Final evaluation: Strengthening Capacity and Incentives for Wildlife Conservation in the Western Forest Complex Project

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Evaluation Plan:
2017-2021, Thailand
Evaluation Type:
Final Project
Planned End Date:
07/2021
Completion Date:
08/2021
Status:
Completed
Management Response:
Yes
Evaluation Budget(US $):
35,000

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Title Final evaluation: Strengthening Capacity and Incentives for Wildlife Conservation in the Western Forest Complex Project
Atlas Project Number: 00081732
Evaluation Plan: 2017-2021, Thailand
Evaluation Type: Final Project
Status: Completed
Completion Date: 08/2021
Planned End Date: 07/2021
Management Response: Yes
Focus Area:
  • 1. Others
Corporate Outcome and Output (UNDP Strategic Plan 2018-2021)
  • 1. Output 1.1.2 Marginalised groups, particularly the poor, women, people with disabilities and displaced are empowered to gain universal access to basic services and financial and non-financial assets to build productive capacities and benefit from sustainable livelihoods and jobs
  • 2. Output 1.4.1 Solutions scaled up for sustainable management of natural resources, including sustainable commodities and green and inclusive value chains
SDG Goal
  • Goal 1. End poverty in all its forms everywhere
  • Goal 15. Protect, restore and promote sustainable use of terrestrial ecosystems, sustainably manage forests, combat desertification, and halt and reverse land degradation and halt biodiversity loss
SDG Target
  • 1.4 By 2030, ensure that all men and women, in particular the poor and the vulnerable, have equal rights to economic resources, as well as access to basic services, ownership and control over land and other forms of property, inheritance, natural resources, appropriate new technology and financial services, including microfinance
  • 15.1 By 2020, ensure the conservation, restoration and sustainable use of terrestrial and inland freshwater ecosystems and their services, in particular forests, wetlands, mountains and drylands, in line with obligations under international agreements
  • 15.2 By 2020, promote the implementation of sustainable management of all types of forests, halt deforestation, restore degraded forests and substantially increase afforestation and reforestation globally
Evaluation Budget(US $): 35,000
Source of Funding: GEF
Evaluation Expenditure(US $): 27,600
Joint Programme: No
Joint Evaluation: No
Evaluation Team members:
Name Title Nationality
Adrian Stokes Team Leader
Piyathip Eawpanich Team member THAILAND
Adrian Luke Strokes International Consultant
Piyathip Eawpanich National Consultant THAILAND
GEF Evaluation: Yes
GEF Project Title: Strengthening Capacity and Incentives for Wildlife Conservation in the Western Forest Complex Project
Evaluation Type: Terminal Evaluation
Focal Area: Multifocal Areas
Project Type: FSP
GEF Phase: GEF-5
GEF Project ID: 4677
PIMS Number: 5436
Key Stakeholders:
Countries: THAILAND
Lessons
Findings
Recommendations
1 Concerned parties should agree on the process, responsibilities and governance for establishing a business case for a sustainable financing mechanism for this project. The analysis and investigations undertaken as part of this project have provided the groundwork to develop a sustainable financing mechanism to fill the WHS budgeting gap. It is recommended that a process is put in place, with agreed responsibilities and governance, to develop a business case for realizing the potential to establish a sustainable financing mechanism for conservation in the WHS.
2 Allocate funding to enable the continuation of the increased management capacity that was in place in the wildlife sanctuaries during this project. The increased temporary increased capacity in DNP (especially in the number of rangers) has been an important contributor to the results in Outcome 1. A funding allocation to enable this to continue would enable the project results to continue and expand.
3 Prepare a report on the tiger conservation and monitoring activities from this project to inform the review of the Thailand - Tiger Action Plan 2010–2022. Thailand set the ambitious goal of doubling its tiger population by 50 percent by 2020 and has made significant progress in tiger conservation activities. The Thailand - Tiger Action Plan 2010–2022 (TTAP) will soon be reviewed. This project has been a significant investment in tiger conservation, and it is important that the findings and lessons be considered in the review of the TTAP. A report should be prepared as soon as possible, while the findings are still fresh, on the various tiger conservation and monitoring activities undertaken during the project. This should include recommendations and lessons learned to inform the review of the TTAP.
