Final Evaluation of Country Programme Document for Thailand 2017 – 2021

Report Cover Image
Evaluation Plan:
2017-2021, Thailand
Evaluation Type:
Outcome
Planned End Date:
07/2021
Completion Date:
10/2021
Status:
Completed
Management Response:
Yes
Evaluation Budget(US $):
35,000

UNDP Thailand’s current Country Programme Document (CPD) (2017-2021) is ending in 2021. The CPD evaluation has been commissioned by the UNDP Country office to inform the development of its next CPD for the period 2022-2026. The evaluation aims to take stock of the progress and performance of the current CPD and to generate evidence and knowledge about the programme. The results from the evaluation will be used to inform decision-making, course correction and development of the new CPD. Thailand is in the process of developing the country to be an innovation-driven and value-based economy by 2036. To achieve more inclusive and sustainable development growth, the country needs to tackle several key challenges, including inequality and regional poverty, vulnerability to climate and disaster risks, environmental degradation, lack of good governance and social exclusion, and innovation deficiency. Thailand is also one of Southeast Asia’s hardest hit country by COVID-19, despite its marked success in controlling the outbreak.

The current CPD is the continuation of long-standing development collaboration between the Royal Thai Government and UNDP. It was formulated in consultation with the relevant stakeholders and efforts were made to make it fully consistent and aligned with Thailand’s long and short-term national visions, goals and plans. The CPD draws its mandate from the United Nations Partnership Agreement Framework (2017-2021) for Thailand and contributes to its broader outcome. The CPD consists of a total of 10 outputs, which fall under two main thematic areas: a) Promoting anti-corruption, inclusive engagement, and social cohesion (Outputs 1-4) and b) Promoting green and inclusive growth (Outputs 5-10).

The CPD evaluation exercise was conducted in accordance with UNDP Evaluation Guidelines (2019) and United Nations Evaluation Group (UNEG) norms and standards. The evaluation process consisted of five standard evaluation steps: 1) Evaluation Questions, 2) Evaluation Design, 3) Data Collection Methods, 4) Data Analysis and 5) Presentation and Reporting. The evaluation used the standard criteria of Relevance, Effectiveness, Efficiency and Sustainability to assess the overall CPD progress and performance, including the cross cutting themes of gender equality and human rights. The key findings of this evaluation reflect that UNDP is very well positioned as a development partner in the overall development sphere in Thailand. UNDP’s reputation and its positioning has greatly helped in building strong and long-term partnerships with all stakeholders. Collaboration among stakeholders during CPD initiatives implementation remained appropriate and fruitful. Most of the large scale CPD implementation partnerships pertained to national level ministries and governmental institutions. However, collaboration with local civil society organizations and community groups, including vulnerable groups was found to be a bit limited, spontaneous, and short term. The Monitoring and Evaluation functions at the CO level remained limited in scope and capacities and a comprehensive M&E framework and plan for CPD was lacking. Overall M&E functions remained limited to internal progress reporting and Mid Term Review.

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Title Final Evaluation of Country Programme Document for Thailand 2017 – 2021
Atlas Project Number: 00047052
Evaluation Plan: 2017-2021, Thailand
Evaluation Type: Outcome
Status: Completed
Completion Date: 10/2021
Planned End Date: 07/2021
Management Response: Yes
Focus Area:
  • 1. Governance
  • 2. Others
Corporate Outcome and Output (UNDP Strategic Plan 2018-2021)
  • 1. Output 1.1.1 Capacities developed across the whole of government to integrate the 2030 Agenda, the Paris Agreement and other international agreements in development plans and budgets, and to analyse progress towards the SDGs, using innovative and data-driven solutions
SDG Goal
  • Goal 12. Ensure sustainable consumption and production patterns
  • Goal 16. Promote peaceful and inclusive societies for sustainable development, provide access to justice for all and build effective, accountable and inclusive institutions at all levels
SDG Target
  • 12.7 Promote public procurement practices that are sustainable, in accordance with national policies and priorities
  • 16.5 Substantially reduce corruption and bribery in all their forms
  • 16.6 Develop effective, accountable and transparent institutions at all levels
Evaluation Budget(US $): 35,000
Source of Funding: TRAC
Evaluation Expenditure(US $): 36,000
Joint Programme: No
Joint Evaluation: No
Evaluation Team members:
Name Title Email Nationality
Nisar Ahmad Khan Team Leader niskhan65@yahoo.com PAKISTAN
Kusumal Rachawong Team member rachawongk@gmail.com THAILAND
GEF Evaluation: No
Key Stakeholders:
Countries: THAILAND
Comments:

Consultants submitted the final report since July.  But the report is still under review of IEO and we expect it will be endorsed and approved by the end of August and no later than September 2021.

