Mid-Term Evaluation of the promoting climate-resilient, community-based regeneration of indigenous forests in Zambia Central Province project

Report Cover Image
Evaluation Plan:
2016-2021, Zambia
Evaluation Type:
Mid Term Project
Planned End Date:
06/2018
Completion Date:
11/2018
Status:
Completed
Management Response:
Yes
Evaluation Budget(US $):
40,000

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Title Mid-Term Evaluation of the promoting climate-resilient, community-based regeneration of indigenous forests in Zambia Central Province project
Atlas Project Number: 00086025
Evaluation Plan: 2016-2021, Zambia
Evaluation Type: Mid Term Project
Status: Completed
Completion Date: 11/2018
Planned End Date: 06/2018
Management Response: Yes
Focus Area:
  • 1. Environment & Sustainable Development
  • 2. Others
Corporate Outcome and Output (UNDP Strategic Plan 2014-2017)
  • 1. Output 1.4. Scaled up action on climate change adaptation and mitigation across sectors which is funded and implemented
SDG Goal
  • Goal 13. Take urgent action to combat climate change and its impacts
SDG Target
  • 13.2 Integrate climate change measures into national policies, strategies and planning
Evaluation Budget(US $): 40,000
Source of Funding: Project Budget, Donor
Evaluation Expenditure(US $): 66,010
Joint Programme: No
Joint Evaluation: No
Evaluation Team members:
Name Title Email Nationality
Nelson Gapare International Consultant gaparen@greensoftgroup.com
Dr Chiselebwe Ng’andwe National Consultant hiselebwen@yahoo.com
GEF Evaluation: Yes
GEF Project Title: promoting climate-resilient, community-based regeneration of indigenous forests in Zambias Central Province project
Evaluation Type: Mid-term Review
Focal Area: Climate Change
Project Type: EA
GEF Phase: GEF-4
GEF Project ID:
PIMS Number: 4712
Key Stakeholders: Ministry of Mines, Energy and Water Development (MMEWD), Ministry of Chiefs and Traditional Affairs (MOCTA), Ministry of Agriculture and Livestock (MAL), Zambia Meteorological Department (ZMD), Serenje District Council, District Council of Chiefs, and Zambia Climate Change Network (ZCCN)
Countries: ZAMBIA
Lessons
Findings
Recommendations
1

1. Improve communication and coordination

At  the technical level, inadequencies in communication and clear articulation of institutitional roles abnd responsibilities has led to basic misunderstandings in activity implmentation, sequencing, as well as design and distribution of farming implements. The project lacks visibility, because there are limited communication materials such as project info sheets, pamphlets and sign boards, which would be useful in promoting project achivements and emerging lessons.

2

Re-assess activity sequencing in order to reduce time lags, and conduct prioritization and economic viability of livelihood options.

 

Sub optimal sequencing limits options for adjustments once an investment is made. It is necessary to reduce the time lag between livelihood activity training and provision of inputs. Project teams need to apply critical path analysis and understand activity interdependencies prior to commencing implementation. For example, community training on various livelihood activities must be immediately followed with distribution of inputs.

3

Follow-up on co-financing resource mobilization.

The project has not yet fully harnessed the potential co-financing resources from the oter partners. As a matter of priority, efforts should be made to establish formal arrangements with other partners to support certain activities, including in-kind contributions or cash for project implementation. These discussions need to happen urgently.

4

Conduct socio-economic viability analysis before introducing briquetting machines

Promoting sustainable charcoal production requires robust socio-economic analysis and lessons from other similar projects, such as Westernt Tanzania can be useful. It is necessary to undertake analysis of the socio-economic potential and the likely barriers to adoption of briquetting machines prior to any investment.

Considerations could be made for commercial type sustainable charcoal production systems and the formation of associations. This approach reduces the burden of monitoring and builds a potential framework for deforrestation free charcoal production
 

5

Improve attendance at Project Steering Committee (PSC) Meetings

The PSC meets twice a year, ut it is understood that it remains difficukt to get al appointed members to regularly attend. Often only proxies attend the meetings. The MTR team highly recommends that members of the PSC attend meetings because the convenining power of PSC's enables quick and strategic decision making when project issues arise as well as manageing risks and opportunities. It is perhaps worth creating PSCs comprising of deputy PSCs and departmental heads, in order to increase attendance while still maintaining the necessary high level representation.

1. Recommendation:

1. Improve communication and coordination

At  the technical level, inadequencies in communication and clear articulation of institutitional roles abnd responsibilities has led to basic misunderstandings in activity implmentation, sequencing, as well as design and distribution of farming implements. The project lacks visibility, because there are limited communication materials such as project info sheets, pamphlets and sign boards, which would be useful in promoting project achivements and emerging lessons.

