Terminal Evaluation of the UNDP Support to Health Sector in Limpopo Programme: Phase III

Report Cover Image
Evaluation Plan:
2013-2020, South Africa
Evaluation Type:
Final Project
Planned End Date:
03/2016
Completion Date:
12/2016
Status:
Completed
Management Response:
Yes
Evaluation Budget(US $):
14,100

Share

Document Type Language Size Status Downloads
Download document Terms of Reference Project Evaluation- Final July 2015.pdf tor English 491.13 KB Posted 484
Download document Phase III Final Evaluation 2015.docx.pdf report English 1385.24 KB Posted 595
Title Terminal Evaluation of the UNDP Support to Health Sector in Limpopo Programme: Phase III
Atlas Project Number: 00058382
Evaluation Plan: 2013-2020, South Africa
Evaluation Type: Final Project
Status: Completed
Completion Date: 12/2016
Planned End Date: 03/2016
Management Response: Yes
Focus Area:
  • 1. Poverty and MDG
  • 2. Democratic Governance
  • 3. Others
Corporate Outcome and Output (UNDP Strategic Plan 2014-2017)
  • 1. Output 3.2. Functions, financing and capacity of sub-national level institutions enabled to deliver improved basic services and respond to priorities voiced by the public
SDG Goal
  • Goal 1. End poverty in all its forms everywhere
  • Goal 3. Ensure healthy lives and promote well-being for all at all ages
SDG Target
  • 1.4 By 2030, ensure that all men and women, in particular the poor and the vulnerable, have equal rights to economic resources, as well as access to basic services, ownership and control over land and other forms of property, inheritance, natural resources, appropriate new technology and financial services, including microfinance
  • 3.3 By 2030, end the epidemics of AIDS, tuberculosis, malaria and neglected tropical diseases and combat hepatitis, water-borne diseases and other communicable diseases
Evaluation Budget(US $): 14,100
Source of Funding: Cost-sharing
Joint Programme: No
Joint Evaluation: Yes
  • Joint with UNDP, Limopo Department of Health
Evaluation Team members:
Name Title Email Nationality
Andires Mr andriesmangokwana@yahoo.com
GEF Evaluation: No
Key Stakeholders: UNV, Health Professions Council of South Africa,
Countries: SOUTH AFRICA
Comments:

The evaluation will assess the overall contribution of the programme to the Government of Limpopo efforts in improving health service delivery as set out in the programme document, in particular, strengthening the capacity of the Department of Health on strategic planning, monitoring and evaluation, promoting advocacy for volunteerism, MDGs domestication, human rights, and gender equality

Lessons
1.

Programme Design and Implementation Approach: The design of the programme needs to ensure that problems are diagnosed and that proposed interventions respond to the needs of the Department and, most importantly, to the programme beneficiaries. Establishing proper institutional arrangements is key to an effective and efficient programme.


2.

Communication is an essential ingredient of a successful programme. Both stakeholders and in particular hosting health facilities should be properly briefed about the objectives of the programme and its requirements.

 

3. Sustainability: The lesson emerging from the programme is that sustainability should be seen in its wider context, not only in terms of finances. Transfer of skills and mentoring is a key component of sustaining the efforts and achievements made in the programme.

 

4. Target setting should not be done in isolation of the complex regulatory environment that the programme operates under. It is important to take into account what has been achieved in the previous phases of the Programme and understand the regulatory processes that could impact on the achievement of the target.


Findings
1.

4.1 Programme Design/Implementation

Approach The UNDP Support to the Health Sector was borne out of an agreement between the Department of Health in Limpopo and the UNDP and was intended to support health care service delivery in the province of Limpopo. The UNDP support stems from a cooperation agreement signed in 1994 to provide South Africa with development assistance. The Province of Limpopo is an exemplary province in the country that welcomed the support to its Health Sector. The Project Document was signed off on 2 September 2009 by UNDP and Limpopo DOH representatives

Implementation of Phase III began in October 2009 and was conceptualised with four complementary sub-programmes in mind. This phase is an extension of Phase I and Phase II which were implemented in sequence from 2002. Phase III comprised the following programmes:

 


Tag: Challenges Relevance Health Sector Programme/Project Design Project and Programme management UNDP Management

2.

