Strengthening the Rule of Law: Justice and Security for the Palestinian People (SAWASYA) - Final Programme Evaluation

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Evaluation Plan:
2012-2017, Palestine
Evaluation Type:
Final Project
Planned End Date:
12/2017
Completion Date:
11/2017
Status:
Completed
Management Response:
Yes
Evaluation Budget(US $):
25,000

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Title Strengthening the Rule of Law: Justice and Security for the Palestinian People (SAWASYA) - Final Programme Evaluation
Atlas Project Number: 00088270
Evaluation Plan: 2012-2017, Palestine
Evaluation Type: Final Project
Status: Completed
Completion Date: 11/2017
Planned End Date: 12/2017
Management Response: Yes
Focus Area:
  • 1. Democratic Governance
  • 2. Others
Corporate Outcome and Output (UNDP Strategic Plan 2014-2017)
  • 1. Output 3.4. Functions, financing and capacity of rule of law institutions enabled, including to improve access to justice and redress
Evaluation Budget(US $): 25,000
Source of Funding: MPTF/EU - Sweeden, The Netherlands, DIFID UK, and EU
Evaluation Expenditure(US $): 25,000
Joint Programme: Yes
Joint Evaluation: Yes
  • Joint with UN Agencies
  • Joint with UNWomen
Evaluation Team members:
Name Title Email Nationality
GEF Evaluation: No
Key Stakeholders: UNDP, UN Women, National IPs, Joint Programme Donor Consortium
Countries: OCCUPIED PALESTINIAN TERRITORIES
Lessons
1.

A. Strategic and Thematic Focus of the Programme  


- The Sawasya Programme has been well aligned with national priorities and strategies, leveraging cross institutional synergies. Future programming should continue to link with the PA’s National Policy Agenda, with relevant sector and cross-sector strategies as a main focus of support;

- In light of the national division and increasing government centralisation, future programming should nonetheless be careful to retain autonomy in relation to engagement in Gaza and with civil society;

- Alignment with UNCT priorities (UNDAF etc.) is important for the strategic positioning and effectiveness of programme interventions;

- A lack of political will for the preconditions for sustainable institutional reform (including national unity, resolving conflicting institutional roles & mandates, investment of planning units, etc.) has hampered implementation of the programme’s strategy. Engagement with the political dimension to complement the programme’s technical work is essential for achieving impact. The programme should better leverage its weight as one of the major RoL players to more effectively influence political processes, and ensure more structural engagement with the UNRC/UNCT to do so.

- There are broader institutional weaknesses (i.e. in relation to public administration) that affect the impact and sustainability of programme interventions. The programme’s efforts hence need to dovetail with other interventions supporting broader institutional reforms such as public administration reform and integrity and accountability efforts.

- The programme has provided a vehicle through which to work on issues of accountability, integrity and anticorruption beyond the justice sector, that directly intersect with broader processes of public administration reform. These efforts can potentially be expanded, either in the framework of a separate programme, or incorporated as a complementary pillar within the vehicle of a new phase.

- The programme has – due to the ‘low contact’ policy – uniquely focused on supporting civil society efforts in Gaza. This non-engagement with institutions has significantly limited sustainability and impact of the programme’s rule of law strategy in Gaza. By refraining from engagement with the sitting judiciary in the Gaza Strip, for instance, it is not possible to increase their capacity to handle cases in accordance  with international standards and good practice, and simultaneously reinforce the problematic discourse around ‘illegitimacy’ that pervades the political division.

- Fragmentation is a hallmark of the Palestinian institutional context (e.g. Gaza / WB, jurisdictional fragmentation, national policy issues, and institutional fragmentation within the PA) which needs to be carefully addressed in programme design and implementation strategies.

- The Sawasya Programme has funded civil society efforts in East Jerusalem and Area C, which have produced important results in terms of addressing particular legal needs of residents in these areas, complemented by strategic litigation and advocacy. However, a clear articulation of the programme’s strategy in relation to East Jerusalem and Area C is needed to ensure that interventions produce impact, complement political/advocacy efforts and are effectively responding to rights and needs. This is an area of profound international concern and all efforts should be made to support a joined-up response with other partners.

- Whilst the Sawasya programme’s Theory of Change refers to the programme’s intention to support efforts to strengthen the ‘social contract’, the programme has not quite managed to articulate activities that help foster this process in a systematic manner, such as efforts to foster structured dialogue between institutions and civil society representatives.

