Final Evaluation of the Strengthening climate information and early warning systems in Eastern and Southern Africa for climate resilient development and adaptation to climate change Zambia project

Report Cover Image
Evaluation Plan:
2016-2021, Zambia
Evaluation Type:
Final Project
Planned End Date:
03/2018
Completion Date:
11/2019
Status:
Completed
Management Response:
Yes
Evaluation Budget(US $):
60,000

Project Summary Table

This is a report for the UNDP-GEF Terminal Evaluation of the project “Strengthening climate information and early warning systems in Eastern and Southern Africa for climate resilient development and adaptation to climate change – Zambia (PIMS 5091). Project information is presented in Table 1-1.

Table 1-1 Project Information

 

Project Information

Project Title: Strengthening climate information and early warning systems in Eastern and Southern Africa for climate resilient development and adaptation to climate change – Zambia

Country

Zambia

Management Arrangement

NIM (National Implementation)

Executing Entity/Implementing Partner

Ministry of Transport and Communication (Zambia Meteorological Department)

Implementing Entity/Responsible Partners

Disaster Management and Mitigation Unit (DMMU), Department of Water Affairs (DWA)/Water Resource Management Authority (WRMA), Ministry of Agriculture and Livestock (MAL), Ministry of Health (MoH), Central Statistics Office (CSO), and Interim National Climate Change Secretariat (INCCS

GEF Focal Area: Climate Change

LDCF

Project Start Date (actual)

26 February 2014  

Project Start Date (planned)

September 2013

Project Closing Date

17 November 2017

PAC Meeting Date

31 July 2013

Atlas Award ID: 00074216 

Project ID: 00086729   

 

PIMS

 5901

GEF ID

 

Total Allocated Resources:  

US$ 17,131,947

 

 

GEF/LDCF                    US$   3,600,000

Government (In Kind)   US$   3,746,947

UNDP (Grant)               US$      600,000

UNDP (Cash)                US$      400,000

Other                             US$     8,785

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Download document UNDP-GEF-Terminal-Evaluation-Terms-of-Reference-Template-2018.docx tor English 57.66 KB Posted 329
Download document Zambia UNDP-GEF PIMS5901 CIEWS Project Terminal Evaluation Draft Report 22.2.2019.docx summary English 3287.58 KB Posted 204
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Title Final Evaluation of the Strengthening climate information and early warning systems in Eastern and Southern Africa for climate resilient development and adaptation to climate change Zambia project
Atlas Project Number: 00074216
Evaluation Plan: 2016-2021, Zambia
Evaluation Type: Final Project
Status: Completed
Completion Date: 11/2019
Planned End Date: 03/2018
Management Response: Yes
Focus Area:
  • 1. Environment & Sustainable Development
  • 2. Others
Corporate Outcome and Output (UNDP Strategic Plan 2014-2017)
  • 1. Output 1.4. Scaled up action on climate change adaptation and mitigation across sectors which is funded and implemented
SDG Goal
  • Goal 13. Take urgent action to combat climate change and its impacts
SDG Target
  • 13.2 Integrate climate change measures into national policies, strategies and planning
Evaluation Budget(US $): 60,000
Source of Funding: Project Budget, Donor
Evaluation Expenditure(US $): 23,780
Joint Programme: No
Joint Evaluation: No
Evaluation Team members:
Name Title Email Nationality
Nelson Gapare Mr
GEF Evaluation: Yes
GEF Project Title: Strengthening climate information and early warning systems in Eastern and Southern Africa for climate resilient development and adaptation to climate change Zambia project
Evaluation Type: Terminal Evaluation
Focal Area: Climate Change
Project Type: FSP
GEF Phase: GEF-5
GEF Project ID: 4995
PIMS Number: 5091
Key Stakeholders: Global Environmental Facility (GEF), Ministry of Lands, Natural Resources and Environmental Protection (MLNREP), Ministry of Agriculture (MoA), Priority Line Ministries, Civil Society organizations, Private Sector, and Other Cooperating Partners
Countries: ZAMBIA
Comments:

The project requested for a no-cost extension after the Mid-Term Evaluation which was conducted in 2016. The project is going to continue up to March 2018. Draft ToRs have been developed and have been circulated to stakeholders for review.