Sub-Programme 1: Recruitment and placement of volunteers

This sub-programme is the foundation of the entire programme, and was implemented through the two phases mentioned above. The objectives of this sub-programme were:

  •  to recruit volunteer doctors abroad and place them in needy Limpopo hospitals;
  •  for UNVs and health professionals to work with local hospital management to improve health facility performance in terms of the organisational management, learning and the professional growth of local health personnel;
  •  to institutionalise the local volunteerism programme.

Tag: Challenges Health Sector Human and Financial resources Capacity Building Institutional Strengthening Technical Support

3.

Sub-Programme 2: Health Planning Support Programme (Health Economics)

Its objective was to appoint a health economist to strengthen health service planning, capacity of local health personnel at policy and planning levels, through analysis, development and institutionalisation of effective health planning


Tag: Challenges Health Sector Capacity Building Institutional Strengthening

4.

Sub-Programme 3: Knowledge management and leadership development

It was envisaged to establish a Health Knowledge Management Centre to systematically generate, collect, store and utilise information to inform strategic planning processes. This programme was aimed to facilitate knowledge sharing between local and international practitioners. A leadership development programme was also planned to enhance the capacities of relevant local Senior Managers to improve on overall departmental performance.


Tag: Challenges Health Sector Knowledge management Capacity Building Policy Advisory Technical Support

5.

Sub-Programme 4: Monitoring and evaluation, which includes the domestication of MDGs

The sub-programme was introduced to assist with the establishment of the provincial Department of Health Service Delivery (DOHSD) M&E System to improve on service delivery, accountability and strategic planning. It was also aimed to assist with the domestication of MDGs within the Limpopo DOH.


Tag: Challenges Impact Health Sector MDGs Monitoring and Evaluation Sustainability Capacity Building Agenda 2030

6.

Draft Report: Terminal Evaluation of the UNDP Support to Health Sector in Limpopo Programme: Phase III

 The Project Document fully describes the Program Logic in the form of Results and Resources Framework tables reflecting the sub-programmes. This could however be expanded and reviewed on an annual basis to reflect changing circumstances. There was an attempt to create the indicators for outputs and outcomes to establish the basis for a theory of change. There was a clear integration of the Logical Framework with the Departmental strategic goals.


Tag: Challenges Health Sector Monitoring and Evaluation Strategic Positioning

7.

Implementation Approach

The delivery of this project is carried out through the Programme and Administration Coordinator, with support and oversight from UNDP Pretoria. As envisaged in the programme design, each sub-programme was supposed to have a technical manager. For instance, the Knowledge Management Programme Officer was employed to run the Knowledge Management Programme and Leadership sub-programme, and the Health Economist the Health Planning sub-programme. While the former was appointed but relieved of his duties in September 2012, the latter never got deployed. In addition, the Programme Manager for the PMU also vacated the position in November 2012. This was mainly due to inability by the DOH to secure funding for the other three programmes, which resulted in the restructuring of the PMU.


Tag: Relevance Health Sector Implementation Modality Project and Programme management Country Government Capacity Building

8.

4.2 Institutional Arrangements and Programme Management

The DOH is responsible for the political leadership and strategic focus of the programme, including placement of the UNVs within the health facilities in the province. The policy and advisory role on strategic issues and oversight lies with the Project Steering Committee (PSC). See the envisaged Organogram in Figure 1 below. The PSC comprised the DOH, UNDP and PMU Manager (ex-officio). Allocation of funds, project reviews, approvals, progress reports and challenges facing the project are issues to be discussed in the PSC meetings.


Tag: Relevance Global Fund Health Sector Implementation Modality Project and Programme management Country Government

9.

At the programmatic level, a Project Management Unit was set up in June/July 2010 to coordinate the day-to-day activities of the programme. Initially, it employed four staff members, namely, the Programme Manager, Programme Officer for Knowledge Management, Programme and Administration Coordinator, and the Programme Driver. As one respondent aptly put it, “The establishment of the PMU was a brilliant idea since it came from Government realising that they will not be able to manage and co-ordinate all the tasks for the effective and efficient smooth operation of the programme”.

Unfortunately, due to financial challenges and the subsequent suspension of subprogrammes 2, 3 and 4, there was staff rationalisation to align the PMU structure to its narrow scope of work and that led to the Programme Manager and Programme Officer being released from their posts in 2012/13. The Overall Coordinator and Programme Driver are the only ones currently running the Polokwane UNDP office with support from the UNDP focal person.

