GGCA Evaluation Report gender-responsive climate change initiative

Report Cover Image

Share

Document Type Language Size Status Downloads
Download document GGCA eval report Gender-responsive climate change initiative - 20Dec.pdf report English 1500.55 KB Posted 605
Download document GGCA eval report vol2 annexes 1-9 - 20Dec.pdf related-document English 1996.70 KB Posted 948
Title GGCA Evaluation Report gender-responsive climate change initiative
Atlas Project Number:
Evaluation Plan: 2009-2013, Bureau for Policy and Programme Support
Evaluation Type: Thematic
Status: Completed
Completion Date: 12/2013
Planned End Date: 12/2013
Management Response: Yes
Focus Area:
  • 1. Environment & Sustainable Development
Corporate Outcomes (UNDP Strategic Plan 2014-2017)
  • 1. National and local governments and communities have the capacities to adapt to climate change and make inclusive and sustainable environment & energy decisions benefitting in particular under-served populations
Evaluation Budget(US $): 70,000
Source of Funding: GGCA and UNDP
Joint Programme: No
Mandatory Evaluation: No
Joint Evaluation: No
Evaluation Team members:
Name Title Email Nationality
Kris Prasada Consultant
Susan Bazilli Consultant
GEF Evaluation: No
Key Stakeholders:
Lessons
1.

Management, administration, and coordination:

·       It can be challenging to have one partner in an equal partnership as the grant recipient and fund manager. When partners see equality as important, the management modalities must be considered carefully. In such cases, it may be a better option to engage a credible external entity as fund administrator.


2.

Monitoring and reporting:

·       For partnership projects, it is important to establish a joint monitoring and reporting framework, which is results-oriented. Otherwise, there is a risk that reporting becomes overly time consuming and elaborate, but still not sufficiently capturing results.


3.

Events and workshops:

·       High-level events are important at the COPs to develop ongoing support and leadership.


4.

Strategic advocacy and technical support:

·       Strategic synergies between government and civil society are vital to achieving the goals.

·       Professionalising advocacy and ensuring consistency, institutional memory and the availability of experienced advocates results in better advocacy.

·       Strategic interventions to gender language across all the areas of CC require both technical expertise and institutional knowledge of the climate negotiation process.

·       Diversity in the team membership is critically important, both thematically and geographically: as it creates the flexibility to deploy the expertise and knowledge to contribute to different and emerging processes.

·       A long-term involvement of a dedicated team of advocates in the process to be influenced can enhance the results of advocacy efforts.


5.

Women Delegates Fund:

·       Selection of appropriate participants is critical for empowered participation.

·       Funding of participation is not enough in itself to ensure effective participation of, and contributions from, women; capacity building plays a critical role in this and support is most effective when provided consistently over time.

·       Linking of delegates in global negotiations to country level interventions can enhance synergies and coherence


6.

Collaboration with UNFCCC Secretariat:

·       An important entry point to mainstreaming gender in international agreement is to support its inclusion in the work process in order to create space for gender to be considered discussed by the parties.


7.

Climate finance:

·       Effective engagement in global finance discussions requires a continued presence.

·       To enhance accuracy and to maximise the potential benefits of national level studies by global and regional (UNDP) entities it is important to adequately involve national stakeholders (incl. COs) and link to national processes – even if the studies are intended mainly to inform global and regional levels.


8.

UNDP Cadre of Experts:

·       Concrete efforts to build a pool of regional experts can enhance the availability of technical expertise, and thereby contribute to the implementation of other activities and initiatives.


9.

IUCN Training of Trainers and Delegates:

·       ToTs can serve multiple purposes, such as transfer of skills and knowledge to a larger audience, enhancing global advocacy work, create synergies between the work of partner institutions, and enabling technical inputs to national planning and implementation.


10.

UNDP country projects:

·       Ensuring gender mainstreaming in climate change policies and planning involved continuous processes, and short term or stand-alone efforts are unlikely to significantly influence policies and plans, unless firm provisions are made for ensuring the process is followed through by others.

·       Funding should be of a sufficient size to follow processes through; either by providing sufficiently large grants or by demanding co-funding.

·       It is rational for global programmes to use existing country level projects and processes as vessels to enhance national anchoring, outreach and continuity, but care should be taken to ensure that the activities are complementary, add value and remain loyal to the global programme objectives.


