Evaluation of the Juvenile Court Project

Report Cover Image
Evaluation Plan:
2017-2021, Trinidad and Tobago
Evaluation Type:
Final Project
Planned End Date:
06/2018
Completion Date:
09/2018
Status:
Completed
Management Response:
Yes
Evaluation Budget(US $):
15,000

This report provides an evaluation of the Trinidad and Tobago Juvenile Court Project (JCP). The JCP was a project led by the Judiciary of Trinidad and Tobago for the establishment of a children court system, and resulted in the development and modification of the legal framework, support systems and staff necessary to operationalize the two Children Courts in Trinidad and Tobago. The JCP also led to the acquisition of two buildings by the Judiciary of Trinidad and Tobago and customisation of the two buildings by the project to house the Children Courts. 

The JCP sought to achieve the following core objectives:

  • Establishment of two children courts in Trinidad that meet standards for adjudicating child justice cases.
  • Building of institutional capacity of children courts to adjudicate cases in an efficient and effective manner in accordance with new laws and principles of restorative justice through training to improve adjudication, case management, implementation of rules and procedures, and court-annexed programs in collaboration with government agencies, NGOs, Civil Society Organizations (CSOs) and the Children’s Authority.
  • Building of institutional capacity of organizations providing services to Children in conflict with the law through the creation of effective referral and coordination mechanisms, training on new laws and procedures, improved programs and ability to fulfil the reporting and monitoring requirements of the children courts.
  • Establishment of a Peer Resolution Programme based on principles of restorative justice and the development of a cadre of youth leaders. Youth courts will facilitate the adjudication of minor offences committed by persons falling within the ambit of the Children Act.
  • Execution of public awareness campaigns to educate and sensitize the public to the reform of the child justice system and the JCP initiatives to support the implementation of the Children Act.

This evaluation is being conducted in line with the Monitoring and Evaluation provision of the project and in accordance with UNDP and USAID Evaluation Policies. In this regard, the evaluation exercise is independent, impartial and of the appropriate standard and quality and is designed with utility in mind. The evaluation is designed to generate relevant and useful information to support evidence-based decision making. The findings, lessons learned and recommendations generated by the evaluation will be used by project partners and project stakeholders to improve future projects and programmes related to child justice. The evaluation will assess the results of the project and will undertake a review of project implementation and provide useful and actionable recommendations for similar projects in the future.

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Title Evaluation of the Juvenile Court Project
Atlas Project Number: PROJECT
Evaluation Plan: 2017-2021, Trinidad and Tobago
Evaluation Type: Final Project
Status: Completed
Completion Date: 09/2018
Planned End Date: 06/2018
Management Response: Yes
Focus Area:
  • 1. Others
Corporate Outcome and Output (UNDP Strategic Plan 2018-2021)
  • 1. Output 3.4. Functions, financing and capacity of rule of law institutions enabled, including to improve access to justice and redress
Evaluation Budget(US $): 15,000
Source of Funding: Project budget
Evaluation Expenditure(US $): 10,000
Joint Programme: No
Joint Evaluation: No
Evaluation Team members:
Name Title Nationality
Randy Seepersad Doctor
GEF Evaluation: No
Key Stakeholders: Judiciary of Trinidad & Tobago; USAID
Countries: TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO
Comments:

Final project evaluation for Juvenile Court Project (ATLAS output #00089378)

 

Lessons
1.

Key lessons learned from the evaluation are as follows:

1. A detailed mapping exercise conducted at the outset , ideally before funding is acquired could have contributed to ascertaining the full scope of works of the project. This will assist in the in estimating the time and funding required.

2. For a project of this nature , there is need for flexibility and adaptability when the volume of work expands as the project progresses.

3. As the child justice system in Trinidad and  Tobago is complex and comprised of a wide array of diverse agencies who do not coordinate with each other and which are not fully aware of the roles and procedures employed within each respective agency. Through the JCP project it was realized that continuous multi-dimensional consultations with a wide cross-section of child justice actors were critical to the success of the project.

4. The importance of having a project champion to advocate the project over the course of its implementation was also deemed important to the success of the project. A project such as the JCP has far-reaching implications as it intends to drive a fundamental shift in thinking and in the operation of a system which may have become entrenched in the use of outdated practices related to child justice.Changing such a system requires buy-in from all levels of government, the judiciary, and a wide renage of other stakeholders. Without key persons who can inspire the change in attitudes and attain commitment from the required actors projects such as the JCP may be doomed to failure.

5. The importance of having a dedicated project team who strongly believed in the project was critical to its eventual success. The complex nature of the project required that project staff had to be carefully selected as the team is ultimately responsible for driving the project.

6. Having an oversight and administrative body responsible for ensuring transparency and accountability in the project financial matters was essential to the project.

7. The development of protocols to guide coordination among child justice actors was deemed essential to the success of the project as these formalized the rules and procedures necessary for the agencies to collaborate with one another.

8. It was noted that continuous monitoring and evaluation allowed the project team to detect issues that may threaten project activities and the attainment of pre-defined targets. All issues detected were put forward to the project board which met frequently, who developed strategies to correct or mitigate these issues.

9. The legislative issues experienced during the implementation of the project underscored the importance for a dedicated legal team to be recruited to the project.

10. Having an influential and competent project manager to drive the project was one of the major factors responsible for the project's success. 


Findings
1.

RELEVANCE
As indicated previously, Relevance concerns the extent to which the JCP and its intended outputs or outcomes are consistent with national and local policies and priorities and the needs of intended beneficiaries. Relevance concerns the congruency between the perception of what is needed as envisioned by the initiative planners and the reality of what is needed from the perspective of intended beneficiaries. Overall this evaluation found that the JCP and its end products were highly relevant for the child justice system in Trinidad and Tobago.


Tag: Relevance Human rights Justice system Rule of law Country Government Education Capacity Building Youth

2.

i) Efficiency in the Completion of Project Activities
Respondents were asked to indicate whether project activities were completed on time, in a logical sequence, and with appropriate quality. Responses indicated that the JCP was a very complex project with several components which were undertaken simultaneously, and with several levels of actors involved within each component. In addition, there was the need for coordination among the various components/activities of the JCP. The time allotted to achievement of several components also added to the challenges, and in many cases achieving some goals were dependent on the achievement of other goals which were logically prior.


Tag: Efficiency Human and Financial resources Operational Efficiency Procurement

3.

