Terminal evaluation of the project on Land Degradation Offset and Mitigation

Report Cover Image
Evaluation Plan:
2017-2022, Mongolia
Evaluation Type:
Final Project
Planned End Date:
06/2019
Completion Date:
07/2019
Status:
Completed
Management Response:
Yes
Evaluation Budget(US $):
25,000

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Download document TE REPORT LD Offset and Mitigation in Western Mongolia_July 2019.pdf report English 1065.33 KB Posted 433
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Title Terminal evaluation of the project on Land Degradation Offset and Mitigation
Atlas Project Number: 00087440
Evaluation Plan: 2017-2022, Mongolia
Evaluation Type: Final Project
Status: Completed
Completion Date: 07/2019
Planned End Date: 06/2019
Management Response: Yes
UNDP Signature Solution:
  • 1. Sustainable
Corporate Outcome and Output (UNDP Strategic Plan 2018-2021)
  • 1. Output 1.1.1 Capacities developed across the whole of government to integrate the 2030 Agenda, the Paris Agreement and other international agreements in development plans and budgets, and to analyse progress towards the SDGs, using innovative and data-driven solutions
SDG Goal
  • Goal 15. Protect, restore and promote sustainable use of terrestrial ecosystems, sustainably manage forests, combat desertification, and halt and reverse land degradation and halt biodiversity loss
SDG Target
  • 15.3 By 2030, combat desertification, restore degraded land and soil, including land affected by desertification, drought and floods, and strive to achieve a land degradation-neutral world
Evaluation Budget(US $): 25,000
Source of Funding: project budget
Evaluation Expenditure(US $): 25,000
Joint Programme: No
Joint Evaluation: No
Evaluation Team members:
Name Title Email Nationality
Sabine Schmidt colt0524@yahoo.com
Narangerel Yansanjav nyansanjav@yahoo.com
GEF Evaluation: Yes
GEF Project Title: Land Degradation Offset and Mitigation in Western Mongolia
Evaluation Type: Terminal Evaluation
Focal Area: Land Degradation
Project Type: MSP
GEF Phase: GEF-5
GEF Project ID: 5700
PIMS Number: 5287
Key Stakeholders:
Countries: MONGOLIA
Lessons
Findings
1.

3.1. Project Design / Formulation 3.1.1. Analysis of LFA/Results Framework (Project logic /strategy; Indicators)
The project was designed based on the barrier and root cause analysis, and through a series of stakeholder consultations in 2014, and the overall logic and strategy of the project is considered sound and appropriate. It addresses the two key barriers to long-term solution for managing competing land uses avoiding extreme degradation of land and ecosystem services and functions. Most importantly, it is framed appropriately in the context of Mongolia’s national policies and to assist in further developing the legal and regulatory framework, while supporting on-the-ground activities and capacity development for SLM.
 


Tag: Ecosystem based adaption Relevance Programme/Project Design Project and Programme management

2.

3.1.2. Assumptions and Risks
The project document identified six risks, and was realistic in its assumptions on impacts and likelihood, and defined mitigation measures. The identified risks were: 1. lack of coordination among stakeholders 2. poor understanding of offsetting among the public and low capacity at local government level to realize offset benefits
3. unwillingness of the mining companies to commit to additional mitigation and offset measures
4. mismatch of identified priority areas for offsetting among local communities and government
5. restructuring of government following 2016 elections 6. very short implementation period.


Tag: Extractive Industries Natural Resouce management Risk Management Country Government Coordination

3.

3.1.3. Lessons from other relevant projects (e.g., same focal area) incorporated into project design
Applicable best practices from other initiatives pertain mostly to rangeland management activities introduced by the UNDP “Sustainable Land Management for Combating Desertification” )and on the successful models introduced by the long term “Green Gold - Mongolian Pasture Ecosystem Management Programme” and “Coping with Desertification” projects supported by SDC. The practices include social organization of herders for collective action in pastureland management.


Tag: Natural Resouce management Knowledge management Programme/Project Design

4.