- A significant number of Palestinians have benefitted from the free legal aid services provided through the programme’s partners in Gaza and the West Bank, including East Jerusalem and Area C. For future programming, it is important to review the programme’s strategy vis-a-vis legal aid and focus more on sustainability, quality control, and fostering coordination.

- The Sawasya programme’s engagement with informal justice has supported interventions, in particular in Gaza, that have produced important results in terms of introducing human rights principles and female leadership. While it remains an important justice avenue for many Palestinians, the informal justice sector continues to be driven by a  community/household reconciliation approach, and not an individual rights-based approach, in particular if the victim is a woman or a child.  The programme should continue to engage with this sector to promote a human rights based approach and to build awareness and understanding among informal justice actors of how gendered social norms and other social dynamics may adversely affect the outcomes for victims. This approach requires a continuous monitoring of the risks of engagement for Sawasya, and should be informed by periodic evaluations of public perceptions of informal justice vs formal justice outcomes according to their fairness and efficacy.

- Sawasya has supported gender mainstreaming within institutional planning, M&E and budget processes, while also building the substantive capacity of staff on gender justice issues. This approach has not yielded the expected results in terms of institutional organizational culture change as it has not directly addressed the deeply entrenched discriminatory attitudes, behaviours and mindsets present in the justice and security
institution staff, reflective of wider societal norms. In the next programme, employing a “gender transformational” approach will target personal transformations in strategically placed staff in institutions, in complement to technical capacity building on gender justice issues. This approach addresses in a more direct manner the underlying factors of discrimination against women in the law and in practice.  

 

B. Programme Implementation Strategy 

 
- The logical nexus between the work carried out under Sawasya and the mandates of UNICEF, UNODC and OHCHR in particular have resulted in increased collaboration and coordination. Improved clarity on roles and coordination could have important benefits in optimising the expertise of these agencies under one coherent strategy, strengthening positioning within the UNCT, and maximising impact by working from a clearly delineated intervention framework that draws on comparative strengths.

 - Programme CSO staff resources have in large part been dedicated to ensuring delivery and grants management, at the expense of a more substantive or strategic engagement with civil society across jurisdictions and geographical areas and ensuring gender mainstreaming across all CSO interventions. In designing future programming, there may be a need to rethink grant modalities and move from project funder to facilitation role to enhance civil oversight and dialogue with institutions and joint advocacy strategies, in particular between UN Women and UNDP CSO partners on gender justice issues. Improving the engagement with mainstream human rights organizations on gender justice issues can have an important multiplying effect;

- The UNDP CSO Roster modality has allowed for swift contracting to adapt to changing contexts (ex. Gaza Emergency Component). It has also facilitated a shift from a primary focus on legal aid intervention at the start of the programme to more advocacy and HR/IHL accountability projects (focusing on Israeli jurisdictions), as considered appropriate given the political context. However, the roster modality has also had challenges in terms of sustainability of partnerships due to short grant time frames and transparency issues. The roster is a critical modality for emergency interventions and would benefit from a common project review committee and clear parameters of agency engagement to ensure coordination, mainstreaming, and effective distribution of focus. However the new phase should carefully consider how to cultivate more strategic, longer term, and transparent partnerships.

- The breadth of programme has enabled intersections and synergies (including e.g. Mizan2) between sector institutions, which has been one of the strengths of the programme and given leverage to the programme vis-a-vis institutional leadership.

- Adaptable & responsive engagement with institutions is essential to overcome challenges. 

- In the context of the current political context, it is important to maintain an appropriate balance between supply and demand sides of the rule of law equation.  
 
- In such a fluid context, rolling assessment of risk and the flexibility for programme adjustment is essential for successful implementation.

- The programme has invested significant resources in building institutional capacity in planning, M&E as well as substantive areas, including through seconding experts to institutions. The extent to which this technical expertise has been absorbed, institutionalised and made sustainable is not quite clear, due to more structural challenges in relation to institutional reform. The programme will need to review its capacity development strategy, and rethink the current secondment modality.

- Protracted support (direct, programmatic and technical) to Palestinian institutions across the board has in many cases contributed to a culture of dependency and entitlement, exacerbated by an absence of proper performance-based career development structures and broader human resource reforms, a reluctance to internalise properly bureaucratised planning, financial and project management processes. Extensive international investment therefore often yields limited sustainable results. Careful prioritisation of support, together with optimising collective traction to advocate for essential reforms, is necessary to maximise impact and results.