Lessons
1.

1. UNDP, along with other UN Agencies, have made considerable contributions to the joint UNPAF outcome. Overall CPD mandate and interventions were fully aligned with national plans and priorities. UNDP remained the fifth biggest contributor, among UN agencies, with around 10% of the total UNPAF expenses during 2017-2020. Most promising contributions were made in the areas of sustainable policy making, capacity building, natural resource management and climate change. However, the single UNPAF outcome and respective indicators were found to be very broad in scope and posed challenges in terms of measuring the exact extent of contributions of the CPD’s towards these targets.

2. Overall a major share of CPD resources (62%) were utilized by various projects and initiatives addressing sustainable natural resource management and climate change related issues. Considerable contributions have been made in the development and implementation of various solutions for sustainable management of natural resources and to address climate change issues. However, other important issues, like poverty, inequality and social inclusion, especially addressing the needs of women, disadvantaged and vulnerable groups received limited resources. Among others, the main reason was the difficulties faced in mobilizing required funding, due to the upper middle income country status of Thailand.

3. CPD has also made contributions towards strengthening of mechanisms for anti-corruption and building capacities to monitor public and business sector integrity. Contributions were made to include of extended definition of ‘gender’ in Gender Equality Act. Contribution to disaster risk reduction include development and adoption of national guidelines on Tsunami Evacuation Plans. Considerable contributions were made towards strengthening of south-south cooperation, especially with neighboring countries. CPD has also contributed in the promotion of innovation based development solutions. However, these contributions were on a very limited scale. Cumulatively interventions related to outputs 1,2,4,5,7,8,9,10 consumed only 13.5% of the total spent resources.    

4. UNDP has made continued efforts to engage local institutions, CSOs and especially youth groups in the southern border provinces to promote social cohesion and inclusive development. Overall CPD interventions helped in building the capacities of CSOs, local communities, especially youth to develop innovative solutions to improve harmony and livelihoods. However, UNDP engagement in the southern border provinces remained quite limited, due to the very sensitive and complex nature of socio-political circumstances, accessibility issues and funding constraints.

5. UNDP is very well positioned as development partner in the overall development sphere in Thailand. UNDP is also held in good esteem by all stakeholders, as a very trusted, influential and active partner. UNDP’s reputation and its positioning has helped greatly in building strong and long term partnerships with all stakeholders. Overall collaboration among stakeholders during CPD initiatives implementation remained appropriate and fruitful. Most of the large scale CPD implementation partnerships pertained to national level ministries and governmental institutions. However, collaborations especially with local civil society organizations and community groups, including vulnerable groups was found a bit limited, spontaneous and short term.

6. The Monitoring and Evaluation functions at the CO level remained limited in scope and capacities and a comprehensive M&E framework for CPD was lacking. At the higher level, CPD relied on the UNPAF steering committee for oversight and guidance, which was found less rigorous and spontaneous. Little efforts have been made to regularly monitor CPD output and especially relevant UNPAF outcome indicators. Some of the outputs level indicators also couldn’t sufficiently capture the true scale of CPD work. Overall M&E functions remained limited to internal progress reporting and MTR.


Findings
1.

1. The CPD interventions and results are found to be duly consistent, aligned and supported the implementation of the Royal Thai Government’s long term national visions, goals and short term national and thematic development plans. Most of the CPD support was concentrated in the areas of sustainable natural resource management, biodiversity conservation and climate change.

2. The CPD was found to be consistent with and responded to some of the needs and priorities of target communities/beneficiaries, especially women and other vulnerable groups. However relevant and good, these interventions were found to be limited, keeping in view the large scale and very complex nature of various issues faced by the marginalized and vulnerable segments of society, especially in the southern border provinces.

3. Overall, UNDP’s mandate and its positioning in the larger development sphere in Thailand is found to be very relevant and well placed and UNDP is considered a very influential and active development partner, especially among UN agencies and other development partners working in Thailand.