This had a negative impact on the delivery of the programme. As one respondent put it, “The response rate became slow and UNVs that were earmarked to join the programme lost interest”.

 


Tag: Challenges Project and Programme management Strategic Positioning Policy Advisory

10.

4.3 Effectiveness

Output 1: 192 Health and Allied Professionals recruited and deployed in Limpopo Province

In total there were 40 doctors (representing 48%) recruited and deployed in Limpopo across 16 hospitals during Phase III. Table 3 below shows the number and hospitals where they were deployed. The target for doctors was 120. The map below indicates where the doctors were placed. The recruitment of 12 clinical engineers, 40 pharmacists and 20 specialist nurses could not be achieved through this programme as the respective Councils for Pharmacists and nurses do not have provision for ‘’volunteer’’ category in their respective registration process.


Tag: Effectiveness Relevance Health Sector Human and Financial resources Country Government Regional Institutions

11.

Output 2: A successful volunteerism programme to enhance commitment of local health professionals to serve in disadvantaged areas as a result of an increased appreciation of volunteerism

Apart from the number of doctors decreasing from time to time due to repatriation, the appreciation of the presence of the UNV doctors by all stakeholders, especially hospitals, cannot be overstated. As one respondent put it, “an extra pair of hands of any doctor is a blessing” to the CEO, clinical managers, and nursing staff. In some instances, like in Mecklenburg hospital, the doctors were readily available and willing to see patients whether or not it was outside of working hours. That spirit of volunteerism has encouraged other younger doctors to stay a bit longer in the rural hospitals by observing the dedication of the UNV doctors to the local hospitals. As a result, as one clinical manager observed, “more patients were saved, queues were shortened and more operations were undertaken”.

The volunteerism spirit has also rubbed off on other stakeholders who were involved in the programme. As one respondent commented that “South Africans are used to thinking of a volunteer as someone unskilled and unemployed. It has made me think about doing something in my community when I see the passion and commitment of these doctors.”


Tag: Challenges Efficiency Health Crises Health Sector Institutional Strengthening

12.

Output 3: A successfully implemented mentorship programme

The programme is recruiting highly professional, specialist doctors with the aim of transferring knowledge and skills to young doctors locally. It was found that the mentorship programme may not be as structured as intended and yet it appears to be working at two different levels.

Typically doctors have daily meetings with their Head of Department to discuss clinical issues and procedures that may have been performed or are to be performed. These meetings bring about a sufficient exchange of information between local doctors and UNV doctors. They create an opportunity to interrogate different approaches to medical problems and learn from each other’s expertise.


Tag: Efficiency Relevance Health Sector Policies & Procedures Capacity Building Youth

13.

Output 4: A successfully institutionalised retention strategy for local doctors and health personnel

The retention of doctors, whether of intern doctors or doctors completing their period of community service, is challenging in some respects and the DOH is still grappling with this issue. There are some hospitals that have less retention capacity and others that are retention magnets either by default or design. The dominant external factors affecting retention are the locality of the hospital. If the hospital is too rural and the accommodation is not up to the standard expected by the doctors, there is a tendency for doctors not to stay longer in such places. The depth of the rural environment on its own is at the heart of the brain drain. In skills development terms, it is referred to as relative scarcity when suitably qualified people that are available have a preference of geographic location.

Some hospitals have not yet benefited from infrastructure revitalisation. Houses developed for accommodation are either few or in a state that does not meet all the specifications expected by the doctors or hospitals. The shortage of medical equipment, the amount of surgical equipment in a state of disrepair, as well as insufficient infrastructure to cater for the high volume of patients, are common disincentives for retention and continuation of voluntary work. There was one hospital sampled that has no space for doctors to rest, write reports or meet during working hours.

This underscores the importance of health planning and reinforced the complementarity and soundness of the programme design of Phase III which had additional sub programmes.


Tag: Effectiveness Health Crises Health Sector Regional Institutions

14.

Output 5: Institutionalisation of a roadmap for effective health planning

There was no data gathered to measure this output and its effectiveness. This is the one area that was affected by lack of funding in that the position of Health Economist to impact policy and planning was never effected.


