Outcome Mid-Term Review Report Review of the Environmental Sustainability, Climate Change and Resilience Pillar

Report Cover Image
Evaluation Plan:
2016-2021, Tanzania
Evaluation Type:
Outcome
Planned End Date:
09/2018
Completion Date:
11/2018
Status:
Completed
Management Response:
Yes
Evaluation Budget(US $):
80,000

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Title Outcome Mid-Term Review Report Review of the Environmental Sustainability, Climate Change and Resilience Pillar
Atlas Project Number: 94386,94384,83123,86631,61988,102185,74211,92475,61743,60996,68935
Evaluation Plan: 2016-2021, Tanzania
Evaluation Type: Outcome
Status: Completed
Completion Date: 11/2018
Planned End Date: 09/2018
Management Response: Yes
Focus Area:
  • 1. Environment & Sustainable Development
  • 2. Others
Corporate Outcome and Output (UNDP Strategic Plan 2014-2017)
  • 1. Output 2.5. Legal and regulatory frameworks, policies and institutions enabled to ensure the conservation, sustainable use, and access and benefit sharing of natural resources, biodiversity and ecosystems, in line with international conventions and national
  • 2. Output 5.2. Effective institutional, legislative and policy frameworks in place to enhance the implementation of disaster and climate risk management measures at national and sub-national levels
Evaluation Budget(US $): 80,000
Source of Funding: UN, UNDP
Evaluation Expenditure(US $): 27,229
Joint Programme: No
Joint Evaluation: No
Evaluation Team members:
Name Title Email Nationality
Veronica Nyawira Muthui Evaluation Team Leader nyawira.muthui@gmail.com
Stephen Mariki Evaluation Team Member stephenmariki49@gmail.com
GEF Evaluation: No
Key Stakeholders: Vice President's Office, Ministry of Natural Resources and Tourism, UN agencies under the Outcome
Countries: TANZANIA (UNITED REPUBLIC OF )
Lessons
1.

Strong partnerships for planning and implementation of programmes and projects still remain the most cost-effective vehicles for development assistance.


2.

While mainstreaming projects into government programmes catalyses inclusion of project issues into national budgeting processes, it does not automatically guarantee availability of finances because the government budget is still limited, and many budget lines are not fully funded. Thus, the struggle for moving funding for the resilience pillar from project to systemic (budgetary) is not yet over. 


Findings
1.

Finding 1: Overall, the projects’ (outcomes, outputs, and activities) were designed to address the development challenges identified in the country under Pillar II outcome; moreover, by and large all the projects remained relevant throughout the implementation phase, even where some changes took place in the development of the country.
46. Design of all the seven projects reviewed ranked as satisfactory on the question of relevance to the country’s needs, with good quality project documents, and objectives in line with the Tanzania national development priorities as well as with the Country Programme outcome on climate change, environment and resilience. The seven evaluation reports available to this review show that 71 percent scored highly relevant, 29 percent scored relevant, with none of the projects found to be irrelevant (Fig 2). All the stakeholders interviewed during the evaluation process confirmed that UNDP’s projects under pillar II are in line with the countries challenges and objectives on environment, sustainability, climate change and resilience.


Tag: Climate Change Adaptation Ecosystem based adaption Natural Resouce management Relevance Programme/Project Design Country Government

2.

Finding 2: UNDP has, through the projects implemented within the outcome, played a key role in introducing the Government to the best global practices to promote partnerships for the SDGs:
50. The evaluation finds that in general, formulation of all projects in Pillar II is informed by baseline assessments, including an analysis of lessons generated by similar projects. Although the project template for the older GEF projects (GEF 5 cycle) did not require an explanation of how the lessons have specifically informed formulation of any new projects, the newer ones (GEF 6 cycle) require a more in-depth analysis of lessons and a plan to link any project to those generating the lessons, including south-south triangulation. In addition, projects are required to have a knowledge management plan, ensuring that they also contribute lessons to other current and future projects.


Tag: Climate Change Adaptation Biodiversity Natural Resouce management Effectiveness Global Environment Facility fund Agenda 2030

3.

