Final Evaluation of the Parliament support project

Report Cover Image
Evaluation Plan:
2011-2017, Somalia
Evaluation Type:
Final Project
Planned End Date:
11/2017
Completion Date:
11/2017
Status:
Completed
Management Response:
Yes
Evaluation Budget(US $):
50,000

In spite of a challenging context, UNDP’s substantial effort at creating functionality through capacity development of Parliamentary staff and MPs has broadly been successful in terms of transferring skills. Training reports indicate a rich curriculum of training content has been delivered through the project. The gap arises in being able to track and establish how well the transferred skills have been operationalised to create impact. The project successfully delivered competence and capability for selected functions for both Parliamentary staff and MPs. On the other hand, measures of the staff providing assistance to Parliamentarians or Parliamentarians actively engaging staff in initiating parliamentary business are sparse.

Share

Document Type Language Size Status Downloads
Download document ToRs Evaluation Parliament Support Project Final .pdf tor English 545.84 KB Posted 996
Download document Summary of PSP Evaluation Report.pdf summary English 294.63 KB Posted 1158
Download document Evaluation Report.pdf report English 1613.71 KB Posted 1168
Download document Management Response lb.pdf related-document English 378.42 KB Posted 987
Download document Lessons Learned (002).pdf related-document English 680.18 KB Posted 974
Title Final Evaluation of the Parliament support project
Atlas Project Number: 00085369
Evaluation Plan: 2011-2017, Somalia
Evaluation Type: Final Project
Status: Completed
Completion Date: 11/2017
Planned End Date: 11/2017
Management Response: Yes
Focus Area:
  • 1. Democratic Governance
  • 2. Cross-cutting Development Issue
  • 3. Others
Corporate Outcome and Output (UNDP Strategic Plan 2018-2021)
  • 1. Output 2.1. Parliaments, constitution making bodies and electoral institutions enabled to perform core functions for improved accountability, participation and representation, including for peaceful transitions
SDG Goal
  • Goal 16. Promote peaceful and inclusive societies for sustainable development, provide access to justice for all and build effective, accountable and inclusive institutions at all levels
SDG Target
  • 16.6 Develop effective, accountable and transparent institutions at all levels
  • 16.7 Ensure responsive, inclusive, participatory and representative decision-making at all levels
Evaluation Budget(US $): 50,000
Source of Funding: Project
Evaluation Expenditure(US $): 67,450
Joint Programme: Yes
Joint Evaluation: No
Evaluation Team members:
Name Title Email Nationality
GEF Evaluation: No
Key Stakeholders: National Parliament and SL and PL House of Representatives
Countries: SOMALIA
Lessons
1.

The PSP has made a significant contribution to state building in Somalia through the establishment of, and support to, functioning Parliamentary institutions. That the project has done so in a particularly difficult post-conflict context also needs to be recognized and commended.

According to our assessment, the project is taking the same approach as the Somali Compact by laying the foundation for parliaments to be inclusive, transparent and effective law-making, oversight and representative bodies contributing to national peace-building and nation-building goals. The current project design lends itself to function, as it will have had to, given the baseline of end of the transition roadmap. However, design flexibility depends on the approach taken.


Findings
1.

Outcomes, outputs, activities and management

This section provides the findings and analysis of the evaluation conducted in 2016, within an evaluation and analytical framework that takes into account the nuances of the context.

The outcomes, outputs, and activities for the purposes of this analysis are defined as:

Outcomes –the direct effects of parliamentary activities on the outside world, specifically in relation to three governance functions—accountability, transparency and participation.

Outputs –the products of parliamentary activity, notably debates, laws, resolutions, and reports and assistance to constituents/communities/citizens.

Activities – Support provided for functionality (including provision of material and equipment) and operationalizing functionality by providing technical support to MPs and staff in parliamentary sessions, in committees, with communities (constituents).


Tag: Effectiveness Parliament Rule of law

2.

Theory of Change

The theory of change for the project was based on institutional development as the main supply-side impetus to democratic development.

This was supported by mechanisms to extend outreach, to enhance the representation function, and to initiate a process of transparent function and accountability of MPs.

Initially, there was an emphasis on drafting of a new constitution. However, this was compartmentalized as constitution support took on the shape of an independent undertaking supported by UNDP. 

The institutional development inputs were to contribute, in the longer run, to peacebuilding, state building and negotiating peaceful political settlements.

In the short run, the ToC was aimed at parliaments functioning as inclusive and transparent law-making, oversight, and representative bodies.


Tag: Effectiveness Relevance Theory of Change Peace Building Institutional Strengthening

3.