11.

IUCN ccGAPs:

·       Champions in key government agencies are critical for a successful ccGAP planning process and ultimately ccGAP implementation.

·       Government capacity constraints, uneven awareness, and to some extent a tendency of viewing ccGAPs as projects which need donor funding can hamper ccGAP implementation.


12.

The Alliance:

·       Drawing on experiences of a broad range of members can enrich the discussions and knowledge base.

·       Cohesive messaging on gender and climate change and representation at global events is important to further global agreement on the issues.

·       An active Secretariat makes active members.


Findings
1.

Management, administration, and coordination:  

·  Finland is generally satisfied with the programme management and administration and communication.

·  There have been tensions in relation to the management of the programme, but partners report these have been fully resolved. The main issues appear to have been: Partners expecting an equal partnership while choosing one partner as the overall responsible for the programme.

·  There are communication and interpersonal issues. An external governance audit in 2013 found the programme management partially satisfactory, but partners report that all the issues found have been addressed.

·  At the global level, coordination and collaboration between the partners was generally well functioning in relation to training of WDF delegates, the advocacy team, joint events, and climate finance.

·  Coordination and collaboration at the country level and some extent the regional level were limited and opportunities for synergies were not adequately taken advantage of.


2.

Monitoring and reporting:

·       The indicators and targets are mainly output oriented and do not capture outcomes/results – and they are not monitored systematically.

·       The reporting system is overly elaborate and time consuming.

·       Monitoring and reporting is activity focused, and does not provide sufficient and easily accessible information on results/outcomes; nor is it sufficient to provide strategic guidance for the implementation.


3.

Budget, spending, financial management, and financial reporting:

·       Overall the financial management by the partners was found satisfactory by the audit, albeit with some issues and errors identified, which the partners report have been rectified.

·       There have been challenges related to disbursement procedures, overheads and administrative cost recovery, financial reporting, and information sharing, but these are now reported by partners to have been resolved.

·       Reclassification of the Programme Manager position will in the future increase staff costs.

·       Release of funds for three months periods only poses a challenge for the preparation of activities for IUCN and WEDO. UNDP does not have an instrument for providing funding for longer periods for NGOs/non-UN.


4.

Events and workshops:

·       A significant component of the Programme is to organise side-events at global meetings, and host events to launch GGCA publications.

·       GGCA organised events are widely seen as having increased the understanding and adoption of gender into climate change agreements and were influential in the adoption of the Gender Decision.

·       GGCA involved high-level participants in events.


5.

Strategic advocacy and technical support:

·       In Phase 2, the AT was very active, as it was a priority area for the Danish support. In Phase 3, the funds available for the AT had reduced, so the activity level of the AT significantly reduced.

·       Participation at the UNFCCC international levels has resulted in bringing the global experience back to the regional, and particularly the national, levels. The skills and knowledge gained have been very useful in influencing climate change policy nationally in some countries.

·       The GGCA advocacy appears to have made an important contribution to the inclusion of gender in the UNFCCC agreements in combination with interventions by other organisations.

·       AT members express that their work has helped ensuring the inclusion of gender considerations in policies and programmes at the national level.


6.

Women Delegates Fund:

·       Around 10 women delegates were receiving continuous/consistent support from WDF in Phases 2 and 3, including travel funding. Around 70 additional woman delegates participated in one of more training sessions.

·       With a total WDF budget in Phase 2 of USD 813,819, costs appear high compared to the number of delegates supported and trained.

·       Funding the participation of women was not enough in itself to ensure their effective participation in the UNFCCC negotiations. Capacity building efforts played a critical role in this.

·       Many of the supported women would probably not be able to participate in UNFCC processes if WDF funding is discontinued, but some would.

·       The WDF Night School is an important feature of the programme to train women delegates prior to the major UNFCCC sessions and has significantly increased their knowledge of gender and climate change. The training was responsive to requests from the WDF delegates.

·       Most of the WDF delegates appear able to engage proactively in UNFCCC negotiations and being welcomed as full members of their national delegations with defined roles. Reportedly, WDF delegates made important contributions to the negotiations.

·       WDF delegates were not linked systematically to national level GGCA interventions. Such involvement could have enhanced the synergies and coherence between the different GGCA activities.