Finding 3: While newer projects are designed with an explicit ToC, the older projects did not have one; however, they all applied the logical framework analysis and had clear logic underpinning their design. These projects had a ToC reconstructed as part of either the MTR or the TE.
54. In general, the intervention logic of most of the projects was sound; with appropriate linkages among all the project variables (problem, intervention areas, specific activities, outputs, outcomes and goal). Fifty seven percent of the seven evaluation reports available for this review scored as “Satisfactory” while 43 percent scored “Moderately Satisfactory” (Figure 4).


Tag: Biodiversity Natural Resouce management Programme/Project Design Theory of Change Capacity Building

4.

Finding 4: Overall, the projects under the outcome have strong arguments on cost effectiveness (efficiency), largely based on consideration for alternative options to tackle the challenges, and adequately informed by best practices generated via both UNDP and government programmes. However, in most cases, the resources mobilized through the projects are only adequate to demonstrate best practices and technologies. There is still a significant gap in resources for upscaling the demonstrated practices and technologies to increase the impacts and advance the SDGs across the three outputs of the outcome. 58. The seven evaluations available to this review reported that 86 percent of the projects scored “Satisfactory” or higher on efficiency (Fig 5).


Tag: Climate Change Adaptation Emission Reduction Biodiversity Ecosystem based adaption Natural Resouce management Efficiency

5.

EFFECTIVENESS
72. The outcome is being delivered through twelve projects; five under output 1, four under output 3 and two under output 3. Five of the projects have undergone terminal evaluations; three have been through mid-term reviews; four are just starting implementation (Table 2). The CPD expected the Pillar to be financed by a total of US$ 31,900,000, which included $8,900,000 to be mobilized by UNDP (from GEF and other sources), while the government and other partners would raise $23 million as co-finance. The MTR however finds that the total funds mobilized to date by UNDP, in partnership with government, civil society and NGOs is US$ 129,229,009.


Tag: Effectiveness Efficiency Human and Financial resources

6.


Finding 6: Despite the above challenge, there is evidence of progress towards increasing capacity of the country (national government, Local Government Authorities, and communities) to reduce the likelihood of conflict and lower risk of natural disasters, including from climate change; however, additional resources (funds, partnerships) are needed to upscale the proven technologies and methodologies to significantly shift the barriers and contribute to the SDGs in the 28 target districts.


Tag: Climate Change Adaptation Ecosystem services Natural Resouce management Challenges Effectiveness Capacity Building

7.

Output 2: Select districts and communities have their capacities strengthened in climate change governance and sustainable energy access
96. This output was to be delivered via four projects with a total budget of $ 16,113,329.00. The projects are Low Emission Capacity Building (LECB); Sustainable Energy for All (SE4ALL) Implementation in Tanzania; Capacity Development in the Energy Sector and Extractive Industry (CADESE) and Climate Change Adaptation through Small Grants Programme.
Indicator 2.1: Number of districts with plans and strategies for enhanced resilience to climate change impacts (Baseline: 5; Target: 28) 97. The CADESE project increased awareness and understanding of the linkage between climate change and human development for local communities by implementing climate change awareness programmes in 22 villages, surpassing the target by 7 villages. The project also demonstrated practical ways of adaptation in agriculture, livestock management and water sectors by implementing demonstration projects responding to locally identified vulnerable segments in Ruaha, Longido and Bahi Districts.


Tag: Climate Change Adaptation Emission Reduction Energy Site Conservation / Preservation Water resources Bilateral partners Country Government Capacity Building

8.

SUSTAINABILITY
Finding 8: Sustainability is mixed. Initiatives piloted by the projects under the three outputs of Pillar II generally have fewer environmental, institutional framework and governance risks to sustainability, but stronger socio-economics and financial risks to sustainability.
123. The sustainability of 29 percent of the seven evaluations of the Pillar II projects available to this review were rated “Unlikely”, 43 percent rated “Moderately Unlikely” while only 28 percent rated “Moderately Likely”. Indeed, Overall Sustainability scored lowest for most projects compared to other evaluation criteria (Fig. 10).


Tag: Climate Change Adaptation Energy Natural Resouce management Sustainability Country Government Capacity Building

9.