Strengths of the ToC

  • i) Keeping functionality as the main objective gave the project flexibility to be responsive to changing needs. For example when the Turkish government support to parliament building and structure did not materialise, the project was able to mobilise its resources to provide the basic infrastructure necessary for a functioning parliament.
  • ii) In line with the ToC, the project design as elaborated in the outputs, lends itself to function i.e parliamentary function. Parliaments will have to legislate, represent, and do oversight. This, in view of this evaluation, gives it focus and distinguishes it from other governance and democratization projects, while clearly supporting larger goals of governance and democratization.
  • iii) In view of the unique context presented to UNDP and other development partners in Somalia, an institutional development impetus was relevant. Parliaments, usually exist within contexts of some history, albeit often colonial legacy, some institutional memory, some precedent, etc – however in this unique situation none of those things exist so that space had to be created and the process actually had to begin from the very basic.

Tag: Effectiveness Parliament Programme/Project Design Theory of Change Institutional Strengthening

4.

Possible areas of Improvement for ToC

  • i) The ToC mentioned inclusion as part of the institutional processes. Inclusion, in view of this evaluation, goes beyond any one institution. Inclusion is a function of developing a narrative supporting a pluralistic polity. Therefore, a political settlement, which recognizes pluralism and appreciates an inclusive political evolution, must be included within the ToC, going forward.
  • ii) The review team had to decipher the ToC from a diagram only, there was no comprehensive narrative of the ToC. The theory of change is recognized as a successful approach in large part due to its ability to make the assumptions explicit. In absence of a ToC narrative, this important function of ToC is not achieved.
  • iii) Finally, the bifurcation of interventions for constitutional and parliament projects required a more detail overhaul of the ToC than we could see.

Tag: Effectiveness Relevance Parliament Theory of Change Institutional Strengthening

5.

At the time of the 2016 evaluation, the project was working on the following identified outputs:

Output 1 (Parliament Strategic Plan Objective 1): NFP and Parliaments of Somaliland and Puntland supported to enact quality legislation and to maintain effective oversight over the other branches of government according to the interests of all people and in support of peace-building and nation-building.

 


Tag: Parliament Oversight Country Government Peace Building

6.

Management, staffing, office accommodation

The project is led by a Chief Technical Advisor (CTA) The CTA is supported by an Operations Specialist leading the national staff for Operations and a Parliamentary Development Specialist leading the technical support national staff. The organogram of the project is attached as annex.

The project has had up to five offices UNCC and MIA in Mogadishu, Hargeisa, Somaliland, Garowe, Puntland and Nairobi Kenya.

These staff are responsible for project implementation, which in practice meant negotiating annual work plans and letters of agreement, and delivering activities. Since much of the project’s activities were delivered through national and international consultants, the project structure had to organize the timing and venues for these consultants to undertake their work.


Tag: Efficiency Human and Financial resources Project and Programme management

7.

Assessment of results and immediate future priorities

a. Overall Assessment

We understand that this review follows the 2016 evaluation, with interaction with project staff and interlocutors, including the 2016 evaluation team, over Skype or conference calls.

We believe that the document review and discussions conducted have provided the review with an thorough appreciation of the Project, and that this, in turn, provides pertinent ‘lessons’ for application in a ‘phase two’ (Part II).


Tag: Effectiveness Parliament Strategic Positioning National Institutions

8.

Elaborations, in the TPM, other reports reviewed, and also, some of the discussions, specifically discussions with the ex-CTA and the evaluators, were along the lines of ‘the Project is doing what it is supposed to but it needs do more of what it is doing at present’ and to build linkages where the results chain is de-linked, weak or non-existent. No respondent stated that the Project was unnecessary or unwelcome. All the Project staff Members are self evidently dedicated and determined to do their utmost in support of Parliament, a fact clearly acknowledged in the evaluation report.

Reviewing Project outputs in detail, a pattern is discernable in which subordinate or marginal activities, usually thoroughly worthwhile in themselves, generate relatively positive results whereas more fundamental reforms fare less well. This is perfectly understandable. Subordinate activities may often be inherently more straightforward to achieve than fundamental reforms.


Tag: Relevance Parliament Programme/Project Design National Institutions

9.

Further, as mentioned in the evaluation report, the project came to a virtual halt following the terrorist attack on the Parliament, resulting in loss of lives. Moreover, “The months October–December in 2013 and again in 2014 were characterized by gridlock and infighting within the SFG over the dismissal of incumbent prime ministers and horse-trading over the selection of replacements.” (Mosley 2014: 5)

It was, therefore, only towards the third quarter of 2014 that rehiring resulted in a team being reinstated to restart the project. This, effectively, gave the project 15-18 months to implement a 36 month project which to begin with required more than 36 months to complete trajectories culminating in outcome level results.

 


Tag: Relevance Project and Programme management Risk Management

10.

Finally, the contribution of donors to the modernization of Parliament is a task that needs to be coordinated amongst the contributing donors if overall efficiency and effectiveness is not to be sacrificed. There was certainly a recognition from an early stage that donor coordination would be vital in the design and implementation of the Project but, in our view, fully efficacious means to make such coordination effective did not transpire.


Tag: Relevance Parliament Bilateral partners Country Government Donor Coordination

11.

