Final evaluation of the project "Initial implementation of accelerated HCFC Phase Out in the CEIT Region" PIMS 4309 FSP

Report Cover Image
Evaluation Plan:
2014-2017, RBEC
Evaluation Type:
Final Project
Planned End Date:
03/2018
Completion Date:
10/2018
Status:
Completed
Management Response:
Yes
Evaluation Budget(US $):
85,000

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Title Final evaluation of the project "Initial implementation of accelerated HCFC Phase Out in the CEIT Region" PIMS 4309 FSP
Atlas Project Number: 00066255
Evaluation Plan: 2014-2017, RBEC
Evaluation Type: Final Project
Status: Completed
Completion Date: 10/2018
Planned End Date: 03/2018
Management Response: Yes
Focus Area:
  • 1. Others
Corporate Outcome and Output (UNDP Strategic Plan 2014-2017)
  • 1. Output 1.3. Solutions developed at national and sub-national levels for sustainable management of natural resources, ecosystem services, chemicals and waste
Evaluation Budget(US $): 85,000
Source of Funding: GEF
Evaluation Expenditure(US $): 18,000
Joint Programme: No
Mandatory Evaluation: No
Joint Evaluation: No
Evaluation Team members:
Name Title Email Nationality
Dalybor Kysela Evaluator
GEF Evaluation: Yes
GEF Project Title: HCFC Phase Out in the CEIT Region" PIMS 4309 FSP
Evaluation Type: Terminal Evaluation
Focal Area: Ozone Depleting Substances
Project Type: FSP
GEF Phase: GEF-4
GEF Project ID: 4102
PIMS Number: 4309
Key Stakeholders: UNDP, GEF
Lessons
1.

The project design with the regional component to support the national components allowed for a consistent approach for implementation of the sub-component on ODS legislation through engagement of an international consultant. Moreover, it facilitated establishment of an equal basis of master trainers as a foundation for further cascading down of trainings enforcement officers and RAC service technicians in the participating countries. The centralized procurement of services through the regional component proved to be the efficient waxy of spending the limited project resources.

However, design of future similar projects should take into full account the decentralized project implementation at the multi-country level. Mandatory approval of the project by the implementing agency and all participating governments took about 6 months and in one country there was further delay in establishment of the national project implementation unit. All this resulted in uneven progress in implementation in the four countries which inevitably affected implementation of the regional component.

From this experience, the planned three-year duration proved to be too short for such a complex project and a two-year extension had to be requested. Such extension represented obvious challenges as to the allocation of the project management costs for the regional component and therefore it would be prudent to take into full account the predisposition for extension in the budgetary allocations of future similar regional component’s.

The original project document envisaged that the Project Implementation Unit (PIU) would consist of a 30% part-time project assistant who would work in coordination with the Regional Technical Advisor. This arrangement proved to be vastly insufficient for a project of this complexity and size (the regional component budget allocation US$ 1,080,000 and envisaged support to four countries in two sub-regions). The corrective measure taken at the 2015 Regional Project Board, namely recruitment of the regional Project Manager, albeit on 50%-time allocation basis, was a step in the right direction and dramatically improved effectiveness of the support provided to the substantive activities of the four national components as well as timeliness of the administrative/financial procedures required for the project extension and closure.

The experience gathered with the establishment of the PIU in Uzbekistan provides further evidence that the PIU composition requires a careful consideration at the project design. Instead of a single national project manager, the national Project Steering Committee decided to recruit several experts with expertise in differentiated areas such as investment/demonstration projects, monitoring & evaluation as well as in public relations & outreach. Such division of responsibilities allowed the national Project Manager to concentrate fully on the project management and coordination function while enabled use of a specific expertise for development and practical implementation of innovative activities and production of cutting-edge results such as the on-line monitoring of ODS consumption, development of interactive games and the photo contest on ozone layer protection.