GENDER MAINSTREAMING
Finding 9: The design, implementation and monitoring of environmental sustainability, climate change and resilience projects has addressed gender issues adequately, increasingly more so for the newer projects. 133. The MTR finds that even though the gender marker was introduced in 2009, only the newest projects
(about to start implementation) have a gender marker and a gender strategy. Indeed, the oldest projects in the Pillar – Miombo Woodlands, Climate Information, SPANEST, CADESE - did not have gender disaggregated indicators. Nevertheless, UNDP has actively promoted the empowerment of vulnerable groups – women and youth - in all its projects and activities. It has improved gender mainstreaming and capturing and reporting its achievements in empowerment, as reflected in the newer projects.


Tag: Small Grants Programme Gender Equality Gender Mainstreaming Women's Empowerment Project and Programme management Youth

10.

Finding 5: Evaluation of the extent to which the projects are delivering outputs that contribute to the three Pillar II outputs as well as how those outputs contribute to the CPD Outcome is challenged by the weak link between the Pillar indicators and projects’ indicators and limited monitoring and reporting at the Pillar and CPD levels.


Tag: Effectiveness Monitoring and Evaluation

11.

63. Integrated soil fertility management is critical since return on investment for inorganic fertilizer is often too low to sustain widespread use except for cash crops. The Securing Watershed Services via SLM, the Forest Nature Reserves and the SFM for Miombo Woodlands projects sort to mainstream integrated soil fertility management to increase productivity of the land already under cultivation; this would stem the need for clearing new land for agriculture, which is a driver of deforestation, land, forest and watershed degradation. Integrated soil fertility management offers a cost effective means of increasing the ability of forests and woodlands to provide services to both livelihoods and conservation, particularly when compared to the cost of physically rehabilitating the degraded watersheds, forests and fragile woodlands. When done right, this can accomplish conservation at a fraction of the cost of establishing, maintaining and keeping the communities away from protected areas and watershed sensitive areas. Boosting agricultural yields on existing farms is a more socially acceptable way of stemming forest loss than simply restricting agricultural expansion, because, in theory, it allows increased demand for food to be met without displacing forest loss or adding to the poverty of local people.


Tag: Biodiversity Natural Resouce management Effectiveness

12.

66. Strengthening the resilience of small holder agriculture to climate change impacts and improvement of watersheds in Tanzania were identified in the NAPA as urgent and immediate adaptation priorities with the highest immediate cost-benefit ratio. Adaptation measures that involve massive engineering solutions and extensive use of technologies are beyond the reach of many rural communities. Output 3 projects focus on developing adaptive capacity and use of nature based solutions in combination with some soft engineering processes, to provide cost effective, practical and locally appropriate adaptation measures.


Tag: Climate Change Adaptation Biodiversity Natural Resouce management Effectiveness Private Sector

13.

69. The GEF funded projects are implemented via a National Implementation Modality (NIM), which ensures cost-effectiveness in the following ways. In most of the projects, the GEF funds proved about a third of the total cost of the project, with co-finance providing the balance. Using the GEF funds to test and demonstrate best practices and technologies to be upscaled via co-finance is cost effective because, where the co-finance is availed; it ensures support of tested and proven methods. Unfortunately, this co-finance is not always available, leaving a significant gap in the resources required to fully implement the initiatives under the outcome, limiting UNDP’s contribution to advancing the sustainable development goals linked to environment, natural resources, and resilience.


Tag: Effectiveness Global Environment Facility fund Implementation Modality

14.

Key Achievements Contributing to the Outcome
Output 1: Relevant ministries and districts are able to formulate, implement and enforce environmental and natural resources management policies, strategies and regulations.
77. This output is to be achieved via five projects with a total budget of $ 24,456,400.00 (GEF and UNDP, excludes other co-finance).


Tag: Climate Change Adaptation Biodiversity Environment Policy Natural Resouce management Site Conservation / Preservation Effectiveness

15.