Tag: Effectiveness Relevance Health Sector

15.

Output 6: A functional Information Nerve

Centre The purpose of this activity was threefold. Firstly, the UNDP provided technical assistance in creating platforms for the exchange of information and knowledge, and facilitated collaboration between health professionals. These platforms will encourage and stimulate the transfer of tools and skills to enhance the development of individual and organisational capacity for improved health service delivery in Limpopo.


Tag: Effectiveness Health Sector Knowledge management Policies & Procedures Project and Programme management Capacity Building National Institutions

16.

Output 7: The enhancement of M&E

The intention to establish an M&E system is well-documented in the project document. From the DOH, institutional management and doctors there is consistent anecdotal evidence that with an M&E system in place there is improved service delivery from doctors and hospital management, and a stronger chance of achieving the relevant MDG.


Tag: Effectiveness MDGs Monitoring and Evaluation Technical Support

17.

4.4 Efficiency

At the time of conceptualisation the approved budget for the roll-out of Phase III was set at R287,133,000 (USD 36,300,000 ). The contribution made by the DOH for the duration of the programme amounted to R50, 707,983. It had a shortfall of R236 425 017.

It is acknowledged that the DOH should have provided more funding had it not been for the two-year period of austerity brought about by the Department being placed under administration.

The policy directed at overtime appears to be a good attempt to manage costs even though it has limitations. CTO serves to give doctors leave in lieu of overtime. Indeed time off provides opportunity for medical officers to rest and recharge, but it can also be counterproductive by taking doctors away from treating patients. Furthermore, the absence of doctors due to leave puts pressure on those doctors who remain at work. There is also a perception among UNV doctors that local doctors do receive monetary compensation for overtime and therefore they (UNVs) are being discriminated against. The perception of unequal treatment seems to create animosity and unnecessary tension.


Tag: Efficiency Resource mobilization Human and Financial resources Project and Programme management

18.

4.5 Relevance

The responsiveness of the needs and alignment of the programme to Government priorities has been established. This programme responds directly to the acute shortage of medical doctors, particularly in rural areas. The recruitment and placement of volunteer doctors has contributed immensely in making health care accessible to rural residents.

Queues were cut short or managed better because the patient-to-doctor ratio improved. The average number of hours served by each doctor per hospital is 151 per month. Over time, due to increased service volumes, the doctor-to-patient ratio has decreased from 18:100,000 in 2011/12 to 16:100,000 in 2012/13 (Annual Report, 2013/2014).


Tag: Relevance Health Crises Health Sector Capacity Building Institutional Strengthening Policy Advisory

19.

4.6 Sustainability

The issue of retention is a key factor for the success of the project in Limpopo because of the province’s predominantly rural nature. It has an estimated population of 5 million people, 40 hospitals, 22 health centres and 416 clinics. Due to the mobility of health professionals, a dire shortage of health professionals severely compromises the province’s capacity for health care service delivery.

There is agreement from all stakeholders that the resources to support the UNDP programme must be improved if the project is to be continued. The financial and nonfinancial (governance, human resources management and development) support must be in place whether or not UNVs are deployed. While it is true that the cost of retention is less than the cost of recruitment in the long term, it is also true that resources invested today will show savings in later years. Affording UNVs the opportunity to attend medical conferences, seminars or training workshops is a welcome gesture that will not only benefit the doctors involved but the very hospitals at which they are deployed to provide health care services.


Tag: Relevance Sustainability Health Crises Health Sector

20.

Respondents identified the following key factors as critical for the model to be replicated:

  •  There must be a real, justifiable need for the model to work, for instance, a shortage of doctors due to factors such as rural conditions. These conditions must precipitate relative or absolute scarcity. The latter situation relates to instances where suitably qualified people are not available at all.
  •  Financial Resources and Human Resources: that is, money and doctors including allied professionals.
  •  A responsive recruitment system with reasonable turnaround times, ideally less than six months.
  •  Deployment of doctors on a hospital need-informed basis, i.e. quantity of medical officers and their areas of specialisation must match the defined need.
  •  Consistent support system for the Department and the hospital management both in terms of revitalisation of hospitals and furnishing adequate equipment.

Tag: Sustainability Health Crises Health Sector Harmonization Capacity Building

21.

4.7 Impact

From the Department of Health Annual Plan 2014/2015, the following key achievements were noted.

