD and activities proposed under the successor DRR programme

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
Similar to Recommendation 2, this will be implemented through the new DRR programme. The new project aims to continue strengthening national coordination mechanisms for disaster management. In addition, the new project will incorporate Meteo Rwanda as one of the implementing partners, with activities aimed at strengthening coordination and collaboration between MIDIMAR and Meteo Rwanda.
[Added: 2018/08/28]
PEU 2023/06 Initiated
4. Recommendation:

Clearly indicate the theory of change and define the role of every stakeholder in the upcoming programmes

Management Response: [Added: 2018/08/28] [Last Updated: 2021/02/01]

Accepted

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
The theory of change has been added in the new Strengthening National and Local Disaster Risk Management Capacity, Resilience and Enhancing Preparedness and Early Warning System in Rwanda project as well as the roles of each of the stakeholders
[Added: 2018/08/28]
PEU 2018/06 Completed
5. Recommendation:

Conduct capacity needs assessment by UNDP/One UN in the areas related to disaster management

Management Response: [Added: 2018/08/28] [Last Updated: 2021/02/01]

Accepted

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
This will be undertaken under the new DRR project. Output 1 of the new project focuses on institutional capacity building, based on capacity needs assessments. (E.g.: Activity 1.1 Conduct DRR/DRM Capacity Needs Assessment of MIDIMAR, District staff, NPDM, NADIMATEC, Rwanda Meteorology Agency, DIDIMACs and SEDIMACs and other institutions involved in disaster management and Activity 1.2 Develop the capacity development strategy and plan for MIDIMAR, Districts, DIDIMACs, SEDIMACs, NPDM, NADIMATEC and Rwanda Meteorology Agency based on the results of the capacity need assessment exercise.)
[Added: 2018/08/28]
PEU 2023/06 Initiated
6. Recommendation:

Support the operationalization of early warning system

Management Response: [Added: 2018/08/28] [Last Updated: 2021/02/01]

Accepted. This is aligned with the new UNDP CPD and activities planned under the successor DRR programme

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
This is a key activity planned under the new DRR programme. (Output 3 of the new Strengthening National and Local Disaster Risk Management Capacity, Resilience and Enhancing Preparedness and Early Warning System in Rwanda project is fully dedicated to the establishment and operationalization of a national early warning system. Output 3: Enhanced multi hazard early warning systems to enable effective preparedness, response and recovery)
[Added: 2018/08/28]
PEU 2023/06 Initiated
7. Recommendation:

Improve database (data management) as some of them are not available. This is the case especially of training where the data are not well organized.

Management Response: [Added: 2018/08/28] [Last Updated: 2021/02/01]

Accepted. This will be done under the new DRR programme

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
The new project document aims to address the issue of availability of data. See, for example, Output 2: Population, local authorities and institutions have increased knowledge and skills of risks from evidence-based disaster risk assessments. Activity 2.1 will focus on updating and digitizing the National Risk profiles, while Activity 2.6 focuses ccollecting and documenting disaster data, events and evidence through digitalized systems for public awareness.
[Added: 2018/08/28]
PEU 2023/06 Initiated

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