- The Sawasya programme produced a communication strategy, and several knowledge and communication products, however the work in this area should be further intensified and better target specific audiences and change objectives and in particular consider how to contribute to international advocacy efforts.  


1. Governance Structure: - The Programme Board of the Sawasya Programme, convened yearly, is too large and too high-level to meaningfully steer the programme and serve as a tool to secure deep national ownership. Alternative options should be examined to enhance programme oversight and focus, and explore ways for civil society representation and involvement in programme discussions. The ‘coordination’ of a sector wide programme by one (weak) lateral Ministry of the sector (the MOJ), whose mandate and relationship vis-à-vis other institutions of the sector is in any case often conflicting, presents challenges. Governance options for future programming could be explored to seek more robust ownership and oversight in relation to the national development agenda manifested in the programme.  


2. Management Arrangements - Non-earmarked funding from donors, through the MPTF, has enabled the programme to be flexible and adaptive to changing political circumstances, and ensured coherent management of activities and funds across the different outcome areas and agencies;  - UNDP programme staff report directly to the Joint Programme Manager, whilst UN Women staff report to the UN Women Special Representative. This situation of dual reporting lines has affected the JPM’s ability to manage the programme’s implementation in a coherent, efficient and accountable manner, and should be reviewed.  
 
- Close involvement of UN agency Senior Management is crucial for the programme’s ability to strategically implement, and channel political/advocacy messaging to UNCT or other political platforms.  - Co-location of relevant capacities is essential for such a joint programme to be effective.  - In an inter-agency framework of this nature, consideration should be given to centralisation of certain functions (e.g. communications, reporting, M&E, admin. support).


Findings
1.

Key findings

Impact and results

The evaluation finds that the Sawasya programme has achieved good results, in terms of promoting the rule of law and access to justice, in a context where many of the usual preconditions for doing so are absent or impaired. The restrictive/inhibiting factors include the division of Gaza and the West Bank, the fragmentation of the West Bank into areas A, B and C, each with its own distinct legal framework, and the application of ‘customary law’ next to secular state law. All within the overarching framework of ongoing occupation of the West Bank, including East Jerusalem, and the effective siege of the Gaza Strip.

The Sawasya programme demonstrates, that it is indeed possible to promote the ‘rule of law’, and access to justice, beneath this ‘glass ceiling’ of security, political and jurisdictional limitations and it is also possible to invest in meaningful interventions that supports access to justice in the short term and which may benefit a unified state of Palestine if, or when, it is declared.  

Results include (but are not limited to):

  • Introduction of tools for facilitating and monitoring case management, judicial performance and collection of certain levels of administrative data. Kiosks, in a number of courthouses, which provide essential automated services for lawyers and members of the public were introduced to. These strengthen the transparency of and access to information for citizens concerning their legal proceedings.
  • A Certified Professional Diploma Programme that provides technical and soft skills to ministerial employees in legal and organizational development skills. The course provides a framework for both staff members and managers to identify and solve challenges in their organisation, using the skills and knowledge they have learned during the diploma course.
  • The expansion of access to legal aid for poor and marginalised segments of the community (in additional to services provided by CSOs) through the introduction of legal clinics inside law schools (introduced originally by UNDPs access to justice programme) . The clinics also contribute to changing students’ perception about, and focus, on social justice.
  • The introduction and expansion of Family Protection Units, under the Palestinian Civil Police and the establishment of a one-stop center for victims of violence.
  • The training of Special prosecutors under the Attorney General’s Office with the aims of criminalising domestic violence in Palestine and improving justice for victims, as well as making perpetrators accountable.
  • The establishment and training of a corps of specialised prosecutors for handling juvenile cases, in accordance with the provisions of the Juvenile Protection Law, enacted by presidential decree in 2016.

Sustainability

The evaluation finds that despite the efforts that have been listed above, the results will be largely unsustainable, if the political, legal and managerial preconditions for their preservation are not addressed. The internal, political conflicts between the authorities in Gaza and on the West Bank itself affect the division of power and the area’s stability. The operation of the entities that should execute the laws, is also affected as ministers and staff are reallocated and talks between Gaza and the West Bank are put on hold. In addition to this, the absence of elections undermines the legitimacy of whatever legal framework is approved by presidential decree (although the basic law provides for such decrees). If the impact of the Programme’s support to the structures and systems that are supposed to promote rule of law and access to justice (at the level of ministries and other public authorities) is to be maintained, the Programme should work systematically, to strengthen the top and mid-level programme managers’ capabilities, commitment and will. Their support and attitudes set the agenda for other employees. They also determine the longer-term commitment and motivation of the staff Sawasya has trained, and establish how well the structures and systems Sawasya introduced are implemented.