4. CPD support of the implementation of the Procurement and Supplies Administration Act 2017 contributed towards improved efficiency and cost saving through reducing corruption in overall public sector procurements. However, the output was found quite broad, as addressing the issues of corruption across sectors is quite complex and cumbersome undertaking involving diverse range of stakeholders.

5. CPD support was found instrumental in building capacities and raising awareness among private sector organizations and listed companies regarding integrating SDGs and human rights based business approaches and practices to enhance business sector integrity. However, the private sector also seems to be a bit reluctant and slow in integrating SDGs and human rights into their business practices, as they think it may hamper their profitability.

6. Despite sensitive socio-political circumstances, accessibility issues and funding constraints, UNDP has made some inroads and engaged with local institutions, CSOs and youth groups to raise awareness about promoting social cohesion, inclusive peace, and development processes. Additionally, UNDP engaged with the aforementioned parties to build the capacities of local youth to develop innovative solutions to improve harmony and livelihoods. However, these activities, were found quite limited in addressing various issues, mainly because of the very complex and sensitive peace and development circumstances in the southern border provinces.

7. UNDP provided technical support in improving the inclusivity of the Gender Equality Act and in the development of two more acts to safeguard the rights of people with different sexual orientation. Capacities of the relevant government functionaries were built for implementation of the Gender Equality Act. However, there are still several challenges hindering the full scale implementation of the Gender Equality Act and approval of other acts by parliament.

8.  The CPD has not implemented any specific interventions related to engagement of local governments and urban poor communities to effectively define localized multi-dimensional poverty indicators. Overall the progress on this output remained lagging.  

9. CPD projects and interventions considerably helped in strengthening the capacities of relevant institutions. Innovative biodiversity conservation approaches and efforts were also made to improve coordination, legal frameworks. Finally, enforcement mechanisms were made to combat illegal wildlife trade and to protect endangered species from extinction.

10. The CPD had initially envisaged large scale interventions to upgrade the irrigation infrastructure in Yom and Nam river basins and had also anticipated benefits for the local population. However, these interventions didn’t materialize, due to funding constraints.

11. By the end of 2020, the CPD projects and interventions for GHG reduction in energy and transport sectors have resulted in reduction of greenhouse gases equivalent to 120,000 tons of carbon dioxide.

12. Considerable progress has been made to build the capacities of key institutions to utilize climate/disaster risk information for development purposes. However, the work related to Multi-Criteria Assessment across all provinces need to be further streamlined and scaled up to cover the entire country.  

13. UNDP supported the preparations of the National Voluntary SDG Report (2018) and the National Human Development Report (2020). UNDP, with the support of the regional hub, has provided support for the SDGs localization and reporting. However, UNDP support towards the capacity building of NSO and relevant ministries to collect, manage and use data required for SDGs reporting were very limited. 

14. UNDP supported a number of initiatives which has significantly contributed in improving south-south cooperation for development solutions, especially with neighboring ASEAN countries. Commendable progress has been made under this output through a wide range of knowledge exchanges to learn and benefit from each other’s experiences in addressing various development issues.

15. UNDP has supported a number of initiatives which contributed in the promotion of innovation based development solutions. Overall these initiatives contributed to developing innovative approaches in policy making, empowering young people to create innovative ideas to improve social inclusion and livelihoods. However, most of the work that have started in the near past are in initial stages; therefore, the results and benefits will flow soon.

16. Due to the outbreak of the Covid-19 pandemic in 2020, UNDP has supported a number of initiatives to mitigate the impacts of the pandemic and to provide policy recommendations for post-COVID recovery. The advice specifically addresses the basic needs of some of the most vulnerable segments of society. UNDP has played a catalyzing role, despite the scale and impact of the crisis.

17. CPD outputs have contributed handsomely to all four of the outlined UNPAF outcome strategies. In monitory terms among all UN Agencies, UNDP remained the fifth biggest contributor with around 10% of the total UNPAF expenses during 2017-2020. Most promising contributions were made in the areas of sustainable policy making, capacity building, natural resource management and climate change. Over the years, there have been slight improvements in several relevant UNPAF outcome indicators. However, the singular UNPAF outcome and respective indicators were found to be very broad in scope and posed challenges in terms of measuring the exact extent of contributions of the CPD’s outputs and interventions towards these indicators and targets.