The example of the photo contest, namely that it had expanded from the national component to reach world-wide proportions is an illustration of importance of assistance by the regional component that allocated additional funds and opened communication channels that were not available at the national level. This case also suggests that additional capacity on public outreach and external communication should be considered for any future regional project, at least on a part time basis. Such capacity will also help with translation of the technical language related to the Montreal Protocol into communications easily understandable by the general public and will thus make a notable contribution to the public awareness facet of the project.

The substantive revision of the national component for Ukraine included revision of the original investment technology conversion sub-project of a systems house Polyfoam. The revision included allocation of additional funds for technology conversion at the downstream clients of the systems house. This is considered as good practice for facilitation of technological conversion at SME companies that are not eligible for direct financial assistance due to their low consumption of HCFC. The experience from the completed Polyfoam investment sub-project will be vital for smooth implementation of the newly formulated investment sub-projects at two other systems houses that also include conversion of their downstream clients.

The cancellation of the national pilot ODS waste sub-projects and the subsequent commissioning of the ODS Waste Management Concept for the four countries by the regional component demonstrates beyond reasonable doubt that the area of ODS waste management and disposal requires a regional approach, in particular for smaller countries, given the low amounts of ODS in the current ODS banks in the project countries.

The support from the policy component of the project to initial capacity building on HFC phase-down was incorporated into the project as a response to the recent adoption of the Kigali Amendment of the Montreal Protocol. Although such activities were beyond the scope of the original project they represent an example of a prudent reaction to recent development in the area closely related to the theme of the project.  The exposure of the project beneficiaries to essential information on phase-down of HFC could be considered as an incentive for early ratification of the Kigali Amendment by the project countries and the first step towards future activities on HFC phase-down. The country specific roadmaps elaborated under the ODS Waste Management Concept cover apart from the existing ODS banks also unwanted HFC therefore the capacity building on HFC contributed to the discussion of potential solutions to the ODS waste disposal challenge through improved economy of the joint ODS/HFC management and disposal.

On the contrary, the aspiration of the project to support development of a regional network of RAC associations proved to be too ambitious for two reasons. Firstly, there is no experience with establishment of a similar regional mechanism for the Article 5 countries in the ECA region and secondly, the RAC associations were functional only in two of the four project beneficiary countries. Therefore, support for establishment of RAC associations should be provided primarily under national projects with additional support through bilateral exchanges with countries with already functional RAC associations.

The project has proven enormous value of the support to pilot demonstration sub-projects and confirmed the conducive and catalytic effect international development assistance can have for adoption of ozone-friendly technologies and non-ODS refrigerants by the private sector.  The uptake and replication of the initial project-funded demonstration cases by the private sector beneficiaries attests that such projects can leverage extensive investments into ozone-friendly technologies and refrigerants, in particular as cost performance (including energy efficiency) appears to be dominating factor for private sector investments rather than the environmental performance. Projects that can demonstrate substantive operational cost savings and related profit gains in addition to environmental benefits will have a huge impact on progress in HCFC phase-out and reduction of HCFC and HFC use in refrigeration and AC systems. Last but not least, such projects are a good example of cooperation of UN organization with private sector and in particular show a catalytic role UN can play in demonstration of environmental-friendly technologies and mobilizing of private sector funding


Findings
1.

In order to achieve the objectives, the project was designed as a combination of regional and national assistance approaches and includes:

(a) enabling-type of activities complemented with experience exchange and networking, contained in the regional Component 1; and

(b) specific technical assistance and capacity building activities contained in the country-oriented Component 2.

The project Component 1 addressed barriers associated with incomplete knowledge and awareness about HCFC phase-out. Specifically, the regional component aimed to provide common Russian language regulatory guidance, “train the trainers” opportunities related to enforcement of HCFC legislation, customs control, integration of HCFC phase-out with energy efficiency and GHG reduction, training materials for transfer to national level programs, and expanded country exposure within the existing ECA network. It has been developed to build on the tools and networks currently in place for some CEITs and the Article 5 countries in the Commonwealth of Independent States (CIS) and is to be accessible to all non-Article 5 CIS countries in the region, although direct participatory funding support will be confined to the four countries participating in this project (Belarus, Tajikistan, Ukraine and Uzbekistan).

