Outcome Evaluation of CPR Portfolio

Report Cover Image
Evaluation Plan:
2017-2021, Lebanon
Evaluation Type:
Outcome
Planned End Date:
07/2019
Completion Date:
05/2019
Status:
Completed
Management Response:
Yes
Evaluation Budget(US $):
30,000

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Title Outcome Evaluation of CPR Portfolio
Atlas Project Number: 00078129,00093058,00105798
Evaluation Plan: 2017-2021, Lebanon
Evaluation Type: Outcome
Status: Completed
Completion Date: 05/2019
Planned End Date: 07/2019
Management Response: Yes
UNDP Signature Solution:
  • 1. Poverty
  • 2. Governance
Corporate Outcome and Output (UNDP Strategic Plan 2018-2021)
  • 1. Output 3.2.1 National capacities strengthened for reintegration, reconciliation, peaceful management of conflict and prevention of violent extremism in response to national policies and priorities
SDG Goal
  • Goal 16. Promote peaceful and inclusive societies for sustainable development, provide access to justice for all and build effective, accountable and inclusive institutions at all levels
SDG Target
  • 16.3 Promote the rule of law at the national and international levels and ensure equal access to justice for all
  • 16.7 Ensure responsive, inclusive, participatory and representative decision-making at all levels
Evaluation Budget(US $): 30,000
Source of Funding: CO
Evaluation Expenditure(US $): 25,000
Joint Programme: No
Joint Evaluation: No
Evaluation Team members:
Name Title Email Nationality
GEF Evaluation: No
Key Stakeholders: LPDC, MEHE, UNRWA, MOI, MOIM, MOSA, PMO
Countries: LEBANON
Lessons
Findings
1.

Relevance

The interventions under the UNDP CPR programme all proved relevant to address the needs of the various types of stakeholders. As the interventions are all supportive of the broader LCRP framework, the typology of beneficiaries and targets are identified in the various interventions. The CPR programme is fully aligned with the UN normative frameworks, particularly the Human Rights Based Approach (HRBA), and is also supporting the Government priorities as articulated through the LCRP, with a strong focus on crisis response and social stability


Tag: Relevance Human rights Crisis prevention Social cohesion Stabilization Agenda 2030

2.

Efficiency

In terms of programme delivery and considering that most of the interventions are still ongoing as this evaluation takes place in April 2019 while the CPD covers the period from 2017 to 2020, the delivery rate to date is good. Counting with the delivery of the CSI project, but without data for the PVE project which has just started in 2019, the overall expenditure for the seven projects amount to USD 18.468 million versus a budget of USD 27.700 million. This corresponds to a delivery rate of 66,67%. In terms of management efficiency, the results vary according to the different interventions. The UNDP office structure and the division of labour amongst the unit, as well as the interventions that make up the portfolio of each unit, is debatable. The slotting of the LHSP and the Peacebuilding under different programmes does not contribute to efficiency or utilizing most of the existing synergies. In fact, the tools used under each project, the Map of Risks and Resources (MRR) developed by the LHSP and the Mechanism for Social Stability Projects GatheringsPeacebuilding tensionsCSAJLPDC DRM LMAC PVE Average Rating 21 (MSS) developed by the peacebuilding project are overlapping in some stages and have been joined at the end of 2018 under a single mechanism: the MSR (Mechanism for Stability and Resilience), as the use of both MRR and MSS ended-up creating confusion both for partners and for some of the target communities. Both projects (LHSP and PB) are supposed to be “conflict sensitive” in their approach, meaning that they should at least ensure a “do no harm” result in their implementation.


Tag: Efficiency Human and Financial resources Project and Programme management Risk Management Stabilization Jobs and Livelihoods

3.

Effectiveness

Almost all projects were able to achieve key results in line with the project’s objectives, with one exception where some constraints did not allow to reach the intended results. It is important to note that donors interviewed confirmed the effectiveness of the UNDP in achieving its objectives.

Only one intervention (CSAJ) is contributing to Outcome 1.2 Lebanese authorities are better equipped to maintain internal security and law and order in accordance with human rights principles, through CPD Output 1.3 Systems and capacities in place to govern municipal police.