18. There was around 22% short fall in the mobilized funds as compared to the original CPD budget. From 2017 to 2020, around 70% of the total available programme resources has been utilized. There has been a greater disparity among the magnitudes of individual output level spending. Output-6 i.e. “Solutions developed for sustainable management of natural resources” consumed 61.6%, while the 2nd highest spending was 4.3% under output-10, the rest of outputs have spent respectively further low.

19. Overall programme funds flow was smooth. Funds were managed by UNDP CO, with support from UNDP regional hub, to provide transactional support services and procurement, human resources, and IT related services.

20. Implementation arrangements and collaboration and partnerships among various stakeholders during programme implementation remained appropriate and swift. However, most of the CPD partnerships pertained to national level ministries and governmental institutions, collaboration with local administrations. Partnerships with civil society, community groups and the private sector were a bit limited and spontaneous.

21. At the higher level, CPD relies on the UNPAF steering committee for overall oversight. Most of the programmatic M&E related functions takes place at the CO level, with support from the regional hub. CPD progress has been regularly monitored and reported through Annual Reports and Mid-term evaluation. However, the CO level M&E related capacities remained a bit limited, which has somehow hampered the development and implementation of a comprehensive CPD M&E framework and plan.

22. Overall, the high level of alignment of the CPD with the national priorities, policies and plans, and the strong buy in and ownership of governmental institutions provides sound basis for the likelihood of the sustainability of programmatic interventions and continuity of benefits. However, the main risks to sustainability of natural resource management interventions pertains mostly to the poor socio-economic conditions of local communities. There are also significant financial constraints in mobilizing desired financial resources to sustain and scale up inclusion and livelihood interventions, especially in the deep south.

23. CPD has made considerable efforts to incorporate gender equality and human rights approaches in its design and implementation. Most interventions were directed towards improvement and capacity building for the implementation of the Gender Equality Act, implementation of NAP on Business and Human Rights and providing relief to Covid-19 affected vulnerable groups etc. However, these interventions were found a bit limited keeping in view the larger scale of issues faced by women and vulnerable groups.


Recommendations
1

It is recommended that upcoming UNSDCF outcomes and respective indicators should be made more specific, which should duly respond to the mandates and scope of the work of participating UN agencies, including UNDP. CPD outputs, corresponding indicators and targets should be made more specific and measurable and exhibiting clear and direct linkages to the UNSDCF indicators and targets.

2

It is recommended that the new CPD should continue its main focus on addressing issues related to environmental sustainability and climate change in Thailand. The new CPD should devise specific and measurable outputs to fully comprehend and match the broad scope of this thematic area. With this, it is also recommended that other important and pressing issues like poverty, inequality and social inclusion, especially addressing the needs of women, disadvantaged and vulnerable groups should also be prioritized and duly incorporated in the new CPD, with more specific and tangible outputs and matching allocations. Overall, there is a greater need for formulating more balanced CPD outputs, which are equitable in scope and resources.

3

It is recommended that the new CPD should devise and implement more specific and relevant interventions to address the most pressing issues of social inclusion, conflict resolution, peace and development and livelihood improvements in the southern border provinces. This should be done through active involvement of local communities and stakeholders. UNDP should use its influence to take up the accessibility issues of international agencies in the target areas, with relevant national and provincial authorities to give way to easy access/interaction for large scale implementation.

4

It is recommended that in the implementation of upcoming CPD, the level of involvement of local CSOs, community groups and private sector should be enhanced considerably, as full partners through longer term partnerships agreements, especially in areas of awareness raising, advocacy and implementation of community based social cohesion and livelihood interventions

5

It is recommended that capacities at the CO level should be considerably strengthened to effectively undertake the M&E functions in monitoring the progress and performance of the new CPD. A comprehensive M&E framework and work plan for the new CPD should be developed and rigorously implemented in collaboration with stakeholders. Furthermore, capacities of relevant institutions like National Statistical Organization and relevant ministers should be built to monitor SDGs and national level indicators and targets.