·       With a budget of USD 813,819 in Phase 2, the costs of the WDF appears high compared to the number of women directly benefitting from travel funding and capacity building.

·       Training women delegates, who were already core members of country delegations but not funding their travel would have reduced costs, and enabled WDF to reach more people. If these were carefully selected, they could also have been provided with continuous support. Moreover, the risk of their COP participation being discontinued after the Programme ends would probably be lower than for the WDF participants


7.

Collaboration with UNFCCC Secretariat:

·       GGCA collaboration with the UNFCCC Secretariat has worked well and contributed to getting gender considerations on the agenda, especially in COP 18, but also in relation to NAP, NAPA and NAMA development.

·       GGCA has so far not engaged as strongly in gender and mitigation as in adaptation, but mitigation action and national emission plans will in the future be a prominent issue on the UNFCCC discourse


8.

Climate finance:

·       GGCA work on climate finance has mainly focused on the global level and was in particular implemented in Phase 2 with Danish support. Nonetheless, with the introduction of the GGCA Climate Finance Working Group, new climate finance work was initiated in Phase 3.

·       GGCA advocacy work has been an important factor in ensuring the inclusion of gender considerations in the procedures (e.g. requirements, operational guidelines and templates) of the CIF, AF, GCF, and also contributed to this in the UN-REDD. Results were in particular achieved in relation to the CIF.

·       In Phase 3, country level finance readiness studies are conducted in Kenya and Malawi. In Kenya, this could have been better linked to the country level, which would both enhance the ability to engage stakeholders and the outreach of the studies in terms of adding value to national processes.


9.

UNDP Cadre of Experts:

·       UNDP has successfully trained and established a Cadre of Experts (international, African and Asian), who generally appear to have a high level of knowledge on gender and climate change

·       The experts trained by UNDP appear to actively apply the knowledge obtained:

·       In relation to transferring knowledge to others, in particular from government and civil society, but also academia, private sector and media.

·       In different ways, such as lobbying, project development, project monitoring and evaluation, and consultancies.

·       A number of experts have been further involved in GGCA, e.g. as consultants, but there is also several who have not been involved – and there is high demand for such further involvement and follow-up training


10.

IUCN Training of Trainers and Delegates:

·       IUCN has successfully trained a large number of experts (international, regional, national), who generally appear to have a high level of knowledge on gender and climate change.

·       The global ToDs and ToTs have been an important element of, and enabling factor for, the global advocacy work of GGCA, e.g. at the COPs.

·       The experts trained by IUCN appear to actively apply the knowledge obtained:

·       In relation to transferring knowledge to others, in particular from civil society, but also governments, academia, private sector and media.

·       In different ways, such as project development, commenting on strategies, lecturing at universities, and development of manuals.

·       While a number of experts trained have been involved in ccGAP processes, GGCA advocacy, or the WDF, the majority of people trained appear not to have been involved subsequently in the Programme.

·       The ToTs and ToDs we discontinued from 2011, as IUCN chose to focus on capacity building for ccGAP processes and contributing to WDF related training


11.

UNDP country projects:

·       UNDP has implemented, or is implementing, 13 country interventions and four regional interventions.

·       Some, but not all, country projects have been very relevant and added value (or have the potential to add value) to national processes, policies, and strategies.

·       UNDP used other UNDP projects as implementation vessels at the country level to enhance synergies, outreach and continuity. This was a rational approach, but while it worked well in some countries it did not in other.

·       The collaboration with AAP was particularly useful and of mutual benefits for AAP and GGCA.

·       The transaction/administration costs for the small USD 30,000 grants provided were too high for the COs.

·       The USD 30,000 provided per country were not always enough to ensure that processes were followed through and the intended results or catalytic effect were fully achieved. As a result there was a tendency of implementing one-off events or preparing strategies without ensuring their subsequent use.

·       Interventions were based on CO proposals and priorities to ensure ownership, but at least in the case of Bangladesh this came at the expense of the contribution to achieving GGCA objectives.


12.

IUCN ccGAPs:

·       IUCN has facilitated the participatory formulation of ten national and two regional ccGAPs and four Gender and REDD+ Strategies, which focus on mainstreaming gender considerations into national climate change strategies and plans.