This project contains various components, including access to justice. However, the most significant progress achieved to date relates to the preparation, support, training and capacity development of the municipal police (project outputs 1 and 2). Given the responsibilities devoted by the MOIM to municipalities and the municipal police, and in light of the limited existing resources and the complexity of the situation with the protracted Syrian crisis and an increase demand for service delivery from municipalities, the need to support the professionalisation of the municipal police, as the first line of response in dealing with host communities and vulnerable groups, is both relevant and justified. Evidence collected during interviews with key informants, in particular from the ISF Academy and one municipality (Burj Hammoud) shows that key results achieved have led to positive change processes accounts.


Tag: Civic Engagement Human rights Justice system Local Governance Partnership Capacity Building Institutional Strengthening Vulnerable

4.

Outcome 1.3. Lebanon has institutionalised mechanisms to promote peace and prevent, mitigate and manage conflict at municipal level and local level. This outcome is supported primarily through the PB project and two sub-projects, but in view of the evaluator and given the overall objective of the intervention, it is also supported through the Gatherings project, (slotted in the CPR programme presentation under UNSF Outcome 3.1). Tensions project is also contributing to this outcome, although technically not under the CPR unit. This outcome is achieved through CPD Output 1.2. Systems and capacities in place to monitor tensions and maintain peace.

Field visits to the PB project intervention areas (Tripoli area, Zgharta and Chekka municipalities) and the Gatherings project (Alkharayeb municipality) have provided the evaluation with illustrative evidence that these interventions have obtained results that directly contribute to the outcome statement. The PB in Tripoli sub-project which started in March 2017 had three outputs: 1) Promoting social cohesion through developing a Mechanism for Social Stability 2) Promoting social cohesion through Violence-free schools (VSF) 3) Support ex-fighters advocating for peace instead of war 25 For the PB intervention, the bottom-up approach used to bring communities together has found its expression through a mechanism named “Mechanism for Social Stability” or MSS that allows to undertake a conflict assessment and brings together the different parties in order to identify solutions to address some of the conflict drivers.


Tag: Effectiveness Local Governance Crisis prevention Peace Building Social cohesion Advocacy

5.

The VFS was evaluated in July 2018 as a successful initiative with concrete results in the target schools. The approach and mechanisms to bring on board parents, students and teachers is a valid one and certainly creates openings for social cohesion. As with the MSS, positive attitudinal change was observed, and illustrative evidence of change provided. It is unclear however whether there has been enough follow-up and coaching in a large enough number of schools to create a critical mass of educational community members that can be seen as champions of the cause. Again the coverage in the number of schools covered by the project versus the total number of public schools in the target area is not provided, so it is difficult to understand whether the objective is to demonstrate the use of the approach in a limited number of schools, or whether there is a commitment to creating an educational community of violence free supporters in the 251 municipalities. The component supports directly Outcome 1.3, but it may not yet be scaled to cover the existing needs and may need more time to be firmly rooted into the schools’ behaviour patterns.


Tag: Waste management Effectiveness Crisis prevention Peace Building Social cohesion Education Jobs and Livelihoods Women and gilrs Youth

6.

Secondary Outcome 2.1: Government’s ability to improve the performance of institutions and promote participation and accountability increased. This outcome is supported by the DRM and LMAC projects, as well as from the PVE and LPDC projects. All except the PVE are under NIM.

The fact that three of the four projects are under national implementation (NIM) creates both opportunities and challenges for UNDP. Regarding its effectiveness, it contributes to capacity development of governmental institutions (with three projects PVE, DRM and LPDC at the Grand Sérail) and facilitates access to the government for UNDP. At the same time, it requires a high level of dedication as participation and support outside of the project-established framework are sometimes required from the project staff. Having to wear these two hats (UNDP financed but serving the Government) requires a careful balancing act. Some interventions have been decisive in contributing to the outcome statement: the LPDC, through its two flagship achievements: the Palestinian Census and the Unified Vision, has provided the basis from which a comprehensive response to the Palestinian file can be gradually implemented.