3.1.4. Planned stakeholder participation
Stakeholder involvement was high during project formulation in 2014 (detailed in Annex 5 of the Project Document), ensuring a participatory process for design and setting the stage for ownership in implementation and oversight. The project document provides a comprehensive stakeholder analysis (page 22, table3) describing the roles of all central and local government bodies, academic institutions, national and international NGOs, and international /donor organizations associated with establishing and implementing the mitigation hierarchy and offsetting framework in Mongolia.


Tag: Effectiveness Bilateral partners Civil Societies and NGOs Country Government

5.

3.1.5 Replication approach
Project design proposes that the outcomes of the project will be made available nationally and internationally for replication through the dissemination of project results, lessons learned and experiences including demonstration of best practices. More specifically, it refers to the website of MET as key platform for information sharing, as well as Government participation in international events.


Tag: Natural Resouce management Sustainability Country Government

6.

3.1.6. UNDP comparative advantage
UNDP in recent years has supported the Government of Mongolia in initiatives on protected areas, sustainable land management, ecosystem-based adaptation and formulation of the national policy on green development. Through implementation of several land management projects starting from 2002, UNDP Mongolia has gained a significant experience and expertise in the area. It has also supported the environmental governance programme, strengthening the country’s systemic capacity for environmental management.


Tag: Natural Resouce management Effectiveness UN Agencies UNDP Management

7.

3.1.7. Linkages between project and other interventions within the sector
Project design identified linkages to the following initiatives: ? UNDP’s “Ecosystem-based adaptation approaches to maintaining water security in critical water catchments of Mongolia” project through its work at aimag and soum levels to implement landscape-scale strategies for land and water management to increase resilience and reduce the vulnerability of the local communities and their livelihoods.
? UNDP/GEF “Sustainable Land Management for Combating Desertification” project ? UNDP/GEF “Community-based Conservation of Biological Diversity in the Mountain Landscapes of Mongolia’s Altai Sayan Eco-region” project


Tag: Ecosystem based adaption Programme/Project Design Coordination

8.

3.1.8. Management arrangements
The project management structure was designed to provide appropriate implementation capacity and oversight at the different implementation levels. The project was agreed to be as executed u n d e r the National Implementation Modality (NIM) whereby M E T a c t s a s t h e “Implementing Partner” with management responsibility and accountability for project implementation, following all policies and procedures established for its own operations, while accountable to UNDP for production of the outputs, achievement of objectives, use of resources provided by UNDP, and financial reporting.


Tag: Effectiveness Human and Financial resources Implementation Modality Project and Programme management

9.

3.2. Project Implementation
3.2.1. Adaptive management (changes to the project design and project outputs during implementation)
There was no change to project objectives and outputs, only changes to indicators were discussed (recommended by PIW, but not formally approved), and all planned activities were implemented in less than 3 years as opposed to the planned 4 years.
Ahead of the 2017 PIR, the Project National Coordinator advised the RTA that the Project Board decided not to make any changes to the results framework instead deciding to reinterpret indicators. No changes were adopted to the results framework as none were presented to the RTA for approval.


Tag: Human and Financial resources Implementation Modality Project and Programme management Results-Based Management

10.

3.2.2. Partnership arrangements (with relevant stakeholders involved in the country/region)
The partnerships for the implementation of key activities under both outcomes were a prominent feature and success factor in achieving project targets, as the partner organizations had long term experience in-country, and a track record of successful activity implementation and innovation in their specific fields. This applies to the completion of the Eco Regional Assessment though TNC, and to implementation of (SLM) rangeland management activities through the “Green Gold” Project under formal agreements. Also the collaboration with the selected mining companies, formalized by MoUs5, as well as the more informal arrangements with local community organizations as partners, with the local WWF office of the Western region, and collaboration with the Khomyn Talin Takhi (KTT) NGO for shared objectives in the pilot landscapes added value to effective implementation and local ownership of project activities. The project has played an important facilitating role in bringing local stakeholders together, and in building trust and capacity for collaboration among stakeholders.


Tag: Natural Resouce management Bilateral partners Civil Societies and NGOs Country Government

11.