Indicator 1.2: Number of districts with financial and sustainable environmental / natural resources plans and strategies (baseline 6; target 28)
80. The Securing Watersheds via SLM project has already delivered four District Land Use Management Plans integrating SLM - for Morogoro, Mvomero, Mkinga and Muheza District Councils; from which sixteen 16 village land use management plans integrating SLM have been developed and approved by village and district authorities. The project has also delivered four District Land Use Framework Plans for the same districts (Morogoro, Mvomero, Mkinga and Muheza).
81. The SPANEST project facilitated the formulation of Business and Finance Plans for managing negative impacts of development in conservation sensitive areas of the Greater Ruaha and Greater Kitulo-Kipengere landscapes. It also facilitated the formation of Landscape Coordination Committees (LCC) for Njombe, Mbeya and Iringa regions, to oversee the implementation of these landscape management plans, operationalizing monitoring, reporting and enforcement measures.


Tag: Climate Change Adaptation Natural Resouce management Efficiency Sustainability Country Government

16.


Indicator 1.3: Extent to which national monitoring system, surveys and census are in place to monitor progress on poaching reduction and wildlife crime (Baseline: No system in place Target: National system in place) 88. The MTR questions the accuracy of the baseline for this indicator. As currently stated, it portrays the notion that there are no systems for surveying wildlife or monitoring wildlife crime in the country. Even though a formal and functioning system is yet to be operationalized, Tanzania has had a long history of conservation and strong institutions for both tasks, with technical and financial assistance from UNDP and other Development Partners. Several wildlife surveys have taken place. The country was part of the Africa-wide Great Elephant Census (GEC) of 2014, sponsored by Microsoft billionaire Paul G. Allen33; there was a wildlife census in Singita in 201334; there was an aerial wildlife dry season census in Selous-Mikumi ecosystem in 201735.


Tag: Biodiversity Natural Resouce management Wildlife Conservation Effectiveness

17.


94. The Securing Watershed Service via SLM project has promoted improved land management and afforestation of riverine areas in two districts. The MTR reported that 22,143 ha have been put under improved management (4,727 ha of agriculture land, 15,452 ha of rangeland, 917 ha of forest land outside the protected forest and 1,047 ha of protected forest). A total of 8,000 Seedlings have been planted over an area of 207 ha to encourage and catalyse natural regeneration (7,000 in Zigi catchment 1,000 in Ruvu). Three hundred permanent beacons have been installed in strategic places marking the sixty meter radius of the river channels, which are being planted with trees and/or tree crops. This protects 152 hectares (101 ha in Zigi and 51 ha in Ruvu) of river buffer with about 31,830 surrounding community members sensitized on protection of reserved land. In Zigi catchment, about 30 sites in 8 villages have been replanted with 5,400 tree seedlings of natural species including Allanblackia spp, Newtonia spp, Tabana,spp, Beilchmedia spp and Draceana spp., covering an area of 225 ha outside the protected forests.


Tag: Biodiversity Natural Resouce management Effectiveness

18.

95. The Securing Watershed Service via SLM project also introduced income generating activities for communities residing along the river banks, to reduce pressure on the riverine forest (and secure watershed services). The MTR reported that two fish-farming groups have been established with a total of 63 members (50 male, 13 female) and provided with improved fish ponds whose capacity can produce 27 tons of fish per year with a local market value of 175 million Tanzanian Shillings. In Ruvu catchment 350 members (266 male, 124 female) from 9 groups and 5 Water Users Associations have established beekeeping learning sites, with a total of 360 beehives. In addition, the project has demonstrated sustainable livestock practices that keep cattle outside the river channels. About eight percent of livestock keepers are adapting sustainable rangeland management practices; three cattle water troughs have been constructed in Zigi catchment, serving 88 families of livestock keepers with a livestock population of 4,600 which previously negatively impacted 150 ha of riverbanks. Three village (Mashewa, Kimbo and Shebomeza) community gravity water projects have been completed; providing these communities with clean water away from the river bed. These measures promote the recovery of the degraded riverine forests.


Tag: Natural Resouce management Wildlife Conservation Effectiveness

19.