4 Continue to engage with Karen communities in TYW to enable this program to realize its potential in improving livelihoods, traditional knowledge and wildlife management. The Karen youth from TYW who participated in the Indigenous knowledge youth project showed a high level of pride in their knowledge, their role, and their communities’ role in the WHS. In turn, this is leading to significant improvements in relations between the Karen villagers and DNP officers and, therefore, to the connection of traditional and scientific knowledge and the application of traditional knowledge to PA management. The youth involved are enthusiastic to build on this program and feel that, for 4 them and their communities, the program is still gaining strength and momentum. A small level of funding directed through the Rabbit in the Moon Foundation would enable this program to realize its full potential.
5 Projects should strategically plan for project sustainability throughout a project’s life, from project development through inception, implementation and project close. Sustainability is the most significant weakness of this project. In particular, the return to pre-project levels (or lower) of DNP rangers in TYN-HKK WHS and the lack of an established financing mechanism are fundamental constraints to the continuation of results. These constraints were clear from the start of the project, yet at project conclusion there is no clear plan for sustainability. It should be noted that the MTR recommended that a Project Sustainability Taskforce be set up to develop an exit plan; however, this Taskforce was not set up. It is recommended that, in future projects, sustainability should be a strategic focus throughout project implementation, from inception to close, and that this should be led by the Implementing Partner (in this case DNP) and should involve project staff, stakeholders identified during project development, Board members, agency representatives, and other participating organizations and individuals. Board minutes show that some members raised sustainability in the early years, but there was no process established to follow up on this.
6 Projects should establish working relationships between different partners and contributors, including project staff, to improve shared understanding of goals and to facilitate knowledge sharing and shared 5 learning. The TE team found that there was a low level of understanding among project parties of the overall project strategy and outcomes and of the roles and activities of different groups and individuals. In particular, NGOs and outreach officers involved in the project often had little involvement with each other. The MTR recommended that a Community Technical Reference Group be established to improve communications and knowledge sharing between organizations working on community aspects; however, this group was not established. This lack of understanding of project strategy and roles was also apparent among some Board members, who often had limited understanding of different aspects of the project because of the limited strategic engagement with them, as described previously (although some other Board members had a detailed understanding of the project and its components). A shared understanding of the project’s goals and activities and greater understanding of different roles would foster a sense of teamwork and provide opportunities for parties to share experiences and learn from each other.
7 Projects should work closely with Project Boards during implementation to value-add from Board members’ expertise and roles. The Project Board has a high level of experience and a wide range of expertise and could be a valuable resource for providing the project with strategic direction, identifying synergies and planning the sustainability of project results. Many Board members were enthusiastic about their role on the Board. However, engagement with the Board was largely process-related, focused on procedural matters such as work plans, budgets and approving results framework changes, and many members did not visit the project site during the project. Consequently, many members were passive participants with low engagement with the project. An example of this was a visit by the Ambassador to the project site, which was strategically well conducted but was reported to the Board after the trip. Such events have significant potential for engagement and networking by Board members and for development of opportunities for synergies and collaboration. Another trip for Project Board was planned since the Ambassador’s visit but was not conducted. A shift to a more active, participatory role for the Board would value-add to projects by leveraging from the experience and expertise of the members.
8