EFFECTIVENESS
As stated previously, Effectiveness is a measure of the extent to which the initiative’s intended results (outputs or outcomes) have been achieved or the extent to which progress toward outputs or outcomes has been achieved. Overall this evaluation found that the JCP was highly effective. Despite this several factors also hindered the effectiveness of the JCP. These included changes in the scopes of work after project start, expansion of the amount of work beyond what was initially anticipated, challenges related to the identification of suitable buildings for the Children Court, high workloads of the project team and intermittent communication issues among project partners. The key areas identified with respect to effectiveness of the JCP are:


Tag: Effectiveness Justice system Rule of law Monitoring and Evaluation Procurement

4.

SUSTAINABILITY
Sustainability measures the extent to which benefits of initiatives continue after external development assistance has come to an end. Assessing sustainability involves evaluating the extent to which relevant social, economic, political, institutional and other conditions are present and, based on that assessment, making projections about the national capacity to maintain, manage and ensure the development results in the future. Overall this evaluation found that relevant systems were put in place to ensure the sustainability of the Children Courts in the medium to long term. The key sustainability factors identified are:


Tag: Sustainability Justice system Rule of law Country Government Capacity Building

5.

ii) Equity in the Administration of Justice
The issue of gender equity is an important one to consider in the development of any system which adjudicates child matters. International literature has shown that inequities in the administration of justice occur even in systems with the best safeguards. Literature from the United States and Canada, for example, show that there are inequities based on ethnicity, class, residential location, age and gender (Doerner & Demuth, 2010; Wortley, 1999). It is therefore important to consider the issue of equity and to determine what safeguards have been put in place to ensure that inequities do not occur in the administration of justice in the Children Courts. Equity in the administration of justice improves relevance of the JCP and the Children Courts. Gender equity is of particular importance in Trinidad and Tobago.


Tag: Relevance Gender Equality Human rights Justice system Rule of law Capacity Building Youth

6.


ii) Processing Time for Procurement and Financial Matters
There were a few occasions where the time required for the completion of the procurement process created delays which affected the efficiency of the JCP. In terms of the processing time required, donor agencies such as USAID require robust procurement and finance processes which ensure transparency and accountability.


Tag: Efficiency Human and Financial resources Operational Efficiency Procurement Project and Programme management

7.

iii) Identification and Management of Risks
A project such as the JCP could be subject to several risks across its duration. At the outset of the project a Risk Register was developed to identify possible risks and to propose possible mitigation strategies. However, as the project got underway this document was not updated due to the large workload of the project and the many other reporting requirements. Despite this, the monthly reports which were developed included a section on risks and their mitigation.


Tag: Efficiency Oversight Procurement Project and Programme management Risk Management

8.

iv) Accountability and Efficiency in the Use of Financial Resources
At the outset the project team as well as the UNDP recognized that the project entailed a significant amount of work which needed to be completed with a finite budget. As such, from the start there was very careful financial management and utilization of financial resources. The allocation of financial resources was discussed on an on-going basis by the project team and the UNDP. Careful consideration was given to all of the areas of expenditure and discussions held to determine which expenditure was critical and which represented the most efficient use of financial resources.


Tag: Efficiency Human and Financial resources Operational Efficiency Procurement Project and Programme management Bilateral partners Donor

9.


v) Location of Court Buildings
Many factors affected the final selection of buildings for the Children Courts. To date, the number of cases in the Port of Spain court has been much higher than in Fyzabad. While this is said, locating a court in a rural community in south Trinidad increases access to such services.


Tag: Efficiency Justice system Rule of law Human and Financial resources Operational Efficiency

10.


vi) Quantitative Findings
A quantitative questionnaire was administered to participants (Appendix 4). Completed surveys were received from 22 participants. Participants were asked to rate the cost effectiveness of several of the activities which were carried out under the JCP. Table 1 shows the percent of persons who rated each area as either cost ineffective/very cost ineffective or cost effective/very cost effective. The highest cost effectiveness applied to the Court Case Management System (CCMS) for which 100% of participants rated this as cost effective or very cost effective. The public education campaign as well as the establishment of the location for the court as well as the acquisition of the buildings themselves followed with 87.5% of participants rating these processes as cost effective or very cost effective. Staff training, training on new laws and procedures, the establishment of court annexed programmes and the implementation of new rules and procedures were also seen as cost effective with at least 80% of participants agreeing that these activities were cost effective. Two areas were considered to be less cost effective than the others. The first was the creation of referral mechanisms with 62.5% rating this as cost effective while the second was training to improve adjudication with 66.7% rating this as cost effective.


Tag: Effectiveness Efficiency Human and Financial resources Project and Programme management

11.

ii) Buy-in to a New Model of Child Justice
The Children Courts are intended to operate on rehabilitative and restorative principles. The use of such principles represent a fundamental departure from what occurred in Trinidad and Tobago where child justice was concerned. Ensuring the continued use of this new approach requires a change in attitudes and culture among organizations and actors within the justice system and within ancillary services such as those within the court annexed programmes. While it may be easy to express positive opinions about restorative approaches after the receipt of training or when interviewed to determine suitability for employment within the Children Courts, it is also easy to revert to older practices which agencies and actors were accustomed to prior to the start of the Children Courts.


Tag: Sustainability Justice system Rule of law Country Government Education Capacity Building Youth

12.

iii) Adequacy of Court Annexed Services
The success of the Children Courts depends on the availability of court annexed services which provide alternatives to incarceration for children who come before the courts. There must be adequate services available to cater to the needs of the courts, and the services provided should meet certain minimum quality standards. The Children Court has court annexed programs in four key areas: 1) External Programs, 2) Internal Programs, 3) Peer Resolution, and 4) Drug Treatment. External programs have been identified and were screened through a rigorous process to ensure quality in the services provided. Training was also provided to staff in agencies which were selected to ensure knowledge of and commitment to a restorative approach to child justice.


Tag: Efficiency Sustainability Justice system Rule of law Human and Financial resources Country Government Capacity Building Youth

13.

iv) Peer Resolution
The sustainability of the peer resolution component of the Children Courts must also be considered. This represents a critical mechanism which allows children who commit minor offences to be assessed by their peers who will recommend sanctions to the judicial officer. The peer resolution component will be used in schools as well as within the Children Courts. Sustaining this component requires access to a pool of youth as well as adult peer resolution volunteers. Stakeholders indicated that there was an overwhelming response when the call for volunteers was initially put out, and a team of youth and adult volunteers were trained and are ready for use. However, because youth volunteers cannot be older than 17 years of age, several youths who were initially trained have since aged out of the program. Of the approximately 170 youths who were initially trained approximately half can no longer serve as youth volunteers. Those who were left were retrained in April 2018 since the initial training was undertaken over two years before the actual start of the courts.


