Project evaluation on decentralization and local governance

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Evaluation Plan:
2017-2022, Mongolia
Evaluation Type:
Final Project
Planned End Date:
04/2019
Completion Date:
04/2019
Status:
Completed
Management Response:
Yes
Evaluation Budget(US $):
30,000

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Title Project evaluation on decentralization and local governance
Atlas Project Number: 00096426
Evaluation Plan: 2017-2022, Mongolia
Evaluation Type: Final Project
Status: Completed
Completion Date: 04/2019
Planned End Date: 04/2019
Management Response: Yes
UNDP Signature Solution:
  • 1. Governance
Corporate Outcome and Output (UNDP Strategic Plan 2018-2021)
  • 1. Output 1.2.1 Capacities at national and sub-national levels strengthened to promote inclusive local economic development and deliver basic services including HIV and related services
SDG Goal
  • Goal 16. Promote peaceful and inclusive societies for sustainable development, provide access to justice for all and build effective, accountable and inclusive institutions at all levels
  • Goal 5. Achieve gender equality and empower all women and girls
SDG Target
  • 16.6 Develop effective, accountable and transparent institutions at all levels
  • 16.7 Ensure responsive, inclusive, participatory and representative decision-making at all levels
  • 5.5 Ensure women’s full and effective participation and equal opportunities for leadership at all levels of decision-making in political, economic and public life
Evaluation Budget(US $): 30,000
Source of Funding: project budget
Evaluation Expenditure(US $): 25,000
Joint Programme: No
Joint Evaluation: No
Evaluation Team members:
Name Title Email Nationality
Cherian Joseph Dr. hranewdelhi@gmail.com
GEF Evaluation: No
Key Stakeholders:
Countries: MONGOLIA
Lessons
Findings
1.

5. Project findings

The following section provides a brief description of the key results under each of the outputs of the project. The key progress results are highlighted as these underpin the capacity development of local self-governing bodies, address the interrelated levels of their legal and institutional environment, and the organisational capacity development of hurals including individual capacity development of locally elected representatives. The key results reveal the multi-faceted spectrum of work and the range of stakeholders engaged with. It is against that background that perceived challenges are then articulated for each output.

5.1 Output 1. Improved legal framework for local governance

Interventions under this output will be centred around the LATUG revisions mainly. The project will provide the necessary technical support to the Standing Committee on State Structure and SubStanding Committee in developing a conceptual framework for the reform of local government system in Mongolia, reform options based on comparative analysis, consensus building on the conceptual framework through different means such as regional and national forums and online discussions

5.1:1 Progress results LATUG revision

1. The project has over the last two years made steady and valuable progress to this output. Numerous rounds of discussions were organised in 2017 with relevant experts. These discussions covered various aspects of local governance; the scope of LATUG and relations it regulates. Dialogue was arranged to “identify implementation challenges, and reflect suggestions for revised conceptual framework of the Law; these consultations were held at different levels of administrative units, including bagh, soum and aimag, with participation of representatives of both local governments and local self-governing bodies.” The contribution of these discussions was acknowledged by the Chairman of the Standing Committee on State Structure.2. A study supported by a team of local governance experts was commissioned in late 2017 for analysing the implementation of LATUG (Law on Administrative and Territorial Units and their Governance) and developing guiding principles for local governance legal revisions. The study is completed. The guiding principles developed in the study were presented to the Parliamentary Working Group on Decentralization earlier this year in June as well as to the Parliamentary Working Group for Constitutional revision consultations. This is a critical achievement. 3. Following from this and as part of the planned activities a Legal Firm was hired to “(i) draft amendments of LATUG, (ii) prepare concept papers and draft amendments of related laws/ regulations, etc.” 4. Currently, the Law firm has prepared the concept note for submission to the Parliamentary Sub Committee on decentralization. 5. To further support this process, in March 2018, two separate parliamentary delegations comprising Members of Parliament and technical staffers serving in the Working Group for Constitutional revision consultations regarding State Structure travelled to Finland and Japan respectively, for a one week study visit. “The visits aimed to strengthen key decision makers’ knowledge of relevant features of foreign local governance systems in the view of the upcoming constitutional and policy reforms in Mongolia.”