Assessment of the Specific Outputs

1. Output 1

This output has not been achieved, fully though adequate starts have been made in the production of a body of manuals, other publications, and a relevant set of trainings for Members. While this is, to an extent, subordinate activity it is nonetheless important and the successor project should consider continuing with this work building on what has been achieved.

Overall, meeting this output has been a challenge for the Project partly due to the consequences of heightened security tensions which were outside its control and which limited the intervention of the international expert working on committees.

A discussion on progress and results are given for consideration of the future phase of the project, later in the report.


Tag: Parliament Oversight Country Government Peace Building Capacity Building

12.

Output 2: Summary

A training needs assessment conducted by the project M&E staff was also shared with us. The production of such documentation provides positive human resources change and can be developed with training activities designed to broaden the awareness of the Secretariat staff about the nature and structure of modern Parliamentary Secretariat work. A future project should certainly continue with targeted training activities similar to those undertaken in this period and which have continued utility.

Moreover, under this output support to was provided to Puntland and Somaliland parliaments. An essential element of this support was the development of parliamentary strategic plans, owned by the parliament as their document.


Tag: Effectiveness Parliament Human and Financial resources Monitoring and Evaluation Oversight Capacity Building

13.

The Success of HACT Compliance

One of PSP’s most widely cited successes was the creation and implementation of HACT (Harmonized Approach to Cash Transfers) compliant systems in several parliaments. The HACT is a set of common principles and a processes for managing cash transfers among UN agencies that have adopted the approach across all countries and operational contexts. 4HACT standards envision a transparent and rigorous system for managing the use of funds. HACT is a detailed process that is challenging to implement and cumbersome to some of the institutions, however, it is a necessary process to ensure that UNDP resources (ultimately donors money) are protected through carefully applied procedures and checks and balances.


Tag: Effectiveness Procurement Project and Programme management Cash Transfers

14.

In order to assess the capacity of the parliaments to implement HACT in their financial management of UNDP funds, a Kenyan based company ABRIMO was contracted to conduct HACT assessments on the 6 parliaments. The assessment uncovered institutional weaknesses and specified areas that required the attention of UNDP. The Project in turn developed a series of mitigation measures, which allowed them to provide the funding to the parliaments. We were told that there have been very few cases of conflict between UNDP and the parliaments in the way they applied the HACT rules, but those were addressed to the satisfaction of UNDP.


Tag: Effectiveness Parliament Human and Financial resources Cash Transfers National Institutions

15.

Substantial progress, however, will depend crucially on political and top management will to initiate and apply a thorough ‘training needs assessment’ or ‘present skills review’ exercise to identify key current gaps and structural weaknesses within the Secretariats, building upon, and where necessary supplementing, the work commissioned by the Project to date, and thereafter applying fully transparent and comprehensive staffing processes to implement the findings. Our proposals is for a ‘second phase’ project seek to address these key requirements by linking Secretariat reform to key Member-driven requirements.


Tag: Effectiveness Human and Financial resources Project and Programme management Country Government Capacity Building

16.

Output 3 Summary

This output is clearly linked to creating legitimacy of the parliament among citizens. The presentation of progress, evidence and results for this output are therefore, perhaps, scattered across the three outputs e.g. committee visits to communities though covered under oversight also contributes towards achieving this output. Substantial benefits could flow to Parliament if key components such as committees are seen going out and about throughout the country engaged on enquiries focused upon the key concerns of the citizenry, interacting directly with them and local CSOs.

We are proposing that for ‘phase two’ the focus of attention in this area for the Project itself should be directed towards media and CSO support, starting with taking along media representatives in the regions where the MP visits have worked successfully.


Tag: Effectiveness Parliament Disabilities Capacity Building Civil Societies and NGOs Vulnerable

17.

Output 2 (Parliament Strategic Plan Objective 3): NFP and Parliaments of Somaliland and Puntland established as an effective institution, with a functioning administration and infrastructure and leadership supported to discharge their constitutional mandates to fairly, inclusively and transparently manage the business of Parliament and lead the Parliamentary Administration


Tag: Parliament Country Government National Institutions

18.

Output 3 (Parliament Strategic Plan Objective 2): MPs are empowered to represent and remain accountable to the people and to provide leadership in a way that promotes national unity for Somalis, including young people and women, participative & representative democracy and more effective contribution to political decision-making.

These outputs translate into 100s of activities – the Annual Workplan for 2016, for instance, had 52 activities against these three outputs.


Tag: Parliament Women and gilrs Youth

Recommendations
1

Recommendations for future support to Parliament

Given the challenges faced by the project in the past three years and the areas in which there has been success, there are clearly some areas of intervention in which the project can provide support to the National and regional parliaments in Somalia.

One message that was made clear through the evaluation report and our consultations was that the project must focus more on strategic interventions. Work with Parliaments is inherently dynamic, but this is accentuated to a greater degree in Somalia’s recent political and security trajectory and current political environment.

