Support to Public Administration mid term evaluation

Report Cover Image
Evaluation Plan:
2016-2018, South Sudan
Evaluation Type:
Mid Term Project
Planned End Date:
08/2017
Completion Date:
12/2017
Status:
Completed
Management Response:
Yes
Evaluation Budget(US $):
60,000

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Title Support to Public Administration mid term evaluation
Atlas Project Number: 00072642
Evaluation Plan: 2016-2018, South Sudan
Evaluation Type: Mid Term Project
Status: Completed
Completion Date: 12/2017
Planned End Date: 08/2017
Management Response: Yes
Focus Area:
  • 1. Poverty and MDG
  • 2. Democratic Governance
  • 3. Others
Corporate Outcome and Output (UNDP Strategic Plan 2014-2017)
  • 1. Output 3.1. Core functions of government enabled (in post conflict situations) to ensure national ownership of recovery and development processes
SDG Goal
  • Goal 1. End poverty in all its forms everywhere
SDG Target
  • 1.2 By 2030, reduce at least by half the proportion of men, women and children of all ages living in poverty in all its dimensions according to national definitions
  • 1.a Ensure significant mobilization of resources from a variety of sources, including through enhanced development cooperation, in order to provide adequate and predictable means for developing countries, in particular least developed countries, to implement programmes and policies to end poverty in all its dimensions
Evaluation Budget(US $): 60,000
Source of Funding: Government of Norway
Evaluation Expenditure(US $): 50,000
Joint Programme: No
Joint Evaluation: No
Evaluation Team members:
Name Title Email Nationality
Hariet Kuyang Logo Ms. kuyanglogo@yahoo.co.uk
Michael Meyer Mr.
GEF Evaluation: No
Key Stakeholders: Ministry of Labour, Public Service and Human Resources Development
Countries: SOUTH SUDAN
Comments:

Evaluation succesfully completed

Lessons
1.

Strong inter-and intra-institutionalised coordination mechanisms between the coordinating ministry and participating institutions are essential for harmonised and coherent project implementation. This includes corresponding mechanisms between national and sub-national levels, as well as inter-state levels.


2.

When a country is as fragile and in a way ‘unpredictable’, such as South Sudan, it becomes extremely challenging to consolidate capacity enhancement results. Fluidity of the context and unexpected political changes take a toll on well-intentioned interventions such as the RSS/IGAD project.


3.

Post conflict capacity building, especially in a country like South Sudan, is a process - and at times exploratory in nature, and unrealistic to expect tangible results, impact and higher-level outputs to be realised in the short or medium-term.


Findings
1.

Relevance

Although subject to undesirable political, economic and security constraints, the project still reflects the strategic considerations of UNDP to build human resources, organisational and institutional level capacities, which remains a critical national priority for recovery, restoring peace and stability, creating functional institutions, and ultimately support democratic governance, and inclusive service delivery for all.


2.

Effectiveness

The December 2013 crisis delayed the deployment of civil service support officers (CSSOs) in August 2015. Sixty-one   over from Phase I had to be evacuated to their respective countries in December 2013. As a result of the crisis, much was not achieved between January 2014 and August 2015.

Several institutional policies and strategic documents have been drafted, and some tabled before state councils of ministers for review and approval. Completion and approvals of targeted policies was delayed due to frequent changes in government’s priorities and lack of resources.

Following the abrupt and unforeseen creation of new states, some civil servants in various state ministries, including paired civil servants (twins) were reassigned to the newly created states. This disrupted the mentoring process and the project’s capacity to attain the desired results.

Project outcomes have not been realised in full. Whilst this is expected since the project is still ongoing, the slow realisation of outcomes has been attributed to the quality of paired civil servants as South Sudan is still in the process of establishing a fully-fledged civil service and institutions, and therefore recurrent challenges of a young civil service are still prevalent.


3.

Efficiency

The project lost about US$5 million in exchange rate losses following the depreciation of the Norwegian Kroner (NOK) against the United States dollar during the course of the project. The losses were not reported timely to the donor, resulting in a funding gap and inability to implement planned initiatives like the CSSO Innovative Grant to supplement CSSOs’ coaching and mentoring.