Management Response Documents
1. Recommendation:

It is recommended that upcoming UNSDCF outcomes and respective indicators should be made more specific, which should duly respond to the mandates and scope of the work of participating UN agencies, including UNDP. CPD outputs, corresponding indicators and targets should be made more specific and measurable and exhibiting clear and direct linkages to the UNSDCF indicators and targets.

Management Response: [Added: 2021/11/09]

UNDP CO accepts this recommendation. The new Country Programme Document (CPD) 2022-2026 outcomes are copied verbatim from the new United Nations Sustainable Development Cooperation Framework (UNSDCF). The CPD RRF outcome level indicators are from adopted from the new UNSDCF indicators.

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
1.1. UNDP CO as part of the UNSDCF (here after CF) formulation exercise, contributed to the stakeholder discussions and discussions with donors and key stakeholders to ensure UNSDCF outcomes and indicators are specific and covers mandates of contributing UN agencies. The stakeholder meetings and strategic CF formulation meetings were undertaken to better define and develop interlinkages and complementarities between different UN Agencies.
[Added: 2021/11/09]
UNDP Country Office (RR/DRR and RCO). 2021/08 Completed
1.2. The outputs and indicators are contributing to the CF outcomes in the new CPD RRF. The CPD outputs and indicators will measure how the results of CPD (outputs) contribute to CF outcomes. This will demonstrate CPDs’ contributions to CF and its targets.
[Added: 2021/11/09]
UNDP Country Office (RR/DRR, Programme Unit, and projects). 2021/09 Completed
1.3. The new CPD Outcomes enhance the linkages and connections among CPD outputs and outcomes. The data analysis and theory of change consultations conducted for the Cooperation Framework was used as a base for UNDP CPD process. The CPD articulates UNDP’s contribution to the Cooperation Framework and put in place systems to monitor and track that contribution.
[Added: 2021/11/09]
UNDP Country Office (RR/DRR, Programme Unit, and projects). 2021/09 Completed
2. Recommendation:

It is recommended that the new CPD should continue its main focus on addressing issues related to environmental sustainability and climate change in Thailand. The new CPD should devise specific and measurable outputs to fully comprehend and match the broad scope of this thematic area. With this, it is also recommended that other important and pressing issues like poverty, inequality and social inclusion, especially addressing the needs of women, disadvantaged and vulnerable groups should also be prioritized and duly incorporated in the new CPD, with more specific and tangible outputs and matching allocations. Overall, there is a greater need for formulating more balanced CPD outputs, which are equitable in scope and resources.

Management Response: [Added: 2021/11/09]

UNDP CO accepts this recommendation. The new CPD incorporated all aspects of recommendation#2, integrating environmental sustainability, addressing issues of poverty, inequality and taking in to account the needs of vulnerable population.

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
2.1. The new CPD outputs designed towards mitigating Climate Change, meeting the needs of vulnerable population.
[Added: 2021/11/09]
UNDP Country Office (RR/DRR, Programme Units) 2021/10 Completed Completed. CPD outputs are 1,2 and 3 are designed to contribute People, Planet, Prosperity and Peace.
2.2. The new CPD designed in a balanced and integrated manner focusing on key developmental challenges identified by the evaluation as well as the CCA.
[Added: 2021/11/09]
UNDP Country Office (RR/DRR, Programme Units) 2021/10 Completed
2.3 Country office’s internal Gender Equality Strategy is developed as part of the new CPD 2022-2026, ensuring that LNOB is a cornerstone of UNDP’s work (in project design, implementation, monitoring, learning and evaluation).
[Added: 2021/11/09]
UNDP Country Office (RR/DRR, RBM Analyst and Gender Task Team) 2021/10 Completed
3. Recommendation:

It is recommended that the new CPD should devise and implement more specific and relevant interventions to address the most pressing issues of social inclusion, conflict resolution, peace and development and livelihood improvements in the southern border provinces. This should be done through active involvement of local communities and stakeholders. UNDP should use its influence to take up the accessibility issues of international agencies in the target areas, with relevant national and provincial authorities to give way to easy access/interaction for large scale implementation.

Management Response: [Added: 2021/11/09]

UNDP CO accepts this recommendation.