Tag: Sustainability Justice system Rule of law Country Government Education Capacity Building Youth

14.

v) Public Education and Communication
Public education which was aimed at building awareness about the newer approaches to child justice, and which was designed to change attitudes so that the public would eventually become more accepting of such an approach, and therefore more willing to use it, was pursued aggressively under the JCP. Public sensitization sessions and high quality media releases were among the approaches used and these were targeted at the general public as well as youths in schools. This is critical to the success of the Children Courts since public opinion, as well as the opinions of key decision makers were, in the past, supportive of more punitive approaches to dealing with transgressions of the law by children. This was driven in large measure by media practices which resulted in wide publicity when violent offences were committed by youths. While data from the TTPS show that only a very small proportion of minor offences are committed by youths, the public is of the opinion that youths are violent and should be punished severely5. The project team was of the opinion that the public education and communications strategy was sufficiently aggressive and was able to reach key stakeholders and persons and was able to change opinions. Independent evaluation conducted by NCSC confirmed that the public education strategies were effective.


Tag: Effectiveness Sustainability Justice system Rule of law Communication Country Government Education Capacity Building Youth

15.

vi) Responsiveness of the Courts to External Changes
While the Children Courts were set up to be relevant given current environmental, cultural and economic conditions as well as best practices, the issue of sustainability must consider the court’s ability to adapt to future changes in external conditions which may necessitate changes in the way that the court operates, or in its philosophy and practices. This hinges on the court’s ability and willingness to change its practices and procedures in response to future environmental changes which may as yet be unknown.


Tag: Relevance Sustainability Local Governance Rule of law Risk Management Youth

16.

vii) Ability of External Agencies to Respond Appropriately
The Children Court depends on other agencies to function effectively. Such agencies include the Police Service, the Children’s Authority, Probation Services, the Director of Public Prosecutions and Legal Aid. Some agencies have already made provisions for resources which are specific to children and which facilitate the operation of the Children Courts. For example, Probation Services has instituted dedicated child probation officers while the Police Service has a specialized Court and Process Team which specializes in dealing with children matters.


Tag: Relevance Sustainability Justice system Rule of law Country Government Youth

17.

viii) Inter- and Multi-Agency Protocols
The Inter- and Multi-Agency Protocols were already described elsewhere in this document (see Coordination among Stakeholders). Legislation related to children which exist in Trinidad and Tobago, while specifying the responsibilities of various agencies which deal with children, do not specify the interactions among relevant agencies and do not provide mechanisms for that interaction. The Inter- and Multi-Agency Protocols seek to address this shortcoming. The Judges’ Rules also cover some of these gaps as it specifies some of the roles of the Police Service in its interaction with children and the courts. The Multi-Agency Protocols was built using the Judges’ Rules as its starting point since the protocols must be consistent with these Rules. The development of both protocols brought together all of the main agencies which play a role in child justice. These included the Trinidad and Tobago Police Service, Trinidad and Tobago Prison Service, Probation Services Division, the Office of the Director of Public Prosecutions, the Legal Aid and Advisory Authority, the Children’s Authority, the Ministry of Education, the Solicitor General’s Department, and the Judiciary of Trinidad and Tobago.


Tag: Relevance Sustainability Justice system Rule of law Country Government Youth

18.

ix) Monitoring and Evaluation of the Children Courts
Monitoring and evaluation of the operation of the Children Court need to be conducted on a periodic basis. Such exercises should focus on each of the key areas which are necessary for the effective functioning of the courts. Areas may include medium and long-term outcomes for children who come before the courts, management of the courts, transparency and accountability in the functioning of the courts, performance of the peer resolution component, equity in the administration of justice, etc. The initial monitoring and evaluation exercise is critical as it must anticipate the future direction and needs of the courts so that measures which are included will remain relevant in the long term. This is critical since the first monitoring and evaluation exercise will collect baseline data on the courts and the same measures will be used in subsequent rounds of monitoring and evaluation so that trends can be assessed over the long term. While it may be too early to begin a monitoring and evaluation exercise, relevant staff should determine the starting point for the first exercise as well as the periodicity with which such exercises will be conducted. Findings from monitoring and evaluation can be used to detect areas of nonperformance and will allow for corrective action which will improve the effectiveness of the Children Court


Tag: Justice system Rule of law Monitoring and Evaluation

19.

ii) Coordination among Stakeholders
Prior to the JCP a major obstacle to justice where child matters were concerned related to a lack of coordination among the various actors. Various parts of the criminal justice system which dealt with child matters, as well as other organizations such as NGOs operated in isolation of each other to form a system which was fragmented and which lacked the cohesiveness to ensure a concerted and coordinated approach to dealing with children in need of supervision and those who came into conflict with the law. The JCP brought the various actors together, not only for the purpose of training and sensitization about child matters, but with the purpose of developing a system whereby the role of each actor was clear and where there were specified protocols in place for dealing with child matters. The JCP created a Children Court system to facilitate the coordination required for more effective administration of justice in child matters. In this regard the JCP can be considered effective, both in terms of the coordination which it fostered, and in terms of the procedures and documents which it developed to foster coordination among stakeholders.


Tag: Coherence Effectiveness Justice system Rule of law Bilateral partners Country Government Coordination

20.

iii) Training
A wide range of training was done under the JCP and included training provided to stakeholders, peer resolution volunteers, staff, the Police Service, DPP, providers of auxiliary services, the  Prison Service and other persons. A challenge related to training was that it involved not just the dissemination of information, but also included an attempt to change attitudes so that persons would be more accepting of the newer approaches to child justice. It was critical that stakeholders developed buy-in to the concepts that were being shared since these were critical to the success of the Children Courts. Training also involved special components to improve professionalism and courtesy among staff and stakeholders especially when dealing with child matters. The whole approach of the Children Court is one which embodies sensitivity and self-reflection and which puts the child first and looks at the complete development as well as needs of the child. The Judiciary recognized that when children come before the courts there is a sense of apprehension and fear and the JCP sought as far as possible to ensure that the Children Courts were warm and inviting so that they would serve to reduce apprehension about their use.