Another consistent message was that the PSP structure, like many similar programmes, is not seen to be grounded in a strong political economy analysis of the local context. Broadly, our observations and recommendations fall in the categories of energising the project’s internal and external communications for better facilitation and outreach; and improving process-based links across project activities for improved results chain and synergistic impact.

2

Key priorities for reform have been articulated and mobilized in the strategic plans for parliaments. This articulation has been the result of a consultative process that has already yielded some level of consensus . Aligning these key themes with the project objectives and then informing the theory of change would be advisable. We see that that has been catered for in the new project document, although translating it into effective AWPs and Letters of agreement would be required. Moreover, a strong integrated communication strategy could be devised (informed by capturing honest, accurate data on institutional performance gathered through supply-side interventions).

We recognize that the project has to negotiate the difficult task of managing competing political agendas to deliver processes and structures that facilitate accountable oversight, legislation, and representation. It is therefore all the more vital that the project approach be informed by a robust political economy analysis and adapt to the challenges.

3

The future project’s success can be improved by: a) finding an alternative or creative solution where structural disincentives to engage in certain behaviors and practices exist for political actors (constituency engagement efforts by MPs, for instance, are directly impeded by the high cost of making such trips to their respective regions); and b) creating incentives for performance where incentive structures are absent (for instance, trainings may be delivered but the skill transfer may remain under-utilised unless an incentive exists for trainees to demonstrate their skill development against functional goals). In the absence of such an adaptive or localisation approach, many of the project outcomes are at risk of remaining aspirational against the expectations of donors.

4

Finally, there is a lot of discussion within the evaluation report on context specificity. In our limited consultations security concerns came up again and again, similarly in all our discussions the level of understanding of an MP about his/her role was the focus of all our discussions. However, the role of MPs and parliament (beyond the fundamental State-building role) in peace building was not discussed at length in the project document. We would recommend that context specificity of design and approach be linked more specifically to peace-building than it is in the project document for the project ending December 2016.

A possible entry point maybe provided through operationalizing SDG 16 for Somalia through an ad-hoc parliamentary committee. In the new prodoc, the activities though relevant to SDG 16 are not clearly linked to the parliament. Reporting to an ad-hoc committee will create that linkage. If successful, this committee can be a good forum for linking up with media and civil society as:

  • - There is an interest in SDGs
  • - There is a constant security concerns and concerns for peace in the current scenario in most of Somalia
  • - The activities proposed in the new prodoc are data and information which can make for good advocacy pieces to be disseminated through media and civil society
5

Many successful examples of ad-hoc parliamentary committees on MDGs can be found (Mongolia being a front-runner) specifically in localizing MDGs. With localization being part of Agenda 2030, this may provide a pathway to building MPs role around peacebuilding in Somalia.

Programming interventions in democratic governance are generally subject to certain stakeholder dynamics, which have direct implications for program management and implementation. This is due to the inherently political nature of the beneficiaries, where the “buy-in” and engagement of political actors is necessary for the programme to achieve its outcomes. The dynamic renders a certain level of agency to political actors where their level of participation affects the timeline and inclusion in the implementation process more directly compared with other programmes in which project beneficiaries have less control. The project has responded well to this dynamic by maintaining a centralized system of communication, where the project is the sole interlocutor with the Parliaments.

6

The proposed project design in the new phase, therefore, adapted well to build on being in this position, by assuming the responsibility for building connectivity and networking. Secondly, these institutions are nascent bodies in an evolving context and parliamentary stakeholders will require a regular re-orientation (corresponding to capacity development) on their roles and responsibilities within the institutional framework. For instance, as the representative function of MPs evolves into an electorate-based model, re-orientation on aspects of constituency relationship management and responsive governance will be required.

In spite of a challenging context, UNDP’s substantial effort at creating functionality through capacity development of Parliamentary staff and MPs has broadly been successful in terms of transferring skills. Training reports indicate a rich curriculum of training content has been delivered through the project. The gap arises in being able to track and establish how well the transferred skills have been operationalised to create impact. The project successfully delivered competence and capability for selected functions for both Parliamentary staff and MPs. On the other hand, measures of the staff providing assistance to Parliamentarians or Parliamentarians actively engaging staff in initiating parliamentary business are sparse.