Effectiveness

Sawasya’s size, in terms of funding and scope, is a challenge as well as an opportunity. The evaluator finds that the Programme’s holistic approach to the rule of law, and its emphasis on the interplay between the presences of a conducive legal framework (and a judiciary that can and will rule according to the law) and an executive power (that can provide services and manage in accordance with the spirit and letter of the law is highly relevant. As such it carries the potential for a truly integrated programmematic approach as opposed to the ‘silos’ or islands of interventions that characterise many other interventions.

However, responsibilities and challenges also come with an integrated approach such as the one applied by Sawasya. The complexity and number of interventions, that fall under the Sawasya umbrella, require a management system that enables staff and managers to reflect, justify and communicate - to internal and external stakeholders - how and why any Sawasya intervention contributes to the desired changes. The evaluation team finds that these answers were not always clear. This may have affected the programme’s effectiveness adversely as clear answers are likely to contribute to priority setting and a selection of the most effective interventions and approaches to bring about the desired changes. Providing such answers entails a shift in focus – both in the Programme document and in the progress reports: from what is being, or has been done to how, and why, interventions contribute to change. The programme document for the second phase of the Sawasya programme takes steps in that direction.

The programme’s effectiveness has also been adversely affected by cumbersome administrative procedures of grants to CSOs and short-term funding modalities for CSO support and – in some ministries and government entities – by limited management support for initiatives introduced.

Efficiency

The evaluation finds that, in particular, two things - the Continued Learning that Birzeit University offers and the legal aid, counselling and accompaniment that are provided by the group of CSOs - are efficient ways to contribute to rule of law. The diploma courses offer a highly cost-effective approach that address public institutions’ technical capability needs together with their need to mobilise commitment and support among mid-level managers. For a cost per student of 2500 – 3000 USD (managers and staff) they propose an action learning approach that provides an opportunity for managers and staff alike to identify and solve organisational problems inside their own workplace. Furthermore, the approach is likely to contribute to sustainable organisational changes, as the problems addressed have been identified and are solved by staff and managers jointly, in alignment with the principle that ‘learning and change come from within’.

The counselling, mediation and legal representation that the CSOs provide to vulnerable groups who are ‘in contact with the law’ are also efficient ways to promote rule of law. Feedback from the juveniles, who were interviewed for the evaluation, confirms this: as in other parts of the world, ‘accompaniment’ and support from a third party (the CSOs) is an efficient way to moderate behaviour and reduce authorities’ abuse of power. However, the work of the CSOs needs to be accompanied by support to strengthen the accountability of authorities in order to contribute to sustainability.

The programme’s efficiency is likely to be further strengthened by a revision of the granting scheme to CSOs, as well as a stronger focus on genuine partnerships, and strategic reflections, with civil society. The evaluation finds that the short-term ‘go-stop-go’ character of funding provisioning has adversely affected the delivery of legal aid to beneficiaries. It has also forced Sawasya’s staff members to spend unreasonable amounts of time on the administration related to grant making and reporting; time that would be better spent on strategic reflections and cooperation with the CSOs.

Relevance

The evaluators find the Sawasya joint programme is indeed relevant. The size and scope of the Programme seems to contribute to the creation of a momentum and sets an agenda that many actors and stakeholders, in the sectors of the rule of law, would like to be a part of. We find that if its potential is to be fully realised, this will require a closer coordination and facilitation than has been the case so far (see annex I).

Strong testimony for the Programme’s relevance is also given by events and situations such as the continued harassment, with impunity, of settlers; the committing of crimes against Palestinians on the West Bank; a Palestinian authority that continues be seriously limited in their ability, or willingness, to respect and respond to the rights of Palestinian citizens and the patchwork nature of the legislative frameworks in Gaza, the West Bank and East Jerusalem.

The programme document for the programme’s second phase indicates that steps are taken in that direction, choosing stakeholders and partners more carefully and backing choice of interventions with additional policy analyses

See programme reports for 20154 and 2016 and the Sawasya programme document for phase I

Conclusion based on a review of the programme’s total amount of grants distributed, a review of grant guidelines,  focus group discussions with CSOs in Gaza and on the West Bank, interviews with Sawasya staff members

See annual progress reports from 2015 and 2016

Conclusion based on assessment of materials provided by Birzeit University, interview with staff from the Center for Continued learning, interview with 5 staff members of PACC and focus group discussions with representatives from PA ministries.