Tag: Effectiveness National Local Governance Implementation Modality Institutional Strengthening

7.

The challenge for ensuring UNDP’s effectiveness in its future programming is many-fold:

1) Providing a clear vision of success that is understandable for all external stakeholders 2) Ensure a corporate identity regarding the way projects are implemented, giving a UNDP label rather than a project label to the achievements, through streamlining of conflict sensitivity throughout the office 3) Improve the communication for results and reporting on achievements, through a better understanding of RBM and improved M&E practices to identify meaningful outcomes that can realistically be achieved and evaluated 4) Using a proper language to address its various audiences. In a protracted crisis, it is not easy to develop soft skills and intangible activities (processes) which compete for funding with assistance-driven responses in priority sectors with higher levels of visibility and do not lend themselves easily to evaluation. Yet the work of the UNDP in conflict management and peacebuilding is actually the key driver of peace – the socalled conflict sensitivity. Ultimately the avoidance of an open conflict in Lebanon – through maintaining social cohesion, social stability, peacebuilding, or any other related terminology, is the single most important result that can be leveraged in Lebanon. The wording of the intervention is the envelope that allows to communicate the results to the different audiences, but the important aspect is the process of bottom-up participation across the different population groups that allows to build bridges and work on common objectives (e.g. working as “connectors”). The situation has been kept to a manageable degree despite heightening tensions over the past eight years since the Syria crisis began, but the situation is becoming everyday more complex as pressure on basic services, jobs, housing and the economy continues to be felt, and with limited prospects in the short-term for a substantial change in the Syria crisis response. UNDP should review its CPR programming content to reflect this essential and critical element of its work, which is under reported and not sufficiently understood by its various stakeholders.


Tag: Effectiveness Local Governance Communication Human and Financial resources Results-Based Management Conflict Peace Building Social cohesion Stabilization Institutional Strengthening

8.

Meso-level analysis

Although this outcome evaluation focuses on the CPR programme, the effectiveness of its contribution to the corresponding outcome statement is also tributary of the corporate performance of UNDP in the country. It is therefore necessary to address the issue of how the CO had divided and slotted the different interventions across its four programming units (SLD, E&E, Governance and CPR). Three key findings emerge from this analysis:

1) The CPR programme does not have an overarching programme document to contribute to a single outcome. Rather, it is a collection of separate interventions, some of which are not technically under the CPR unit manager (such as the tensions project or Common Space) while they are linked to the mandate of the CPR programme. Some projects, such as the LMAC, should have a stand-alone outcome to feed into, as a separate intervention within the CPR “programme”. 2) DRM is, at the corporate level in UNDP, actually closely linked to Climate Change Adaptation (CCA), as another side of the same coin. From a technical perspective, the project should be slotted in the E&E unit, along all CCA interventions, in order to be able to exploit the natural synergies amongst the two. 3) The main project that is responsible for over 50% of UNDP’s delivery is the LHSP. The project is slotted under the SLD unit, although two of its three goals are linked to conflict transformation skills. It shares areas of intervention with other UNDP projects such as PB. From the evaluator’s perspective there are lost synergies as a result of this structure.


Tag: Climate Change Adaptation Effectiveness Monitoring and Evaluation Programme Synergy Project and Programme management Theory of Change

9.

Sustainability

Sustainability in Lebanon’s current context of political instability and institutional volatility, coupled with the protracted Syrian crisis and the resulting dire effects on the socio-economic situation of all the people who reside in Lebanon, is a particularly challenging objective. The three primary “operational” interventions that develop implementation from the local level through a participatory methodology (PB, Gatherings, CSAJ) have all some elements of sustainability ensured through the capacity development and training provided to the partners, NGOs and municipal authorities. In theory, the MOSA through the SDC can continue to undertake MSR processes in the municipalities, as can be done in those geographical areas where Palestinians reside (camps and gatherings) to ensure the process is taken over by the government and/or local partners. However, in the LCRP, MOSA has a wider role than its mandate indicates, and it is not yet clear whether the trainings have been sufficiently internalised by all partners to automatically ensure their applicability. In addition, considering the high turn-over in government and institutions, it is necessary to create a refresher’s course, as well as for new staff recruited. The evaluator has not been able to appraise whether a training of trainers’ capacity is fully established in MOSA and SDC for the MSR.