Indicator 3.1: Number of districts with early warning systems for man-made and natural hazards; Baseline: 2. Target 28 102. UNDP support has been key in strengthening institutional capacities to use weather data to forecast accurately and prepare standard operating procedures for responding to climate related disasters. The Climate Information project has strengthened the capacity for climate monitoring, predicting weather and flooding events and disseminating information in early warning systems for the whole country, albeit marginally. The project constructed twenty hydrological stations (10 in Pangani basin, 5 in Pangani basin and 5 in Ruvuma basins) and fifteen mini Automatic Weather Stations (10 in Ruvuma Basin, 5 in Pangani Basin). This has increased the availability of real-time hydrological and river flow data for the country’s major rivers in Pangani  and Ruvuma Basins.


Tag: Climate Change Adaptation Disaster risk management Disaster Risk Reduction Country Government Capacity Building

20.


Indicator 3.2: Number of women prepared to minimize consequences of disaster
107. Through UNDP’s support, measures to address gender inequalities were put in place by supporting women to access energy and strengthen  project on Anti-poaching will promote greater involvement of women, taking a gender inclusive approach to encourage involvement of the traditionally less vocal groups (i.e. youth groups) in activities. Involvement of women in building their capacities through the use of sustainable land management techniques in the Miombo Woodlands and the Zigi and Ruvu watershed helped them to protect their woodlands and water sources respectively, reducing vulnerability. Provision of alternative farming has empowered women economically and also reduced pressure on the forests in Miombo woodlands while the use of modern stoves as alternative energy source helps to conserve the forests. During CPD implementation, UNDP work on energy access and disaster risk management, through its downstream work with Civil Society Organizations, supported nine communities in renewable energy access initiatives to enhance livelihood of climate-vulnerable villages. An estimated 27,000 people, 50% of them women, benefitted from the initiative. These initiatives promote women empowerment, involvement and their contribution to protection of natural resources and adaptation to climate change.


Tag: Natural Resouce management Water resources Effectiveness Capacity Building

21.

Finding 7: The factors that contributed to achievement of the pillar II Outcome include high levels of stakeholder participation during planning and innovative implementation arrangements, close alignment of the projects to the government priorities, and UNDP’s recognized leadership in the environment, climate change and disaster risk reduction work in Tanzania. Inadequate assessment of risks, limited co-finance and weak monitoring and evaluation had negative effects on effectiveness.
109. High levels of stakeholder engagement: The MTR finds that all the projects in the Pillar were designed in a highly participatory process and scored fairly highly on stakeholder engagement during the implementation process (Fig. 7). 


Tag: Natural Resouce management Project and Programme management Bilateral partners Civil Societies and NGOs Country Government Coordination

Recommendations
1

The projects contributing to the Pillar outputs are complex and are delivering many results that are not captured by the indicators of the Pillar in the UNDAP. In addition, while the indicators of the Pillar provide a mechanism to monitor and capture production of project outputs, they limit analysis of the project’s contribution to Country Programme Document Outcome. It is recommended that a pillar-level strategy document be developed to spell out how the projects will contribute to the pillar outputs and the Country Programme Document outcome, linking project indicators more clearly to pillar indicators.

2

UNDP should increase effort in resource mobilization, formulate budgeted exit strategies for projects and help them capitalize

3

UNDP should pay more attention to sustainability issues at project design, and that it uses best practices from its large network of projects globally to tackle difficult challenges

4

Projects without gender action plans should formulate one as soon as possible

5

Recommendation 1: Indicators and monitoring: The projects contributing to the Pillar outputs are complex and are delivering many results that are not captured by the indicators of the Pillar. In addition, while the indicators of the Pillar provide a mechanism to monitor and capture production of project outputs, the limit analysis of the project’s contribution to CPD Outcome. It is recommended that the Pillar indicators be revised to enable both the capturing of more project results and analysis of contribution to outcomes. It is also recommended that targets and baseline values be provided for indicators currently lacking these values, and that baseline value for indicator 1.4 be refined. The target value for indicator 1.3 should also be adjusted. In addition, a definition of the indicators should clarify the dimensions of strategies and plans, to improve the accuracy of monitoring and reporting. For example does a village whose two divisions had a plan or strategy count just as much as a district that formulated a district-level plan?