Projects should put in place governance and control mechanisms to transparently track actual co-financing contributions during project implementation. The contribution of DNP to this project was very substantial, with several business areas of the agency contributing to a wide range of significant outcomes. The sum of co-financing committed at CEO endorsement was large: US$22,864,427, which is three times the GEF allocation of US$7,339,450. However, records of actual co-financing were not available for this evaluation, which means that the significant financial contribution of the Government of Thailand cannot be validated. This also means that the evaluation cannot fully assess the project’s efficiency and value for money to inform future programming. Actual co-financing was also not provided for SNF. Mechanisms and guidelines would enhance transparency and improve understanding of expectations.

9 Projects should use the Social and Environmental Screening Procedure as a dynamic tool during projects to proactively manage risk and maximize opportunities. The RTA recommended in the 2018, 2019 and 2020 PIRs that the SESP be reassessed to address potential project risks that may arise from a grievance that had arisen within the project area (this grievance was not directed at the project or its activities). However, this SESP re-assessment did not occur. Similarly, the RTA recommended several times in PIRs that a gender analysis be conducted to improve the gender marker rating and identify targeted interventions for gender mainstreaming that can be progressed by the project; again, this was not undertaken. In addition to managing risks, undertaking these assessments may have identified new opportunities for the project to achieve improved development outcomes. It is recommended that the SESP and approach to gender in projects is not ‘locked in’ at project commencement, rather that they are used as dynamic tools to manage risk and maximize opportunities.
10 Thailand’s World Heritage authorities should consider opportunities to make greater use of local knowledge and values in planning and management of natural World Heritage sites. During mission interviews, the Karen youth from TYW who participated in the traditional knowledge youth project demonstrated a high level of pride in their knowledge of wildlife and their role in the HKK-TYN WHS, and also an enthusiasm to learn from scientific knowledge. WHS planning and management would benefit from seeking opportunities to use local knowledge and values and to engage positively and proactively with local people.
11 DNP should seek partnership to promote/support community outreach functions as part of respective agencies’ regular mandates on protected area management, especially those adjacent to PAs. This project has shown that significant benefits can be gained through improving relations between DNP officers at project sites and 8 affected members of the community. In TYE and TYW, several outreach officers were employed by DNP after they had shown successful outreach outcomes results. However, there are limitations to how DNP can employ staff, so these people were employed in ranger roles rather than in outreach roles. This is a missed opportunity for DNP to make community liaison a part of ‘business as usual’ in protected area management.
1. Recommendation: Concerned parties should agree on the process, responsibilities and governance for establishing a business case for a sustainable financing mechanism for this project. The analysis and investigations undertaken as part of this project have provided the groundwork to develop a sustainable financing mechanism to fill the WHS budgeting gap. It is recommended that a process is put in place, with agreed responsibilities and governance, to develop a business case for realizing the potential to establish a sustainable financing mechanism for conservation in the WHS.
Management Response: [Added: 2021/11/03] [Last Updated: 2021/11/03]

Agreed. A study funded by the project has been conducted to explore innovative finance solutions for tiger conservation, of which few have been pursued but unsuccessful, several solutions need to be pursued proactively.

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
Continue following up with the Uthai Thani provincial administration on budget allocation for wildlife tourism development at Thap Saloa Non-Hunting Area
[Added: 2021/11/03]
DNP/UNDP 2022/12 Initiated History
Continue pursuing innovative finance solutions for biodiversity conservation, such as the conservation license plate scheme, wildlife tourism, crowdfunding, result-based local budget realignment through ongoing and new projects/initiatives.
[Added: 2021/11/03]
UNDP 2022/12 Initiated
2. Recommendation: Allocate funding to enable the continuation of the increased management capacity that was in place in the wildlife sanctuaries during this project. The increased temporary increased capacity in DNP (especially in the number of rangers) has been an important contributor to the results in Outcome 1. A funding allocation to enable this to continue would enable the project results to continue and expand.
Management Response: [Added: 2021/11/03] [Last Updated: 2021/11/03]

Partially agreed. While this is a good and sensible recommendation, Covid-19 pandemic has taken a great toll on government budget since last year as all ministries’ annual budget has been reduced significantly from pre-Covid years. This will force DNP to focus on core functions/mandates while significant number of staff is expected to be cut. Additional funding, if any, would need to come from outside development partners.

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
Explore additional funding sources from sub-national governments (e.g., provincial administration/agencies, PAOs, TAOs) and development partners (e.g., WWF, USAID, WCS) to sustain increased management capacity of the WHS
[Added: 2021/11/03] [Last Updated: 2022/03/15]
DNP 2022/12 Initiated DNP in collaboration with UNDP to explore additional funding sources. History
3. Recommendation: Prepare a report on the tiger conservation and monitoring activities from this project to inform the review of the Thailand - Tiger Action Plan 2010–2022. Thailand set the ambitious goal of doubling its tiger population by 50 percent by 2020 and has made significant progress in tiger conservation activities. The Thailand - Tiger Action Plan 2010–2022 (TTAP) will soon be reviewed. This project has been a significant investment in tiger conservation, and it is important that the findings and lessons be considered in the review of the TTAP. A report should be prepared as soon as possible, while the findings are still fresh, on the various tiger conservation and monitoring activities undertaken during the project. This should include recommendations and lessons learned to inform the review of the TTAP.
Management Response: [Added: 2021/11/03] [Last Updated: 2021/11/03]