The project Component 2 on national capacity building and technical assistance targets support to the adoption of the fully completed HCFC phase-out strategy (with selected legislative options to control HCFC import/use), capacity building and supply of analytical and servicing equipment/tools for environmental inspectorate and Customs Department and refrigeration technicians, modernization of HCFC re-use scheme in the country and demonstration of alternative technologies in refrigeration equipment and A/C sectors, ODS destruction, the current absence of effective regulatory instruments and need to support ongoing institutional development and is aligned with Outcome 2.

At the regulatory level, the country specific components were expected to ensure the implementation of enhanced HCFC regulation/import control, enhanced licensing systems, and introduction of HFC monitoring inclusive of working enforcement level training. These components were complemented by training to strengthen enforcement (environmental and Customs officers to control HCFC end-use and imports) and operational refrigeration-servicing sectors (training, certification, RAC Association), including promotion of energy efficiency and GHG reductions during servicing.

In addition, investment programs were proposed to cover technological conversions in solvent and rigid foam sectors as well as pilot retrofit/replacement incentive programs targeting priority high service demand sectors. The investment programmes aimed at strengthening of refrigeration service capacity and optimizing chemicals distribution to allow control of container size, as well as preparing collection/storage modalities for destruction facilitated by a pilot destruction project. Where cost effective/economically sustainable opportunities were identified, pilot investments in direct consumption phase-out were undertaken specifically in the foam, refrigeration and solvent sectors.

The GEF financial support for the phase-out of HCFCs in the four countries proved to be critical in enabling the countries to comply with their obligations as for the accelerated phase-out schedule of the Montreal Protocol valid for Article 2 countries of MP.

In particular, the regional component of the GEF project was important for the review and update of national policies and legislation for control of ODS import and consumption. The regional approach on the legislative sub-component through engagement of an international legal consultant with all four countries ensured provision of a uniform and consistent advice to the project countries to make revisions and update of their national ODS-related legislation based on experience from the member countries of the EU that had experienced similar situation (used to be economies in transition before accession to the EU in 2004). Because of the transboundary movement of ODS linking the CEIT countries, the regional approach was far more effective and efficient than would have been separate and therefore fragmented national approaches.

Three project countries fully followed the international consultant’s recommendations for update of their national legislative frameworks. Two countries (Belarus and Tajikistan) adopted a national strategy and action plan for HCFC phase out until 2020 as envisaged in the project. The other two countries have chosen a more comprehensive approach to incorporate HCFC-related legal provisions into broader pieces of legislation such as the Law on Atmosphere Air Protection in Uzbekistan or the Law on ODS and F-Gases in Ukraine. However, the latter approach proved to be notably slower and more complicated due to the complexities of the more comprehensive legislation.

The government commitment to the HCFC phase-out has been in general better in the two countries that adopted the separate HCFC phase-out strategies. This can be proved by the fact that by the end of the project, Belarus and Tajikistan have adopted and implemented a comprehensive HCFC-related legislative framework including a number of concrete legislative measures to reduce HCFC consumption in line with the accelerated MP schedule. Both countries have effective and transparent licensing and quota system for HCFC import and effective customs controls of ODS transboundary movement. Furthermore, the two countries have banned imports of non-refillable refrigerant containers as well as import of refrigeration and air-conditioning equipment containing or relying upon HCFCs and have introduced annual reporting requirements for enterprises on the type and quantity of ODS imported, used and stored. Overall, the adopted legislative and policy improvements provided important signals to the private as well as public sectors that the time has come to reduce the consumption of HCFCs and/or adopt more ozone-friendly alternative refrigerants and technologies.