·       Most ccGAPS have been finalised, but not yet endorsed by governments and have not yet moved to implementation.

·       Most Gender and REDD+ Strategies are under implementation.

·       The ccGAP processes and documents are appreciated by local stakeholders and found relevant and of high quality, although the ownership is not equally high among all the relevant ministries.

·       Moving from strategy development to implementation is a challenge, due to a number of constraints including: getting the strategies endorsed, technical and financial capacity constraints of government, varying (albeit often good) ownership and commitment by different ministries, and difficulties in influencing government budgets.

·       The ccGAPs include significant detail about the Ministries and departments responsible for the various actions and activities, but none include budget line items – the success of their implementation will largely depend on each government’s ability to finance the commitments and will require strong overview and accountability mechanisms.

·       Some ccGAP training workshop participants use the skills imparted in their jobs (e.g. informing communities about gender and climate change) on their own initiative.

·       Although ccGAP tools and materials are publicly available, there is a demand from national stakeholders for better access to these.

·       Further support will be needed to ensure that ccGAPs will actually be implemented. IUCN is aware of this, intends to include support for ccGAP implementation in Phase 4 of the programme, and is in the process of raising additional funds for ccGAP implementation.


13.

Knowledge management and products:

·       The GGCA partners have each contributed very important knowledge products to the emerging new area of gender and CC.

·       The Cadre of Experts and affiliates have been involved in the process of production, dissemination and use of knowledge products.

·       GGCA knowledge products are disseminated through the GGCA website, which receives a significant number of visits


14.

The Alliance:

·       The GGCA Secretariat provides a wide range of services to the 91 members and is a key driver of the Alliance.

·       The broad membership strengthens the voice of GGCA in global CC discussions.

·       Governance issues for the Alliance were addressed effectively by the Secretariat.

·       The WGs have provided specific expertise and inputs on technical issues pertinent to upcoming issues on gender and CC.

·       Strong strategic leadership and facilitation of the GGCA secretariat has resulted in members being more active.

·       GGCA remains largely dependent on funding from Finland and to a large extent driven by UNDP, IUCN and WEDO, albeit with contributions from the rotating Steering Committee members. So far, no other members have raised funding, initiated partnerships or engaged in programmes under the GGCA umbrella.

·       The Alliance and Secretariat are not yet solid and sustainable, and models for achieving legal status and financial sustainability are being explored.


15.

Attainment of outcomes, objectives, and goal:

·       The two objectives of the Programme have partly been achieved.

·       Good progress has been made towards delivering the intended outcomes for objective 1, and gender is now reflected well in the UNFCCC agreement texts, gender is recognised as an official agenda item of the COP, and is being included in the modalities for financing mechanisms.

·       The foundation has been made towards delivering the intended outcomes for objective 2 through building capacities at regional and national levels and preparing ccGAPs, roadmaps, guidelines and strategies.

·       More work is needed and the intended results have not yet been fully delivered in relation to implementation of the UNFCCC agreements and projects with climate finance.

·       Climate change policies and initiatives at regional and national levels have only to a limited extent been influenced to ensure gender responsiveness.

·       National and government capacities appear not yet sufficient to prepare gender responsive policies and plans and implement gender sensitive climate change interventions.

·       While GGCA and the Programme are not the only initiatives or actors working actively to ensure gender responsive climate change agreements, policies and interventions, GGCA is widely seen as a significant actor and instrumental for the progress at the global level in terms of gender responsiveness, particularly in relation to the UNFCCC agreements, the COP process (including the Cop18 Gender Decision), and the CIF climate finance guidelines.

·       At the regional and national levels, GGCA activities such as the ccGAPs, UNDP projects, the Cadre of Experts, and ToTs have laid the foundation, build capacities and provided women with opportunities to engage in the climate discourse, but more work is needed to ensure that climate changes policies and interventions are gender responsive.


16.

Performance assessment:

·       The Programme is very relevant, as climate change has differentiated impacts on women, men and children, and at the onset of the Programme, gender was only considered and addressed to a limited extent in the international climate change agreements.

·       The approach of addressing gender and climate change at global, regional and national levels was appropriate, and most interventions appear to have been relevant, although some country level activities have not been sufficiently contributing to the programme objectives.

·       Overall, the Programme is very cost-effective and has engaged in several processes with a quite limited budget.