Tag: Challenges Effectiveness Local Governance Parliament Rule of law Knowledge management Policies & Procedures Risk Management Promotion of dialogue Institutional Strengthening Technical Support

2.

5.2. Output 2. Citizens’ Representative Hurals have improved organizational capacity 

Interventions under this strategy will aim at improving the internal structures, policies and procedures, thus the effectiveness of hurals as an institution

5.2:1 Progress results Output 2 addresses critical aspects of the functioning of hurals to strengthen them as representative bodies. The key progress is summed up below.

Strengthening hural capacities 1. An achievement that has contributed significantly to strengthening hural capacities in the last two years is the completion of a model meeting procedure for hurals. It was developed in 2017 through multiple consultations held with a sample of soum, aimag, the capital city and Chingeltei district hurals, etc. A further survey was conducted in 120 soums, hurals of 13 aimags. Consequently, a total of 15 hural meeting procedures were reviewed, and a list of laws and Parliamentary resolutions being used in hural operations was prepared. The model meeting procedure was presented to hural secretaries earlier this year. 2. In 2018 one of the six working groups formed from aimag and district CRH secretaries as task forces to cooperate on different project related responsibilities, customised through online consultations the standard meeting procedures and devised a plan to advocate the standard procedure for adoption by some aimag and soum hurals. Some soums committed to adopting the same. 3. Subsequently in response to a letter sent in November 2018 to all aimag hurals, along with the improved procedure, requesting them to examine the possibility to have the procedure approved for both the aimag hurals and their soums, one aimag (Arkhangai) has adopted the procedure. 4 The project formed six working groups of aimag and districts hural secretaries as task forces in early 2018 to take on responsibilities for: - Mainstreaming of standard meeting procedures - Support to hurals for updating www.khural.mn and finding solutions for funding for maintenance costs - Establishment of training plans of soum hurals and funding for cost sharing - Support to the development of a Performance Management Framework - Support to application of Law on General Administrative Procedure ? Public awareness raising about hural functions 5. A handbook for hurals to apply the Law on General Administrative Procedure (LGAP) was developed to assist hurals to fulfil their duties as stipulated in the LGAP. To prepare the handbook, a list of hural administrative acts registered with MOJHA was analysed, and consultations held across all levels of the local government structure. Court decisions related to hurals, Citizens’ General Meeting decisions were also analysed. Legal professionals from wider society, lecturers of administrative law, and lawyers in general were also invited to participate in consultations. The LGAP handbook also has been presented to hural secretaries. 


Tag: Effectiveness Civic Engagement Local Governance Parliament Rule of law Policies & Procedures Capacity Building Institutional Strengthening Regional Institutions

3.

5.2:1 Progress results (continuation)

Information dissemination At more than one venue (where we went) one was struck by the display of documents, photographs, graphs, etc, either in the corridors or in the meeting halls, of information related to the concerned soum, aimag, district, etc. At Khan-Uul district hural we were shown handouts prepared on some laws by the hural. The willingness to disseminate information, through such display practices promotes greater transparency and accountability in a small but significant way.

Small grant supported projects A key input in Output 2 has been the small grant support. The small grants are awarded to Hurals and NGOs to work on specific activities that contribute to development of institutional capacity in participation-based policy-making and monitoring of local services and improved decision-making and oversight capacity. In both 2017 and 2018 small grants have been awarded (see Annex 7 for details of Small grant awards). In 2017 the grant program resulted in the preparation of 16 procedural guidelines and four programs being developed by the Hurals. An end of grant workshop in 2017 resulted in a horizontal learning process between 2017 and former grantees. The interaction reinforced connections of hurals with non-profit organizations for capacity building purpose, and improved quality of several small grant proposals in 2018 (see Annex 5 for details on small grants).


Tag: Effectiveness Efficiency Local Governance Communication Human and Financial resources Knowledge management Policies & Procedures Micro-credit Institutional Strengthening South-South Cooperation

4.