7

However, going forward into the new phase, broadly these recommendations can assist with translating gains from activities to accrue into institutional successes:

  • a. Regularized communication of staff capability to MPs following trainings and a series of mentoring sessions with staff in which the project can follow up on issues faced by staff in operationalizing newly acquired skill sets. In doing so, the UNDP will also have the opportunity to tap into MPs identification of their urgent needs and shift the training agenda development from a needs assessment system to a more urgent demand-based system where the beneficiaries have more incentive to take ownership and participate.
  • b. Pilot-testing products post-training as part of the training activity and transitioning skills into processes. Certain gaps exist only in the project implementation even though they are sufficiently captured in the project design – one of these is surveying developed products and assisting trained staff and MPs through the initial stages of using new templates and skills collaboratively.
  • c. Creating more incentives for MPs to engage in constituent representation through localized Parliamentarian scorecards. Scorecards are effective tools to communicate expectations to parliamentarians in terms of their roles as representatives. Parliamentarians are able to track their own activity against rational indicators, which create incentives to engage with constituents on a regular basis. As a monitoring and evaluation tool for the project, scorecards may also bridge the link between the capacity development of stakeholders and improved functionality
8
  • d. We strongly recommend that the project undertake a combined political economy and conflict-sensitivity assessment to serve as a baseline for the next phase, and that the baseline be revisited and updated at strategic intervals. In terms of scope, we advise the assessment be structured to answer the following questions:
  • a. What are the proximate drivers of conflict/violence?
  • b. What triggers have sparked conflict/violence in the past and risk escalating conflict/violence in the future?
  • c. Who are the main actors contributing to conflict/peace, and what are their main interests, goals, positions, capacities, and relationships?
  • d. How do PSP institutions include these actors?
9

e. With respect to accountability, oversight of the accountability-related final outcome to the system gets overlooked. How can CSOs help in highlighting the impact on outcomes? Only a select group of civil society organisations have access to the legislative arena and their engagement is on an ad hoc basis, often pre-empted by the elected representatives’ lack of capacity to draft legislation. CSOs therefore are included in their role as service providers. Developing citizen scorecards, or using the equivalent of legislative or manifesto watch programmes can be effectively mobilized for creating baseline, mid-line and final assessment for performance of the new parliament. However to ensure inclusion of vulnerable and marginalized groups a targeted consultative process mobilized through CSOs will be required.

f. It is important to consider coverage as part of sustainability. In a nascent federal state, it may not be enough to support just the national parliament and two regional parliaments7 . The new state assemblies in Jubaland, Southwest, Galmudug and HirShabelle are an important indicator of the consistent commitment to federalism. Supporting these parliaments to be effective, transparent and accountable will be an important contribution towards consolidating the gains in federalism in Somalia. UNDP’s PSP project is, indeed, uniquely positioned to extend this support.Synergies between State parliaments need to be explored. Possible entry point can include;

10
  • i) Inter-parliamentary forums focusing/specializing on specific SDGs. Thus one SDG on poverty (SDG 1) or hunger (SDG 2) with membership from all State assemblies would encourage sharing of experiences and create healthy competition even. This will also help PSP prioritize where to invest the resources earmarked for research support within the parliamentary project, given that SDG monitoring emphasizes collection of disaggregated by geography, gender and other deprivation criteria.
  • ii) Inter-parliamentary women caucus established
  • iii) Inter-parliamentary youth caucus established
  • iv) Local level political actors mapping and conflict sensitivity analysis will be required for different regions/States to design and prioritise sets of activities most relevant to their particular context. These supplemental conflict analysis will help illustrate how political and institutional actors tend to perform around active conflict faultlines, which of these faultlines are likely to become active, and how an outbreak of violent conflict will be managed/negotiated by the programme.
  • v) This can serve not only the project team in designing specific activites but can also contribute to the research support extended to these parliaments by PSP for informed debates and policy discussions.
Management Response Documents
1. Recommendation:

Recommendations for future support to Parliament

Given the challenges faced by the project in the past three years and the areas in which there has been success, there are clearly some areas of intervention in which the project can provide support to the National and regional parliaments in Somalia.

One message that was made clear through the evaluation report and our consultations was that the project must focus more on strategic interventions. Work with Parliaments is inherently dynamic, but this is accentuated to a greater degree in Somalia’s recent political and security trajectory and current political environment.

Another consistent message was that the PSP structure, like many similar programmes, is not seen to be grounded in a strong political economy analysis of the local context. Broadly, our observations and recommendations fall in the categories of energising the project’s internal and external communications for better facilitation and outreach; and improving process-based links across project activities for improved results chain and synergistic impact.

Management Response: [Added: 2021/01/28] [Last Updated: 2021/09/14]

Recommendations accepted.

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
1.1 Provision of material and equipment for parliamentary function (video tele-conferencing equipment, procurement of vehicles, library books etc.) 1.2 Technical advisory support to MPs, committees, and staff in parliament (young graduate interns, hiring national and international consultants) 1.3 Provision of infrastructure support parliaments 1.4 Develop outreach and communication strategies for the parliaments to enhance the representation and accountability of MPs.
[Added: 2021/07/18] [Last Updated: 2021/07/21]
UNDP PSP 2021/07 Completed Project provided material and equipment to both houses of the federal parliament, Somaliland House of Representatives, Puntland House of Representatives. Project hired international and national consultants to support the parliamentary leadership on the development of strategic plan for the House of the People, revision of rules of procedures, technical advisory support on the revision of the provisional constitution, petroleum law etc. Similarly, the project supported young graduate schemes to enhance the secretariat capacities of the parliaments, specifically the parliamentary oversight committee on constitution review. Project support construction of plenary hall for Jubaland Parliament. The project also constructed library for South West Parliament. Draft Communication Strategy was prepared for Somaliland House of Representatives and further work will be taken through future projects. History
2. Recommendation:

Key priorities for reform have been articulated and mobilized in the strategic plans for parliaments. This articulation has been the result of a consultative process that has already yielded some level of consensus . Aligning these key themes with the project objectives and then informing the theory of change would be advisable. We see that that has been catered for in the new project document, although translating it into effective AWPs and Letters of agreement would be required. Moreover, a strong integrated communication strategy could be devised (informed by capturing honest, accurate data on institutional performance gathered through supply-side interventions).