Agreed. There are many successes and lessons from this project that can be utilized as Thailand plans to review the current Tiger Action Plan 2010-2022. In addition to the report as suggested, the project is developing a digital repository of knowledge products which was produced during the course of implementation. Once finished, it will be a useful source of information on Thailand’s achievement on tiger conservation which will be used to not only inform the next Tiger Action Plan but also a showcase for other tiger countries.

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
The successes of this project will be used to inform a review of the new Tiger Action Plan after 2022.
[Added: 2021/11/03] [Last Updated: 2022/03/15]
DNP 2022/09 Initiated DNP will review a new Action Plan after 2022. History
The project website and digital archive will be developed to collect all project’s knowledge products for further public utilization or Thailand’s policy and plan on tiger conservation
[Added: 2021/11/03]
UNDP 2021/09 Completed
4. Recommendation: Continue to engage with Karen communities in TYW to enable this program to realize its potential in improving livelihoods, traditional knowledge and wildlife management. The Karen youth from TYW who participated in the Indigenous knowledge youth project showed a high level of pride in their knowledge, their role, and their communities’ role in the WHS. In turn, this is leading to significant improvements in relations between the Karen villagers and DNP officers and, therefore, to the connection of traditional and scientific knowledge and the application of traditional knowledge to PA management. The youth involved are enthusiastic to build on this program and feel that, for 4 them and their communities, the program is still gaining strength and momentum. A small level of funding directed through the Rabbit in the Moon Foundation would enable this program to realize its full potential.
Management Response: [Added: 2021/11/03] [Last Updated: 2021/11/03]

Agreed. Empowering these youth members further will carry the momentum of the work initiated by the project and will increase the sense of ownership by the youth members.

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
Additional financial support has been given to Rabbit in the Moon to continue promoting local products and livelihoods of Karen group.
[Added: 2021/11/03] [Last Updated: 2021/12/07]
UNDP 2021/09 Completed The final transaction had delivered to "Rabbit in the Moon" for continuing promote the local products and livelihoods since June, 2021. History
5. Recommendation: Projects should strategically plan for project sustainability throughout a project’s life, from project development through inception, implementation and project close. Sustainability is the most significant weakness of this project. In particular, the return to pre-project levels (or lower) of DNP rangers in TYN-HKK WHS and the lack of an established financing mechanism are fundamental constraints to the continuation of results. These constraints were clear from the start of the project, yet at project conclusion there is no clear plan for sustainability. It should be noted that the MTR recommended that a Project Sustainability Taskforce be set up to develop an exit plan; however, this Taskforce was not set up. It is recommended that, in future projects, sustainability should be a strategic focus throughout project implementation, from inception to close, and that this should be led by the Implementing Partner (in this case DNP) and should involve project staff, stakeholders identified during project development, Board members, agency representatives, and other participating organizations and individuals. Board minutes show that some members raised sustainability in the early years, but there was no process established to follow up on this.
Management Response: [Added: 2021/11/03] [Last Updated: 2021/11/03]

Partially agreed. Project sustainability is always in the core of any projects DNP/UNDP have engaged or implemented. Sustainability of conservation work lies in the fact that DNP remains the core agency which is mandated and given budget for that. The project came in to complement DNP’s mandate by bringing leverage resources to help accelerate the agency’s goal.