5.2:2 Challenges

1. In 2018 the small grants programme has seen a drop in the number of hural grantees working on the grant projects they took up. NGOs have on the other hand have been able keep the momentum. Discussions brought out that hurals have had difficulties pursuing these projects as there are no staff with them to conduct, organize and write up findings. This is a valuable intervention and requires to be strengthened. (Only the Chair and Secretary of hurals are employed staff of soum hural.)


Tag: Challenges Effectiveness Civic Engagement Local Governance Parliament Micro-credit

5.

5.3 Output 3. National training programme for local elected representatives is institutionalized

An elected representative is a position of responsibility. This is a challenging role with limited resources available to reach out their electorate and they have other duties besides being a representative. In order to be a competent elected representative and for carrying out such responsibilities, they need experience and skills. Elected representatives need to understand how local government works, how it relates to central authorities, local government’s legal rights and obligations and the opportunities and obstacles.


Tag: Effectiveness Gender Equality Gender Mainstreaming Women's Empowerment Local Governance Knowledge management Policies & Procedures Institutional Strengthening Regional Institutions

6.

5.3 Output 3. National training programme for local elected representatives is institutionalized - 5.3.1 (continuation)

Training materials The project developed a training programme and handbook for Chairs of bagh General meetings for the first time in the local government history of Mongolia. It covered 1,870 grassroots / community level officials. This included 97% of the 525 women who were elected as Chairs of bagh General Meeting. The training handbook for baghs contained a compilation of relevant legal provisions, templates commonly used for baghs, and other reference materials, such as pasture use agreement template. Neither such training nor training handbook for Chairs of bagh General Meetings had been provided before. 20 11. Other materials prepared for training support include: leadership training handbook for trainers and participants, women leadership training handbook. 


Tag: Effectiveness Efficiency Civic Engagement Local Governance Communication Knowledge management Policies & Procedures Awareness raising Institutional Strengthening Regional Institutions

7.

5.4 Output

4. Improved capacity of the Parliament Secretariat to support representative bodies

The Parliament Secretariat (PS) has been assigned with important new roles in the legislative process by the Law on Legislation. Project will provide capacity development support to the staff of the Parliament Secretariat for them to effectively undertake newly assigned roles by the Law on Legislation. This requires the Parliament Secretariat to develop new technical skills among its staff to review impacts and cost-benefit analysis by law initiators, and also conduct monitoring of the implementation of laws. Output 4 is central to enhancing technical capacities of the Parliament Secretariat in what is mentioned above and for anchoring future law-making pertaining to decentralization and local government. 


Tag: Effectiveness Civic Engagement Human rights Local Governance Parliament Rule of law Donor relations Oversight Institutional Strengthening National Institutions

8.

5.4 Output

4. Improved capacity of the Parliament Secretariat to support representative bodies

Improved procedures for public consultations 3. Project supported the first evaluation by the Parliament Secretariat in 2017 on Monitoring of the Law on Combating Alcoholism. 4. Under the requirements of Mongolian Law with reference to public consultation on draft laws through public hearing, two public consultations were held. An online conference was held in July 2017, including MPs, senior officials of aimag and the Capital government departments and local self-governing bodies on proposed amendments to the Constitution. 5. A public hearing was organized by the Standing Committee on Petitions in December 2017 on monitoring the implementation status of the Resolution No.5 of 2016 on the enforcement of legal acts regarding rehabilitation of the degraded land due to mining activities and the compensation of damages. 


Tag: Challenges Effectiveness Efficiency Civic Engagement Local Governance Parliament Oversight Policies & Procedures Promotion of dialogue Institutional Strengthening National Institutions

9.

6. Critical cross cutting themes

Underneath all the above outputs is the driving thought that “the indirect and ultimate target group of the project is the population in the constituencies of the local Hurals *…+ By focusing some of the project activities specifically on improving the interaction between local Hural representatives and people of marginalised or “voiceless” groups, like youth, women and urban and rural poor, the Project aims to make them more visible for local Hural representatives and to create an accountability link between the local Hural representatives and these marginalized groups in order to move their interests higher on the agenda of the local Hurals.” Another cross cutting theme is of “external communication established to convey the project progress and (intended) results to the public” (from Consultant ToR). Both these themes came up repeatedly in the discussions of the MTR team and were discussed with the PIU. They are reviewed below.