·       Some challenges and shortcomings affected the efficiency, mainly in relation to the programme management and coordination; but partners report these issues have now been addressed. The inefficiencies appear to some extent to have had a negative impact on the programme.

·       The programme setup created tensions among the partners, and although global level interventions were generally collaborative, some potential synergies between partners and activities, especially at the country level were not utilised.

·       Some administrative requirements created challenges for IUCN and WEDO in terms of planning and implementation, and UNDP had to invest significantly in providing guidance to them on UNDP procedures.

·       The monitoring system does not effectively capture the results of the programme or provide strategic guidance for its implementation, but a the same time the reporting appears overly elaborate.

·       WDF consumes a significant amount of programme funds, but only supports a limited number of delegates.

·       The limited funds disbursed to UNDP COs makes it difficult to follow processes through, so there is a tendency of supporting on-off interventions without sufficient follow-up, and transaction costs for UNDP COs are too high compared to the benefits.

·       The effectiveness of the Programme is satisfactory, and objectives and outcomes have partly been achieved; Gender is now reflected in the UNFCCC agreement texts, gender is recognised as an official agenda item of the COP, and is being included in the modalities for financing mechanisms, especially the CIF.

·       Stakeholders acknowledge the contribution of GGCA as being significant and governments and delegates approach GGCA for advice and support.

·       Capacities at regional and national levels to consider and address gender issues in relation to climate change planning have been enhanced.

·       ccGAPs, roadmaps, guidelines and strategies have been prepared and lay the foundation for gender responsive climate change policies and plans.

·       However, the programme has not yet fully resulted in national gender responsive policies, plans and investment projects and more work is needed to support this.

·       Less than a year is remaining of Phase 3, so the objectives and outcomes are unlikely to be fully achieved within the remaining implementation period. This appears not to be due to deficiencies in programme implementation, but rather due to unrealistic expectations of what could be achieved within the timeframe of Phases 2 and 3.

·       The tendency of implementing one-off or time limited interventions with limited follow-up means that the intended/potential results are not always fully achieved.

·       At the global level, awareness and capacity has been created, the number of female delegates at COPs has increased, and with the

·       COP18 Gender Decision and gender as an item in future COPs, the process appears sustainable.

·       Climate financing processes are less mature and there will be a continued need to promote gender responsiveness as the financing mechanisms are rolled out.

·       At the regional and national level, the GGCA interventions are not yet consolidated and sustainable. Without continued support, the ccGAPs and gender strategies are unlikely to be implemented, and a number of short-term activities are unlikely to have a lasting influence, unless the processes embarked upon are followed through.

·       GGCA is not yet a consolidated and sustainable structure, as it is still largely dependent on programme funding and remains largely driven by programme partners.


Recommendations
1

Focus on the implementation of climate agreements, especially ensuring gender responsiveness of regional and national climate change policies, plans, budgeting, and climate investments/projects.

2

Focus on climate finance, i.e. a) ensuring that global finance mechanisms are gender responsive in their implementation, and b) ensuring that work on making countries climate finance ready also addresses gender issues in the implementation of CC interventions.

3

Focus on consolidation of the results achieved and the processes that have already been initiated, to a) ensure that the intended results/outcomes (and impact) are fully achieved and sustainable – but only when there is a real potential to achieve the intended and tangible results.

4

Carefully analyse the processes and results achieved, and focus resources on the more promising ones, where there is a good chance of achieving success and sustainability within the remaining time frame. This analysis should also take into account the extent to which the interventions contribute to the higher objectives of GGCA.

5

Focus on following continuous processes through rather than one-off activities, especially at the regional and national levels.

6

Focus only on activities, which directly relate to gender mainstreaming in CC policy and planning processes.

7

Do not start new interventions, unless they contribute to the consolidation of what has already been done in a tangible and significant way.

8

Significantly enhance collaboration between the implementing programme partners in relation to country level activities, and the sharing of information, knowledge, lessons and approaches.

9

Focus on fewer UNDP countries/projects and increase the funds allocations, to at least USD 60,000 per country.

10

Ensure that WDF participants are systematically linked to GGCA country level interventions, including UNDP interventions.

11

Consider to develop approaches to maintain contact with the experts trained and provide support to them.