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
Continue monitoring efforts (e.g., technical assistance, resources) by concerned parties (e.g., DNP, UNDP, WCS, provincial administration) to protect tiger population and WHS management
[Added: 2021/11/03]
DNP and partner agencies, provincial administration and/or agencies, UNDP 2022/12 Initiated
Enhance involvement/role of Protected Area Committee (PAC) and local authorities to support a larger picture of conservation work in WHS
[Added: 2021/11/03]
DNP 2022/12 Not Initiated
6. Recommendation: Projects should establish working relationships between different partners and contributors, including project staff, to improve shared understanding of goals and to facilitate knowledge sharing and shared 5 learning. The TE team found that there was a low level of understanding among project parties of the overall project strategy and outcomes and of the roles and activities of different groups and individuals. In particular, NGOs and outreach officers involved in the project often had little involvement with each other. The MTR recommended that a Community Technical Reference Group be established to improve communications and knowledge sharing between organizations working on community aspects; however, this group was not established. This lack of understanding of project strategy and roles was also apparent among some Board members, who often had limited understanding of different aspects of the project because of the limited strategic engagement with them, as described previously (although some other Board members had a detailed understanding of the project and its components). A shared understanding of the project’s goals and activities and greater understanding of different roles would foster a sense of teamwork and provide opportunities for parties to share experiences and learn from each other.
Management Response: [Added: 2021/11/03] [Last Updated: 2021/11/03]

Agreed. Although the project has already finished, this recommendation is still valid and applicable for future projects of DNP/UNDP.

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
Take a proactive approach in engaging board members from different ministries in order to leverage their expertise and agency’s resources to help achieve the project’s goal. This can be done through the ongoing IWT (GEF6) project.
[Added: 2021/11/03]
DNP/ UNDP 2022/12 Initiated N/A
Coordination mechanism using existing structure(s) should be better than establishing a new body by a project, considering that the project has its own life time but the work of all parties will continue. Engage the Protected Areas Committee (PAC) as a body for improving communications and knowledge sharing between organizations working on community aspects.
[Added: 2021/11/03]
DNP 2022/12 Not Initiated N/A
7. Recommendation: Projects should work closely with Project Boards during implementation to value-add from Board members’ expertise and roles. The Project Board has a high level of experience and a wide range of expertise and could be a valuable resource for providing the project with strategic direction, identifying synergies and planning the sustainability of project results. Many Board members were enthusiastic about their role on the Board. However, engagement with the Board was largely process-related, focused on procedural matters such as work plans, budgets and approving results framework changes, and many members did not visit the project site during the project. Consequently, many members were passive participants with low engagement with the project. An example of this was a visit by the Ambassador to the project site, which was strategically well conducted but was reported to the Board after the trip. Such events have significant potential for engagement and networking by Board members and for development of opportunities for synergies and collaboration. Another trip for Project Board was planned since the Ambassador’s visit but was not conducted. A shift to a more active, participatory role for the Board would value-add to projects by leveraging from the experience and expertise of the members.
Management Response: [Added: 2021/11/03] [Last Updated: 2021/11/03]

Agreed. Good recommendation. This will be applied to ongoing and future UNDP/GEF projects.

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
Ensure more engagement of project board members’ technical expertise in project oversight and organize field visits for them to enhance their understanding of the project (applicable to IWT project and new GEF7 biodiversity-based tourism project)
[Added: 2021/11/03]
UNDP / DNP 2022/07 Not Initiated
8. Recommendation:

Projects should put in place governance and control mechanisms to transparently track actual co-financing contributions during project implementation. The contribution of DNP to this project was very substantial, with several business areas of the agency contributing to a wide range of significant outcomes. The sum of co-financing committed at CEO endorsement was large: US$22,864,427, which is three times the GEF allocation of US$7,339,450. However, records of actual co-financing were not available for this evaluation, which means that the significant financial contribution of the Government of Thailand cannot be validated. This also means that the evaluation cannot fully assess the project’s efficiency and value for money to inform future programming. Actual co-financing was also not provided for SNF. Mechanisms and guidelines would enhance transparency and improve understanding of expectations.

Management Response: [Added: 2021/11/03] [Last Updated: 2021/11/03]

Agreed. Regular and consistent tracking of co-financing budget should be done annually to examine whether the project still brings relevance to the mandates of relevant project partners who share the common development goal.