Lessons
Findings
1.

3 FINDINGS

3.1 Project Design and Formulation

The project design and formulation process are critical aspects and influence the degree of project success. Projects need to have well-crafted and specific, measurable, attainable, realistic and time-bound (SMART) indicators. Similarly, it is necessary to ensure indicators are objective, with adequate formulation of assumptions and assessment of risks to ensure reasonable mitigation measures are put in place. It is also important that the project design and formulation integrate lessons and linkages with other relevant projects, avenues for stakeholder participation, replicability of the project approach, as well as the robustness of the management arrangements. Thus, the analysis of the project design/formulation features all these variables, as outlined in the following sections. 

3.1.1 Analysis of Results Framework 

The project logic was sound, as there is a clear linkage between the problems being addressed, the interventions, specific activities undertaken and the results at output and outcome levels that feed into the project goal. On the whole, the results framework provided a useful guide for tracking project progress at different stages of implementation as reported in the MTR and PIRs. The only aspect that perhaps could help in clarity is numbering the indicator in a continuous sequence across the two outcomes (i.e. 1 to 7). 

The TE agrees with the MTR that the project is well designed in line with the country needs and the baseline justifies the selected outcomes, outputs and indicators. It is noted that some stakeholders expressed that outputs and activities in Outcome 1 could have focused on the capacity building activities more broadly beyond ZMD. The outputs and outcomes were largely maintained and adhered to throughout the project. Although an element of adaptive management was required towards the end of the project, as an opportunity emerged to support a Green Climate Fund (GCF) project proposal. In February 2017 the Ministry of Transport and Communications requested UNDP to provide additional funding to the CIEWS project, in order to support the preparation of a US $32 million GCF project proposal. The proposal was successful and will support the Government of Zambia to strengthen the resilience to climate change risks of vulnerable smallholder farmers in the country’s Agro-Ecological Regions I and II. Consequently, US $3.174 million has been allocated to further strengthen generation and interpretation of climate information and data collection to ensure timely, accurate and detailed weather, climate, crop and hydrological forecasts. It is envisaged that the forecasts will support smallholder farmers in planning and the sustainable management of water resources used in resilient agricultural practices. An additional US $1.589 million has been allocated to strengthen dissemination and use of tailored weather/climate-based agricultural advisories to ensure smallholder farmers receive the information they need for planning and decision-making. This funding will ensure the sustainability of the CIEWS project.


Tag: Agriculture Climate Change Adaptation Climate change governance Vulnerable Relevance Gender Mainstreaming Results-Based Management Country Government Resilience Capacity Building

2.

3.1 Project Design and Formulation

3.1.2 Assumptions and Risks

The risk assessment details were provided in the project document and more specific issues were outlined under strategic result framework. The project worked well to address or mitigate the risks. The relevance of the ten risks indicated in the ProDoc was well verified through further project reporting and documentation, as well as in interviews with most stakeholders. Mitigation measures designed for these pre-identified risks, as detailed in the ProDoc, were also adequate. However, the identification of risks was only partial, and, therefore, the effectiveness of the pre-defined mitigation measures was also insufficient. This is expected in any project, considering that not all risks that become apparent during implementation, are easy to identify in advance of project commencement. Moreover, implementation of the identified mitigation measures was only partially successful, as further detailed below. 

Risk 1 appropriately focuses on improved technical capacity and the assumption taken is also in line with the necessary mitigation measures. However, it appears that there was a very slow response to the training opportunities, specifically the decisions in the selection of staff to undergo technical training. Although the project has finished, students are still completing studies at various institutions. Risk 2 identifies the need for strengthened intersectorial coordination, but the feedback from some stakeholders suggests that the level of intersectoral coordination remains insufficient and could certainly be strengthened. For example, while this evaluation observed the willingness to make primary data available, the mechanics and operationalization of data sharing arrangements remain somewhat vague. ZMD indicates a business model to recover costs of operations through selling of data. Such a business model needs to be carefully considered, so as not to inhibit access and use of weather data and information. It is noted that ZMD will create user accounts with different access rights to meteorological data and this is encouraged.

