Final Evaluation: Increasing Climate Resilience through an Integrated Water Resources Management Programme

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Evaluation Plan:
2011-2015, Maldives
Evaluation Type:
Final Project
Planned End Date:
07/2015
Completion Date:
04/2016
Status:
Completed
Management Response:
Yes
Evaluation Budget(US $):
20,000

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Title Final Evaluation: Increasing Climate Resilience through an Integrated Water Resources Management Programme
Atlas Project Number: 00061753
Evaluation Plan: 2011-2015, Maldives
Evaluation Type: Final Project
Status: Completed
Completion Date: 04/2016
Planned End Date: 07/2015
Management Response: Yes
Focus Area:
  • 1. Others
Corporate Outcome and Output (UNDP Strategic Plan 2014-2017)
  • 1. Output 5.4. Preparedness systems in place to effectively address the consequences of and response to natural hazards (e.g. geo-physical and climate related) and man-made crisis at all levels of government and community
SDG Goal
  • Goal 12. Ensure sustainable consumption and production patterns
  • Goal 9. Build resilient infrastructure, promote inclusive and sustainable industrialization and foster innovation
SDG Target
  • 12.4 By 2020, achieve the environmentally sound management of chemicals and all wastes throughout their life cycle, in accordance with agreed international frameworks, and significantly reduce their release to air, water and soil in order to minimize their adverse impacts on human health and the environment
  • 9.4 By 2030, upgrade infrastructure and retrofit industries to make them sustainable, with increased resource-use efficiency and greater adoption of clean and environmentally sound technologies and industrial processes, with all countries taking action in accordance with their respective capabilities
Evaluation Budget(US $): 20,000
Source of Funding: AF
Evaluation Expenditure(US $): 22,847
Joint Programme: No
Joint Evaluation: No
Evaluation Team members:
Name Title Email Nationality
GEF Evaluation: No
Key Stakeholders:
Countries: MALDIVES
Lessons
1.

Put the water customer first. Island communities are not helpless recipients of gifted aid.  A sea change is needed in how the investments funds are perceived, irrespective of the source of funding. If the project rests on the assumption that customers will pay for the service, design it so that it is user-friendly, affordable, it has quality materials and fittings, and it provides the quality of water that the customers are expecting


2.

These innovative, integrated types of projects will not be inexpensive to install. The projects must have the appropriate staff on the contractor team and the supervisory team, and be prepared to pay for the cost of the expertise in order to achieve for effective long-term results.   Climate change implies a departure from the observed climate patterns and a departure from a business-as-usual is needed. Because climate change will impact on water resources, emphasis must be placed on understanding the water resources available to an island in order to design an appropriate solution. 


3.

Rainwater harvesting capacity above ground was much smaller than envisaged in the project Results Framework and too small to provide the water blend envisaged in the project document for affordability reasons.  The lesson learned here is that alternative ways of rainwater harvesting should be investigated for small island environment in Maldives, including below ground options. All options should be explored. Adaptation to climate requires experimentation with different approaches.  Climate change will bring unprecedented changes


4.

Mobilising households to determine the requirements for a service and developing the business model should frame the technical design, in the spirit of designing a sustainable, user-led system. Experience in Maldives has shown on many occasions that reverse osmosis plants have broken down in the past because of a lack of demand for desalinated water outside of the dry season. 


5.

 Contracts must be appropriately packaged. Smaller packages means that reputed firms do not compete and the contractors are more costly to monitor and supervise. An efficient procurement strategy would establish a performance-based integrated supply, fitting and operation of the system to give contractors the incentive to install an effective system. A clear, agreed and single objective for the project will help to deliver the intended results


6.

Structure the implementation team in a manner than enhanced cooperation and accountability. Ensure that the appropriate mix of skills is represented and empowered to act in the team


Findings
Recommendations
1

1. Replace PVC pipes in the rainwater harvesting system and fix all the connections so that they have a reasonable chance of last for a few years. This should be done urgently in all three islands as the year of defective liability in relation to the pipe supplies will be ending in October 2016.

2

2. Carry out a compliance check against materials specification and installation standards approved by EPA and replace the materials that do not comply. This is important to ensure sustainability over time

3

3. Start up the desalinated water supply and get the system working. The system was designed to work with a 25% rainwater mix and without it the system will be more expensive but the additional costs could be covered by production of freshwater supplies to the surrounding islands. Apart from needing to use the system in order to keep the warranty on the plant, prevent damage to the pipes and to keep the trained personnel on the job, this is also a matter of public relations given the negative feelings among households about the project. A grace period may be needed to build confidence among households in the water supply system before charges can be applied

4

4. Retrofit the GRP tanks on the three islands to include more compartments which would increase rainwater storage capacity, benefitting the affordability of the combined system.

5

5. Carry out a risk assessment for the combined systems on the three islands and address the risks to sustainability, for example, the risk of accidental damage, the risk of vandalism, the risk of machine failure and the risk of heavy rainfall events.

1. Recommendation:

1. Replace PVC pipes in the rainwater harvesting system and fix all the connections so that they have a reasonable chance of last for a few years. This should be done urgently in all three islands as the year of defective liability in relation to the pipe supplies will be ending in October 2016.

Management Response: [Added: 2019/02/01]

This has been rectified through project and through UNOPS and government investment. 

Key Actions:

2. Recommendation:

2. Carry out a compliance check against materials specification and installation standards approved by EPA and replace the materials that do not comply. This is important to ensure sustainability over time

Management Response: [Added: 2019/02/01]

This has been completed during life of project. 

Key Actions:

3. Recommendation:

3. Start up the desalinated water supply and get the system working. The system was designed to work with a 25% rainwater mix and without it the system will be more expensive but the additional costs could be covered by production of freshwater supplies to the surrounding islands. Apart from needing to use the system in order to keep the warranty on the plant, prevent damage to the pipes and to keep the trained personnel on the job, this is also a matter of public relations given the negative feelings among households about the project. A grace period may be needed to build confidence among households in the water supply system before charges can be applied

Management Response: [Added: 2019/02/01]

Systems have been started up and are now operational by end of project life. O&M is being managed by state utilities Fenaka and STELCO. Community uptake has also improved as public confidence has grown. 

Key Actions:

4. Recommendation:

4. Retrofit the GRP tanks on the three islands to include more compartments which would increase rainwater storage capacity, benefitting the affordability of the combined system.

Management Response: [Added: 2019/02/01]

2 tank system has been established. 

Key Actions:

5. Recommendation:

5. Carry out a risk assessment for the combined systems on the three islands and address the risks to sustainability, for example, the risk of accidental damage, the risk of vandalism, the risk of machine failure and the risk of heavy rainfall events.

Management Response: [Added: 2019/02/01]

Assessment has been carried out by a local expert who assessed the issues associated with the proejct from design to consturciton to commissioning to O&M. This report is now used as best practices

Key Actions:

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