We recognize that the project has to negotiate the difficult task of managing competing political agendas to deliver processes and structures that facilitate accountable oversight, legislation, and representation. It is therefore all the more vital that the project approach be informed by a robust political economy analysis and adapt to the challenges.

Management Response: [Added: 2021/01/28] [Last Updated: 2021/09/14]

Recommendations Accepted.

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
2.1 Develop strategic plans. 2.2 Develop communication strategy.
[Added: 2021/07/18] [Last Updated: 2021/07/21]
UNDP PSP 2021/07 Completed Strategic plans have been developed for 4 parliaments (Puntland, South West, Hirshabelle and Jubaland parliaments). The project also provided technical support to Somaliland parliament to review and update its existing strategic plan for both the House of Representatives and Gurti. Draft communication strategy was prepared, and further work will be taken through the new CPD. History
3. Recommendation:

The future project’s success can be improved by: a) finding an alternative or creative solution where structural disincentives to engage in certain behaviors and practices exist for political actors (constituency engagement efforts by MPs, for instance, are directly impeded by the high cost of making such trips to their respective regions); and b) creating incentives for performance where incentive structures are absent (for instance, trainings may be delivered but the skill transfer may remain under-utilised unless an incentive exists for trainees to demonstrate their skill development against functional goals). In the absence of such an adaptive or localisation approach, many of the project outcomes are at risk of remaining aspirational against the expectations of donors.

Management Response: [Added: 2021/01/28] [Last Updated: 2021/09/14]

Recommendations Accepted.

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
3.1 Create incentive structure for MPs constituency visits
[Added: 2021/07/18] [Last Updated: 2021/07/21]
UNDP-PSP 2021/07 No Longer Applicable [Justification: Activity not implemented due to funding problems. The activity will be included in the next phase of the project.]
History
4. Recommendation:

Finally, there is a lot of discussion within the evaluation report on context specificity. In our limited consultations security concerns came up again and again, similarly in all our discussions the level of understanding of an MP about his/her role was the focus of all our discussions. However, the role of MPs and parliament (beyond the fundamental State-building role) in peace building was not discussed at length in the project document. We would recommend that context specificity of design and approach be linked more specifically to peace-building than it is in the project document for the project ending December 2016.

A possible entry point maybe provided through operationalizing SDG 16 for Somalia through an ad-hoc parliamentary committee. In the new prodoc, the activities though relevant to SDG 16 are not clearly linked to the parliament. Reporting to an ad-hoc committee will create that linkage. If successful, this committee can be a good forum for linking up with media and civil society as:

  • - There is an interest in SDGs
  • - There is a constant security concerns and concerns for peace in the current scenario in most of Somalia
  • - The activities proposed in the new prodoc are data and information which can make for good advocacy pieces to be disseminated through media and civil society
Management Response: [Added: 2021/01/28] [Last Updated: 2021/09/14]

Recommendations Accepted.

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
4.1Establishment of parliamentary caucus for operationalization of SDG 16. 4.2 Engage with media and CSOs on SDG 16 for Somalia
[Added: 2021/07/19]
UNDP-PSP 2021/07 No Longer Applicable [Justification: Activity not implemented due to funding problems. The activity will be included in the next phase of the project.]
Activity not implemented due to funding problems. The activity will be included in the next phase of the project.
5. Recommendation:

Many successful examples of ad-hoc parliamentary committees on MDGs can be found (Mongolia being a front-runner) specifically in localizing MDGs. With localization being part of Agenda 2030, this may provide a pathway to building MPs role around peacebuilding in Somalia.

Programming interventions in democratic governance are generally subject to certain stakeholder dynamics, which have direct implications for program management and implementation. This is due to the inherently political nature of the beneficiaries, where the “buy-in” and engagement of political actors is necessary for the programme to achieve its outcomes. The dynamic renders a certain level of agency to political actors where their level of participation affects the timeline and inclusion in the implementation process more directly compared with other programmes in which project beneficiaries have less control. The project has responded well to this dynamic by maintaining a centralized system of communication, where the project is the sole interlocutor with the Parliaments.

Management Response: [Added: 2021/01/28] [Last Updated: 2021/09/14]

Recommendations Accepted.