Risk 3 and Risk 4 are straightforward, as they refer to the need for increased political will and for mainstreaming into national policies. Climate change is considered a major risk to the economy and rural livelihoods. Therefore, adaptation and mitigation measures are being mainstreamed into every sector of the economy. Risk 5, referring to synchronization with the baseline projects, proved to be correct but was mitigated through adaptive change of planned activities (mainly through the change of one of the target districts); Risk 6, 7 and 10 remained important and are adequately covered. Discussion with the project team indicated that securing the weather stations should be priority. As reported in the MTR, Risk 8, regarding limitations to information transfer, was adequately identified, and its mitigation needed to be strengthened through a participatory approach. Risk 9 was not well-managed, as delays in the procurement of equipment subsequently led to delays in overall project implementation.

Overall the project risks and mitigation measures and assumption were generally deemed Satisfactory.

 


Tag: Programme/Project Design Risk Management Coordination Technical Support

3.

3.1 Project Design and Formulation

3.1.4 Planned stakeholder participation 

The TE assessment observes that there has been significant and adequate stakeholder consultation and participation. It is noted that multi-stakeholder consultations were conducted to inform the design of the LDCF project in September and December 2012 and continued through a validation mission and series of consultations in April and May 2013 (28 April – 3 May 2013, including a validation workshop on 2 May 2013). There is adequate evidence that there was wide ranging consultation and engagement of the national operational focal points and government departments responsible for generating and using climate information and early warning systems, as well as a number of development partners, NGOs, and civil society organisations. Bi-lateral stakeholder consultations included a range of additional meetings that were held between September 2012 and April 2013 with bi-lateral and multi-lateral organisations, government departments and NGOs, as well as private sector partners. The MTR suggests that while most key stakeholders were consulted at the project's design phase, several essential stakeholders at national level and mostly at the local level reported that they were not consulted or involved in the project design. However, a comprehensive Communication Strategy for the CIEWS Project was prepared in 2016 to provide communications support, including consultation with key stakeholders and the integration of their inputs. The project made important efforts to strengthen stakeholders' engagement and enabling public consultation, noting that in Gwembe District the project undertook awareness activities with the surrounding communities. The TE confirms the MTR observation that the small project team become over committed with the implementation of activities at the central level. This overcommitment meant that no on-going permanent consultation processes with provincial, district and local stakeholder took place. 


Tag: Relevance Sustainability Global Environment Facility fund Local Governance Programme Synergy Strategic Positioning Civil Societies and NGOs Capacity Building

4.

3.1 Project Design and Formulation

3.1.8 Management arrangements

The project management arrangements were based on national ownership with ZMD, as the implementing partner under National Implementation Modality (NIM). The project outputs support national and local capacity building, and thereby promoted national ownership. A Project Board (also called the Project Steering Committee) was established and responsible for making the management decisions of the project and provided guidance to the Project Manager. The Project Board played its role in monitoring progress of implementation and ensuring that recommendations from annual and mid-term evaluations were adopted for performance improvement, ensuring accountability and adoption of lessons learnt. The project was implemented based on an approved Annual Work Plan and the Project Board was kept informed of progress through quarterly and annual reports. At the district level, the project facilitated the organization of the multisectorial District Disaster Coordinating Committee (DDCC). This committee enabled weather and climate information sharing with energy, water, disaster management, health and tourism sectors. Figure 3-1 Project organizational structure.


Tag: Human and Financial resources Implementation Modality Oversight Ownership Project and Programme management Capacity Building Technical Support

5.

3.2 Project Implementation 

3.2.1 Adaptive management

The project adequately applied adaptive management. For instance, implementation was initially slow due to the delay in the procurement of the Automatic Weather Stations and the recruitment of the project staff. Adjustments were made through the phasing of many activities that were originally planned for the first, moving them into the second year (2015/2016). The slow implementation in the first year has created a backlog of activities, which need to be implemented in subsequent years. As such, it required the project to be extended beyond the planned end period of September 2017. The no cost extension necessary for the project to fully achieve its objectives was also recommended by the MTR, which took place between February and March 2016.