The capacity building sub-component was implemented as a combination of the initial regional approach for training of trainers and provision of resource and training materials followed by the cascaded down trainings of customs and enforcement officers as well as RAC service technicians through the national project components. In the RAC service sector, additional ad-hoc support was provided from the regional component in the form of funding for national trainings on natural refrigerants in the four project countries.

The project supported upgrades in the training centres affiliated with national institutes for education of customs officers and environmental inspectors. In Belarus, Tajikistan and Uzbekistan, training programmes for customs and environmental inspectors were incorporated into the national programmes for training and re-training of the enforcement officers thus ensuring that the training on ODS will be sustained beyond the project time boundaries. The enforcement agencies in Tajikistan were provided with two mobile mini-laboratories were equipped for control between the official border-crossings along the entire border. For Belarus and Ukraine, the project provided advanced GC-MS analysers for exact identification of imported ODS refrigerants.

The capacity building sub-component for the customs and enforcement officers have notably improved the national capacities for monitoring of HCFC transboundary movement and interception of illegal ODS shipments through provision of portable refrigerant identifiers for deployment at the main border points. Several cases of seizure of illegally imported ODS by the customs in all four countries reported during the project implementation period prove the effectiveness of this project sub-component.

In the four countries, the capacity building sub-component of the project has compelled and improved reporting on several aspects of ODS and alerted the countries for more vigilance on transboundary movement of and illegal trade in ODS. The latter is a continuous threat that could undermine the otherwise good achievements of the HCFC phase-out. The HCFC-based equipment constitutes an on-going demand for HCFC refrigerant.

Training programmes for RAC service technicians were developed in cooperation with prime national educational institutions in Belarus, Tajikistan and Ukraine. Master trainers educated in the train-the trainers events organized by the regional component facilitated 3-5 days training programmes for a sizeable number of RAC service technicians on good practices in installation, maintenance and servicing of RAC equipment. In addition to the trainings, RAC servicing equipment and tools were distributed to the service workshops that were represented in the trainings.

Through implementation of this sub-component, the project helped to reduce amount of HCFC vented to the atmosphere as a result of unsuitable practices in RAC servicing. It has also produced economic benefits as the trainings enabled several RAC service workshops to accept more requests for servicing advanced more sophisticated RAC equipment and create new jobs for service technicians.

In Belarus and Tajikistan, the trainings were organized under cooperation with the national Refrigeration Associations. Such cooperation notably increases sustainability of the training efforts as the RAC Associations were helpful in introduction of voluntary certification for RAC service technicians. Although mandatory certification of RAC technicians was considered by the participating countries, the relevant legislative measures were not introduced by the end of the project. In the continued absence of the national RAC Association in Uzbekistan, the UNDP project team substituted its function, but this is obviously not sustainable beyond the project time boundaries.

The project has also contributed to establishment of centralized or semi-centralized national schemes for ODS recollection, recycling and reclamation in Belarus, Tajikistan and Uzbekistan. Thirteen ODS recollection & recycling centres were provided with refrigerant recovery units and tools and four ODS reclamation centres received advanced refrigerant reclaim units. This sub-component also triggered collection of data on amounts of ODS recycled and reclaimed for reuse in Belarus and Tajikistan and similar work is in progress in Uzbekistan. Although the essential hardware for establishment of the national R&R schemes was provided, there is still amount work to be done in order to achieve full operation of the schemes as the evaluation found some reclaim centres not been fully linked for provision of refrigerant purification services to all workshops with ODS recovery units.

There are no incentives for ODS end-users (in particular from the residential sector) to call for services of trained and certified refrigeration service technicians. This is in particular problem in Tajikistan and Uzbekistan where the so called “suitcase technicians” constitute by estimation about 20-25 % of RAC service operations. This situation will persist in the continued absence of certification for RAC service technicians and licensing of RAC service workshops. 