Conclusion based on focus groups with CSOs in Gaza and on the West Bank, semi-structured interviews with the Shari’a courts and the Palestinian Maintenance Fund.


Recommendations
1

Mobilize and motivate top management and PA political commitment and donor support to organisational and systemic change.

2

Strengthen and build on the existing leadership capabilities of those strategic senior decision makers, in each PA institution, who are truly interested in challenging patriarchal and dysfunctional organisational cultures.

3

Further refine the programme’ approach to knowledge transfer and capacity development of staff within justice and security sector institutions, by building on the achievements and lessons learnt from its collaboration with Birzeit University (diploma programmes) and other capacity development approaches, with a view of enhancing sustainability and impact.

4

4. Revise the grant framework to stimulate strategic cooperation, longer-term partnership and added value of the investment.

 

 

5. Strengthen partnership with CSOs as ‘co-production’.

5

6. Continue support and engage with the informal justice sector, including Mukhtars and legal clinics to further strengthen outreach and access to free legal support for some of the most vulnerable parts of the Palestinian population.

6

7. The Sawasya joint programme to engage sector stakeholders in  discussions about how long-term funding and support to social justice for women and juveniles can be secured in the future.

7

8. That the Sawasya joint programme enhance the coordination and cooperation between all the actors engaged in law enforcement for women and juveniles.

8

9. That the Sawasya programme applies a theory of change approach to programme planning and management.

9

10. Strengthen the programme’s ability to measure and reflect on quantitative and qualitative results that interventions contribute to at the level of individuals and institutions.

10

11. Emphasise and reinforce the key role and responsibility of the Programme management in facilitating the joint strategic reflections and discussions, as listed above, and any corresponding decisions about programme adjustments.

1. Recommendation:

Mobilize and motivate top management and PA political commitment and donor support to organisational and systemic change.

Management Response: [Added: 2017/12/30]

A new project board will be established to ensure a higher level of representation and involvement of the Government of Palestine and UN stakeholders in the implementation of the objectives of the program. Moreover, the new program will be designed in full correspondence with the national priorities (National Policy Agenda (NPA), Justice Sector Strategy (JSS), Security Sector Strategy (SSS)) and in close consultation with national stakeholders, in order to ensure full ownership of the outcomes, outputs and activities to be implemented. Finally, the programme intends to support justice sector institutions in planning, monitoring and evaluation against the Government’s JSS, SSS and NPA, in order to inform strategic sector-wide discussion on progress and obstacles to achieve benchmarks for reform, as well as support coordination of the donor community in implementing sectoral strategies.

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
1.1 Establish a new project board to be included in the Program document.
[Added: 2017/12/30] [Last Updated: 2018/07/30]
UNDP/UNWomen/UNICEF Senior Management 2018/07 Completed Completed by the signature of the project document as attached. The project obtained a two-months no-cost extension in April and the Sawasya II program will therefore start only on the 1st of July. The majority of the key actions are linked to the signature of the new project document (1.2, 2.1, 3.1, 6.1-2 and 8.2). The PRODOC is now finalized. A revised version translated in Arabic that takes into consideration the last comments were received from the national stakeholders shared last week and PAPP plan is to start the signing process with the 5 national institutions and 4 UN entities (RC, UNDP, UN Women and UNICEF) by the end of June 2018. History
1.2. Include support to planning, M&E capacities against the Justice Sector Strategy priorities in Sawasya II.
[Added: 2017/12/30] [Last Updated: 2018/07/30]
Sawasya Team 2018/07 Completed Completed after the signature of the new project document. The project obtained a two-months no-cost extension in April and the Sawasya II program will therefore start only on the 1st of July. The majority of the key actions are linked to the signature of the new project document (1.2, 2.1, 3.1, 6.1-2 and 8.2). The PRODOC is now finalized. A revised version translated in Arabic that takes into consideration the last comments were received from the national stakeholders shared last week and PAPP plan is to start the signing process with the 5 national institutions and 4 UN entities (RC, UNDP, UN Women and UNICEF) by the end of June 2018. The M&E project staff will move from UNDP component to the program management team and will therefore ensure the M&E for the entire joint program. The M&E software is also finalized and we will start using it by the 1st of July when PAPP move to the new phase of the program. History
2. Recommendation:

Strengthen and build on the existing leadership capabilities of those strategic senior decision makers, in each PA institution, who are truly interested in challenging patriarchal and dysfunctional organisational cultures.