To address the void left by the resignation of the Project Manager, a ZMD staff has been appointed as focal point to stand in while the UNDP country office is in the process of recruitment. There were also significant delays in the procurement process of the AWSs and the equipment for the rehabilitation of the manual stations. These delays slowed down progress towards achieving the objective and outcomes, as reflected in most of the relevant pre-defined indicators. But these delays were mitigated through the technical support of the CIRDA, who helped with the procurement process through regional LTAs. The equipment was procured and subsequently installed in 2016. Rating: Satisfactory


Tag: Partnership Procurement Project and Programme management

6.

3.2.3 Project Finance

The Implementing Agency was required to provide certified periodic financial statements, and with an annual audit of the financial statements relating to the status of UNDP (including GEF) funds. This was in addition to other financial management regulations specified in the UNDP-GEF Programming and Finance manuals. In conformity with the project audit clause, both internal (quarterly) and external audits have been performed and the results have been used to inform the Project Board. The project financial management system included appropriate controls that allowed the project management team to make informed choices regarding the budget at all times. Two audit reports were made available (Financial Years 2015 and 2016) and no major issues were raised in the reports. In terms of financial delivery, the overall cumulative expenditure over the four years has been 99.75%.

There was adequate commitment to align project expenditure with the annual work plans and budgets, which ensured that resources are spent towards realizing project outputs. The project budget was allocated to specific outcomes (i.e. outcome-based budgeting) implying that project spending has been well aligned with the envisaged project results, which promotes value for money. 

The responsibility of financial administration and reporting was routinely done by ZMD, supported by the UNDP Country Office in Zambia. Financial reports were periodically reviewed by the Project Board, pending approval of the next implementation budget. The project satisfactorily maintained appropriate and reliable management structures, internal controls and record-systems that supported sensible financial management. This represents a sound financial management arrangement that has ensured appropriate utilization of the project’s financial resources. The graph and table below summarize the budget allocation by outcome and output.

This TE recognizes the government´s in-kind contribution to the project. However, it has not been possible to quantify or verify the contribution in dollar values, in order to measure the magnitude of commitment. Table 3-2 Project budget by output. Rating: Satisfactory


Tag: Efficiency Global Environment Facility fund Monitoring and Evaluation Policies & Procedures Results-Based Management

7.

3.3 Project results 

3.3.1 Overall results (attainment of objectives)

This TE agrees with the MTR and the subsequent monitoring reports that the development objectives of the project have been achieved in a generally satisfactory manner. This achievement has been achieved through capacity development and transforming the system for generating, analyzing, packaging and dissemination of weather and climate information. Zambia has benefited from the CIEWS project as there is now a legal framework through the development of the Meteorological Act. Critical capacity enhancement for managing weather and climate information has been attained to a large extent and further work will be undertaken through the GCF project now underway. The project has also contributed to the attainment of the Government’s plan, as enshrined in the 7th National Development Plan (7NDP), as well as attainment of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) by the year 2030. There has been transformation in small-scale farming systems, with increased crop yield and income generating and resilience, through crop diversification and promotion of early maturing varieties. This transformation is contributing to the achievement of the 7th National Development Plan (7NDP) goals on poverty reduction and vulnerability, as well as economic diversification and job creation/livelihoods.


Tag: Agriculture Vulnerable Coherence Relevance Jobs and Livelihoods Poverty Reduction SDG Integration

8.

3.3.3 Effectiveness

For the CIEWS project, an analysis of cost-effectiveness and sustainability of investments was undertaken and assessed against alternative approaches (Table 8, page 54 of the ProDoc). This analysis was useful as it enabled a collective determination of the best options. The achievements described in Section 3.3.1 and feedback from stakeholders and partners confirms the level of effectiveness. 


Tag: Climate Change Adaptation Climate change governance Effectiveness Sustainability Data and Statistics

9.

3.3.4 Efficiency

The extent to which the project resources (financial, equipment and human) have been used appropriately and economically to deliver the desired results in a cost-effective manner has been a key yardstick for assessing the degree of project efficiency. The CIEWS project was not a standalone project, as it was designed as part of a wider multicountry programme that implemented similar initiatives on generating climate information and Early Warning Systems in at least 11 countries in Africa (including Benin, Burkina Faso, Ethiopia, Liberia, Malawi, Sierra Leone, São Tomé & Príncipe, Tanzania, Uganda and Zambia). The project achieved a good level of efficiency through synergies between the projects and enhanced the cost-effectiveness through access to a pool of specialized technical staff knowledge sharing; training in operations and maintenance of equipment; and forecasting techniques.According to the ProDoc the total project budget was US $17,131,947 and was broken down as presented below:


Tag: Efficiency Global Environment Facility fund Human and Financial resources Knowledge management Operational Efficiency Programme Synergy Capacity Building

10.