Tag: Sustainability Civic Engagement Local Governance Implementation Modality Country Government Security Social cohesion Stabilization

10.

Coverage

Coverage is the degree to which the intervention is able to respond to the needs, expressed in geographical terms. For example, if one municipality has 10,000 inhabitants and 3,900 are in need of livelihood assistance, of which 1,300 are assisted, the percentage of people assisted compared to the identified needs provides the coverage (in this example 33%). It is important to show both a) progress against the target objective and b) the timeliness of the intervention compared to the baseline. If 10 pilot municipalities are defined as the intervention area for two years (with 0 as baseline), with 251 needy municipalities, the coverage remains weak. It is important for projects to indicate the extent of the needs that are being answered to and scale the project to service the identified needs rather than responding to other considerations such as donor funding opportunities. It should be noted that the “red” rating was given when the project couldn’t provide a single vision of coverage to be achieved (i.e. no benchmark to compare with).

The three main operational projects do not have the concept of coverage included in the design or in monitoring of results. This is in sharp contract with the capacity of the interagency team for the LCRP to provide monitoring and evaluation data, including on outcomes, in a detailed and disaggregated manner. It is urgent for UNDP to include coverage as a key criterion of its intervention strategy, for all projects that have a targeted intervention area, as one of the ways to report outcome achievements.


Tag: Effectiveness Service delivery

11.

Connectedness/coherence

To what extent are UNDP interventions connected to that of other actors, in order to ensure complementarity and coherence and This table indicates that the level of coordination with external partners is higher than between UNDP itself. It is important to underline the fact, recognised by a majority of PM interviewed, that with the new UNDP RR the level of internal coherence (communicating across projects or areas of practice) has substantially improved, as the office reportedly followed the working-in-silo structure that UNDP is sometimes using. Notwithstanding the noticeable improvement, ratings indicate that there remains substantial room for further interaction between the different interventions, to ensure a clear line and a coherent corporate position on issues of common interest. For example, various UNDP projects work with MEHE, but they do not appear to talk to each other on their interaction with MEHE – ProjectsGatheringsPeacebuildingtensionsCSAJLPDCDRM LMAC PVEAverage Rating N/A N/A N/A Gaths PB tensions CASJ LPDC DRM LMAC PVE Average external coherence internal coherence N/A 36 thus losing an opportunity of creating synergies between the various interventions. Similarly, greater interaction and communication could take place between the LHSP and the PB and Gatherings projects. Several examples were mentioned to show that UNDP still needs to support the development of a collaborative team spirit amongst projects. avoid duplication through joint coordination or communication.


Tag: Partnership Programme Synergy Programme/Project Design Coordination

12.

Partnerships

Developing partnerships is a recognised strength of the UNDP, both from an internal UNDP perspective but also from donors and other partners. UNDP and in particular the CPR unit manager are good at leveraging partnerships and identifying potential partners. This yields an across-the-board mark of green for all interventions under the CPR programme.


Tag: Partnership Project and Programme management

13.

Gender and Human Rights

The heart of the CPR programme is firmly aligned to the UN’s HRBA normative framework. Human Rights are at the core of peacebuilding and conflict management. Impartial and equitable support to the various groups is a recurrent effort of the operational interventions, either through direct activities or through mechanisms and processes that will contribute to the programmatic outcome. The three projects that operate at field level are strongly mindful of the HRBA and the intervention contents evidence that this aspect is streamlined in the interventions. Unfortunately, gender has not received the same attention and has been largely absent during the design of the CPR interventions


Tag: Gender Equality Gender Mainstreaming Human rights Programme/Project Design Conflict Peace Building

Recommendations
1

Develop an overarching CPR programmatic outcome linked to peacebuilding objectives (e.g. either conflict management, diminishing tensions, civil peace construction, confidence-building, or similar) that highlights the fact that the overall objective of the interventions at the outcome level is the contribution to avoiding open conflict through creating inter and intra-community dialogues and processes that allow to address identified triggers of conflict. It does not matter if the conflict is Lebanese-Lebanese, Lebanese-Palestinian, Lebanese-Syrian. Any deterioration in the current context of fragile stability is likely to have very negative consequences for all actors in Lebanon. UNDP must coin its next outcome in line with the realistic vision of what it is pursuing and communicate this vision accordingly as a key corporate achievement. Once the new CPD ToC is development, CPR should develop the ToC that informs the overarching programmatic outcome that most interventions must be contributing to.