Management Response: [Added: 2017/12/30]

As mentioned in the previous point, the program will be designed in full correspondence with the national priorities (NPA, JSS, SSS,…) in order to ensure the full ownership and commitment of the stakeholders concerned by the implementation of the activities and their accountability not only vis-s-vis the project’s board but also in he framework of the NPA M&E process linked to the Prime Minister’s office. The Sawasya II programme will design its modalities and areas of support to the Government’s institutions based on an analysis of institutional needs as well potential for sustainable change. This implies analysis of ability of leadership to commit to achieving the anticipated results. Furthermore, as part of its gender strategy, the programme will develop a ‘gender transformational approach’ that will – i.a. – work on changing attitudes and behaviours of strategically placed individuals within institutions (‘champions’).

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
2.1.Develop a result framework in line with national priorities to link the M&E of the project to the M&E of the NPA.
[Added: 2017/12/30] [Last Updated: 2018/07/30]
Sawasya Team 2018/07 Completed See attached signed project document. The project obtained a two-months no-cost extension in April and the Sawasya II program will therefore start only on the 1st of July. The majority of the key actions are linked to the signature of the new project document (1.2, 2.1, 3.1, 6.1-2 and 8.2). The PRODOC is now finalized. A revised version translated in Arabic that takes into consideration the last comments were received from the national stakeholders shared last week and PAPP plan is to start the signing process with the 5 national institutions and 4 UN entities (RC, UNDP, UN Women and UNICEF) by the end of June 2018. RRF was designed and included within the project document. History
2.2 Develop Gender Strategy including gender transformation approach.
[Added: 2017/12/30]
Sawasya Team 2017/12 Completed
2.3. Implement the gender strategy including by supporting agents of change in the security and justice sectors.
[Added: 2017/12/30]
Sawasya Team 2019/12 Not Initiated
3. Recommendation:

Further refine the programme’ approach to knowledge transfer and capacity development of staff within justice and security sector institutions, by building on the achievements and lessons learnt from its collaboration with Birzeit University (diploma programmes) and other capacity development approaches, with a view of enhancing sustainability and impact.

Management Response: [Added: 2017/12/30]

The sustainability of the Birzeit diploma program both in terms of implementing partner (though a private university) and results (the staff trained are often reassigned after the training) is currently being assessed. No decision was made yet as concerns the opportunity and the eventual modalities to continue this support. As concerns the training of justice sector actors, the program will focus all its support through the Palestinian Judicial Institute to ensure the full sustainability and ownership of the training provided.

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
3.1 Assess the needs and identify the support to be provided to the Palestinian Judicial Institute.
[Added: 2017/12/30] [Last Updated: 2018/07/30]
Sawasya Team 2018/07 Completed PJI assessment was finalized. Report attached. The project obtained a two-months no-cost extension in April and the Sawasya II program will therefore start only on the 1st of July. The majority of the key actions are linked to the signature of the new project document (1.2, 2.1, 3.1, 6.1-2 and 8.2). The PRODOC is now finalized. A revised version translated in Arabic that takes into consideration the last comments were received from the national stakeholders shared last week and PAPP plan is to start the signing process with the 5 national institutions and 4 UN entities (RC, UNDP, UN Women and UNICEF) by the end of June 2018. History
4. Recommendation:

4. Revise the grant framework to stimulate strategic cooperation, longer-term partnership and added value of the investment.

 

 

5. Strengthen partnership with CSOs as ‘co-production’.

Management Response: [Added: 2017/12/30]

For its second phase, the program will develop a new Civil Society Organization (CSO) strategy that will clarify the modalities of collaboration between the program and civil society organizations. This strategy will follow the recommendations that came out from the consultations with the CSOs organized and the recommendations of the final evaluation including the necessity to focus on a limited number of longer-term agreements, provide more technical guidance s to the organizations and involve them as effective implementing partners of the program through Responsible Party Agreements (RPA). The CSO will be directly selected through the Sawasya CSO roster that will be reopened at the beginning of 2018.