3.3.5 Country Ownership

The government’s contribution to the total cost portrays an important perspective on project ownership. The integration of project implementation in the national implementation modality also illustrates ownership of the project. As such, the involvement of government officials in the entire project implementation processes has been evident in indicating ownership. All the government stakeholders that participated in this evaluation expressed willingness to continue playing active roles in coordinating the implementation of climate change adaptation, disaster preparedness, and climate resilience countrywide. The evaluator attended a training workshop as part of the recently initiated GCF project, where national and district level staff expressed the importance of both national and local ownership of projects, as well as ensuring effective engagement and participation of local communitiesThe government has now established a sectoral legal framework, through the development of the Meteorological Act, with the support of the CIEWS project. This framework recognizes the criticality of mainstreaming climate information into planning systems. Rating: Satisfactory


Tag: Climate Change Adaptation Climate change governance Disaster Risk Reduction Vulnerable Sustainability Gender Mainstreaming Implementation Modality Ownership Country Government Resilience Capacity Building Poverty Reduction SDG Integration

11.

3.3.7 Sustainability 

The overall ranking for sustainability is Moderately likely. More specific issues are outlined below with regard to financial, institutional and socio-economic sustainability.


Tag: Climate Change Adaptation Sustainability Resource mobilization Rule of law Operational Efficiency Risk Management Inclusive economic growth

12.

3.3.8 Gender consideration

The project has a deliberate policy in involving women in the project activities. Out of the total number of over 60,000 small scale farmers reached by the project since inception in Gwembe, Mambwe and Sesheke districts, 60% have been women beneficiaries. In project areas the targeted women groups were established for sharing weather and climate information. The information provided to women facilitated to their planning and decision making over which the farming system to adopt. This resulted in the diversification of their livelihoods, ranging from crop production to small livestock rearing, as well as poultry. The affirmative action taken by the project to involve women in receiving weather and climate information has facilitated their ability to freely choose to grow crops that are drought tolerant, using the flood ponds for rice, as well as diversification of their livelihoods, including keeping goats. 


Tag: Agriculture Rural development Gender Equality Gender Mainstreaming Women's Empowerment Capacity Building

13.

3.3.9 Impact 

There is unreserved recognition from stakeholders and project partners that the project has opened numerous opportunities to build greater climate resilience and disaster preparedness. There has been capacity increase from 80 to 156 as per the capacity scorecard, which represents a 91% increase since the inception of the project (the target at the end of the project capacity score was 171. 


Tag: Climate Change Adaptation Disaster Risk Reduction Vulnerable Impact Capacity Building Poverty Reduction Advocacy Technical Support

Recommendations
1

Recommendation 1. Data access and tailoring

To ZMD: It is noted that data is being shared through the daily and 10-day forecasts through radio, TV, and website and this is encouraged and should continue. In response to repeated feedback from stakeholders and partners, it is highly recommended that:  a. There is clarity in the form of clear guidelines or data access policies and procedures, including any applicable costs to enable institutions to include such costs in annual budgets.   b. Recognize the varying sectoral data needs and that some institutions may wish to undertake their own analysis. It is, therefore, highly recommended that ZMD works with the different sectors to establish clear user needs, types of data, frequency and establish suitable tailored data access and packaging.

2

Recommendation 2. Maintenance and replacement of Automatic Weather stations

To ZMD: The support and investment provided under the CIEWS project will likely require substantial ongoing maintenance. The project intended to influence the government to increase the ZMD annual budget by almost 50%, but only achieved 28% after the four years of the project. Therefore, funding for the department remains inadequate. It is noted that the cost recovery model will enable ZMD to cover some of the operational costs. It is necessary to understand the full annual operating, maintenance, and replacement costs of the weather stations. The weather stations established under the project face the risk of rapidly deteriorating in functionality if not adequately maintained. It is highly recommended that:  a. A full assessment be undertaken to determine the annual operating, maintenance and replacement costs (where necessary) of the weather stations, at least for an initial period of 5 to 7 years.  b. From the assessment, identify funding shortfalls and prepare a funding strategy to address any shortfall. 