3.2.3. Feedback from M&E activities used for adaptive management
The MTR had recommended the development of an exit strategy, in particular in the face of short implementation period and the expected results of approved legislation, which the MTR considered at risk not be accomplished in the remaining time. The MTR therefore also recommended to improve consultation of the legal amendments with relevant stakeholders and public.


Tag: Monitoring and Evaluation Project and Programme management Results-Based Management Risk Management

12.

3.2.4. Project Finance and Co-Financing
Discussions and documentation suggests that an efficient, transparent financial planning and monitoring in compliance with all requirements (national, UNDP, GEF) was established and followed. The PMU planned activities, budget and procurement for the next year, to be approved by PB upon review and comments. Project National Director and project finance officers had access to detailed financial information by component and activities.


Tag: Efficiency Human and Financial resources Project and Programme management

13.

3.2.5. Monitoring and evaluation: design at entry and implementation (*)
Implementation of M&E is rated as MS – Moderately Satisfactory M&E Design at entry is rated as S – Satisfactory (details have been discussed in Section 3.1.1.)
Project design established the Strategic Results Framework with performance and impact indicators for project implementation with corresponding means of verification. The M&E plan laid out the key steps, and documents to be generated for M&E in accordance with established UNDP and GEF procedures, including Inception report, project implementation reviews (PIR), annual work plans (AWP) and annual project reports (APR), as well as mid-term (MTR) and terminal evaluation (TE) reports. The M&E plan assigned responsibilities and allocated a budget for all M&E activities (see Annex 8.1.). M&E activities as implemented are listed in Annex 8.2., however the format of the latter does not follow the format of the original M&E plan, and it is not clear from the table in Annex 8.2. whether budgets were allocated as planned per design.


Tag: Impact Monitoring and Evaluation Results-Based Management

14.

3.2.6. UNDP and Implementing Partner implementation / execution coordination, and operational issues
UNDP Implementation is rated as HS – Highly Satisfactory, Execution of the project by the Implementing Partner is rated as Highly Satisfactory - HS
The two project components by design are very different, the first with results on policy level and the second with results on the ground, in remote areas, piloting new concepts that required the cooperation and collaboration of stakeholders that at project start may have had no shared objectives or even adversarial attitudes, such as between mining companies on the one hand, and local government and local communities on the other hand reflecting a common situation in local areas with mining operations. This alone requires a broad skill set, flexibility, and tenacity to drive implementation forward and facilitate stakeholder cooperation.


Tag: Implementation Modality UN Agencies Coordination

15.

3.3. Project Results 3.3.1. Overall results (attainment of objectives) Achievement of overall results/attainment of objectives is rated as Highly Satisfactory - HS
With the achieved results, namely the increase in land area under integrated land use planning considering key biodiversity areas, the increase of areas under formal protection at local and state level, rehabilitation of degraded grazing lands, through improvements and protection of water resources, and agro-forestry activities, the project has made contributions towards global environmental benefits. The protection of the most valuable ecosystems has been furthered, ecosystem functioning and resilience improved, soil erosion reduced, thereby improving the conditions for carbon sequestration, and by applying the mitigation hierarchy and offsetting an international best practice has been implemented.


Tag: Biodiversity Ecosystem based adaption Natural Resouce management Impact Results-Based Management

16.

3.3.2. Relevance The project is rated as R (relevant)
Local communities were identified as the key users of natural resources and beneficiaries of the project. As mobile pastoralists, they directly depend on healthy rangelands and water resources. Competing land use, namely including mining operations and related infrastructure development have already impacted pasture and water resources, access to water and seasonal migrations that are a key strategy for sustainable land management in Mongolia. Through the project achievements, beneficiaries in the pilot landscapes were able to restore degraded land, improve water supplies, develop livelihood strategies that reduce pressure on grasslands, establish local financial mechanisms, and built their own capacity for CBNRM governance and in technical skills for livelihood strategies.


Tag: Ecosystem based adaption Extractive Industries Natural Resouce management Relevance

17.