  •  TB case detection has improved from 21,849 in 2008 to 19,513 in 2013;
  •  TB cure rate has improved from 67.4% in 2008 to 76.6 % in 2012
  •  Smear conversion rate has improved from 59% in 2008 to 683% in 2012
  •  TB defaulter rate has reduced from 8.2 % in 2008 to 5% in 2012
  •  Number of TB patients with ‘known’ TB status has improved from 22.3% in 2013
  •  Number of HIV positive TB patients, including those on ART, has improved from 67% in 2008 to 83.1 % in 2012.

Tag: Impact Health Crises Health Sector

22.

There has been an instance of unforeseen security risks posed by some doctors even though the recruitment is done in good faith. In some instances these doctors are not who they claim to be, which means recruitment and vetting must be strengthened.

It was also not foreseen that the political and economic climate in the Limpopo Province would severely affect the sustainability of the project. Having the DOH under administration contributed to the government’s budget cuts to the project which in turn affected the staff retention at the UNDP PMU office (two staff members were retrenched) and generated high mobility of staff within the Department. It also caused a lot of anxiety amongst the UNVs. These factors negatively impacted the programme’s implementation as well as UNVs perception of the South African government.

In Letaba there is a sense among clinicians that the population surrounding the hospital is larger than they can handle. They feel that the changes are insignificant given that the doctor-patient ratio is not strong. However, they feel they have educated and mentored interns and many other doctors that pass through the hospital every three months. Part of the challenge is the mobility rate of personnel, doctors, interns and staff, who tend to remain only for about three months before moving elsewhere.


Tag: Sustainability Health Sector Human and Financial resources Project and Programme management Risk Management Awareness raising Capacity Building

Recommendations
1

7. Recommendations

The UNDP Support to the Health Sector in Limpopo: Phase III, which was undertaken from 2009 to March 2015, has had a very positive impact on the DOH and more importantly on the rural communities that are being served by these facilities. The programme has ended but has been continuing as Phase IV since April 2015, and will end in 2020. The following recommendations build on the strengths and lessons of the past five years so as to maximise the programme’s impact in Phase IV

. 7.1.Governance Structure.There is a need to re-establish a Programme Steering Committee with very clear terms of reference. The terms of reference should deal with challenges that have been identified such as composition of the committee, quorums, decision making by members and feedback mechanisms and frequency of meetings.

2

7.2 Recruitment and Placement of UNVs The three stakeholders, UNDP/UNV Office, UNV Bonn and DOH and PMU should explore writing up a recruitment process that specifies roles and responsibilities and related time frames for the deliverables. This will go a long way to managing the different expectations of all involved and lay the foundation to expedite the recruitment and placement processes. Furthermore, the introduction and acceptance of doctors showing direct interest in the programme needs to be clarified. Those who have applied, it is important that their applications should be followed up by UNV Bonn.

3

7.3 Knowledge and information sharing. The DOH should revive the annual meeting/workshop with all UNVs. This plays a crucial role in knowledge and information sharing and serves as a support mechanism for UNVs.

4

Robust induction and awareness-raising about the programme among hospital management and personnel is required. The induction should expose all stakeholders to the programme in its entirety. In addition, there must be a one-on-one session with hospital management not only to prepare them for the arrival of new UNVs but also for the hospital to share their limitations in terms of logistics, infrastructure and medical equipment.

5

7.4 One of the critical aspects of sustainability is transfer of knowledge and skills from UNVs to locals and vice versa. Mentoring is a critical vehicle to ensure that this take places, and thus it should be more carefully structured. Different models of mentoring should be explored, including one-to-one mentoring, group mentoring, and cross-hospital mentorship (staff of different hospitals mentored together.

6

7.5 Extension Request. There is a need to streamline the processes and document the key steps and responsibilities of people involved to avoid lengthy bureaucratic processes.

1. Recommendation:

7. Recommendations

The UNDP Support to the Health Sector in Limpopo: Phase III, which was undertaken from 2009 to March 2015, has had a very positive impact on the DOH and more importantly on the rural communities that are being served by these facilities. The programme has ended but has been continuing as Phase IV since April 2015, and will end in 2020. The following recommendations build on the strengths and lessons of the past five years so as to maximise the programme’s impact in Phase IV

. 7.1.Governance Structure.There is a need to re-establish a Programme Steering Committee with very clear terms of reference. The terms of reference should deal with challenges that have been identified such as composition of the committee, quorums, decision making by members and feedback mechanisms and frequency of meetings.