3

Recommendation 3. Capacity building

To ZMD:  Staff at the district level raised the need for additional and ongoing capacity to continue engaging with local communities beyond the project life.  It is highly recommended that ZMD efforts continue to increase and enhance the critical mass to enable wider extension services and sectoral support to different sectors. The current efforts to seek cabinet office approval to establish high positions for those who have been trained and those to graduate should continue.  It is noted that the government human resource regulations states that staff members who are provided training are bonded to the department for the period of two years. However, additional efforts should be made to ensure that staff stay with the department beyond the two-year bonding period. 

4

General Project Management Recommendations

Recommendation 4: Sharing of lessons learned on good practice project approaches

To UNDP and ZMD: This evaluation commended the baseline self-capacity assessment conducted during the project preparation phase, which guided the identification and prioritization of stakeholder needs. Equipment and capacity-building investments were selected based on identified priorities, as well as the available budget and focal areas of the CIEWS project. This is good practice and should be an important lesson to be shared with other institutions for formulation of future projects. 

This evaluation highly recommends that:  a. In addition to the social media videos produced about the results and impact of the project, preparation of information briefs in good practice project implementation should be shared with all project partners.  

5

General Project Management Recommendations

Recommendation 5. Monitoring and Evaluation

To ZMD and UNDP: The current methods of collecting M&E data are weak and inconsistent to enable longitudinal assessment of development support impact. As a systematic and long-term process, monitoring should continually gather information regarding the progress made by an implemented project. While evaluation is time specific and it is performed to judge whether a project has reached its goals and delivered what is expected according to its original plan.  M&E are also relevant to development partners and donors, who need to assess the reliability of partnerships and accountability upon which further collaborations could be established. This evaluation highly recommends that: - In future, develop an M&E system and reporting for planning and building a knowledge management and database. This can be linked, integrated, and interfaced with the existing government M&E system. This will enhance both management and institutional memory through proper reporting, record keeping and archiving at all central and local government levels, to allow for streamlined integrated database management as a pillar for effective Results-Based Monitoring & Evaluation/Management. 

Management Response Documents
1. Recommendation:

Recommendation 1. Data access and tailoring

To ZMD: It is noted that data is being shared through the daily and 10-day forecasts through radio, TV, and website and this is encouraged and should continue. In response to repeated feedback from stakeholders and partners, it is highly recommended that:  a. There is clarity in the form of clear guidelines or data access policies and procedures, including any applicable costs to enable institutions to include such costs in annual budgets.   b. Recognize the varying sectoral data needs and that some institutions may wish to undertake their own analysis. It is, therefore, highly recommended that ZMD works with the different sectors to establish clear user needs, types of data, frequency and establish suitable tailored data access and packaging.

Management Response: [Added: 2020/06/17] [Last Updated: 2020/11/15]

The recommendation is in line with the required procedure of data access and tailoring 

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
1.1 Include access costs of information by stakeholders
[Added: 2020/06/17]
ZMD 2020/06 Completed There is a bill to transform the Zambia Meteorological Department (ZMD) into an Authority. The bill allows the Authority to provide cost recovery mechanisms for specialised information and services. The bill will be tabled in parliament for enactment in 2020
1.2 Develop sector specific information
[Added: 2020/06/17]
ZMD 2020/06 Completed ZMD started preparing sector specific information for agriculture in 2019. In 2020, they will include the water sector.
2. Recommendation:

Recommendation 2. Maintenance and replacement of Automatic Weather stations

To ZMD: The support and investment provided under the CIEWS project will likely require substantial ongoing maintenance. The project intended to influence the government to increase the ZMD annual budget by almost 50%, but only achieved 28% after the four years of the project. Therefore, funding for the department remains inadequate. It is noted that the cost recovery model will enable ZMD to cover some of the operational costs. It is necessary to understand the full annual operating, maintenance, and replacement costs of the weather stations. The weather stations established under the project face the risk of rapidly deteriorating in functionality if not adequately maintained. It is highly recommended that:  a. A full assessment be undertaken to determine the annual operating, maintenance and replacement costs (where necessary) of the weather stations, at least for an initial period of 5 to 7 years.  b. From the assessment, identify funding shortfalls and prepare a funding strategy to address any shortfall. 