12

For Phase 4, prepare a joint logframe for all partners with: a) clearly defined activities and results for each partner; and b) SMART outcome indicators, with baselines, targets and means of verification established.

13

Establish a system for measuring outcome indicators.

14

Advocate within UNDP for the addition of new instruments in UNDP Regulations that can allow for the provision of funding for periods longer than three months for NGOs.

15

Develop a more democratic and formalised management structure for the Alliance.

1. Recommendation:

Focus on the implementation of climate agreements, especially ensuring gender responsiveness of regional and national climate change policies, plans, budgeting, and climate investments/projects.

Management Response: [Added: 2017/12/25]

This was addressed in Phase IV of the programme, with actions taken to ensure gender responsiveness of regional and national climate change policies, plans, budgeting and climate investments/ projects. 

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
UNDP supported the Government of Ethiopia and the Government of Cambodia in building capacities in key line ministries and on developing gender guidelines at the ministerial level to inform sectoral planning and budgeting.
[Added: 2017/12/25]
GGCA partners 2016/06 Completed
UNDP and its partners advocated for and supported the development of the Lima Work Programme on Gender (LWPG), which was launched during COP20 in 2014. At COP 22 and SBI 45 in Marrakech, Parties continued their consideration of issues under the Gender and Climate Change agenda item and reviewed progress made towards the goals of gender balance and the implementation of gender-responsive climate policy and decided to continue and enhance the Lima Work Programme on Gender for a period of 3 years.
[Added: 2017/12/25]
GGCA partners 2016/06 Completed
Facilitated several new national climate change gender action plans (ccGAPs), bringing the total number to 21. Leveraging support and partnership from across complementary spheres to support ccGAP development and implementation of principles has also been a key result of this phase. Sustained relationships with partners from previous ccGAP processes has also been important for ongoing influence and strengthened decision-making at international level.
[Added: 2017/12/25]
GGCA partners 2016/06 Completed
2. Recommendation:

Focus on climate finance, i.e. a) ensuring that global finance mechanisms are gender responsive in their implementation, and b) ensuring that work on making countries climate finance ready also addresses gender issues in the implementation of CC interventions.

Management Response: [Added: 2017/12/25]

This was addressed in Phase IV of the programme, with actions taken to ensure gender-responsive climate finance mechanisms. 

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
In collaboration with the GGCA Collective Working Groups on Gender and Climate Finance and the Heinrich Böll Foundation, UNDP, IUCN and WEDO undertook various activities to provide technical support to the Green Climate Fund (GCF) and its Secretariat on how to operationalize a gender sensitive approach in its work. Actions included: GCF gender consultation workshops were held with GCF Secretariat consultants and GGCA Climate Finance Working Group participants; Short policy briefs were prepared to inform the development of a comprehensive gender action plan to achieve a gender-sensitive approach within the Fund; Webinars were organized for GGCA members and allies on key gender and climate finance concerns; in 2015, IUCN attended the Board meetings of the GCF to advocate for the adoption of the Gender Policy and Plan of Action and to provide technical support to various members. Approval of the action plan made the GCF the first climate finance mechanism to approve a gender policy in advance of any funds disbursement.
[Added: 2017/12/25]
GGCA team 2016/06 Completed
3. Recommendation:

Focus on consolidation of the results achieved and the processes that have already been initiated, to a) ensure that the intended results/outcomes (and impact) are fully achieved and sustainable – but only when there is a real potential to achieve the intended and tangible results.

Management Response: [Added: 2017/12/25]

This was addressed in Phase IV of the programme, with actions taken to ensure intended impacts are fully achievable and sustainable.  

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
The national climate policy/planning processes were consolidated, through: consistent advocacy actions throughout COP 22 preparations to ensure a COP decision in Marrakech continues to progress on gender-responsive climate change policy; development of relevant gender and climate change tools and training materials to contribute to developing capacities, promoting knowledge sharing, and providing concrete experiences to Parties.
[Added: 2017/12/25]
GGCA partners 2016/06 Completed
4. Recommendation:

Carefully analyse the processes and results achieved, and focus resources on the more promising ones, where there is a good chance of achieving success and sustainability within the remaining time frame. This analysis should also take into account the extent to which the interventions contribute to the higher objectives of GGCA.