2

Truly develop conflict management skills in Syria-response related UNDP interventions to make conflict sensitivity a programmatic reality (and clearly differentiate between conflict sensitivity, responsiveness or transformation). Along this line, it needs to be noted that tools developed in Lebanon for addressing peacebuilding/conflict sensitivity in UNDP programming are largely endogenous (e.g. developed by the UNDP staff in Lebanon for each project). A clearer conceptual framework, with references to key literature such as CDA, tracking assumptions regarding conflict drivers and triggers, would also help clarify the key results of the interventions.

3

Scale up the level of operations of the various operational project (PB, Gatherings, CSAJ) to a higher number of municipalities, inside or outside the 251 LCRP municipalities. While the vulnerability map needs to be updated, the key assumptions behind UNDP’s involvement primarily in the 251 municipalities should be closely monitored as there may be venues for UNDP to operate outside such a geographical intervention area, provided there are clear criteria and data generated by the different projects (PB, Tensions, PVE) evidences the need for such interventions, but always with clearly defined criteria and in support of the overarching programme objective of the CPR.

4

While UNDP has nurtured several positive initiatives dealing with conflict management (e.g. VSF, FFP, media component, incorporating MSS in municipalities, psychosocial support, tentative efforts to address historical narrative and reconciliation), there does not appear to be a roadmap for the future evolution of the PB activities. These initiatives can be brought together to create synergies and contribute to a more prominent outcome in selected sites and areas, because at present, they are not mutually supportive of each other and could be linked more closely in an area-based approach to conflict management.

5

UNDP Lebanon needs to invest more resources into its M&E system, in particular for designing outcomes, evaluating outcomes, incorporating coverage data information, in order to provide more evidence of how its results contribute to the outcome statement. Given the assets used by the interagency group for the LCRP, it may be interesting to see if UNDP could not use some of these available methods and tools for its own M&E system. At the same time, invest in staff capacity development through training in Result-Based Management, environment, gender and administrative procedures, in addition to conflict resolution and negotiation skills, as these are the key skills that staff must use to be able to provide assertive and constructive communication to create the bridges between the various communities in Lebanon.

6

It is important for operational projects (CSAJ, Gatherings, PB) to have a connection with the decision-making policy level actors so that good practice can be used to inform policy. While for the Palestinian file the LPDC plays such a role, it would be useful for the other operational interventions to have a ministerial entry point that could influence policy-making. Problems experienced in the CSAJ shows that when entry points are limited to one person, there may be no alternative entry points. Therefore, the feasibility of supporting policy making partners such as MOIM could also be explored. In the same line of thought, it should be possible to create internal working groups between the higher-level interventions (LPDC, Tensions, PVE, Common Space) with the operational interventions (CSAJ, PB, Gatherings).

7

Continuation of the support to LMAC should be kept under the CPR, but with a separate and specific outcome statement different from the rest of the “peacebuilding or conflict management” programmatic outcome.

Consider moving the DRM project to the E&E programme in order to closely align the work under the DRM project with the UNDP Lebanon’s work on CCA.

8

Consider holding regional exchanges of CPR units through three-day practical workshops sharing experiences and learning from the region. Other countries affected by the Syrian crisis may also have good practices to share, and Lebanon has some good practices to show, so there should be directly learning in the region from this protracted crisis, with the support and agreement of other Country Office, also to develop a corporate sense of CPR programming in these situations that affect more than a single country. This could be organised by the Conflict Prevention and Peacebuilding Advisor from the Regional Hub in Amman.