3.3.3. Effectiveness & Efficiency Effectiveness and Efficiency are rated as Highly Satisfactory - HS Effectiveness
The high degree of achievement of the project’s development intervention’s objectives has been documented and rated in section 3.3.1. above. The major relevant objectives in identifying ecologically sensitive areas, expanding land areas under formal protection, and placing degraded land under rehabilitation have not only been achieved in the pilot landscapes, but an institutional development impact has been achieved to sustain these attainments through capacity for integrated land use planning and the legal framework on mitigation hierarchy.
Efficiency
The project achieved its development objectives and end-of-project targets for all indicators despite the reduction of implementation period by a whole year. Disbursements were according to plan (at time of TE, see table in section 3.2.4., two financial audits carried out in 2017 and 2018 for FY 2017 and FY 2018, respectively confirmed compliance of financial management with requirements, the M&E plan was implemented as designed.  

Implementation arrangements fully integrated and mobilized local stakeholders in local governments and among the pastoral communities, and ongoing facilitation by the PMU secured effective stakeholder collaboration and drove the process to take forward the drafts of regulations for approval. Co-financing mobilized from local governments for SLM activities, and active participation of beneficiaries added to the cost-effective achievement of objectives. Partner arrangements optimized the coordinated input of subject matter experts in mitigation hierarchy, SLM and pastoral livelihoods, biodiversity and landscape conservation.


Tag: Effectiveness Efficiency Impact Implementation Modality Monitoring and Evaluation

18.

3.3.4. Country ownership
The project achievements are important contributions to implement national policies and in line with priorities of the Government of Mongolia. The project contributes to the NAP under the UNCCD to which Mongolia has been a party since 1996, and to the NAP on Climate Change. It is consistent with Article 6.1 of the National Constitution of Mongolia (1992) which lays down the vision of effective management of the country’s natural resources, the Mongolian Action Programme for the 21st century (MAP-21), the 2013 Green Development Policy, in particular its strategic objective to “Sustain ecosystem’s carrying capacity by enhancing environmental protection and restoration activities, and reducing environmental pollution and degradation”, the National Environmental Action Plan, and the Law on Environmental Impact Assessment amended in May 2012, in particular the clause on offset mechanism.


Tag: Extractive Industries Natural Resouce management Impact Ownership Country Government

19.

3.3.5. Mainstreaming
The project positively impacts poverty reduction, income generation and natural resource management through the activities in pasture, water and livestock management and support to crop farming, and rehabilitation of both grazing and croplands.


Tag: Natural Resouce management Gender Mainstreaming Biodiversity Ecosystem based adaption Environmental impact assessment

20.

3.3.6. Sustainability Financial Risks – Evaluated as Moderate
Given the general economic situation in Mongolia, despite the recent beginning of economic recovery, there is a certain financial risk that budget allocations for environmental management and the environmental governance of mining are relatively low for local governments. On the other hand, land use plans plans for the pilot Aimags and Soum Landscape Development Plans have been developed and approved, and therefore will received budget allocations. SLM activities in pastureland management can be supported from Soum Development plans.


Tag: Environmental impact assessment Natural Resouce management Sustainability Risk Management Bilateral partners Civil Societies and NGOs Country Government

Recommendations
1

Conduct workshops on “Sustaining and Scaling up Land Degradation Mitigation and Offsets” in each of the project Aimags to jointly review the findings of the TE, to assess needs for capacity building and to plan forward. Project management to organize meetings, or request Aimag governments to organize participatory meetings, and share the findings with UNDP to inform programming in case of following up activities being undertaken as a stand-alone project, or if ENSURE project can support follow-up.

2

Confirm that all LPAs identified by the ERA, and registered by ALAMGAC are also registered with MRPAM, and show up in the online database (https://cmcs.mrpam.gov.mn/). Project management to request both agencies to compare notes and make updates as needed in case of inconsistencies.

3

Address the issue of exploration license in Durvuljin Soum which overlaps with the selected offsetting area of Bayan Airag Exploration LLC and the pasture contracted by the Soum Governor for management by Janchiv Cooperative. Project management to bring the issue to the attention of Bayan Airag LLC and Durvuljin Soum Governor and Khural Chair, for these stakeholders to follow up

4

Share the final project report, or a summary, with the Altai Sayan Ecoregion Project of WWF in Khovd, and discuss the follow-up of activities by WWF in the overlapping project areas.