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
Update co-financing figures for DNP and Sueb Nakha Sathien Foundation and share with TE team
[Added: 2021/11/03] [Last Updated: 2021/12/07]
DNP, SNF 2021/07 Completed The updated figures had shared with TE team in July, 2021. History
Establish an annual tracking system on project co-financing as part of the annual project implementation report. Co-financing can count both in-kind and in-cash (e.g., investment, grant, equipment).This applies to the ongoing Illegal Wildlife Trade project (GEF6) currently implemented by DNP.
[Added: 2021/11/03] [Last Updated: 2021/12/07]
UNDP / DNP 2021/09 Completed The establishment on project co-financing has been completed as part of the annual tracking system. History
9. Recommendation: Projects should use the Social and Environmental Screening Procedure as a dynamic tool during projects to proactively manage risk and maximize opportunities. The RTA recommended in the 2018, 2019 and 2020 PIRs that the SESP be reassessed to address potential project risks that may arise from a grievance that had arisen within the project area (this grievance was not directed at the project or its activities). However, this SESP re-assessment did not occur. Similarly, the RTA recommended several times in PIRs that a gender analysis be conducted to improve the gender marker rating and identify targeted interventions for gender mainstreaming that can be progressed by the project; again, this was not undertaken. In addition to managing risks, undertaking these assessments may have identified new opportunities for the project to achieve improved development outcomes. It is recommended that the SESP and approach to gender in projects is not ‘locked in’ at project commencement, rather that they are used as dynamic tools to manage risk and maximize opportunities.
Management Response: [Added: 2021/11/03] [Last Updated: 2021/11/03]

Agreed. This recommendation applies to all UNDP/GEF projects and will be implemented through training for UNDP CO staff going forward. SESP risks will be monitored more closely every year during the Project Implementation Review. The response to the RTA’s comment on the villagers’ grievance has been documented in an internal memo for future reference.

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
UNDP to prepare a memo to document the grievance case for future reference
[Added: 2021/11/03]
UNDP 2021/07 Completed
UNDP to conduct training on project oversight and management for CO staff to increase awareness and capacity on risks monitoring during project implementation.
[Added: 2021/11/03] [Last Updated: 2022/03/15]
UNDP 2022/03 Completed The CO staff has encouraged to learn online learning course on risk monitoring during project implementation. History
10. Recommendation: Thailand’s World Heritage authorities should consider opportunities to make greater use of local knowledge and values in planning and management of natural World Heritage sites. During mission interviews, the Karen youth from TYW who participated in the traditional knowledge youth project demonstrated a high level of pride in their knowledge of wildlife and their role in the HKK-TYN WHS, and also an enthusiasm to learn from scientific knowledge. WHS planning and management would benefit from seeking opportunities to use local knowledge and values and to engage positively and proactively with local people.
Management Response: [Added: 2021/11/03] [Last Updated: 2021/11/03]

Disagreed. DNP recognizes cultural value and traditional knowledge of enclave communities inside TYE/TYW and has worked with them continuously through the Tiger project and DNP’s regular activities. It must also note the outstanding universal values (OUV) of the natural World Heritage and the cultural World Heritage should not be mixed as it can/has created confusion and misinterpretation to the public that was troublesome to DNP in the past. Key action(s)

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
No Action Needed.
[Added: 2021/11/03]
UNDP 2021/09 Completed
11. Recommendation: DNP should seek partnership to promote/support community outreach functions as part of respective agencies’ regular mandates on protected area management, especially those adjacent to PAs. This project has shown that significant benefits can be gained through improving relations between DNP officers at project sites and 8 affected members of the community. In TYE and TYW, several outreach officers were employed by DNP after they had shown successful outreach outcomes results. However, there are limitations to how DNP can employ staff, so these people were employed in ranger roles rather than in outreach roles. This is a missed opportunity for DNP to make community liaison a part of ‘business as usual’ in protected area management.
Management Response: [Added: 2021/11/03] [Last Updated: 2021/11/03]

Partially agreed. This recommendation should be taken up jointly not only by DNP but other agencies (e.g., local government, provincial agencies) which share the same goal. In practice, outreach functions have been integrated into the current job description of the management functions of the Regional Administrative Office. However, there are approx. 4,200 communities around the protected areas in Thailand. A better option may be to request community representatives from each community to work with park authorities and serve as the community outreach volunteers.

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
Explore/establish a community outreach volunteer idea to fill the functions as suggested in the recommendation.
[Added: 2021/11/03]
DNP 2022/12 Not Initiated N/A
Raise awareness and seek cooperation of members at HKK, TYE, TYW PACs
[Added: 2021/11/03]
DNP 2022/12 Not Initiated

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