Management Response: [Added: 2020/06/17] [Last Updated: 2020/11/15]

Agreed - the recommendation is relevant as it will serve to enhance the sustainability and continuation of the generation of information in Zambia 

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
.1 conduct assessment to determine cost of operationalization, maintenance and replacement AWSs and prepare funding strategy.
[Added: 2020/06/17]
ZMD 2020/06 Completed Operations and maintenance strategy were developed as part of the formulation of the GCF project and implementation of the same has started
3. Recommendation:

Recommendation 3. Capacity building

To ZMD:  Staff at the district level raised the need for additional and ongoing capacity to continue engaging with local communities beyond the project life.  It is highly recommended that ZMD efforts continue to increase and enhance the critical mass to enable wider extension services and sectoral support to different sectors. The current efforts to seek cabinet office approval to establish high positions for those who have been trained and those to graduate should continue.  It is noted that the government human resource regulations states that staff members who are provided training are bonded to the department for the period of two years. However, additional efforts should be made to ensure that staff stay with the department beyond the two-year bonding period. 

Management Response: [Added: 2020/06/17] [Last Updated: 2020/11/15]

We agree with the recommendation to ensure long term investment in the sector 

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
3.1 Seek cabinet approval to unfreeze positions to be occupied by trained graduates.
[Added: 2020/06/17]
ZMD 2020/07 Completed As part of the restructuring, ZMD as indicated in 1.1 above, the bill in parliament would approve the structures needed for smooth operations of ZMD
3.2 Increase staff bondage to the department after training
[Added: 2020/06/17] [Last Updated: 2020/10/01]
ZMD 2020/12 Completed ZMD operates under the Human Resource Development (HRD) guidelines of the Government of the Republic of Zambia in which all sponsored staff are bonded for two years after training. This is done three months before staff proceed on study leave. History
4. Recommendation:

General Project Management Recommendations

Recommendation 4: Sharing of lessons learned on good practice project approaches

To UNDP and ZMD: This evaluation commended the baseline self-capacity assessment conducted during the project preparation phase, which guided the identification and prioritization of stakeholder needs. Equipment and capacity-building investments were selected based on identified priorities, as well as the available budget and focal areas of the CIEWS project. This is good practice and should be an important lesson to be shared with other institutions for formulation of future projects. 

This evaluation highly recommends that:  a. In addition to the social media videos produced about the results and impact of the project, preparation of information briefs in good practice project implementation should be shared with all project partners.  

Management Response: [Added: 2020/06/17] [Last Updated: 2020/11/15]

During the project and with the current GCF successor project information briefs and good practices will be shared through the project publications   

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
4.1 Preparation of information briefs to be shared with project partners
[Added: 2020/06/17]
UNDP, ZMD 2020/06 Completed Project briefs were prepared and used to design the GCF project which is under implementation and shared to all stakeholders
5. Recommendation:

General Project Management Recommendations

Recommendation 5. Monitoring and Evaluation

To ZMD and UNDP: The current methods of collecting M&E data are weak and inconsistent to enable longitudinal assessment of development support impact. As a systematic and long-term process, monitoring should continually gather information regarding the progress made by an implemented project. While evaluation is time specific and it is performed to judge whether a project has reached its goals and delivered what is expected according to its original plan.  M&E are also relevant to development partners and donors, who need to assess the reliability of partnerships and accountability upon which further collaborations could be established. This evaluation highly recommends that: - In future, develop an M&E system and reporting for planning and building a knowledge management and database. This can be linked, integrated, and interfaced with the existing government M&E system. This will enhance both management and institutional memory through proper reporting, record keeping and archiving at all central and local government levels, to allow for streamlined integrated database management as a pillar for effective Results-Based Monitoring & Evaluation/Management. 

Management Response: [Added: 2020/06/17] [Last Updated: 2020/11/15]

We are agree with the recommendation

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
Develop M & E system
[Added: 2020/06/17]
UNDP, ZMD 2020/12 Completed The M&E system has been developed as part of the GCF project

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