To ensure the communication from UNDP is consistent and is addressed to all people in Lebanon, UNDP should make a special effort to guarantee that all its communications are provided in three languages in Lebanon: Arabic, English and French.

1. Recommendation:

Develop an overarching CPR programmatic outcome linked to peacebuilding objectives (e.g. either conflict management, diminishing tensions, civil peace construction, confidence-building, or similar) that highlights the fact that the overall objective of the interventions at the outcome level is the contribution to avoiding open conflict through creating inter and intra-community dialogues and processes that allow to address identified triggers of conflict. It does not matter if the conflict is Lebanese-Lebanese, Lebanese-Palestinian, Lebanese-Syrian. Any deterioration in the current context of fragile stability is likely to have very negative consequences for all actors in Lebanon. UNDP must coin its next outcome in line with the realistic vision of what it is pursuing and communicate this vision accordingly as a key corporate achievement. Once the new CPD ToC is development, CPR should develop the ToC that informs the overarching programmatic outcome that most interventions must be contributing to.

Management Response: [Added: 2019/08/19] [Last Updated: 2021/01/28]

This recommendation will be taken onboard during the next cycle of CPD formulation. The annex from the evaluation report, including key assumptions, outcome statements, and potential indicators will be used for the development of the TOC.

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
Present the suggested programme structure during the CPR meeting and suggest it for the next CPD planning period
[Added: 2019/11/29]
M and E Officer 2019/06 Completed This action was completed. The structure of the new CPR Programme discussed and presented to senior management.
2. Recommendation:

Truly develop conflict management skills in Syria-response related UNDP interventions to make conflict sensitivity a programmatic reality (and clearly differentiate between conflict sensitivity, responsiveness or transformation). Along this line, it needs to be noted that tools developed in Lebanon for addressing peacebuilding/conflict sensitivity in UNDP programming are largely endogenous (e.g. developed by the UNDP staff in Lebanon for each project). A clearer conceptual framework, with references to key literature such as CDA, tracking assumptions regarding conflict drivers and triggers, would also help clarify the key results of the interventions.

Management Response: [Added: 2019/08/19] [Last Updated: 2021/01/28]

Conflict sensitivity trainings for the country office started in 2019. During the second half of 2019 joint conflict sensitivity training will be delivered to the UNDP North office. Lessons learned session will be organized after the first round of trainings.

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
Develop a conflict sensitivity plan for the country office
[Added: 2019/08/19] [Last Updated: 2019/11/04]
CPR 2019/11 Completed Conflict sensitivity plan is developed and in line with the plan internal trainings for UNDP staff are launched. History
Launch trainings on conflict sensitivity for the country office
[Added: 2019/08/19] [Last Updated: 2019/11/04]
CPR 2019/11 Completed First wave of trainings for UNDP North office took place in September 2019 with very high levels of satisfaction among the training participants. A report by the consultant summarizing lessons learned and experiences from the trainings was submitted. History
3. Recommendation:

Scale up the level of operations of the various operational project (PB, Gatherings, CSAJ) to a higher number of municipalities, inside or outside the 251 LCRP municipalities. While the vulnerability map needs to be updated, the key assumptions behind UNDP’s involvement primarily in the 251 municipalities should be closely monitored as there may be venues for UNDP to operate outside such a geographical intervention area, provided there are clear criteria and data generated by the different projects (PB, Tensions, PVE) evidences the need for such interventions, but always with clearly defined criteria and in support of the overarching programme objective of the CPR.

Management Response: [Added: 2019/08/19] [Last Updated: 2021/01/28]

For the peacebuilding project, there is an ongoing development of an agenda outcome of the 251 most vulnerable municipalities. For the CSAJ project there are existing plans for scale up, but of limited scope. Opportunities for the Gatherings project scale up are limited, as its operations are often limited by the access limitations.

Key Actions:

4. Recommendation:

While UNDP has nurtured several positive initiatives dealing with conflict management (e.g. VSF, FFP, media component, incorporating MSS in municipalities, psychosocial support, tentative efforts to address historical narrative and reconciliation), there does not appear to be a roadmap for the future evolution of the PB activities. These initiatives can be brought together to create synergies and contribute to a more prominent outcome in selected sites and areas, because at present, they are not mutually supportive of each other and could be linked more closely in an area-based approach to conflict management.