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
3.2 UNDP projects would influence through its local and national engagement in multi-partnership and sectors to build trust with stakeholders from government agencies and civil society. Keeping government agencies informed and following protocols will ensure the accessibility to the target areas.
[Added: 2021/11/09]
UNDP Country Office (RR, DRR, Programme Units) 2022/06 Initiated
3.1. Holistically framed by the principle of SDGs integration in area-based development, a strategic framework is designed to guide current and future interventions that lead to strengthening SDG localization in the southern border provinces. Specifically, UNDP will continue to promote Social Innovation Platforms which engages with citizens and governments to develop portfolio of solutions most pertinent in different contexts, as a means to address social inclusion, local governance, livelihood development, and peace in the southern border provinces.
[Added: 2021/11/09] [Last Updated: 2021/12/20]
UNDP Country Office (RR, DRR, Programme Units) 2021/12 Completed Strategic Framework for Localizing SDG in the southern border provinces has been designed and applied in area-based development as well as implemented / tested Social Innovation in Portfolio. History
4. Recommendation:

It is recommended that in the implementation of upcoming CPD, the level of involvement of local CSOs, community groups and private sector should be enhanced considerably, as full partners through longer term partnerships agreements, especially in areas of awareness raising, advocacy and implementation of community based social cohesion and livelihood interventions

Management Response: [Added: 2021/11/09]

UNDP accepts this recommendation with the clarification that UNDP upport the involvement of CSOs, community groups and private sector. The new CPD has key focus on the LNOB principle that strengthen the engagement with CSOs and vulnerable community groups.

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
4.3 Roll out a ‘fee for service’ modality to support companies with consultancy services on issues such as SDGs Impact, Gender, Diversity and Inclusion.
[Added: 2021/11/09]
UNDP Country Office (RR, DRR, Programme Unit) 2022/12 Initiated
4.1 Hiring Partnership and Engagement Advisor to support initiatives with CSOs.
[Added: 2021/11/09]
UNDP Country Office (RR, DRR) 2021/10 Completed
4.2. Setting up a Civil Society Advisory Committee by UNDP CO.
[Added: 2021/11/09]
UNDP Country Office (RR, DRR, Partnership and Engagement advisor) 2021/11 Completed
5. Recommendation:

It is recommended that capacities at the CO level should be considerably strengthened to effectively undertake the M&E functions in monitoring the progress and performance of the new CPD. A comprehensive M&E framework and work plan for the new CPD should be developed and rigorously implemented in collaboration with stakeholders. Furthermore, capacities of relevant institutions like National Statistical Organization and relevant ministers should be built to monitor SDGs and national level indicators and targets.

Management Response: [Added: 2021/11/09]

UNDP CO accepts this recommendation to strengthen the Monitoring and Evaluation functions and documenting the progress of the new CPD. CO has heavy vertical funded projects; the M&E framework should be defined in consultation with the key government partners.

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
5.2. CO Project Cycle Management as well as M&E system (formulation, appraisal, implementation, monitoring, learning and evaluation) will be established and strengthened with appropriate roles, capacities and mechanisms , throughout the project cycle, which allow the CO to identify and measure changes on the ground for corrective action when needed.
[Added: 2021/11/09]
UNDP Country Office (DRR, RBM Analyst) 2022/07 Initiated RBM analyst will identify program team colleagues who have experience on RBM as well as monitoring and evaluation projects.
5.3 A Gender responsive and funded CO and CPD monitoring plan will be developed and capacities will be developed to implement the monitoring plan
[Added: 2021/11/09]
UNDP Country Office (DRR, RBM Analyst) 2022/06 Initiated RBM Analyst and the RBAP will work together to create a CPD monitoring plan.
5.4.CO along with the UNCT members support towards measuring and monitoring the SDGs and report back on the progress towards UNSDCF outcomes.
[Added: 2021/11/09]
UNDP Country Office (DRR,CO Programme team, RBM Analyst) 2022/06 Initiated RBM Analyst will keep a track on the progress towards CF outcomes
5.5. Capacity building of the National Statistical Organization in SDG indicator monitoring through real time data mapping and training on data management.
[Added: 2021/11/09]
UNDP Country Office (DRR, Co Programme team) 2022/12 Initiated RBM Analyst will identify program team colleagues who have experience on RBM as well as monitoring and evaluation projects. Seek support to train staff where required.
5.1. Hiring of RBM Analyst to strengthen the monitoring, evaluation functions within CO.
[Added: 2021/11/09]
UNDP Country Office (DRR) 2021/09 Completed

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