Management Response: [Added: 2017/12/25]

This was addressed in Phase IV of the programme, with actions taken to focus resources on achievable results.

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
GGCA team expressed the work plan for the GGCA Secretariat should be set realistically, based on available resources and capacity. For example, 2 part-time staff consultants were secured to handle the increased work load, prioritizing what could realistically be done well and triage activities on that basis with approval of the SC. This has worked very successfully during throughout the past three quarters.
[Added: 2017/12/25]
GGCA partners 2016/06 Completed
5. Recommendation:

Focus on following continuous processes through rather than one-off activities, especially at the regional and national levels.

Management Response: [Added: 2017/12/25]

This was addressed in Phase IV of the programme, with actions taken to follow continuous processes to ensure sustainability.

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
UNDP and its partners continued to strengthen national-level capacities to implement key commitments made to both gender equality and climate change action, including across relevant sustainable development spheres. They facilitated several new national climate change gender action plans (ccGAPs) and leveraged support and partnership from across complementary spheres to support ccGAP development and implementation of principles. Sustained relationships with partners from previous ccGAP processes has also been important for ongoing influence and strengthened decision-making at international level.
[Added: 2017/12/25]
GGCA partners 2016/06 Completed
6. Recommendation:

Focus only on activities, which directly relate to gender mainstreaming in CC policy and planning processes.

Management Response: [Added: 2017/12/25]

This was addressed in Phase IV of the programme, with actions taken to focus directly on gender mainstreaming in CC policy and planning processes.

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
Actions undertaken by the GGCA partners were focused on advocacy for the establishment and implementation of gender-responsive actions on climate change, such as participating in UNFCCC formal meetings, supporting directly the Convention’s Secretariat, technical support to Parties and stakeholders, and incorporating gender equality and women’s empowerment criteria in climate finance mechanisms.
[Added: 2017/12/25]
GGCA partners 2016/06 Completed
7. Recommendation:

Do not start new interventions, unless they contribute to the consolidation of what has already been done in a tangible and significant way.

Management Response: [Added: 2017/12/25]

This was addressed in Phase IV of the programme, by focusing on the same objectives of previous phases.

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
During the 4th Phase, the Global Gender Responsive Climate Change programme continued to focus on ensuring that the next global climate agreement integrates gender equality dimensions into the relevant global and national bodies, mechanisms and processes. The programme continued to promote women’s leadership as a key aspect to elevate women’s participation and influence in and contribution to the UNFCCC processes through the Women Delegates Fund.
[Added: 2017/12/25]
GGCA partners 2016/06 Completed
8. Recommendation:

Significantly enhance collaboration between the implementing programme partners in relation to country level activities, and the sharing of information, knowledge, lessons and approaches.

Management Response: [Added: 2017/12/25]

This was addressed in Phase IV of the programme, with actions taken to enhance collaboration between the implementing programme partners.

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
Partners developed relevant tools and training materials to contribute to developing capacities to promote knowledge sharing and provide concrete experiences to Parties as part of the objective of the Lima Work Programme on Gender. At the country level, Nevertheless, partners continued to collaborate to explore best approaches to strengthen national capacity for gender-responsive implementation of climate and gender commitments.
[Added: 2017/12/25]
GGCA partners 2016/06 Completed
9. Recommendation:

Focus on fewer UNDP countries/projects and increase the funds allocations, to at least USD 60,000 per country.

Management Response: [Added: 2017/12/25]

This was addressed in Phase IV of the programme, with actions taken to focus on fewer UNDP countries/ projects. 

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
The focus was on limited number of countries as opposed to on many and the work performed by UNDP and IUCN mainly targeted on-going climate change policy processes. UNDP supported the Government of Ethiopia and the Government of Cambodia in building capacities in key line ministries and on developing gender guidelines at the ministerial level to inform sectoral planning and budgeting. The Government of Ethiopia focused on enhancing the capacity of decision makers, who are responsible for the integration of gender issues and to improve the adaptive capacity of marginalized groups which are mainly affected by the impacts of climate change and climate variability. A report was prepared for decision makers for further actions for monitoring and evaluating Climate Resilient Green Economy Strategy and other adaption initiatives from a gender perspective. The Government of Cambodia focused on refining the guidelines and training curriculum. These products were developed in 2015 and are linked to other on-going initiatives such as the Cambodia Climate Change Alliance (CCCA) Trust Fund grant to the Ministry of Women Affairs and the Technical Assistance of the Strategic Programme for Climate Resilience (SPCR).
[Added: 2017/12/25]
GGCA partners 2016/06 Completed
10. Recommendation:

Ensure that WDF participants are systematically linked to GGCA country level interventions, including UNDP interventions.