Tag: Challenges Gender Equality Gender Mainstreaming Gender Parity Women's Empowerment Local Governance Poverty Reduction Capacity Building Vulnerable Women and gilrs Youth

10.

6. Critical cross cutting themes (continuation)

6.2 Project communication

6.2:1 Progress results

1. The project serves project stakeholders well. The website, documents in Mongolian from handbooks, manuals to training materials, designs, etc., are considerable and well brought out. The focus so far has been on basic documentation and internal communication. 

6.2:2 Challenges

1. The project has not produced analytical reports. Challenges must be highlighted. This would contribute to reflection on shortcomings, the possible solutions, the future needs and the strategic choices to be made for strengthening representative bodies. This is required both for the board and key actors. 2. There is much that the project can share. There are projects in the region which would benefit immensely from the experience of the project, the best practices, change stories and project impact. The project must move to another level of communication both with stakeholders and in disseminating within Mongolia and outside


Tag: Challenges Civic Engagement Local Governance Communication Knowledge management Monitoring and Evaluation Results-Based Management Institutional Strengthening Regional Institutions Vulnerable

Recommendations
1

8. Recommendations

The recommendations below address all four outputs and the cross cutting themes. They have been grouped to provide clarity with regard to the focus of the recommendation.

8.1 Citizen engagement 

1. Public awareness raising is included in the multi year work plans in both output 1 and 4. In the latter it refers to raising awareness about legislative process and new laws.  It is recommended that this is addressed with greater vigour with the Parliament Secretariat.

2

8.1 Citizen engagement 

2. To better address citizen engagement, the project should aim for synergies with SDC governance projects which focus specifically on citizen engagement.

3

8.1 Citizen engagement 

3. Aimags, soums, districts, etc. need to explore what they can do to increase citizen awareness and participation. Dialogue events to brainstorm on what needs to be done and what needs to be communicated can be a starting point for a few pilots or even for consideration for small grant projects. NGOs should be involved in these exercises.

4

8.2 Strengthening training for hurals

4, Hurals need higher level skill input in budget review, the planning function, legislative oversight. etc. These can be addressed through thematic training programmes. NAoG is aware of this need. These need to be incorporated into future training revision. Cost sharing possibilities need to be worked on. It will enhance the effectiveness of hurals.

5

8.2 Strengthening training for hurals

5. Hural secretaries and presidium members who are at the core of hural functioning need to be focussed on more in the remaining years.  Greater focus is required on their administrative work to develop greater effectiveness/ efficiencies in the discharge of responsibilities to hurals and citizens.

6

8.2 Strengthening training for hurals

6. The proposed continuation of induction and refresher training by NAoG would only encompass soum and aimag level, but not the bagh level. Given the importance of this lowest tier of governance to ensure that citizens’ needs are reflected adequately in soum and aimag level planning, it is recommended that the aimag level takes on the responsibility to train the Chairs of bagh General Meetings.             

7

8.2 Strengthening training for hurals

7. As the economy is improving and as some regions / aimags are better placed financially, it is an opportune moment to discuss and develop criteria for cost sharing of training costs and to implement in practice. The Project has facilitated the establishment of working groups of aimag and districts hural secretaries, as task forces to support different project related responsibilities. The appropriate working group can be tasked to discuss and work out steps to implement it.

8

8.2 Strengthening training for hurals

8. It would not be appropriate at this point to do a country wide roll out of the Performance management framework for hurals as evidently proposed by the Consultants. The methodology and the content can be first piloted in a sample of aimags and soums, as already indicated in the project document and focus on indices that disclose member performance on fundamentals of their participation. The Consultants should have “consultations with the Central government, hurals, subject matter experts, and citizens and check against the existing reporting requirements”.

9

8.3 Small grants scheme

9. Small grants have significantly contributed to Hural capacity development and greater citizen engagement. Given the difficulties that some hurals have faced in the present round of small grant projects, it is recommended that hurals be twinned with appropriate NGOs or local resource person/s to support project implementation. This would contribute to drawing on local resources and in connecting them even more in the change process.