5

Suggest to mining companies to include spring protection as successfully practiced by WWF in the pilot landscapes. Project management bring to the attention to the participating mining companies to consider including spring protection as practiced by WWF (and TNC) in the pilot areas in future offset planning. Details available at WWF Altai Sayan Region office in Khovd.

6

Conduct training and awareness raising with staff of MRPAM in charge of registering Local Protected Areas about the significance and legitimacy of local protected areas in Mongolia’s development planning, about the issue of competing land use.

7

Bring together ALAMGAC and MRPAM to develop an effective mechanism that ensures database and information on mining licenses and LPAs is identical. 

8

Update required competency standards in relevant organizations to include knowledge and skills on mitigation hierarchy and offsets. 

9

Explore options to include mitigation hierarchy and offsetting into curricula on land and environmental management and policy at tertiary education institutions.

10

Organize experience sharing on the mechanism of the Tripartite Council (Local Government, Local Communities, Mining Company) that has been established in Khanbogd Soum for dispute resolution, joint fact-finding and joint planning

11

Support the development of a manual for local communities on mitigation hierarchy and offsetting, and on the principle and process of joint fact finding. 

12

Suggest to mining companies to include spring protection as successfully practiced by WWF in the pilot landscapes

1. Recommendation:

Conduct workshops on “Sustaining and Scaling up Land Degradation Mitigation and Offsets” in each of the project Aimags to jointly review the findings of the TE, to assess needs for capacity building and to plan forward. Project management to organize meetings, or request Aimag governments to organize participatory meetings, and share the findings with UNDP to inform programming in case of following up activities being undertaken as a stand-alone project, or if ENSURE project can support follow-up.

Management Response: [Added: 2020/01/13] [Last Updated: 2020/11/28]

Recommendation accepted.

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
1.1. Organize workshop in Uvs
[Added: 2020/01/13]
PIU 2019/05 Completed workshop conducted
1.2. Organize workshop in Khovd
[Added: 2020/01/13]
PIU 2019/06 Completed workshop conducted
1.3 Organize workshop in Zavkhan in cooperation with ENSURE project
[Added: 2020/01/13]
PIU in collaboration with ENSURE project 2019/08 Completed Conducted
1.4. Capacity building for locals through the local technical committees, who will continue their activities. Communication will be initiated.
[Added: 2020/01/13]
Local Technical Committees 2019/08 Completed Completed Communicated with all aimag governors through written correspondence. The Khushuut development fund, Durvuljin soum development fund and Bukhmurun development funds confirmed to provide support for future activities. Official letter Nr 06/4768 from 08.July.2019
1.5. To continue project MON 16/301’s activities such as drawing up soum development plans, and cooperating with local herders, citizens and governments of all levels to build capacity under UNDP’s ENSURE project.
[Added: 2020/01/13]
PIU and ENSURE project 2019/08 Completed Completed All relevant activities were included in ENSURE project’s activity plan and approved. Working in the evaluation panel of consultancy service on Soum development plan
1.6. Agreement with the TNC and WWF reached to organise a capacity building for the environmental sector and land management personnel through its local branches on offsetting principles to ensure sustainability.
[Added: 2020/01/13]
PIU 2019/08 Completed Completed. TNC and WWF have agreed and confirmed us that training on offsetting can be organized.
2. Recommendation:

Confirm that all LPAs identified by the ERA, and registered by ALAMGAC are also registered with MRPAM, and show up in the online database (https://cmcs.mrpam.gov.mn/). Project management to request both agencies to compare notes and make updates as needed in case of inconsistencies.

Management Response: [Added: 2020/01/13] [Last Updated: 2020/11/28]

Recommendation accepted.