6

Recommendation 2: Finance and co-finance continues to be a challenge. UNDP, in partnership with the government and all other partners have mobilized US$ 129,229,009 – when the older projects are included – and $ 39.9 million during the period under review. While these are impressive amounts, financing still presents a significant challenge to meeting the target of supporting 28 highly degraded districts to reduce poverty in a gender sensitive manner, through environmental conservation, employment creation and climate resilient and sustainable livelihoods. While the MTR recognizes that UNDP has put tremendous effort to mobilize innovative partnerships and identify news sources of funds, it recommends increasing this effort. In particular, projects should formulate budgeted exit strategies, which UNDP should help them capitalize. Without additional funding, many of the demonstrated methodologies and technologies are not upscaled, reducing the effectiveness of the overall development effort in the country.

7

Recommendation 3: Sustainability: Initiatives piloted by the projects under the three outputs of Pillar II generally have fewer environmental, institutional framework and governance risks to sustainability, but stronger socio-economics and financial risks to sustainability. It is recommended that UNDP pay more attention to sustainability issues at project design, and that it uses best practices from its large network of projects globally to tackle this difficult challenge.

8

Recommendation 4: Gender: Although the gender marker was introduced in 2009, only the newest projects (about to start implementation) have a gender marker and a gender strategy. Indeed, the oldest projects in the Pillar – Miombo Woodlands, Climate Information, SPANEST, CADESE - did not have gender
disaggregated indicators. Nevertheless, UNDP has actively promoted the empowerment of vulnerable groups – women and youth - in all its projects and activities. While the MTR recognizes that projects under the Pillar have improved gender mainstreaming, capturing and reporting achievements on empowerment as new projects have been designed, it recommends that projects without a gender action plan formulate one as soon as possible.

1. Recommendation:

The projects contributing to the Pillar outputs are complex and are delivering many results that are not captured by the indicators of the Pillar in the UNDAP. In addition, while the indicators of the Pillar provide a mechanism to monitor and capture production of project outputs, they limit analysis of the project’s contribution to Country Programme Document Outcome. It is recommended that a pillar-level strategy document be developed to spell out how the projects will contribute to the pillar outputs and the Country Programme Document outcome, linking project indicators more clearly to pillar indicators.

Management Response: [Added: 2019/05/09] [Last Updated: 2020/12/13]

Agrees

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
Review pillar’s indicators to capture more results once new project approval are granted.
[Added: 2019/05/10] [Last Updated: 2020/09/23]
Pillar Lead/Programme Specialist and M&E Specialist 2019/12 Completed Done History
Review projects targets and baseline values for indicators for better reporting.
[Added: 2019/05/10] [Last Updated: 2020/09/23]
Pillar Lead/Programme Specialist and M&E Specialist 2019/12 Completed Done History
Develop Pillar M&E Plan and Communication Strategy to support results documentation and reporting based on CPD and UNDAP indicators.
[Added: 2019/05/10] [Last Updated: 2020/09/23]
Pillar Lead/Programme Specialist and M&E Specialist 2019/12 Completed Done History
2. Recommendation:

UNDP should increase effort in resource mobilization, formulate budgeted exit strategies for projects and help them capitalize

Management Response: [Added: 2019/05/10] [Last Updated: 2020/12/06]

Agrees

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
Develop an Environment and Climate Change Pillar specific Partnership & Resource Mobilization Strategy accompanied with an implementable Action Plan.
[Added: 2019/05/10] [Last Updated: 2020/09/23]
Pillar Lead/Programme Specialist 2019/12 Completed none History
Solicit government’s leadership in facilitating resource mobilization through strategic and continuous engagement of the relevant government institutions.
[Added: 2019/05/10] [Last Updated: 2020/09/01]
Pillar Lead/Programme Specialist 2019/12 Completed This was done, the pillar initiated the environment day where all government counterparts where invited together with the newly appointed envoys. The main aim was to introduce our programmes, unlock opportunities for partnerships and resource mobilization History
Working with the relevant government institutions in developing projects’ budgeted exit strategies with a key focus on achieving full ownerships of projects’ interventions.
[Added: 2019/05/10] [Last Updated: 2020/06/05]
Pillar Lead/Programme Specialist 2019/12 Completed We have two exit strategy documents for the projects which are ending this year, the strategies have been prepared and endorsed by the Project boards for implementation. History
3. Recommendation:

UNDP should pay more attention to sustainability issues at project design, and that it uses best practices from its large network of projects globally to tackle difficult challenges

Management Response: [Added: 2019/05/10] [Last Updated: 2020/12/13]

Agrees

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
Implementation of the actions in Recommendation 2 above shall contribute to sustainability; this shall be considered in future project design processes.
[Added: 2019/05/10] [Last Updated: 2020/09/23]
Pillar Lead/Programme Specialist 2019/06 Completed done History
4. Recommendation:

Projects without gender action plans should formulate one as soon as possible

Management Response: [Added: 2019/05/10] [Last Updated: 2020/12/06]

Agrees

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
Ensure that gender is mainstreamed in all projects
[Added: 2019/05/10] [Last Updated: 2020/09/01]
Pillar Lead/Programme Specialist and M&E & Communication specialists 2019/12 Completed This was done, the pillar initiated the environment day where all government counterparts where invited together with the newly appointed envoys. The main aim was to introduce our programmes, unlock opportunities for partnerships and resource mobilization History
5. Recommendation:

Recommendation 1: Indicators and monitoring: The projects contributing to the Pillar outputs are complex and are delivering many results that are not captured by the indicators of the Pillar. In addition, while the indicators of the Pillar provide a mechanism to monitor and capture production of project outputs, the limit analysis of the project’s contribution to CPD Outcome. It is recommended that the Pillar indicators be revised to enable both the capturing of more project results and analysis of contribution to outcomes. It is also recommended that targets and baseline values be provided for indicators currently lacking these values, and that baseline value for indicator 1.4 be refined. The target value for indicator 1.3 should also be adjusted. In addition, a definition of the indicators should clarify the dimensions of strategies and plans, to improve the accuracy of monitoring and reporting. For example does a village whose two divisions had a plan or strategy count just as much as a district that formulated a district-level plan?

Management Response: [Added: 2020/12/01] [Last Updated: 2020/12/06]

Key Actions:

6. Recommendation:

Recommendation 2: Finance and co-finance continues to be a challenge. UNDP, in partnership with the government and all other partners have mobilized US$ 129,229,009 – when the older projects are included – and $ 39.9 million during the period under review. While these are impressive amounts, financing still presents a significant challenge to meeting the target of supporting 28 highly degraded districts to reduce poverty in a gender sensitive manner, through environmental conservation, employment creation and climate resilient and sustainable livelihoods. While the MTR recognizes that UNDP has put tremendous effort to mobilize innovative partnerships and identify news sources of funds, it recommends increasing this effort. In particular, projects should formulate budgeted exit strategies, which UNDP should help them capitalize. Without additional funding, many of the demonstrated methodologies and technologies are not upscaled, reducing the effectiveness of the overall development effort in the country.

Management Response: [Added: 2020/12/01] [Last Updated: 2020/12/06]

Key Actions:

7. Recommendation:

Recommendation 3: Sustainability: Initiatives piloted by the projects under the three outputs of Pillar II generally have fewer environmental, institutional framework and governance risks to sustainability, but stronger socio-economics and financial risks to sustainability. It is recommended that UNDP pay more attention to sustainability issues at project design, and that it uses best practices from its large network of projects globally to tackle this difficult challenge.

Management Response: [Added: 2020/12/01] [Last Updated: 2020/12/06]

Key Actions:

8. Recommendation:

Recommendation 4: Gender: Although the gender marker was introduced in 2009, only the newest projects (about to start implementation) have a gender marker and a gender strategy. Indeed, the oldest projects in the Pillar – Miombo Woodlands, Climate Information, SPANEST, CADESE - did not have gender
disaggregated indicators. Nevertheless, UNDP has actively promoted the empowerment of vulnerable groups – women and youth - in all its projects and activities. While the MTR recognizes that projects under the Pillar have improved gender mainstreaming, capturing and reporting achievements on empowerment as new projects have been designed, it recommends that projects without a gender action plan formulate one as soon as possible.

Management Response: [Added: 2020/12/01] [Last Updated: 2020/12/13]

Key Actions:

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