10

8.3 Small grants scheme

10. The grants made available to NGOs by the small grant scheme need to be increased. From discussion with NGOs it became evident that they had difficulties in completing commitments with the approved funds. It is recommended that the project makes available fewer grants, but larger amounts with multi-year applicability. This needs to be done without increasing transactions costs. This support to hurals “in order to increase pro-poor focus of its interventions, oversee the executive’s performance in delivering the services and implementation of government programmes aimed at poverty reduction” for women, young people, the poor and vulnerable groups would provide strategic direction. Such support over a longer period of time would increase citizen awareness.

11

8.3 Small grants scheme

11. The criteria for hural / NGO selection must be reviewed to boost effectiveness, sustainability and relevance. Small grants must reinforce project priorities of increasing pro-poor focus of its interventions and developing public hearings initiated by hurals on general oversight.

12

8.4 Youth, vulnerable and marginalised

12. The project’s aims with regards to improving inclusiveness should be clarified first before strategic entry points are identified. It is recommended to establish synergies with existing projects that target the poor and marginalized. This could e.g. be envisioned through the grant scheme under Output 2 or in the frame of the planned activities towards increasing citizens’ awareness about their elected representatives. It may provide a catalyst to greater participation by youth. The appropriate time is now. The grant scheme might provide for opportunities to address issues of inclusion more prominently.

13

8.5 Institutionalisation of www.khural.mn

13. The website evidently needs further updating and technical support. The working group tasked with the working of the website can propose actions necessary to ensure that the website fulfils the invaluable dissemination need with enhanced technological competence and transparency. The website is the most visible dimension of hural developments and actions and adds value to the effectiveness of project dissemination.

14

8.6 Project communication

14. It is recommended that a comprehensive MIS on the number of participants who have undergone training by level of hurals, by region, kind of programme, gender, age, etc. be prepared. This would also provide a baseline for future. The project has a number of reports, surveys etc. but not a comprehensive data picture across all participants. It can then be incorporated with the Training hub proposed by NAoG

15

8.6 Project communication

The project has achieved much in capacity building. A document that captures the journey of capacity building in strengthening representative bodies, in building individual and institutional capacities and its impact on the functioning of hurals, is necessary for institutional memory, for dissemination and for reflection. Documentation must include stories of change at the individual and institutional levels backed by evidence of change at the behavioural, attitudinal, and functional levels. Evidence from the Performance management framework and hural survey would be relevant for this documentation.

16

8.6 Project communication

16. The PIU requires technical support for strengthening both M&E and communication.

17

8.7 Project management 

17. It is recommended that to further strengthen capacities in technical guidance and advocacy in local governance in the project, a senior professional be appointed as an Advisor / Consultant. The individual should have a strong background in local governance and be well acquainted with Mongolian law and practice. The individual should preferably be a Mongolian national. This not is suggested as a permanent advisor/ consultant, but to provide critical backstopping support when required.

18

8.7 Project management 

18. For strengthening ownership of the PS in activities that needs its attention, such activities may be included in the work plan of the Parliament with allotted responsibilities

19

8.7 Project management

19. The present UNV leaves early next year. It is strongly recommended that the process for recruitment of the new UNV be initiated at the earliest and that the individual be appointed a full month ahead of the departure of the present UNV. This would make for a better handing over and integration into the project.

20

It is also recommended that a local consultant be hired to reinforce the M&E and also support documentation. This would depend on budget availability. Short term consultancy may be considered.

8.7 Project management

21

8.7 Project management

21. Support staff should be recruited as per the project need.

22

8.8 The Parliament Secretariat 

21. The ownership of the PS in activities under its oversight needs to be more manifest to stakeholders. Greater visibility of its contribution and leadership to strengthening hurals as representative bodies would immensely serve sustainability and motivate greater participation of stakeholders.

The great value of this project rests in its perceptive and discerning inputs to strengthen local government. The support to buttress the legal framework, enhance capacities of the key institutions, build abilities of the elected and promote citizen participation, is an amazing encompass. That this is done in fullest partnership with the state, roots the effort in reality. Such partnerships inevitably will have operational and ideational differences. What matters is that dialogue is always ongoing. The project has done this. That is to the credit of all the key actors. The progress made would like look small steps today. But the groundwork done till now has long term “significance for equitable and sustainable social and economic and effective, efficient and fair local governments, satisfied citizens, and a genuinely representative and effective civil society”. The next two years must consolidate the gains and utilise the opportunities. 