Management Response: [Added: 2019/08/19] [Last Updated: 2021/01/28]

The aligned approach is piloted in 10 locations, where under the umbrella of Mechanism for Stability and Resilience multiple interventions will be delivered together, including VFS, municipal police and conflict dialogue mechanisms.

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
Promote further synergies between projects in specific location
[Added: 2019/11/29]
CPR Programme Manager 2019/09 Completed In the ongoing UNDP-DFID collaboration, there are 10 pilots, where the objective is to create synergies between conflict dialogue mechanisms, violence free schools, media outreach and the work with municipal police.
5. Recommendation:

UNDP Lebanon needs to invest more resources into its M&E system, in particular for designing outcomes, evaluating outcomes, incorporating coverage data information, in order to provide more evidence of how its results contribute to the outcome statement. Given the assets used by the interagency group for the LCRP, it may be interesting to see if UNDP could not use some of these available methods and tools for its own M&E system. At the same time, invest in staff capacity development through training in Result-Based Management, environment, gender and administrative procedures, in addition to conflict resolution and negotiation skills, as these are the key skills that staff must use to be able to provide assertive and constructive communication to create the bridges between the various communities in Lebanon.

Management Response: [Added: 2019/08/19] [Last Updated: 2021/01/28]

The decision on the new direction in relation to M&E will be taken by incoming Deputy Resident Representative and/or Chief Technical Advisor on Stabilization and Recovery. An update on this issue will provided later in the year.

Key Actions:

6. Recommendation:

It is important for operational projects (CSAJ, Gatherings, PB) to have a connection with the decision-making policy level actors so that good practice can be used to inform policy. While for the Palestinian file the LPDC plays such a role, it would be useful for the other operational interventions to have a ministerial entry point that could influence policy-making. Problems experienced in the CSAJ shows that when entry points are limited to one person, there may be no alternative entry points. Therefore, the feasibility of supporting policy making partners such as MOIM could also be explored. In the same line of thought, it should be possible to create internal working groups between the higher-level interventions (LPDC, Tensions, PVE, Common Space) with the operational interventions (CSAJ, PB, Gatherings).

Management Response: [Added: 2019/08/19] [Last Updated: 2021/01/28]

Community Security and Access to Justice project informs Ministry of Interior and Municipalities on municipal police work, and Ministry of Justice on legal aid. Peacebuilding project has regular meetings with the Ministry of Social Affairs.

Key Actions:

7. Recommendation:

Continuation of the support to LMAC should be kept under the CPR, but with a separate and specific outcome statement different from the rest of the “peacebuilding or conflict management” programmatic outcome.

Consider moving the DRM project to the E&E programme in order to closely align the work under the DRM project with the UNDP Lebanon’s work on CCA.

Management Response: [Added: 2019/08/19] [Last Updated: 2021/01/28]

Similarly to the recommendation #1 this note will be addressed during the next cycle of CPD formulation.

Key Actions:

8. Recommendation:

Consider holding regional exchanges of CPR units through three-day practical workshops sharing experiences and learning from the region. Other countries affected by the Syrian crisis may also have good practices to share, and Lebanon has some good practices to show, so there should be directly learning in the region from this protracted crisis, with the support and agreement of other Country Office, also to develop a corporate sense of CPR programming in these situations that affect more than a single country. This could be organised by the Conflict Prevention and Peacebuilding Advisor from the Regional Hub in Amman.

To ensure the communication from UNDP is consistent and is addressed to all people in Lebanon, UNDP should make a special effort to guarantee that all its communications are provided in three languages in Lebanon: Arabic, English and French.

Management Response: [Added: 2019/08/19] [Last Updated: 2021/01/28]

There is an ongoing UNDP initiative to draw on existing resources in the countries, when it comes to regional exchanges and mutual capacity development support. The suggestion concerning joint CPR events should be addressed at the regional level by RBAS.

Key Actions:

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