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
2.1. Aimag land management plans, and the citizen’s representative khural’s decisions should be based on the Eco regional assessment results. The resulting database can be used by the cadastral department at the MET. The Ministry of Mining and Industry will also be able to make decisions on mining licenses by comparing their information with this database and consulting with the MET.
[Added: 2020/01/13]
PIU 2019/08 Completed The coherence between the relevant organizations was improved through workshops, trainings and by implementing the guidelines approved by Order no A/93 by the Head of Department for Land management, and geodesy on “The registration of land into the cadastral database”, redundancies can be removed completely given time. A handbook on 3 years of project implementation was made in partnership with the Department of land management and geodesy and distributed to the relevant stakeholders and organization.
3. Recommendation:

Address the issue of exploration license in Durvuljin Soum which overlaps with the selected offsetting area of Bayan Airag Exploration LLC and the pasture contracted by the Soum Governor for management by Janchiv Cooperative. Project management to bring the issue to the attention of Bayan Airag LLC and Durvuljin Soum Governor and Khural Chair, for these stakeholders to follow up

Management Response: [Added: 2020/01/13] [Last Updated: 2020/11/28]

Recommendation accepted

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
3.1. Written correspondence will be sent to the relevant organizations regarding the above exploration license issue License number: XV-014381 Name: Khalzan khoshuu Type: Exploration license Status: Valid Owner: ???? Area /hg/: 2890.72 Although preparations to explore were made in 2018, their activities were cut short after locals protested. 3.2. Communicate with the MET and MHI on the possibility of getting the land in concern approved to be included in the local special protected areas or on other possible solutions. Also cooperate with Khomiin tal NGO, which supports the local government.
[Added: 2020/01/13]
PIU PIU/Department of Environment and Natural resource Management of MET 2019/08 Completed Completed Letters were sent to both the MET and the Ministry of Mining and Heavy Industry (MMHI) on making sure that exploitation licenses are not issued for the areas that will be offset. Official letter Nr 06/4767 from 08 of July, 2019
4. Recommendation:

Share the final project report, or a summary, with the Altai Sayan Ecoregion Project of WWF in Khovd, and discuss the follow-up of activities by WWF in the overlapping project areas.

Management Response: [Added: 2020/01/13] [Last Updated: 2020/11/28]

Recommendation accepted

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
4.1. All relevant information and reports were shared both in electronic and printed form. 4.2. Comments to the WWF’s consulting strategy will be submitted and will cooperate with Khomiin tal NGO and Darvi soum’s government during implementation.
[Added: 2020/01/13]
PIU and UNDP CO 2019/07 Completed - Completed. A letter, referenced Nr 06/4769 was sent on 8 of July, 2019. -Completed. Corresponded with both the WWF and Khomiin tal NGO and have agreed to include the relevant activities in their future plan.
5. Recommendation:

Suggest to mining companies to include spring protection as successfully practiced by WWF in the pilot landscapes. Project management bring to the attention to the participating mining companies to consider including spring protection as practiced by WWF (and TNC) in the pilot areas in future offset planning. Details available at WWF Altai Sayan Region office in Khovd.

Management Response: [Added: 2020/01/13] [Last Updated: 2020/11/28]

recommendation accepted

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
5.1. All relevant information and reports were shared both in electronic and printed form.
[Added: 2020/01/13]
PIU 2019/07 Completed Completed. A letter, referenced Nr03/4770 was sent in July, 2019, which included a CD and hardcopy.
6. Recommendation:

Conduct training and awareness raising with staff of MRPAM in charge of registering Local Protected Areas about the significance and legitimacy of local protected areas in Mongolia’s development planning, about the issue of competing land use.

Management Response: [Added: 2020/01/13] [Last Updated: 2020/11/28]

Recommendation accepted

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
6.1. A written recommendation to include officials from the MMHI, Mineral resources and petroleum authority (MRPAM), cadastral surveying specialists, and local citizen’s representatives khural’s representatives were sent to the MET and TNC NGO. Since the representatives from the citizen’s representative’s khural that we trained to change every 4 years, it is crucial to re-train after every election period. Agree with The Nature Conservancy to work on organizing the training and workshops.
[Added: 2020/01/13]
PIU, TNC, MET, UNDP CO 2019/07 Completed Completed, The Nature Conservancy will work to organize trainings and workshops on the importance of included lands in the specially protected areas, and reduction of environmental degradation by mining activities and its rehabilitation through offsetting in accordance with their work plan for this year.
7. Recommendation:

Bring together ALAMGAC and MRPAM to develop an effective mechanism that ensures database and information on mining licenses and LPAs is identical. 