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
5.1 Establishment of parliamentary ad-hoc committees with the focus of localizing the Agenda 2030. 5.2 Train federal parliament MPs on the SDGs Agenda 2030
[Added: 2021/07/19] [Last Updated: 2021/07/21]
UNDP- PSP 2021/07 No Longer Applicable [Justification: Activity not implemented due to funding shortages. This will be prioritized in the next phase of the project ]
Activity not implemented due to funding shortages. This will be prioritized in the next phase of the project. The project organized a two-day induction workshop on parliamentary action to advance the 2030 Agenda. The training was provided with support from the regional hub. History
6. Recommendation:

The proposed project design in the new phase, therefore, adapted well to build on being in this position, by assuming the responsibility for building connectivity and networking. Secondly, these institutions are nascent bodies in an evolving context and parliamentary stakeholders will require a regular re-orientation (corresponding to capacity development) on their roles and responsibilities within the institutional framework. For instance, as the representative function of MPs evolves into an electorate-based model, re-orientation on aspects of constituency relationship management and responsive governance will be required.

In spite of a challenging context, UNDP’s substantial effort at creating functionality through capacity development of Parliamentary staff and MPs has broadly been successful in terms of transferring skills. Training reports indicate a rich curriculum of training content has been delivered through the project. The gap arises in being able to track and establish how well the transferred skills have been operationalised to create impact. The project successfully delivered competence and capability for selected functions for both Parliamentary staff and MPs. On the other hand, measures of the staff providing assistance to Parliamentarians or Parliamentarians actively engaging staff in initiating parliamentary business are sparse.

Management Response: [Added: 2021/01/28] [Last Updated: 2021/09/14]

Recommendations Accepted.

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
6.1 Capacity development support to MPs and parliament staff 6.2 Connectivity support to parliaments.
[Added: 2021/07/19]
UNDP-PSP 2021/07 Completed Induction trainings on parliamentary functions and legislative processes and procedures was delivered to the MPs for Puntland and South West State Parliaments. Also, Hirshabelle members of parliament were trained on functions of committees, role of parliament in good governance and mechanisms of budgets process and budgetary oversight. Staff were trained on parliamentary administration. Project addressed the communication and connectivity needs of the parliaments through provision of funds in the Letters of Agreements. This enhanced functionality of the parliaments.
7. Recommendation:

However, going forward into the new phase, broadly these recommendations can assist with translating gains from activities to accrue into institutional successes:

  • a. Regularized communication of staff capability to MPs following trainings and a series of mentoring sessions with staff in which the project can follow up on issues faced by staff in operationalizing newly acquired skill sets. In doing so, the UNDP will also have the opportunity to tap into MPs identification of their urgent needs and shift the training agenda development from a needs assessment system to a more urgent demand-based system where the beneficiaries have more incentive to take ownership and participate.
  • b. Pilot-testing products post-training as part of the training activity and transitioning skills into processes. Certain gaps exist only in the project implementation even though they are sufficiently captured in the project design – one of these is surveying developed products and assisting trained staff and MPs through the initial stages of using new templates and skills collaboratively.
  • c. Creating more incentives for MPs to engage in constituent representation through localized Parliamentarian scorecards. Scorecards are effective tools to communicate expectations to parliamentarians in terms of their roles as representatives. Parliamentarians are able to track their own activity against rational indicators, which create incentives to engage with constituents on a regular basis. As a monitoring and evaluation tool for the project, scorecards may also bridge the link between the capacity development of stakeholders and improved functionality
Management Response: [Added: 2021/01/28] [Last Updated: 2021/09/14]

Recommendations Accepted.

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
7.1 Carry out capacity building needs assessment exercise to determine training needs for secretariat staff and MPs of all parliaments. 7.2 Conduct targeted capacity building training activities for MPs and Staff. 7.3 Monitor and evaluate impact of capacity building activities 7.4 Develop training curricula for MPs and staff and also to revise the templates and modules developed based on the feedback of the trainees 7.5 Production and translation of manuals/guidelines and other publications 7.6 Regularly conduct post-training monitoring activities 7.7 Develop Parliamentary Scorecards as a mechanism to for strengthening accountability of the parliaments 7.8 Community radio stations programs for MPs to debate and reach out to those living in remote areas, etc. 7.9 Train MPs and Staff to familiarize on the usage of Parliamentary Scorecards and constituency relations
[Added: 2021/07/19] [Last Updated: 2021/07/21]
UNDP-PSP 2021/07 Completed Capacity development and training needs assessment was done on some regional assemblies, which include: Galmudug, Jubaland, Hirshabelle and South West States. a. Induction training workshop was delivered to Puntland parliament MPs on parliamentary business process and procedures. b. Training workshop on protection and promotion of Human Rights for Hirshabelle members of parliament. Affected by Covid 19 restrictions. Activity was not implemented due to funding uncertainties. Manual on reviewing legislations from gender perspective, and a guideline on gender sensitive budgeting developed Activity was not implemented due to funding uncertainties. Activity was not implemented due to funding uncertainties. Activity was not implemented due to funding uncertainties. Activity was not implemented due to funding uncertainties. History
8. Recommendation:
  • d. We strongly recommend that the project undertake a combined political economy and conflict-sensitivity assessment to serve as a baseline for the next phase, and that the baseline be revisited and updated at strategic intervals. In terms of scope, we advise the assessment be structured to answer the following questions:
  • a. What are the proximate drivers of conflict/violence?
  • b. What triggers have sparked conflict/violence in the past and risk escalating conflict/violence in the future?
  • c. Who are the main actors contributing to conflict/peace, and what are their main interests, goals, positions, capacities, and relationships?
  • d. How do PSP institutions include these actors?
Management Response: [Added: 2021/01/28] [Last Updated: 2021/09/14]