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
4.1 Reopen the CSO roster.
[Added: 2017/12/30] [Last Updated: 2018/06/29]
Sawasya Team 2018/06 Completed Update - June 29, 2018 - Roster re-opening was completed. Attached Roster Guidance Note and Form of Application. The process already initiated and it was agreed to establish a joint UNDP/UNWOMEN/UNICEF roster. As a result and since the roster will involved more than UNDP, the process will therefore take more time than initially forecasted and we anticipate that it will be finalized by June 2018. History
5.1 Develop Sawasya II CSO strategy.
[Added: 2017/12/30]
Sawasya Team 2017/12 Completed
5.2 Implement Sawasya II CSO strategy.
[Added: 2017/12/30] [Last Updated: 2018/12/11]
Sawasya Team 2018/12 Completed The selection process started through the roster. Most of the selection will be finalized by December 2018 after the CSO roster panel in the same month. Minutes of meeting will also be uploaded when done. Update. Selection completed and minutes of meeting attached. History
5. Recommendation:

6. Continue support and engage with the informal justice sector, including Mukhtars and legal clinics to further strengthen outreach and access to free legal support for some of the most vulnerable parts of the Palestinian population.

Management Response: [Added: 2017/12/30]

The program will review its strategy to engage with informal justice, in particular as concerns the support provided in Gaza in case the reconciliation process moves on and the formal justice system is fully redeployed. This strategy will specify how the project will engage with this sector and will ensure its conformity with Gender and HR standards, its linkage with the formal justice sector and alternative dispute mechanisms.

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
6.1. Develop an informal justice strategy for the Sawasya II program.
[Added: 2017/12/30] [Last Updated: 2018/07/30]
Sawasya Team 2018/07 Completed See newly signed project document attached. The project obtained a two-months no-cost extension in April and the Sawasya II program will therefore start only on the 1st of July. The majority of the key actions are linked to the signature of the new project document (1.2, 2.1, 3.1, 6.1-2 and 8.2). The PRODOC is now finalized. A revised version translated in Arabic that takes into consideration the last comments were received from the national stakeholders shared last week and PAPP plan is to start the signing process with the 5 national institutions and 4 UN entities (RC, UNDP, UN Women and UNICEF) by the end of June 2018. History
6.2 Implement informal justice strategy for the Sawasya II program.
[Added: 2017/12/30] [Last Updated: 2018/07/30]
Sawasya Team 2018/07 Completed See newly signed project document attached. The project obtained a two-months no-cost extension in April and the Sawasya II program will therefore start only on the 1st of July. The majority of the key actions are linked to the signature of the new project document (1.2, 2.1, 3.1, 6.1-2 and 8.2). The PRODOC is now finalized. A revised version translated in Arabic that takes into consideration the last comments were received from the national stakeholders shared last week and PAPP plan is to start the signing process with the 5 national institutions and 4 UN entities (RC, UNDP, UN Women and UNICEF) by the end of June 2018. History
6. Recommendation:

7. The Sawasya joint programme to engage sector stakeholders in  discussions about how long-term funding and support to social justice for women and juveniles can be secured in the future.

Management Response: [Added: 2017/12/30]

In the framework of Sawasya II, the program will engage all relevant stakeholder (Government of Palestine, CSO, Donors,…) to ensure that sustainable services for women and children are put in place in particular as concerns the provision of legal aid and the provision of psycho-social services to children in contact with the law and women victims of gender-based violence. The programme will provide technical support to nationally led coordination mechanisms mandated to coordinate and advance policy on these issues, in particular the National Legal Aid Committee and the National Committee in charge of overseeing implementation of the Juvenile Protection Law.

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
7.1 Under the auspices of the National Legal Aid Committee, support development of a national legal aid strategy that will ensure sustainable legal aid services for vulnerable populations including juvenile and women.
[Added: 2017/12/30] [Last Updated: 2019/04/02]
Sawasya Team 2019/03 Completed Strategy Adopted. A copy of the strategy will be uploaded soon. History
7.2 Support the full implementation of the juvenile protection law, including through enhancing coordination and dialogue on priorities between sector stakeholders.
[Added: 2017/12/30]
Sawasya Team 2019/12 Initiated
7. Recommendation:

8. That the Sawasya joint programme enhance the coordination and cooperation between all the actors engaged in law enforcement for women and juveniles.

Management Response: [Added: 2017/12/30]

The program will further enlarge its support to all relevant stakeholders involved in law enforcement for women and juvenile including Palestinian Civil Police (PCP), Attorney General Office (AGO), High Judicial Council (HJC), Supreme Judge Deprtement (SJD) and Palestinian Maintenance Fund (PMF).