Management Response: [Added: 2019/05/15] [Last Updated: 2019/05/15]

Strengthening adherence and development communication materials

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
Strengthening adherence to the defined roles and responsibilities of the IPs through reporting lines by monthly partners meetings and quarterly monitoring. Development of communication materials (info sheets, pamphlets, sign boards, brochures, tear drops, banners, posters) covering the project components to improve project visibility.
[Added: 2019/05/15]
COMACO, ZEMA, PSC, Energy 2019/12 Initiated This is being done through improved communication through emails, bi monthly meetings and quarterly monitoring
2. Recommendation:

Re-assess activity sequencing in order to reduce time lags, and conduct prioritization and economic viability of livelihood options.

 

Sub optimal sequencing limits options for adjustments once an investment is made. It is necessary to reduce the time lag between livelihood activity training and provision of inputs. Project teams need to apply critical path analysis and understand activity interdependencies prior to commencing implementation. For example, community training on various livelihood activities must be immediately followed with distribution of inputs.

Management Response: [Added: 2019/05/15]

Alignment of the project imlementation calendar to the farmer seasonal calendar and seasonality of activities

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
Alignment of the project implementation calendar to the farmer seasonal calendar and seasonality of activities
[Added: 2019/05/15]
PIU, Technical team with support and approval by the PSC 2019/02 Completed An implementation plan has been developed. The activities for the three implementing parters are now sequenced with farmers seasonal calendar
3. Recommendation:

Follow-up on co-financing resource mobilization.

The project has not yet fully harnessed the potential co-financing resources from the oter partners. As a matter of priority, efforts should be made to establish formal arrangements with other partners to support certain activities, including in-kind contributions or cash for project implementation. These discussions need to happen urgently.

Management Response: [Added: 2019/05/15]

Engagement of the co-financers through quarterly meetings in order to capture their contributions

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
Engagement of the co-financers through quarterly meetings in order to capture their contributions
[Added: 2019/05/15]
PIU, FD, UNDP 2019/12 Initiated Letters have since been sent to the co-financers requesting for a meeting
4. Recommendation:

Conduct socio-economic viability analysis before introducing briquetting machines

Promoting sustainable charcoal production requires robust socio-economic analysis and lessons from other similar projects, such as Westernt Tanzania can be useful. It is necessary to undertake analysis of the socio-economic potential and the likely barriers to adoption of briquetting machines prior to any investment.

Considerations could be made for commercial type sustainable charcoal production systems and the formation of associations. This approach reduces the burden of monitoring and builds a potential framework for deforrestation free charcoal production
 

Management Response: [Added: 2019/05/16]

Develop efficient charcoal producer groups, undertake learning visits and conduct a socio-economic analysis

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
Efficient charcoal producer groups are in existence under the Village Action Groups which are registered entities (societies)
[Added: 2019/05/16]
Department of Energy, FD, PIU 2019/12 Initiated The project has engaged TDAU to support energy department in the implementation of energy efficient technologies.
Undertake a learning visit for charcoal producer groups to an area with best practices in efficient briquette production
[Added: 2019/05/16]
Department of Energy, FD, PIU 2019/12 Initiated The project has engaged TDAU to support energy department in the implementation of energy efficient technologies
Conducting a socio-economic analysis on potential and likely barriers to adoption of briquetting as well as commercial type sustainable charcoal production systems
[Added: 2019/05/16]
Department of Energy, FD, PIU 2019/12 Initiated
5. Recommendation:

Improve attendance at Project Steering Committee (PSC) Meetings

The PSC meets twice a year, ut it is understood that it remains difficukt to get al appointed members to regularly attend. Often only proxies attend the meetings. The MTR team highly recommends that members of the PSC attend meetings because the convenining power of PSC's enables quick and strategic decision making when project issues arise as well as manageing risks and opportunities. It is perhaps worth creating PSCs comprising of deputy PSCs and departmental heads, in order to increase attendance while still maintaining the necessary high level representation.

Management Response: [Added: 2019/05/16]

Proxies attending PSC meetings should at least be a grade below the member they are representing.

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
Proxies attending PSC meetings should at least be a grade below the member they are representing. In addition, teh Climate Change policy provides for steering committee that comprises only permanent secretaries. The Committee is now operational.
[Added: 2019/05/16]
PSC 2019/06 Overdue-Initiated The project annual work plans and budget are approved by teh climate change steering committee which comprises a committee of Permanent Secretaries.

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