Tag: Effectiveness Justice system Rule of law Country Government Capacity Building

21.

v) IT and Case Management System
As a result of the JCP the Judiciary has acquired the software necessary for case management needs. This contrasts to previous types of software which were used by the Judiciary, but which were not owned and therefore which attracted annual, and usually very costly license fees. The software which was acquired through the JCP is fully customizable so that it can be adjusted to the data capture and analytical needs of the Children Courts. This contrasts to software which is used in other parts of the Judiciary which have not been customized but which can be customized, but only at considerable cost. Project team members argued that such software has the potential to distort data since the input of data must conform with the requirements of the software while in some cases important types of information cannot be effectively captured.


Tag: Effectiveness Efficiency Justice system Rule of law Monitoring and Evaluation

22.


v) Factors which Ensured Project Success
Several factors ensured the effectiveness of the JCP and led to the accomplishment of the goals set out at project start. As indicated before, the JCP was an extremely complex and multifaceted exercise, and according to stakeholders was an extremely ambitious project with very tight time constraints.
Staff Expertise and Competence: Success in a project of this nature requires that staff in the various components (management, project team, procurement, finance, legislative team, etc.) possess the required expertise and are highly motivated. At the outset it was ensured that there was a careful mapping of the tasks required and the expertise needed to complete each task. Interview and screening processes ensured that only staff with the qualities which will lead to success were hired to undertake various tasks which were to be completed.


Tag: Effectiveness Human and Financial resources Project and Programme management Country Government UN Agencies UN Country Team Advocacy

23.

vi) Factors which Hampered Effectiveness
Changes in Scopes of Work: One of the challenges which affected effectiveness during the building customization phase of the project was changes to the scopes of work (e.g. due to errors, change of plans after submission, unanticipated risks which required alterations in the scope of works at a later date, etc.). It was noted that UNDP Procurement begins with scopes of work, so that any change from an initial submission would automatically result in delays in the procurement cycle. It is recommended that for projects as complex as the JCP it is important to carefully develop scopes of work and to ensure that there is sufficient time allocated for adjustment and flexibility.


Tag: Challenges Effectiveness Communication Procurement Project and Programme management Coordination

24.

vii) Quantitative Findings
A quantitative questionnaire was administered to participants (Appendix 4). Completed surveys were received from 22 participants. Participants were asked to rate the efficiency of several areas and outcomes under the JCP (Table 2). When asked whether the project helped to foster better coordination and synergy among different sectors in the child justice system 100% of the respondents felt that it did so. When asked whether project activities contributed to a change in the approach of child justice actors to dealing with children in conflict with the law and in need of supervision 94.4% felt that it did so somewhat or a great deal. Other areas which received favourable efficiency ratings from participants related to court staff commitment to a restorative justice approach, the effectiveness of the CCMS and the processing of court cases in an expeditious manner. Much fewer participants (47.1%) felt that the JCP contributed to buy-in from external stakeholders with respect to the importance of the Children Court. This suggests that the JCP should have allocated more time and resources in this area.


Tag: Effectiveness Impact Justice system Rule of law

25.


The JCP resulted in the creation of a child justice system in Trinidad and Tobago. This was achieved through amendments to eighteen pieces of legislation (Appendix 7), the development of rules and protocols, a public education campaign and an education campaign for key stakeholders, the development of capacity of key stakeholders, including but not limited to the Children’s Authority, the Trinidad and Tobago Police Service (TTPS) and the Prison Service, the identification and development of auxiliary and court annexed programs which will provide alternatives for children who come before the courts, the training of staff to administer the Children Courts, including not just training in procedures but also training in a restorative and rehabilitative approach to child justice, and the location and development of two buildings to house the Children Courts.


Tag: Relevance Human rights Justice system Rule of law Country Government Education Capacity Building Youth

26.

Another factor which affected efficiency and completion time had to do with the fact that the quantity of work which was required was not fully known at the outset and in some cases expanded far beyond what was initially expected. A good example of this related to the laws which were modified. As the project progressed, and as a wider range of stakeholders became involved in the process, a wider range of limitations in the laws became apparent.


Tag: Efficiency Human and Financial resources Operational Efficiency Procurement

27.

NCSC also developed a Monitoring and Evaluation Framework for the 2014 to 2017 period for the JCP. One of the key areas assessed related to workshops which were designed to build stakeholder awareness about the project and to engage stakeholders in the conceptualization of the new children court system. The Youth Court Stakeholder Workshop and the JCP Stakeholder Workshop for the Bar were developed and executed to engage stakeholders who provide services to, and/or are involved in activities related to children.


Tag: Effectiveness Monitoring and Evaluation Capacity Building Civil Societies and NGOs National Institutions Youth

28.

Stakeholders indicated that the data collection systems which are in place at the Children Courts will allow for the capture of data which can be used to determine whether inequities exist. This data can be supplemented with data from the police which are captured using the Child Custody  Forms. While it is too soon to assess this issue based on the limited amount of data which have been captured to date, it is recommended that once data for a period of one year become available that analyses be conducted to determine whether gender inequities exist in the Children Court.


Tag: Sustainability Human rights Justice system Rule of law Youth

29.

While the example provided here relates to the actual construction/modification of the court buildings, the procurement and payment processes were relevant across project activities and it was important to put systems in place to anticipate procurement and payment requests so that they could be placed in advance to allow for the time required by the Procurement and Finance Units. In terms of the administration of funding, the use of a dedicated procurement staff member was also recommended by stakeholders. Given the volume and pace of work, a dedicated Programme Officer was also recommended. A project as complex and extensive as the JCP requires constant attention to procurement matters..


Tag: Efficiency Human and Financial resources Operational Efficiency Procurement Project and Programme management

30.

Given the specific requirements of location and building this created several challenges which delayed the opening of the courts. Given that the courts are now completed and operational and that the vision of what the Children Courts should be have been transformed into a reality, it is recommended that a prototype be created which specify the requirements for Children Courts as it applies to each of the key areas which need to be considered (e.g. location, building design, security issues, layout of the court and other areas, etc.). This prototype would be essential when the judicial system decides to expand the provision of services by increasing the number of Children Courts. Design briefs were already done for the north and south Children Courts, and can be used as the basis for the development of the prototype. While the design briefs would be specific to each of the buildings, they would embody the essential features, or at least the minimum standards, which is what needs to be captured in a prototype document.