Management Response: [Added: 2020/01/13] [Last Updated: 2020/11/28]

Partially accepted as the action is not covered in the project document and no additional resources available. However, possible measures listed below will be implemented.

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
7.1. Widely advertise and inform relevant parties about the guidelines approved by the Head of Department of Land Management and geodesy. 7.2. Organize events to inform parties of project activities such as adding land to specially protected areas and the ecological and economic importance of the said activity. Will cooperated with the MET and UNDP’s public relations department to advertise the main outcomes of the project including the use of social media accounts.
[Added: 2020/01/13]
PIU MET UNDP, CO 2019/08 Completed Completed. The issue was addressed in the Laws on land, special protected areas and natural resources. Starting from December 2018, the MMHI has been asking for the MET’s approval before issuing licenses. The database at the MET will include ecologically sensitive areas and project’s documents such as reports, policies and guidelines will be published in a handbook and distributed to relevant parties. - Completed : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cbE3C9HyvT0 https://www.facebook.com/UNCCDMongolia/ Improved the online video lesson on land protection - http://e-gazar.blogspot.com/ Improved the project’s website - http://www. ldn-mongolia.mn/ Advertising of project activities was done through the project’s website and Facebook page and through NGOs that support ecological education, TV, newspapers and certain blogs in 2019. A short documentary movie on project activities was also made. Manuals, handbooks and other documents were distributed to the local governments, residents and businesses, and development programs. Internationally used methodologies on the reduction of land degradation that can be found on https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/1099145X were included in the MET specialist in charge of land degradation’s work plan. Started work on renewing the National Program against Desertification in accordance with the UN’s Convention to Combat Desertification. Mongolia’s environmental protection strategy should be updated to focus more on finding scientific basis for including offsetting principles in land management and use planning, and surveying areas for offsetting locations, and planning for offsetting, etc. Academy of Geography and Geo-ecology Implement research on methodologies; Prepared content such as handbooks and articles to further publicize offsetting principles using social and newspaper channels. Regularly updated the Facebook page “Let’s get rid of land degradation completely”.
7.3. To propose an amendment to the Land on law that includes a clause for not allowing the issue of mining / mineral resource exploration licenses on special protected areas.
[Added: 2020/01/13]
PIU 2019/08 Completed Completed. The mentioned issues were addressed in our comments to the law concept approved by the Ministry of Justice and Internal Affairs.
8. Recommendation:

Update required competency standards in relevant organizations to include knowledge and skills on mitigation hierarchy and offsets. 

Management Response: [Added: 2020/01/13] [Last Updated: 2020/11/28]

Recommendation accepted.

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
Prepare content such as handbooks and documentaries on project outcomes, the current state of mitigation hierarchy and offsetting in Mongolia, experiences, and capacity building for publishing and distribution to the relevant stakeholders. These materials will also be used by the MET for future trainings and workshops.
[Added: 2020/01/13]
PIU 2019/06 Completed Completed. All relevant materials were sent through official correspondence, in July, 2019.
Both TNC and the WWF have stated they will be able to continue this work during one of our Project steering committee meetings. Their local branches, and local citizens should also be asked to provide support for further activities. Initiate a plan to implement this on a step-by-step basis.
[Added: 2020/01/13]
MET TNC WWF 2019/08 Completed Completed. In order to decrease the issuance of mining licenses in general, it is crucial to widen the area of special protected areas in Mongolia and since this is one our main goals, we will plan and implement this on a step-by-step basis. This is discussed and initiated.
8.3. Additionally, include the before-mentioned issues in the recommendations section of the annual contract signed by the Minister of Environment and Tourism and each aimag’s governor. Letters on the issue will be circulated.
[Added: 2020/01/13]
MET 2019/07 Completed Completed. The local technical committees established in the project aimags will continue their work. Letters regarding this issue were sent to the respective aimag governors in July, 2019. And the results of each aimag Governor’s work will be evaluated using the annual contract signed with the MET.
9. Recommendation:

Explore options to include mitigation hierarchy and offsetting into curricula on land and environmental management and policy at tertiary education institutions.