Recommendations Accepted.

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
8.1 Conduct Political economy and conflict-sensitivity assessment to serve as baseline 8.2 Develop and implement findings of the baseline political economy analysis and conflict analysis
[Added: 2021/07/19] [Last Updated: 2021/07/21]
UNDP-PSP 2021/07 No Longer Applicable [Justification: Activity not implemented due to funding shortages. This will be prioritized in the next phase of the project ]
Activity not implemented due to funding shortages. This will be prioritized in the next phase of the project History
9. Recommendation:

e. With respect to accountability, oversight of the accountability-related final outcome to the system gets overlooked. How can CSOs help in highlighting the impact on outcomes? Only a select group of civil society organisations have access to the legislative arena and their engagement is on an ad hoc basis, often pre-empted by the elected representatives’ lack of capacity to draft legislation. CSOs therefore are included in their role as service providers. Developing citizen scorecards, or using the equivalent of legislative or manifesto watch programmes can be effectively mobilized for creating baseline, mid-line and final assessment for performance of the new parliament. However to ensure inclusion of vulnerable and marginalized groups a targeted consultative process mobilized through CSOs will be required.

f. It is important to consider coverage as part of sustainability. In a nascent federal state, it may not be enough to support just the national parliament and two regional parliaments7 . The new state assemblies in Jubaland, Southwest, Galmudug and HirShabelle are an important indicator of the consistent commitment to federalism. Supporting these parliaments to be effective, transparent and accountable will be an important contribution towards consolidating the gains in federalism in Somalia. UNDP’s PSP project is, indeed, uniquely positioned to extend this support.Synergies between State parliaments need to be explored. Possible entry point can include;

Management Response: [Added: 2021/01/28] [Last Updated: 2021/09/14]

Recommendations Accepted.

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
9.1 Conduct citizen scorecards assessment to measure the performance of new parliaments in an endeavor to contribute to better governance.
[Added: 2021/07/19] [Last Updated: 2021/07/21]
UNDP-PSP 2021/07 No Longer Applicable [Justification: Activity not implemented due to funding shortages. This will be prioritized in the next phase of the project ]
History
10. Recommendation:
  • i) Inter-parliamentary forums focusing/specializing on specific SDGs. Thus one SDG on poverty (SDG 1) or hunger (SDG 2) with membership from all State assemblies would encourage sharing of experiences and create healthy competition even. This will also help PSP prioritize where to invest the resources earmarked for research support within the parliamentary project, given that SDG monitoring emphasizes collection of disaggregated by geography, gender and other deprivation criteria.
  • ii) Inter-parliamentary women caucus established
  • iii) Inter-parliamentary youth caucus established
  • iv) Local level political actors mapping and conflict sensitivity analysis will be required for different regions/States to design and prioritise sets of activities most relevant to their particular context. These supplemental conflict analysis will help illustrate how political and institutional actors tend to perform around active conflict faultlines, which of these faultlines are likely to become active, and how an outbreak of violent conflict will be managed/negotiated by the programme.
  • v) This can serve not only the project team in designing specific activites but can also contribute to the research support extended to these parliaments by PSP for informed debates and policy discussions.
Management Response: [Added: 2021/01/28] [Last Updated: 2021/09/14]

Recommendations Accepted.

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
10.1 Conduct Inter-parliamentary forums focusing/specializing on specific SDGs 10.2 Establish Inter-parliamentary women caucus 10.3 Establish Inter-parliamentary youth caucus. 10.4 Carry out local level political actors mapping and conflict sensitivity analysis for different regions/states 10.5 Design specific activities which can contribute to the research support extended to parliaments by PSP for informed debates and policy discussions
[Added: 2021/07/19] [Last Updated: 2021/07/21]
UNDP-PSP 2021/07 No Longer Applicable [Justification: Activity not implemented due to funding shortages. This will be prioritized in the next phase of the project ]
History

Latest Evaluations

Contact us

1 UN Plaza
DC1-20th Floor
New York, NY 10017
Tel. +1 646 781 4200
Fax. +1 646 781 4213
erc.support@undp.org