The project adopted group-twinning modalities which proved to be more cost efficient, and secured a higher ‘critical mass’ of twins in the public sector. CSSOs are deployed and work in established government institutions, reducing cost of office rent and other service charges, which also secures national leadership and ownership – a value that cannot be quantified in monetary terms.

UNDP’s continued conflict-sensitive analysis and risk management system helped the project to be flexible and context relevant in the management and deployment of CSSOs. The project made use of UNDP’s procurement competitive processes, which in turn secured optimal use of funds, and prevented possible misallocation of funds. UNDP adopted highly flexible implementation modalities, which secured a demand rather than a supply driven allocation of technical assistance and financial resources.


4.

Partnership strategies

Apart from existing partnerships, the project team, CSSOs and twins generated a wide array of working partnerships with other UN agencies, faith based organisations, civil society organisations and non-governmental organisations. However, these are not well documented or institutionalised


5.

Sustainability

There are indications that project results will be sustained at the end of the project. Twinned and non-twinned staff in the participating institutions interviewed noted that, because of successful on-the-job coaching and mentoring, most are in position to continue to mentor and coach other civil servants. The project has an inbuilt sustainability mechanisms which include the deployment of qualified and experienced civil servants from the region with cultural affinity to South Sudan as (opposed to hiring consultants) to provide coaching and mentoring (as opposed to training); placement of the project managing unit within the Ministry of Labour Public Service and Human Resource Development (MoLPS&HRD) as a capacity building measure for the coordinating ministry; and mentoring and coaching civil servants at the technical and managerial levels to ensure continuity at the different levels


6.

Gender considerations

Gender equality was an integral part of the project design and of great significance to project stakeholders including the donor, Government of the Republic of South Sudan (GRSS), participating Intergovernmental Authority on Development (IGAD) countries and UNDP. The project is progressing towards meeting its gender equity target in terms of deployed CSSOs and twins. However, the project’s gender marker in ATLAS is not considered representative and a true reflection of the diverse realties on the ground.

 

 


7.

Social inclusion and Environmental considerations

The project registered progress in addressing the needs of disabled persons and visually impaired groups, and ensuring potentially marginalised persons at state levels get access to government services.  

The project does not have direct environmental impact. However, during implementation environmental care was taken into consideration by the CSSOs and their twins in the targeted institutions. Since 2013 to late 2016 no explicit mention was made in quarterly and annual reports on progress relating to environmental issues.


Recommendations
1

It is essential to first clear the backlog of pending policies and strategic documents, and those at various levels of approval generated by the project before embarking on drafting additional ones. Implementation should be key to the remainder of Phase II – and beyond

2

The sustainability strategy should be reviewed to align with current context and realities

3

The project should develop key indicators for gender considerations and social inclusion for gender equality and focused services delivery to vulnerable people groups

4

The project should develop and mainstream environmental indicators that will ensure a strong awareness on environmental issues, and institutionalise it in collaboration with UNEP, together with, inter alia, the Ministry of Environment and Forestry, Ministry of Wildlife and Tourism, as well as the Ministry of Petroleum and Mining

5

UNDP should strengthen the project’s communications strategy so as to broaden the project’s visibility and popularise its scope, opportunities and results.

1. Recommendation:

It is essential to first clear the backlog of pending policies and strategic documents, and those at various levels of approval generated by the project before embarking on drafting additional ones. Implementation should be key to the remainder of Phase II – and beyond

Management Response: [Added: 2018/01/02] [Last Updated: 2018/01/02]

UNDP appreciates the recommendation and will work with relevant civil service institutions to clear (get approval) the backlog of pending policies and strategic documents before proceeding to possible Phase III