Management Response: [Added: 2020/01/13] [Last Updated: 2020/11/28]

Recommendation accepted.

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
Work to include classes (worth credits toward graduation) on reducing land degradation, land management plans, ecologically sensitive areas and mitigation and offsetting principles at universities and colleges. Work to include classes on the steps to reduce impact on the environment, and the theory of offsetting at the National University of Mongolia (NUM)‘s School of Engineering and Applied Science’s curriculum.
[Added: 2020/01/13]
PIU 2019/08 Completed Completed. Offsetting and mitigation principles were successfully added to Eco-Asia school’s curriculum. Environmental assessment and relevant issues need to be added to curriculums for bachelors’ degrees and approved by the Ministry of Education and Culture (MEC). The University of Agriculture of Mongolia also has added offsetting and mitigation principles to their environmental rehabilitation class program. It was also decided that the University of Science and Technology will be adding topics such as land degradation and offsetting to their curriculum at the School of Geology and Mining for majors such as hydrogeological engineering, etc.
9.2 Continue workshops and trainings on mitigation and offsetting. Initiate an agreement with the universities and colleges.
[Added: 2020/01/13]
MET UNDP, CO BGM 2019/08 Completed Completed. Lessons on mitigation and offsetting, and the reduction of land degradation will be taught at universities and colleges. Environmental protectors, land management specialists and relevant professionals will continue to get information on this topic through workshops and trainings held by the MET in the future. The professional training institute BGM has also shown interest in providing both online and classroom trainings on this topic.
10. Recommendation:

Organize experience sharing on the mechanism of the Tripartite Council (Local Government, Local Communities, Mining Company) that has been established in Khanbogd Soum for dispute resolution, joint fact-finding and joint planning

Management Response: [Added: 2020/01/13] [Last Updated: 2020/11/28]

Recommendation accepted.

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
10.1. The local technical committees will continue their work in their relevant regions to cooperate with their local governments on offsetting and mitigation issues and perform the necessary steps whenever action is needed.
[Added: 2020/01/13]
PIU 2019/07 Completed Completed. A letter, referenced Nr 06/4768 was sent in July, 2019 regarding this issue.
10.2. Make a recommendation to the relevant ministries and organizations on learning from Umnugobi aimag’s experiences and learnings.
[Added: 2020/01/13]
TNC MET Mining companies 2019/07 Completed Completed. A national conference on offsetting and mitigation was held in 2018 in Umnugobi. Another study tour to discuss the issues and outcomes that came after the conference, the new conditions created since then and for general experience sharing is recommended.
11. Recommendation:

Support the development of a manual for local communities on mitigation hierarchy and offsetting, and on the principle and process of joint fact finding. 

Management Response: [Added: 2020/01/13] [Last Updated: 2020/11/28]

Recommendation accepted.

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
11.1. Additional manuals and information sheets will be prepared and distributed. 11.2. All prepared documents will be sent to the MET, the Department of Land Management and all relevant organizations.
[Added: 2020/01/13]
PIU 2019/07 Completed Completed
12. Recommendation:

Suggest to mining companies to include spring protection as successfully practiced by WWF in the pilot landscapes

Management Response: [Added: 2020/01/13] [Last Updated: 2020/11/28]

Recommendation accepted.

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
12.1. Work to include protection for freshwater sources in environmental management plans by mining companies. Also, recommend studying the WWF’s experiences. 12.2. Videos on this topic will be sent in CD form to mining companies.
[Added: 2020/01/13]
PIU 2019/07 Completed Completed. An official letter Nr 06/4768 was sent to Bayan airag exploration LLC, Khotgor mining company and Mon Enco LLC and Green gold NGO regarding this issue. And the letter was sent regarding the action #12.2

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