Tag: Challenges Effectiveness Communication Procurement Project and Programme management Coordination

31.

Procurement issues: The ATLAS software which was used by the UNDP for procurement procedures was problematic. Project team members indicated that the initial training on this system was not adequate and as such the software was not well-understood. Users also questioned the complexity and accuracy of the software as queries using this system, for example to generate financial reports, consistently generated output which was at odds with their own records of expenditure.


Tag: Effectiveness Procurement Project and Programme management

32.

While many of the provisions in the Protocols are enshrined in law, and are therefore mandatory, this in itself may not guarantee compliance. Stakeholders felt that it was more important to get genuine buy-in and commitment to the newer approaches since this would result in willing compliance with new procedures. Concern was also expressed about the trickle down of the information about the newer approaches to other members within the relevant agencies.


Tag: Relevance Sustainability Justice system Rule of law Country Government Youth

33.

The main thrust of these protocols is to foster collaborative partnerships between and among the agencies that are in the best interest of the child who is in conflict with the law. Multi-Agency Protocols are designed to serve the following functions: formalizing and documenting the working relationship of partner agencies; establishing and maintaining effective relationships based on cooperation and shared understanding; maintaining consistency of those relationships; clarifying the roles and responsibilities of each agency in specific situations; stating what each agency has committed to do; identifying the type of support that can be received from partner agencies; and facilitating the effective sharing of data. Signatories to the Multi-Agency Protocols include the Ministry of Education, the TTPS, the Prison Service, the Children’s Authority of Trinidad and Tobago, Probation Services Division, the Solicitor General’s Department, the Legal Aid and Advisory Authority of Trinidad and Tobago and the Office of the Director of Public Prosecutions.Inter-Agency Protocols have also been developed.


Tag: Coherence Efficiency Justice system Rule of law Country Government Capacity Building

34.

Even more important than the above, systems and procedures were put in place, and in many cases were enshrined in law, which not only enabled but mandated the use of truly restorative and rehabilitative approaches. Good examples of this include the Judges’ Rules for Children, the Multi-Agency Protocols and the Inter-Agency Protocols. These were designed specifically with the newer approaches in mind and operate to support such approaches. Other support services, sometimes referred to as wrap around services or court annexed services, were also put in place to ensure the success of the newer approaches to child justice.


Tag: Sustainability Justice system Rule of law Country Government Capacity Building National Institutions

35.

Close Internal Working Relationships: Very strong partnerships and close working relationships among project partners (Project Team, USAID, UNDP, the Judiciary and NCSC) also contributed in a significant way to project success as issues were identified and dealt with in a coordinated and transparent way, and in a manner which drew on the expertise of the various entities which were engaged with the project. A good example which shows the extent of collaboration is the cost sharing engaged in by NCSC. NCSC agreed to provide some of the funding required for the project even though they were not required to do so.


Tag: Sustainability Bilateral partners Country Government UN Agencies UN Country Team Education Capacity Building Youth

Recommendations
1

Very careful and detailed planning must be undertaken before the start of any project similar to the Juvenile Court Project (JCP) to ensure that the scope of works is properly specified. This must involve a comprehensive range of key stakeholders and it is essential that legal experts be included at this stage. It should also be anticipated that the quantity of work may expand once the project gets underway and allowances must be made for this eventuality. 

2

Where a similar project is to be done in the future specific attention should be paid to the issue of gender equity in the administration of justice and documentation and procedures which speak specifically to this issue should be developed.

3

The use of a dedicated programme and procurement staff members is recommended if a project like the JCP is to be done in the future. Future projects of this nature should also have a separate program manager and financial manager. The separation of these functions is important due to the large volume of work required for each post.

4

In undertaking a project of this nature it is critical to keep funds under continuous review to ensure that funding is available. Risks related to lines of funding should be assessed. Where risks exist, strategies should be developed which could be implemented to source additional funding if it becomes necessary to do so.

5

Future projects like the JCP should put systems to review and forecast resource requirements so that procurement requests could be placed in advance to allow for the processing time required by the procurement and finance departments so as not to cause delays in project progress.

6

projects of a similar nature should consider constructing a building as opposed to renting one. it is difficult to locate buildings with all of the specific requirements for courts, and in the long run, the cost of construction is cheaper than the cost of rent.

7

Future projects like the JCP should separate the functions of the project team and the persons who are actually involved in the implementation. Clear demarcations of the functions of other entities should also be done prior to project start.

8

A champion is essential for a project such as the JCP if it is to be undertaken in the future. A champio is someone who has all the right connections and sufficient influence in government and other agencies so that they can get buy-in to the project and can leverage the main actors to properly do their respective parts within the project.

9

If a project of this nature is to be undertaken in the future it is recommended that a Project Manager not only have expertise in project management, but should also possess expertise in areas specific to the project, most critically in the area of law, and importantly must also possess the type of social capital which can be used to engage key stakeholders in government and other agencies which can support the project.

10

If a project of a similar nature was to be undertaken, it is essential that there are open and clear channels of communication ampong the agencies which are involved, that there are clear lines of funding and that there is a management and financial system which ensures efficiency, transparency and accountability.

11

Similar projects of this nature should dedicate sufficient time for training purposes as training may involve not only the dissemination of information but may seek to change attitudes so that recipients of training become more open to newer approaches to child justice.

12

A project such as the JCP should develop a monitoring and evaluation plan for the courts.

13

Future projects like the JCP should, after developing a monitoring and evaluation plan for the courts, ensure the customization of the Court case Management System so that it captures data relevant to the plan.

14

Future projects like the JCP should consider an e-filing system at the courts.

15

If a project such as the JCP is to be undertaken in the future there should be a dedicated legal team to lead the modification of legislation. Projects of this nature should also have persons with social work experience.

16

Future projects similar to the JCP should create a prototype which specifies the requirements for Children Court buildings as it applies to each of the key areas which need to be considered (e.g. location, building design, security issues, layout of the court and other areas, etc.).

17

Future projects of this nature must consider as part of their communications strategy the nature and mechanisms for internal communication among the project partners engaged in the project. This must facilitate clear and open communications among all parties.

18

If a project such as the JCP is to be done in the future it is recommended that careful consideration be given to the needs of the project when determining the suitability of a location/building to house a project of this nature. Sufficient work space and meeting facilities are essential.