As a direct effect of the establishment of the ODS recycling and reclaim schemes, sizeable number of containers with used ODS of unknown composition have been accumulated in some of the R&R centres. In this regard, the evaluation found that the persisting lack of HCFC standards for advanced methods of chemical analysis (other than portable refrigerant identifiers) not only impedes full use of the upgraded laboratory capacities (gas chromatography) for control of ODS import but also prevents identification and determination of the used ODS when composition is not known. Consequently, unidentifiable ODS block a sizeable portion of refillable refrigerant containers at some R&R centres.

The targeted HCFC investment and demonstration sub-components have provided direct support for conversion of selected eligible enterprises in the manufacturing sector in Belarus, Ukraine and Uzbekistan to ozone friendly technologies. In all four countries, this sub-component facilitated introduction of energy efficient technologies based on low GWP refrigerants such as ammonia for chillers or propane for AC systems. The sub-component in Tajikistan tested an innovative method of natural cooling for relay stations of mobile telephone operators. This demonstration project has proven that such interventions have a catalytic effect and further replication by the private sector beneficiaries will be driven by the sizeable economic rather than environmental benefits.

Procurement was found cost-effective when a regional approach was taken, such as translation of information materials and training manuals into Russian using the existing LTA for translation of one of the participation UNDP CO. However, procurement of equipment and tools was conducted under a national approach. In total, more than 80 portable refrigerant identifiers and several hundreds of sets with refrigerant service tools were procured under the project but the procurement was conducted separately in the four countries. Moreover, procurement of major equipment for conversion of the manufacturing enterprises in Belarus and Ukraine did not take into full account the necessity to ensure availability of warranty and after sale services in the recipient or at least neighbouring countries. Consequently, the procurement of major equipment was unnecessarily protracted. 

The project has demonstrated innovative approaches for public outreach in the form of an international photo contest that received a world-wide attention.

It can be concluded that the regional project with its national components made a substantive contribution to removal of a majority of barriers that had prevented three of the participating countries from effective implementation of the Montreal Protocol obligations. Remaining barriers in Ukraine that could not been addressed due to the delays in implementation of the Ukraine national component are subject of the revised national project and will be addressed during the 2-year extension of this component.


Recommendations
1

UNDP should ensure that standards of frequently used ODS are provided to the countries implementing ODS reduction projects to enable both qualitative and quantitative analysis of refrigerants and refrigerant mixtures. In case internationally certified standards can’t be imported to the project countries, support should be provided for development and local certification of ODS proxy standards using imported virgin refrigerants of declared purity.

2

UNDP should consider provision of sufficient number of refillable refrigerant containers to the already established as well as new refrigerant reclaiming centers.

3

UNDP should ensure that international advice on good practices in refrigerant reclamation industry, including advice on elaboration of technical and business plans, is provided to the countries implementing ODS reduction projects in order to improve operations of their national reclamation schemes.

4

UNDP in cooperation with countries implementing ODS reduction projects should develop outreach activities aiming at the end-users of RAC equipment to explain risks and disadvantages of engagements with the informal servicing sub-sector. The end-user outreach programmes should in particular advocate that cheaper immediate options tend to lead to greater costs in the long term and as well as a worse environmental impact.

5

UNDP together with the countries implementing ODS reduction projects should monitor developments under the UNIDO regional demonstration project on ODS disposal and ensure that national reporting systems are developed and functional for inventories of unwanted ODS and that information on the stock of ODS waste is readily available once a viable solution is proposed by the UNIDO project.

6

UNDP should consider conducting an analysis of economic benefits of good practices in refrigeration servicing and retirement of ODS-based equipment for inclusion in public outreach programmes directed on SMEs and residential segment of the end users.

7

UNDP should ensure enlarged participation of qualified national trainers in future ODS-related train-the-trainers programmes and to the extent possible organize T-o-T events with the established refrigerant training centers in the ECA region in order to improve cost-effectiveness and overcome the language barrier.