Management Response: [Added: 2017/12/25]

This was addressed in Phase IV of the programme, with actions taken to link WDF participants to GGCA country level interventions.

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
In Liberia, a WDF representative moved into a strategic Ministerial position, adding value to the potential for continued action on gender and climate in the country and in global spheres. In terms of commitment to implementing specific activities of its ccGAP, Liberia remains in a leading position and is being closely monitored and engaged by IUCN for opportunities during the timespan of this specific GGCA project.
[Added: 2017/12/25]
GGCA partners 2016/06 Completed
11. Recommendation:

Consider to develop approaches to maintain contact with the experts trained and provide support to them.

Management Response: [Added: 2017/12/25]

This was addressed in Phase IV of the programme, with actions taken to maintain contact with trained experts.

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
The WDF hosted two check-in meetings and two skills-sharing sessions to facilitate the effectiveness and active participation of the WDF participants in the session.
[Added: 2017/12/25]
GGCA partners 2016/06 Completed
12. Recommendation:

For Phase 4, prepare a joint logframe for all partners with: a) clearly defined activities and results for each partner; and b) SMART outcome indicators, with baselines, targets and means of verification established.

Management Response: [Added: 2017/12/25]

This was addressed in Phase IV of the programme with logframe for partners created.

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
The Results and Resources Framework describes intended outputs (with baseline, indicators and targets for each), along with activity and action planned for each partner to take.
[Added: 2017/12/25]
GGCA partners 2016/06 Completed
13. Recommendation:

Establish a system for measuring outcome indicators.

Management Response: [Added: 2017/12/25] [Last Updated: 2017/12/25]

This was addressed in Phase IV of the programme by establishing a system for measuring outcome indicators.

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
To support information on women’s participation and to measure progress, WEDO continued to report on women’s participation as delegates in each meeting, specified by region and country as well as on boards and bodies.
[Added: 2017/12/25]
GGCA partners 2016/06 Completed
14. Recommendation:

Advocate within UNDP for the addition of new instruments in UNDP Regulations that can allow for the provision of funding for periods longer than three months for NGOs.

Management Response: [Added: 2017/12/25]

This was addressed in Phase IV of the programme, with actions taken to add new instruments in UNDP Regulations.

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
UNDP and partners had six-month work plans during Phase IV of the project.
[Added: 2017/12/25]
GGCA partners 2016/06 Completed
15. Recommendation:

Develop a more democratic and formalised management structure for the Alliance.

Management Response: [Added: 2017/12/25]

This was addressed in Phase IV of the programme, with a more formalised management structure created for the Alliance. 

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
In 2016, the GGCA Secretariat organized an SC strategy meeting on the future of the GGCA Programme, coordinated GGCA membership activities and strategic direction, and managed the GGCA Secretariat budget, consultants and activities. In the second quarter, the GGCA Secretariat convened an all-day in-person meeting of the GGCA Steering Committee to present and discuss GGCA program updates, transitional and future plans. Reports were presented and in-depth discussions were held on the GGCA mapping project, continuance and fundraising strategy, as well as on the GGCA Strategic and Business Plans moving forward. The GGCA coordinator worked on a membership mapping project, fundraising, and communications. The coordinator also collaborated closely with the two GGCA Program Officers, one on programmatic activities such as organizing a first-ever GGCA Members Conference, SEED Grants, the Ambassadors Program and Learning Platform, and the second on the Evidence Base and Research Project. Communications (GGCA website, webinars, emails, listserv) and Monthly Members Calls were held around key events attended by GGCA Members (including Women Deliver in Copenhagen, the Intersessional in Bonn, and UN Environment Assembly in Nairobi).
[Added: 2017/12/25]
GGCA partners 2016/06 Completed

Latest Evaluations

Contact us

220 East 42nd Street
20th Floor
New York, NY 10017
Tel. +1 646 781 4200
Fax. +1 646 781 4213
erc.support@undp.org