19

In projects such as the JCP, if possible, project partners should collaborate to come up with a reporting template which is acceptable to all partners so that the same report could be disseminated to all a partners.

20

Future projects such as the JCP should encourage the continuation of public eductaion and outreach after the project has ended. This is because the development of buy-in to the newer approcahes to child justice is critical to the success of the courts. The public education component should also have a dedicated budget.

21

For future projects similar to the JCP attention should be paid to the requirements of special needs children and that court annexed programs which cater to these needs be included among those which are eventually selelcted.

22

Future projects such as the JCP should digitize training modules which will be required after the completion of the project. The peer resolution training module is an example.

23

Future projects such as the JCP should include a mapping exercise to determine what types of data are collected by different agencies which work with children and should devote resources to the harmonization of the data collection system with the view of streamlining communication and sharing of information among agencies and between agencies and the courts.

1. Recommendation:

Very careful and detailed planning must be undertaken before the start of any project similar to the Juvenile Court Project (JCP) to ensure that the scope of works is properly specified. This must involve a comprehensive range of key stakeholders and it is essential that legal experts be included at this stage. It should also be anticipated that the quantity of work may expand once the project gets underway and allowances must be made for this eventuality. 

Management Response: [Added: 2018/09/17] [Last Updated: 2020/12/10]

For similar projects in the future the UNDP Country Office would endeavour to engage legal experts to determine the project scope as such expertise is not found in-house. The CO will also engage key stakeholders at the point of project inception not only to encourage buy-in but to examine the various aspects of the projects. This will assist the CO to better understand the project requirements and develop a comprehensive workplan. 

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
The recommendation to recruit legal experts and engage key stakeholders at project inception to determine the scope of work has been documented and will be taken into consideration in the event a similar project is to be undertaken by the UNDP Country Office.
[Added: 2018/09/18]
UNDP Country Office 2018/09 Completed The Juvenile Court Project has come to its conclusion and actions are currently being taken to operationally and financially close the project in ATLAS. The recommendation and accompanying management response will be taken into consideration in the event a similar project is to be developed by the UNDP Country Office.
2. Recommendation:

Where a similar project is to be done in the future specific attention should be paid to the issue of gender equity in the administration of justice and documentation and procedures which speak specifically to this issue should be developed.

Management Response: [Added: 2018/09/19] [Last Updated: 2020/12/10]

Management has determined that any future iteration of the project would take into account the issue of gender equity in the administration of justice.

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
The existing project has since come to a conclusion. However, for future iterations of the project the CO will pay specific attention to the issue of gender equity. This will be included in the project document and an activity would be created that would examine gender equity specifically.
[Added: 2018/09/19]
UNDP Country Office 2018/09 Completed The UNDP Country Office has begun to place focus on gender and gender equity issues in its project design
3. Recommendation:

The use of a dedicated programme and procurement staff members is recommended if a project like the JCP is to be done in the future. Future projects of this nature should also have a separate program manager and financial manager. The separation of these functions is important due to the large volume of work required for each post.

Management Response: [Added: 2018/09/19] [Last Updated: 2020/12/10]

Management agrees with the above-mentioned recommendation and will endeavour to assign dedicated programme and operational staff to assist in the management of such complex projects.

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
For future iterations of such complex projects the UNDP CO would incorporate into the project document direct project costing (DPC) to facilitate the financing of dedicated programme and operational staff deemed necessary for the efficient running of such projects.
[Added: 2018/09/19]
UNDP Country Office 2018/09 Completed The UNDP Country Office has examined the use of direct project costing (DPC) in its project development and has begun to incorporate this in project design for future projects where dedicated programme and operational staff is deemed necessary for the success of these projects.
4. Recommendation:

In undertaking a project of this nature it is critical to keep funds under continuous review to ensure that funding is available. Risks related to lines of funding should be assessed. Where risks exist, strategies should be developed which could be implemented to source additional funding if it becomes necessary to do so.

Management Response: [Added: 2018/09/19] [Last Updated: 2020/12/10]

The UNDP Country Office does not agree with this recommendation as stated. The finances of the Juvenile Court Project was closely monitored throughout the life of the project. Any cost overruns were offset by savings in other areas. Extra funds for the financing of the project was requested as a result of an expansion of the scope of the project. This was authorized by the project board.  

Key Actions:

5. Recommendation:

Future projects like the JCP should put systems to review and forecast resource requirements so that procurement requests could be placed in advance to allow for the processing time required by the procurement and finance departments so as not to cause delays in project progress.

Management Response: [Added: 2018/09/19] [Last Updated: 2020/12/10]

Management is in agreement with the recommendation as stated above. To respond to this issue the UNDP Country Office will facilitate training of programme staff in the use of a new procurement platform which will be used to improve the coordination between procurement and programme staff with respect to annual procurement projections. 

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
Facilitate training of programme staff in the use of Procurement Planning and Management Platform (PROMPT2), a real-time online system which would allow programme team members to upload procurement plans at the beginning of the year and enter new procurement cases throughout the year. It is expected that this will strengthen procurement at the level of the country office and facilitate coordination between procurement and the programme team thus allowing for proper scheduling of procurement requests.
[Added: 2018/09/19]
UNDP Country Office 2018/07 Completed Training of programme staff in PROMPT 2 was conducted and the programme staff ha begun to utilize this system in forecasting its procurement needs.
6. Recommendation:

projects of a similar nature should consider constructing a building as opposed to renting one. it is difficult to locate buildings with all of the specific requirements for courts, and in the long run, the cost of construction is cheaper than the cost of rent.

Management Response: [Added: 2018/09/19] [Last Updated: 2020/12/10]

If future iterations of this project is undertaken management will insist on a cost benefit analysis to determine whether to lease or construct.a building as required.

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
In the future, for similar projects, a cost benefit analysis would be conducted to determine whether to lease or build. This would be included in the project documentation
[Added: 2018/09/19]
UNDP Country Office/ Key Stakeholders 2018/09 Completed The project has come to its conclusion and is awaiting to be operationally and financially closed. In the future, however the CO would insist that a cost benefit analysis be conducted to determine whether to lease or build.
7. Recommendation:

Future projects like the JCP should separate the functions of the project team and the persons who are actually involved in the implementation. Clear demarcations of the functions of other entities should also be done prior to project start.