8

UNDP should ensure that national counterparts from the countries implementing ODS reduction projects learn from the experience with the use of CO2 as refrigerant in the region. E-courses, study tours and train-the trainers programmes could be organized with the Training Centre on use of CO2 as refrigerant that was established at the NORD O.O.O. company in Moscow.

9

UNDP should ensure that indicators in the results framework are attached to a time frame and state when they will be measured. The timely dimension of the indicators will allow for prioritization of actions in the project implementation plans.

10

 

For procurement of portable refrigerant identifiers and RAC service tool kits, UNDP should consider either to conclude own LTAs or use LTAs already in place at sister organizations of the UN system that have acquired experience with procurement of equipment items for MP projects (e.g. UNIDO).

11

UNDP should ensure that Terms of Reference (ToR) for procurement of major equipment items contain clear definition of related services to be guaranteed by the equipment suppliers, in particular that the supplier’s after sale service agents are operational in the recipient country or at least in the neighboring country. Provision of the after-sale services should be one of the criteria for commercial evaluation of bids submitted under the procurement event.

12

UNDP should ensure that national project implementation teams establish on-going operational monitoring on actually provided co-financing for the projects.

1. Recommendation:

UNDP should ensure that standards of frequently used ODS are provided to the countries implementing ODS reduction projects to enable both qualitative and quantitative analysis of refrigerants and refrigerant mixtures. In case internationally certified standards can’t be imported to the project countries, support should be provided for development and local certification of ODS proxy standards using imported virgin refrigerants of declared purity.

Management Response: [Added: 2017/12/29] [Last Updated: 2018/10/19]

 

Recommendation does not target the regional component of the project; therefore, no key action is provided.

Key Actions:

2. Recommendation:

UNDP should consider provision of sufficient number of refillable refrigerant containers to the already established as well as new refrigerant reclaiming centers.

Management Response: [Added: 2018/10/19]

Recommendation does not target the regional component of the project; therefore, no key action is provided.

Key Actions:

3. Recommendation:

UNDP should ensure that international advice on good practices in refrigerant reclamation industry, including advice on elaboration of technical and business plans, is provided to the countries implementing ODS reduction projects in order to improve operations of their national reclamation schemes.

Management Response: [Added: 2018/10/19]

Recommendation does not target the regional component of the project; therefore, no key action is provided.

Key Actions:

4. Recommendation:

UNDP in cooperation with countries implementing ODS reduction projects should develop outreach activities aiming at the end-users of RAC equipment to explain risks and disadvantages of engagements with the informal servicing sub-sector. The end-user outreach programmes should in particular advocate that cheaper immediate options tend to lead to greater costs in the long term and as well as a worse environmental impact.

Management Response: [Added: 2018/10/19]

Recommendation does not target the regional component of the project; therefore, no key action is provided.

Key Actions:

5. Recommendation:

UNDP together with the countries implementing ODS reduction projects should monitor developments under the UNIDO regional demonstration project on ODS disposal and ensure that national reporting systems are developed and functional for inventories of unwanted ODS and that information on the stock of ODS waste is readily available once a viable solution is proposed by the UNIDO project.

Management Response: [Added: 2018/10/19]

Recommendation does not target the regional component of the project; therefore, no key action is provided.

Key Actions:

6. Recommendation:

UNDP should consider conducting an analysis of economic benefits of good practices in refrigeration servicing and retirement of ODS-based equipment for inclusion in public outreach programmes directed on SMEs and residential segment of the end users.

Management Response: [Added: 2018/10/19]

Recommendation does not target the regional component of the project; therefore, no key action is provided.

Key Actions:

7. Recommendation:

UNDP should ensure enlarged participation of qualified national trainers in future ODS-related train-the-trainers programmes and to the extent possible organize T-o-T events with the established refrigerant training centers in the ECA region in order to improve cost-effectiveness and overcome the language barrier.

Management Response: [Added: 2018/10/19]

 

Recommendation does not target the regional component of the project; therefore, no key action is provided.