Management Response: [Added: 2016/04/19] [Last Updated: 2021/02/08]

Yes, the Department of Health endorsed the resuscitation of the Programme Steering Committee to provide oversight for programme implementation

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
ToR for the Steering Committee to be developed and endorsed by the Committee
[Added: 2016/04/19] [Last Updated: 2016/10/26]
UNDP Project Coordinator, and Department of Health Focal Point 2016/04 Completed The final ToR to be shared with members of the Project Steering Committee in April 2016to be endorsed at the next PSC seating History
2. Recommendation:

7.2 Recruitment and Placement of UNVs The three stakeholders, UNDP/UNV Office, UNV Bonn and DOH and PMU should explore writing up a recruitment process that specifies roles and responsibilities and related time frames for the deliverables. This will go a long way to managing the different expectations of all involved and lay the foundation to expedite the recruitment and placement processes. Furthermore, the introduction and acceptance of doctors showing direct interest in the programme needs to be clarified. Those who have applied, it is important that their applications should be followed up by UNV Bonn.

Management Response: [Added: 2016/04/19] [Last Updated: 2021/02/14]

A clear recruitment process with roles and responsibilities already exist within policies of responsible stakeholders but need to be clearly documented.

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
PMU to write/document the recruitment process and also make follow ups with applicants and responsible professional councils.
[Added: 2016/04/20] [Last Updated: 2016/10/26]
PMU, the document process to be endorse by the PSC 2016/06 Completed The recruitment process has been outlined. History
3. Recommendation:

7.3 Knowledge and information sharing. The DOH should revive the annual meeting/workshop with all UNVs. This plays a crucial role in knowledge and information sharing and serves as a support mechanism for UNVs.

Management Response: [Added: 2016/04/20] [Last Updated: 2021/02/14]

Yes, the Department endorsed the annual events with all UNV doctors

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
PMU in consultation with the Department of Health (DOH) will organise annual events for information sharing and learning
[Added: 2016/04/20]
PMU. DOH No due date Initiated Annual events will be continuously organised on annual basis History
4. Recommendation:

Robust induction and awareness-raising about the programme among hospital management and personnel is required. The induction should expose all stakeholders to the programme in its entirety. In addition, there must be a one-on-one session with hospital management not only to prepare them for the arrival of new UNVs but also for the hospital to share their limitations in terms of logistics, infrastructure and medical equipment.

Management Response: [Added: 2016/04/20] [Last Updated: 2021/02/14]

The Human Resource Development Unit in the Department has an induction programme for newly appointed staff, UNVs will also go through this induction programme and any other training programmes organised by the Department.

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
UNVs like any newly recruited staff will go through the induction programme of DOH
[Added: 2016/04/20]
DOH No due date Initiated The induction will be done regularly as and when new recruitment is done.
5. Recommendation:

7.4 One of the critical aspects of sustainability is transfer of knowledge and skills from UNVs to locals and vice versa. Mentoring is a critical vehicle to ensure that this take places, and thus it should be more carefully structured. Different models of mentoring should be explored, including one-to-one mentoring, group mentoring, and cross-hospital mentorship (staff of different hospitals mentored together.

Management Response: [Added: 2016/04/20] [Last Updated: 2021/02/14]

The Department will issue a Circular regarding the training of all staff, including UNV doctors.

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
DOH to circulate the training Circular to all staff including UNVs
[Added: 2016/04/20]
The Human Resource Development Unit in the Department, PMU to ensure that the circular is received by all UNVs. No due date Initiated Circulars are published on regular basis and sharing with UNV doctors will be an ongoing process History
6. Recommendation:

7.5 Extension Request. There is a need to streamline the processes and document the key steps and responsibilities of people involved to avoid lengthy bureaucratic processes.

Management Response: [Added: 2021/02/04] [Last Updated: 2021/02/14]

Key Actions:

Latest Evaluations

Contact us

1 UN Plaza
DC1-20th Floor
New York, NY 10017
Tel. +1 646 781 4200
Fax. +1 646 781 4213
erc.support@undp.org