Management Response: [Added: 2018/09/19] [Last Updated: 2020/12/10]

The UNDP Country Office does not agree with the recommendation as it is currently stated. The work of the project team is to drive implementation of the project so it is expected that they will be involved in project implementation. If perhaps the volume of work proved too great for the team then this could be addressed through the farming out of some of these responsibilities in the form of consultancies or through the recruitment of more project staff. This of course is only possible if there are sufficient funds in the project that will allow this.

The functions of the key project implementing partners were stated in the project document.

Key Actions:

8. Recommendation:

A champion is essential for a project such as the JCP if it is to be undertaken in the future. A champio is someone who has all the right connections and sufficient influence in government and other agencies so that they can get buy-in to the project and can leverage the main actors to properly do their respective parts within the project.

Management Response: [Added: 2018/09/19] [Last Updated: 2020/12/10]

Management agrees that having an influential individual championing any project would assist the project in meetings its deliverables. Unfortunately ensuring that each project has at least one such individual is outside the control of the UNDP Country Office.

Key Actions:

9. Recommendation:

If a project of this nature is to be undertaken in the future it is recommended that a Project Manager not only have expertise in project management, but should also possess expertise in areas specific to the project, most critically in the area of law, and importantly must also possess the type of social capital which can be used to engage key stakeholders in government and other agencies which can support the project.

Management Response: [Added: 2018/09/19] [Last Updated: 2020/12/10]

This recommendation is agreed to in principle. However in reality finding such an individual may prove to be exceedingly difficult. Nevertheless the Country Office would make concerted efforts to recruit such individuals as project managers for any future iterations of the project.

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
The UNDP Country Office will endeavour to draft comprehensive terms of reference (ToR) to assist in the recruitment of suitable candidate for the position of project manager.
[Added: 2018/09/19]
UNDP Country Office 2018/09 Completed The project has come to its conclusion. However if a similar project were to be undertaken in the future, the Country Office will ensure that the necessary expertise, as stated in the recommendation above, is included in the terms of reference for the post of project manager.
10. Recommendation:

If a project of a similar nature was to be undertaken, it is essential that there are open and clear channels of communication ampong the agencies which are involved, that there are clear lines of funding and that there is a management and financial system which ensures efficiency, transparency and accountability.

Management Response: [Added: 2018/09/19] [Last Updated: 2020/12/10]

The UNDP Country Office agrees in principle with the ststement of the evaluator made above but questions its relevance to the JCP project. Clear channels of communication between the agencies involved in the project existed throughout the duration of the project. Further to this the project, during the course of its implementation, abided by UNDP project and financial management rules thereby ensuring transparency and accountability.

Key Actions:

11. Recommendation:

Similar projects of this nature should dedicate sufficient time for training purposes as training may involve not only the dissemination of information but may seek to change attitudes so that recipients of training become more open to newer approaches to child justice.

Management Response: [Added: 2018/09/19] [Last Updated: 2020/12/10]

Management agrees with this recommendation to an extent. Training may result to some degree in behavioural change, however true change in attitudes are derived from the persistent use of new processes and procedures. It is through the successful use of new concepts and implementation of new ideas that persons may be inclined to change their way of thinking. This however takes a considerable period of time. It is unlikely given the limited resources that such time could be factored into a project.  

Key Actions:

12. Recommendation:

A project such as the JCP should develop a monitoring and evaluation plan for the courts.

Management Response: [Added: 2018/09/19] [Last Updated: 2020/12/10]

The UNDP Country Office is not in agreement with the recommendation as stated. A monitoring and evaluation plan was derived for the project and implemented over the project duration. A monitoring and evaluation plan for the courts themselves is outside the scope of the project. As the project has come to its conclusion and operation of the courts have been passed to the Judiciary of the Republic of Trinidad and Tobago, the Judiciary would therefore be entity responsible for developing a monitoring and evaluation plan for the Children Courts. 

Key Actions:

13. Recommendation:

Future projects like the JCP should, after developing a monitoring and evaluation plan for the courts, ensure the customization of the Court case Management System so that it captures data relevant to the plan.

Management Response: [Added: 2018/09/20] [Last Updated: 2020/12/10]

The UNDP Country Office is not in agreement with the recommendation as stated. A monitoring and evaluation plan was derived for the project and implemented over the project duration. A monitoring and evaluation plan for the courts themselves and any customiztion of the Court Case management System to facilitate such a plan are both outside the scope of the project. As the project has come to its conclusion and operation of the courts have been passed to the Judiciary of the Republic of Trinidad and Tobago, the Judiciary would therefore be entity responsible for developing a monitoring and evaluation plan for the Children Courts and any customization to the Court Case Management System.

Key Actions:

14. Recommendation:

Future projects like the JCP should consider an e-filing system at the courts.

Management Response: [Added: 2018/09/20] [Last Updated: 2020/12/10]

The UNDP TTO is not in agreement with the recommendation as stated above. This recommendation falls outside of the scope of the project objectives as stated in the project document. The establishment of an e-filing system, which may enhance the operation of the courts, would not necessarily assist in the attainment of the stated oblectives of the project. In fact the implementation of an e-filing system may be considered a project in itself.

Key Actions:

15. Recommendation:

If a project such as the JCP is to be undertaken in the future there should be a dedicated legal team to lead the modification of legislation. Projects of this nature should also have persons with social work experience.

Management Response: [Added: 2018/09/20] [Last Updated: 2020/12/10]

The UNDP Country Office is in agreement with the afore-mentioned recommendation. For the JCP project to establish the Children Courts 18 pieces of legislation needed to be amended. this required considerable legal expertise. Further to this having experienced social workers on the project team would have assisted greatly in the assessment of court annexed programs. The UNDP TTO wold therefore ensure for future iterations of the project efforts would be made to recruit legal experts and social workers to assist in project implementation.

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
For similar projects the UNDP Country Office in collaboration with the implementing partner will seek to recruit persons with sufficient experience in law and social work to be part of the project team.
[Added: 2018/09/20]
UNDP Country Office and Implementing Partners 2018/09 Completed The current JCP project has come to a conclusion. For similar projects the UNDP Country Office in collaboration with the implementing partner will seek to recruit persons with sufficient experience in law and social work to be part of the project team.
16. Recommendation:

Future projects similar to the JCP should create a prototype which specifies the requirements for Children Court buildings as it applies to each of the key areas which need to be considered (e.g. location, building design, security issues, layout of the court and other areas, etc.).