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
8.1 Include dedicated outcome and outputs in the program document related to strengthening law renforcement for women and juveniles.
[Added: 2017/12/30] [Last Updated: 2018/07/30]
Sawasya Team 2018/07 Completed See newly signed project document attached. Rule of Law (Sawasya) included these activities in the new project document and it was agreed with the national partners and the donors. the project document is anticipated to be signed by the end of May (after the programme board meeting take place in June 2018). Update June 8 2018 - The project obtained a two-months no-cost extension in April and the Sawasya II program will therefore start only on the 1st of July. The majority of the key actions are linked to the signature of the new project document (1.2, 2.1, 3.1, 6.1-2 and 8.2). The PRODOC is now finalized. A revised version translated in Arabic that takes into consideration the last comments were received from the national stakeholders shared last week and PAPP plan is to start the signing process with the 5 national institutions and 4 UN entities (RC, UNDP, UN Women and UNICEF) by the end of June 2018. History
8.2. Support the Juvenile Enforcement Committee (JEC) and the establishement of a simila committee for stakeholders involved in law enforcement for women.
[Added: 2017/12/30] [Last Updated: 2018/07/30]
Sawasya Team 2018/07 Completed See newly signed project document attached. The project obtained a two-months no-cost extension in April and the Sawasya II program will therefore start only on the 1st of July. The majority of the key actions are linked to the signature of the new project document (1.2, 2.1, 3.1, 6.1-2 and 8.2). The PRODOC is now finalized. A revised version translated in Arabic that takes into consideration the last comments were received from the national stakeholders shared last week and PAPP plan is to start the signing process with the 5 national institutions and 4 UN entities (RC, UNDP, UN Women and UNICEF) by the end of June 2018. History
8. Recommendation:

9. That the Sawasya programme applies a theory of change approach to programme planning and management.

Management Response: [Added: 2017/12/30]

A theory of change will be developed jointly by the three agencies and included in the new program document. The pertinence of the theory of change will be reviewed on the yearly basis and any changes will be discussed and adopted in the framework of the project’s board.

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
9.1. Develop theory of change to be included in the program document.
[Added: 2017/12/30]
Sawasya Team 2017/12 Completed
9.2. Yearly review of the theory of change in concomitance with the holding of project’s board meeting.
[Added: 2017/12/30] [Last Updated: 2018/09/28]
Sawasya Team 2019/12 Initiated This Key action is yearly for the years (2018, 19, 20, 21, 22) - PAPP just started the new phase of the project and theory of change was just finalized. No discussions has been made yet on the theory of change during the programme board meeting that took place on the 20/9 as a result. The theory of change will be reviewed if necessary next year. History
9. Recommendation:

10. Strengthen the programme’s ability to measure and reflect on quantitative and qualitative results that interventions contribute to at the level of individuals and institutions.

Management Response: [Added: 2017/12/30]

In the second phase, the program will include a dedicated M&E staff in the program management unit that will ensure an effective M&E of all program activities. A specific software will also be designed in order to facilitate the centralization of all information related to the program and the monitoring of all activities.

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
10.1 Recruit M&E staff for the program management unit.
[Added: 2017/12/30] [Last Updated: 2018/09/24]
Sawasya Team and UNDP HR 2018/09 Completed A decision was made that no need for 2 M&E posts in the project. As a result, the TOR of the current position will be revised and an update will be provided on the status of this key action later before the end of September 2018. Key action will be achieved by July. As of 20 June, the programme M&E focal point will move from the UNDP component to the program management team and will therefore ensure the M&E for the entire joint program. The M&E software is also finalized and we will start using it by the 1st of July when we will move to the new phase of the program. History
10.2 Develop M&E software for the Sawasya II program.
[Added: 2017/12/30] [Last Updated: 2018/07/30]
Sawasya Team 2018/07 Completed Software completed and in use. Attached a screen shot from the system. Key action will be achieved by July. As of 20 June, the programme M&E focal point will move from the UNDP component to the program management team and will therefore ensure the M&E for the entire joint program. The M&E software is also finalized and we will start using it by the 1st of July when we will move to the new phase of the program. History
10. Recommendation:

11. Emphasise and reinforce the key role and responsibility of the Programme management in facilitating the joint strategic reflections and discussions, as listed above, and any corresponding decisions about programme adjustments.

Management Response: [Added: 2017/12/30]

The organigram of the second phase of the program will include a program management unit headed by a program manager (P5 level) in charge of ensuring the coordination and coherence of UNDP, UNWOMEN, UNICEF interventions and provide strategic guidance and thinking during the implementation of the program.

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
11.1 Recruit program manager at P5 level.
[Added: 2017/12/30]
UNDP/UNWomen/UNICEF Senior Management and HR 2017/09 Completed

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