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
Compile and update list of approval pending national and sub-national policies and strategic documents
[Added: 2018/01/02] [Last Updated: 2019/11/17]
Senior Programme Advisor/Project Management Specialist 2019/07 Completed list of policies was compiled by the project team and will be validated during the final project evaluation scheduled for 2019 History
Conduct consultations with the relevant civil service institutions with approval pending for policies and strategic documents
[Added: 2018/01/02] [Last Updated: 2019/11/17]
Senior Programme Advisor/Project Management Specialist 2019/07 Completed consultations conducted. implementation of policies at the national level will be conducted as part of the sucessor GEMS project History
Follow-up and completion of approval of pending policies and strategic documents
[Added: 2018/01/02] [Last Updated: 2019/11/17]
Senior Programme Advisor/Project Management Specialist 2019/10 Completed most pending policies approved History
2. Recommendation:

The sustainability strategy should be reviewed to align with current context and realities

Management Response: [Added: 2018/01/02]

UNDP notes the recommendation of the evaluation team and will work with Ministry of Labour, Public Service and Human Resources Development (MoLPS&HRD) to review and align the project’s sustainability strategy

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
Conduct consultations with the MoLPS&HRD, beneficiary civil service institutions, CSSOs and twins, and Prepare a sustainability strategy review report
[Added: 2018/01/02] [Last Updated: 2019/11/17]
Senior Programme Advisor/Project Management Specialist 2019/04 Completed GEMS project developed and approved as a way to sustain capacity gains at national level History
Get endorsement and dissemination of the strategy by the MoLPS&HRD
[Added: 2018/01/02] [Last Updated: 2019/11/17]
Senior Programme Advisor/Project Management Specialist 2019/07 Completed GEMS project developed and approved as a way to sustain capacity gains at national level History
3. Recommendation:

The project should develop key indicators for gender considerations and social inclusion for gender equality and focused services delivery to vulnerable people groups

Management Response: [Added: 2018/01/02]

UNDP has taken note of this recommendation.  The project will develop key indicator for gender considerations and social inclusion as part of the 2018 CSSOs deployment and the development of Phase III project document

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
Conduct consultations on gender and social inclusion indicators with the MoLPS&HRD, beneficiary civil service institutions CSSOs and twins
[Added: 2018/01/02] [Last Updated: 2019/11/17]
Senior Programme Advisor/Project Management Specialist 2019/04 Completed Gender mainstreaming, human right mainstreaming are emphasixed in the approved successor GEMS project (pages 15-16) History
Develop and share key indicators for gender considerations and social inclusion
[Added: 2018/01/02] [Last Updated: 2019/11/17]
Senior Programme Advisor/Project Management Specialist 2019/07 Completed Gender mainstreaming, human right mainstreaming are emphasixed in the approved successor GEMS project (pages 15-16) History
4. Recommendation:

The project should develop and mainstream environmental indicators that will ensure a strong awareness on environmental issues, and institutionalise it in collaboration with UNEP, together with, inter alia, the Ministry of Environment and Forestry, Ministry of Wildlife and Tourism, as well as the Ministry of Petroleum and Mining

Management Response: [Added: 2018/01/02]

UNDP appreciates the evaluation team for this recommendation and the project will develop indicators and reinforces the mainstreaming of environmental issue

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
Conduct consultations with relevant partners on the need to develop environmental indicators
[Added: 2018/01/02] [Last Updated: 2019/11/17]
Senior Programme Advisor/Project Management Specialist 2019/04 Completed Environment mainstreaming is emphasized in the approved successor GEMS project (page 17) History
Develop and share key environmental indicators
[Added: 2018/01/02] [Last Updated: 2019/11/17]
Senior Programme Advisor/Project Management Specialist 2019/04 Completed Environment mainstreaming is emphasized in the approved successor GEMS project (page 17 History
5. Recommendation:

UNDP should strengthen the project’s communications strategy so as to broaden the project’s visibility and popularise its scope, opportunities and results.

Management Response: [Added: 2018/01/02]

UNDP takes note of this recommendation and will strengthen the project’s visibility through the development of a communications strategy

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
Develop and implement project communications strategy based on the CO communication strategy and in consultation with the UNDP CO Communication Unit
[Added: 2018/01/02] [Last Updated: 2019/11/17]
Senior Programme Advisor/Project Management Specialist 2019/04 Completed Office's communication strategy developed History

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