Key Actions:

8. Recommendation:

UNDP should ensure that national counterparts from the countries implementing ODS reduction projects learn from the experience with the use of CO2 as refrigerant in the region. E-courses, study tours and train-the trainers programmes could be organized with the Training Centre on use of CO2 as refrigerant that was established at the NORD O.O.O. company in Moscow.

Management Response: [Added: 2018/10/19]

Recommendation does not target the regional component of the project; therefore, no key action is provided.

Key Actions:

9. Recommendation:

UNDP should ensure that indicators in the results framework are attached to a time frame and state when they will be measured. The timely dimension of the indicators will allow for prioritization of actions in the project implementation plans.

Management Response: [Added: 2018/10/19]

This recommendation is already in place. As per the POPP UNDP implemented projects have a time frame in terms of annual targets which are entered in Atlas yearly and Project Board reviews/approves AWPs, targets and results on annual basis. Therefore, no key action is provided.

Key Actions:

10. Recommendation:

 

For procurement of portable refrigerant identifiers and RAC service tool kits, UNDP should consider either to conclude own LTAs or use LTAs already in place at sister organizations of the UN system that have acquired experience with procurement of equipment items for MP projects (e.g. UNIDO).

Management Response: [Added: 2018/10/19]

Recommendation is relevant based on the experiences related to procurement cases organized at national level. Considerations of establishing UNDP LTA or using existing LTAs at sister organizations of the UN System are already valid/known approaches given in the procurement section of the POPP.

At regional level, considering specificity of the recommendation, UNDP IRH can contact the respective unit of UNIDO to receive information on availability and requirements of the mentioned LTA at global level and then transfer the relevant information to focal points at UNDP COs of project countries for their further assessment of feasibility of using such LTAs at their context.

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
10.1. Contact UNIDO for the LTA in place for the procurement of refrigerant identifier and RAC service tools; and then inform focal points at project countries with details of the LTA.
[Added: 2018/10/19]
Regional Project Management Unit 2018/11 Overdue-Initiated
11. Recommendation:

UNDP should ensure that Terms of Reference (ToR) for procurement of major equipment items contain clear definition of related services to be guaranteed by the equipment suppliers, in particular that the supplier’s after sale service agents are operational in the recipient country or at least in the neighboring country. Provision of the after-sale services should be one of the criteria for commercial evaluation of bids submitted under the procurement event.

Management Response: [Added: 2018/10/19]

Although recommendation related to after sale services is relevant based on the project’s experience at national level, POPPs for procurement already covers such recommendations related to service guarantee.

As there will be no follow up project implemented at regional level, this recommendation can be addressed to ensure better procurement management under follow up projects in Belarus, Tajikistan and Uzbekistan. In the meantime, in order to support enforcement of this recommendation UNDP IRH can provide to project’s focal points at UNDP COs a ToR example (of very recent procurement case on another GEF financed regional project, GEF/MedWaste Africa project, implemented at UNDP IRH) which includes responsibilities and evaluation criteria for after sale service guarantee.

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
11.1. Share with UNDP CO focal points at project countries, a ToR of the procurement of non-incineration technologies (under GEF/MedWaste Africa project) as an example of ensuring after sale service guarantee.
[Added: 2018/10/19]
Regional Project Management Unit 2018/11 Overdue-Initiated
12. Recommendation:

UNDP should ensure that national project implementation teams establish on-going operational monitoring on actually provided co-financing for the projects.

Management Response: [Added: 2018/10/19]

Recommendation is relevant based on project management experience at national level. Meanwhile, UNDP IRH can remind the relevant GEF guidance notes on co-financing to the UNDP CO focal points at project countries to support better monitoring on co-financing.

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
12.1. Share with UNDP CO focal points at project countries, relevant GEF guidelines on co-financing to support better monitoring of co-financing.
[Added: 2018/10/19]
Regional Project Management Unit 2018/11 Overdue-Initiated

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