Management Response: [Added: 2018/09/20] [Last Updated: 2020/12/10]

The UNDP Country Office does not understand the relevance of the afore-mentioned recommendation. The JCP project is in fact a prototype project as it is the first of its kind in the English-speaking Caribbean. Any similar projects undertaken in the future would refer to the JCP project as a guide. 

Key Actions:

17. Recommendation:

Future projects of this nature must consider as part of their communications strategy the nature and mechanisms for internal communication among the project partners engaged in the project. This must facilitate clear and open communications among all parties.

Management Response: [Added: 2018/09/20] [Last Updated: 2020/12/10]

The UNDP Country Office agrees in principle with the statement of the evaluator made above but questions its relevance to the JCP project. Clear channels of communication between the project partners existed throughout the duration of the project.

Key Actions:

18. Recommendation:

If a project such as the JCP is to be done in the future it is recommended that careful consideration be given to the needs of the project when determining the suitability of a location/building to house a project of this nature. Sufficient work space and meeting facilities are essential.

Management Response: [Added: 2018/09/20] [Last Updated: 2020/12/10]

The UNDP CO is in agreement with this recommendation. In the future the UNDP Country Office will examine the composition and nees of the project team so as to provide them with facilities that would meet their needs.

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
Prior to project implementation the UNDP Country Office would liaise with the project team to determine a comprehensive list of their needs. This list of requirements will be used to select an appropriate location for the team and to provide them with the necessary resources to assist them to successfully manage the project.
[Added: 2018/09/20]
UNDP Country Office/ Project Team 2018/09 Completed The JCP project has come to its conclusion. However for future such projects the UNDP Country Office will liaise with the project team to determine a list of their needs.
19. Recommendation:

In projects such as the JCP, if possible, project partners should collaborate to come up with a reporting template which is acceptable to all partners so that the same report could be disseminated to all a partners.

Management Response: [Added: 2018/09/20] [Last Updated: 2020/12/10]

The UNDP Country Office is in agreement with the recommendation stated above. For similar projects that have reporting requirements for various partners, the CO would liaise with the partners in order to develop a reporting template that is suited to all. This would reduce the number of reports generated by the project team allowing them more time to focus on actual project implementation. 

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
Develop reporting template that would meet the reporting requirements of the various project partners.
[Added: 2018/09/20]
UNDP Country Office; Project Partners 2018/09 Completed As the project has come to its conclusion this key action cannot be implemented for the JCP project. However, for future projects that require reporting to various project partners, the UNDP Country Office in collaboration with the partners would seek to standardize the reporting requirements so as to reduce the number of reports generated by the project team.
20. Recommendation:

Future projects such as the JCP should encourage the continuation of public eductaion and outreach after the project has ended. This is because the development of buy-in to the newer approcahes to child justice is critical to the success of the courts. The public education component should also have a dedicated budget.

Management Response: [Added: 2018/09/20] [Last Updated: 2020/12/10]

The UNDP Country Office is not in agreement with the recommendation as stated by the evaluator. First, there were funds earmarked at the beginning of the project for the implementation of a public awareness campaign. These funds were expended on public awareness activities over the duration of the project. It is not reasonable to expect that after the project has been concluded that the project would continue its public education and outreach campaign. The continuance of such a campaign would have to be driven by the Judiciary of the Republic of Trinidad and Tobago, who was the implementing partner and who is now responsible for the operation of the Children Courts. 

Key Actions:

21. Recommendation:

For future projects similar to the JCP attention should be paid to the requirements of special needs children and that court annexed programs which cater to these needs be included among those which are eventually selelcted.

Management Response: [Added: 2018/09/20] [Last Updated: 2020/12/10]

The UNDP Country Office is in full agreement with the recommendation stated above. To ensure that no child is left behind focus will be placed on the requirements of special needs children in the design of similar projects in the future.

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
At the stage of project design the UNDP Country Office will ensure that the requirements of special needs children are taken into consideration in the formulation of such projects in the future.
[Added: 2018/09/20]
UNDP Country Office 2018/09 Completed As the JCP project has reached its conclusion the factoring of the requirements of children with special needs cannot be done at this time. However, the recommendation is duly noted by the Country Office and any future iteration of the project will include a component to meet these requirements.
22. Recommendation:

Future projects such as the JCP should digitize training modules which will be required after the completion of the project. The peer resolution training module is an example.

Management Response: [Added: 2018/09/20] [Last Updated: 2020/12/10]

The UNDP Country Office is in agreement with the afore-mentioned recommendation. Training documents generated as a result of the project should be digitized to ensure continuity of practices and procedures. For future projects the Country Office will ensure that all training documenxts generated by the project are recorded electronically. 

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
Training modules generated as an output of the project will be recorded electronically in the future.
[Added: 2018/09/20]
UNDP Country Office; Relevant Stakeholder 2018/09 Completed
23. Recommendation:

Future projects such as the JCP should include a mapping exercise to determine what types of data are collected by different agencies which work with children and should devote resources to the harmonization of the data collection system with the view of streamlining communication and sharing of information among agencies and between agencies and the courts.

Management Response: [Added: 2018/09/20] [Last Updated: 2020/12/10]

The UNDP Country Office agrees with the recommendation in principle but recognizes that such a mapping exercise is outside the scope of the project. Indeed a workshop on the harmonizing of Juvenile Justice multi-Agency data was held as part of the project. However, an exercise to map the data collected by the various agencies and harmonize this data would be too large and complex an undertaking to incorporate into a project that is already very complex. Such an endeavour could perhaps be examined as a separate project that could improve the operation of the child justice system in Trinidad and Tobago.

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
The UNDP Country Office will liaise with key actors in the child justice system in Trinidad and Tobago to examine the possibility of a follow-on project that would seek to harmonize that data and sharing of information among agencies that comprise the child justice system.
[Added: 2018/09/20] [Last Updated: 2019/11/20]
UNDP Country Office 2019/09 Completed The Country Office has met with the Children's Court of Trinidad and Tobago to examine possible future interventions to improve the child justice system in the country. Although agreement has been reached between UNDP and the Children's Court regarding building capacity in the area of probation officers no inroads have yet been met with respect to the development of a project which will seek to harmonize information gathering and sharing among the child justice actors in Trinidad and Tobago. History

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