Management Response Documents
1. Recommendation:

8. Recommendations

The recommendations below address all four outputs and the cross cutting themes. They have been grouped to provide clarity with regard to the focus of the recommendation.

8.1 Citizen engagement 

1. Public awareness raising is included in the multi year work plans in both output 1 and 4. In the latter it refers to raising awareness about legislative process and new laws.  It is recommended that this is addressed with greater vigour with the Parliament Secretariat.

Management Response: [Added: 2019/04/27] [Last Updated: 2021/02/07]

This recommendation is fully accepted.

Legal awareness raising by the Parliament Secretariat is included in the 2019 Annual Work Plan (AWP 4.4, 4.9). The 2019 annual work plan also includes activities related to public awareness under Output 1 (AWP 1.3, 1.5, 1.6, 1.8). Attention will continue to be paid to legal awareness raising in 2020 as well.

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
Legal awareness raising by the Parliament Secretariat (AWP 4.4, 4.9).
[Added: 2019/04/27] [Last Updated: 2020/01/01]
SRBM and PS 2019/12 Completed As per the approved AWP item, the legal awareness raising has been conducted. History
Awareness-raising concerning LATUG revision, etc. (AWP 1.3, 1.5, 1.6, 1.8).
[Added: 2019/04/27] [Last Updated: 2020/01/01]
SRBM and PS 2019/12 Completed As per the approved AWP item 1.3, 1.5, 1.6 and 1.8 , the legal awareness raising has been conducted. History
Awareness-raising activities to be included in 2020 AWP.
[Added: 2019/04/27] [Last Updated: 2020/09/16]
SRBM and PS 2020/12 Completed There are several AWP items on awareness-raising included in the 2020 AWP. History
2. Recommendation:

8.1 Citizen engagement 

2. To better address citizen engagement, the project should aim for synergies with SDC governance projects which focus specifically on citizen engagement.

Management Response: [Added: 2019/04/27] [Last Updated: 2021/02/07]

Recommendation partially accepted.

 

It was decided at the planning stage of the project to leave out citizen engagement from the core focus of SRBM. In line with the recommendation, SRBM will aim for stronger synergies with other projects from SDC governance portfolio which focus on citizen engagement (e.g., civic engagement project with MoJIA, etc.)

Citizen engagement related activities are already planned by SRBM: media campaign for citizen awareness-raising on CRHs (AWP 2.3) and small grants (AWP 2.2) with a focus on citizen engagement.

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
Synergies with other projects from SDC governance portfolio which focus on citizen engagement.
[Added: 2019/04/27] [Last Updated: 2021/01/06]
SRBM 2021/02 Completed Citizen engagement has been addressed through the small grants implemented by local hurals and NGOs. And an important mechanism that institutionalized the civil society engagement is the model session procedures approved by the CRHs. CRHs are actively updating their session procedures since the local elections of October 2020. The rate has reached 48% currently at aimag level from 23.8% in August 2020. Participation of youth and women in local decision-making is improving as a result of the small grants. In 2020, 14 CRHs individually and 8 CRHs in partnership with 5 NGOs[1] have improved their internal procedures and practices through pilots and innovations implemented with the small grants, bringing the total beneficiary numbers to 73 CRHs and 23 NGOs since 2017. For instance, over 300 young people proposals (66.6 percent of total proposals) reflected to the local invested funds in 2021, (Arbulag soum, Khuvsgul aimag) History
Citizen engagement related activities already planned by SRBM: - media campaign for citizen awareness-raising on CRHs (AWP 2.3) and - small grants (AWP 2.2) with a focus on citizen engagement.
[Added: 2019/04/27] [Last Updated: 2020/11/30]
SRBM 2020/12 Completed Video training, social media outreach, and online consultations using technological advances such as Zoom have been a timely and effective response to the COVID-19 circumstances. The participants, local and national, showed great interest and actively participated in the online consultations appreciating the advantages such as saving time and resources. Online modality could become a frequent alternative in the new normal after COVID-19. Participation of youth and women in local decision-making is improving as a result of the project small grants. In 2020, 14 CRHs individually and 8 CRHs, in partnership with 5 NGOs, have improved their internal procedures and practices through pilots and innovations implemented with the small grants, bringing the total beneficiary numbers to 73 CRHs and 23 NGOs since 2017. The CRHs became responsive to the needs of marginalized groups and created precedents for participatory decision-making, budgeting and oversight as a result of the small grant projects, demonstrated by an independent evaluation History
3. Recommendation:

8.1 Citizen engagement 

3. Aimags, soums, districts, etc. need to explore what they can do to increase citizen awareness and participation. Dialogue events to brainstorm on what needs to be done and what needs to be communicated can be a starting point for a few pilots or even for consideration for small grant projects. NGOs should be involved in these exercises.

Management Response: [Added: 2019/04/27] [Last Updated: 2021/02/07]

Recommendation fully accepted.

Good effort on this have been completed from the project’s end. Representatives’ engagement with citizens is included as a key topic of all main trainings held so far (induction, leadership, WLT). It is also one of the two key focus areas of the small grants. Down the line, increased focus can be laid on the promotion and dissemination of good practices developed by CRHs to engage with citizens.

Furthermore, CRHs’ good practices of citizen engagement will be collected and presented at different meetings among CRH chairs, secretaries, etc.  including at the regional experience-sharing forums (AWP 2.7). They will be further disseminated to a wider audience through sharing slides, videos, etc. via social media and other channels.

Stronger engagement of the corresponding CRH secretary working group to be aimed at in 2019 and 2020.

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
Promotion and dissemination of good practices developed by CRHs to engage with citizens, e.g. through WLT follow-up activities planned in 2019 (AWP 3.1). CRHs’ good practices of citizen engagement to be collected and presented at different meetings and further disseminated. Foster engagement of the corresponding CRH secretary working group (support to and monitoring of annual work plan).
[Added: 2019/04/27] [Last Updated: 2020/01/01]
SRBM 2019/12 Completed • As a result of leadership training delivered by SRBM, local women politicians have been serving the needs of local communities in a more responsive way and with more commitment. Their good practices for improving access to safe water, medical services, pre-school education, monitoring of public services and small loan funds, combating domestic violence and air pollution, waste recycling, community mobilization, improving community facilities such as street basketball yard, library, and street lights, and using social media for online community meetings were compiled, shared and celebrated at a national forum on women leadership which brought together women politicians from all political levels as well as an international audience. History
4. Recommendation:

8.2 Strengthening training for hurals

4, Hurals need higher level skill input in budget review, the planning function, legislative oversight. etc. These can be addressed through thematic training programmes. NAoG is aware of this need. These need to be incorporated into future training revision. Cost sharing possibilities need to be worked on. It will enhance the effectiveness of hurals.

Management Response: [Added: 2019/04/27] [Last Updated: 2021/02/07]

This recommendation is partially accepted.

The project needs to take into account that the budget available for training purpose in the two remaining years of the project is limited.

Refresher training and thematic training contents finalized by NAoG and ready for roll-out (AWP 3.2). They include the topics of local budget and oversight. Due to limited budget, the thematic training modules will have to be delivered on a cost-sharing basis. Thematic modules will be incorporated into the official training program of NAoG.

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
Roll-out of refresher training and thematic training contents on a cost-sharing basis (AWP 3.2).
[Added: 2019/04/27] [Last Updated: 2020/11/30]
SRBM 2020/12 Completed The financial sustainability of the national training programme for the CRHs, institutionalised at the National Academy of Governance, is envisaged by the inclusion of a legal provision in the draft LATUG revisions in March 2020 (Article 46.2 on Working Environment of the Elected Representatives). Efforts were made by the Project to inform and advocate with policymakers on these issues, including the Members of the State Structure Standing Committee of the Parliament (Output Indicator 3.6 ). To ensure the sustainability of these initiatives beyond 2020, aimag CRHs continue to support the training financially. In 2018, 10 aimags co-financed (ranging from 15% to 62 % of costs, 28% on average) the leadership training for their soums; in 2019, all 21 aimags provided 67% of funds required for the training of CRHs’ staff members; in 2020 the CRHs positively responded to the project call by budgeting training costs in their draft local budget for 2021 before sending it to the Ministry of Finance for review (Output Indicator 3.6 ). History
5. Recommendation:

8.2 Strengthening training for hurals

5. Hural secretaries and presidium members who are at the core of hural functioning need to be focussed on more in the remaining years.  Greater focus is required on their administrative work to develop greater effectiveness/ efficiencies in the discharge of responsibilities to hurals and citizens.

Management Response: [Added: 2019/04/27] [Last Updated: 2021/02/07]

Recommendation partially accepted.             

See above remark concerning limited budget resources for additional training in remaining two years of the project.

Several actions are planned in the 2019 AWP for secretaries to strengthen administrative capacities, including the development of a reference book for soum CRH secretaries (AWP 2.10), support / training for standard meeting procedure and LGAP guidelines (AWP 2.1), as well as regional experience-sharing forums (AWP 2.7).

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
Development of a reference book for soum CRH secretaries (AWP 2.10). Support / training for standard meeting procedure and LGAP guidelines (AWP 2.1) Support to regional experience-sharing forums (AWP 2.7).
[Added: 2019/04/27] [Last Updated: 2020/11/30]
SRBM 2020/12 Completed CRHs’ organizational capacity is enhanced through the introduction and application of a model session procedure and a practical guideline to comply with Law on General Administrative Procedure (LGAP), both of which contributes to better stability and predictability of CRHs’ decisions. History
6. Recommendation:

8.2 Strengthening training for hurals

6. The proposed continuation of induction and refresher training by NAoG would only encompass soum and aimag level, but not the bagh level. Given the importance of this lowest tier of governance to ensure that citizens’ needs are reflected adequately in soum and aimag level planning, it is recommended that the aimag level takes on the responsibility to train the Chairs of bagh General Meetings.             

Management Response: [Added: 2019/04/27] [Last Updated: 2021/02/07]

Fully accepted.

Discussions with aimag CRHs for allocation of funding and management responsibilities concerning the bagh chair training after the next elections will be initiated within 2019 by the project and continued in 2020. Discussions will also address responsibility allocation for training delivery, contents upgrades, etc.

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
Discussion with aimag CRHs to be held in 2019 and 2020, and potentially embedded in the general discussion/preparation of the training plan (see below). Integrating the training budget in the Law on Administration, Territorial units and their governance.
[Added: 2019/04/27] [Last Updated: 2021/04/30]
SRBM 2021/05 Completed Efforts were made by the Project to inform and advocate with legislators on ensuring the sustainability of training for CRHs and its funding in the revision of the Law on Administrative and Territorial Units and their Governance. Accordingly, a legal provision was added to the LATUG revision proposal which was approved in December 2020 (Article 44.2 on Working Environment of the Elected Representatives). Based on this provision, all CRHs can commit and approve the specific budget for training of hurals including the training for bagh hurals. In addition, the PIU had been advocating with CRHs on securing a budget for the training of elected representatives. A recent survey by the PIU established that all 21 aimag CRHs approved in their 2021 local budgets training funding ranging from 2 million to 65 million MNT. History
7. Recommendation:

8.2 Strengthening training for hurals

7. As the economy is improving and as some regions / aimags are better placed financially, it is an opportune moment to discuss and develop criteria for cost sharing of training costs and to implement in practice. The Project has facilitated the establishment of working groups of aimag and districts hural secretaries, as task forces to support different project related responsibilities. The appropriate working group can be tasked to discuss and work out steps to implement it.

Management Response: [Added: 2019/04/27] [Last Updated: 2021/02/07]

Fully accepted.

Aimag / district CRHs should develop and approve their own comprehensive training plans with all trainings and funding source (e.g., NAoG for induction, aimags for leadership training and thematic trainings, etc. including cost-sharing by representatives). The project will prepare a model plan with suggestions, which can then be adapted by each CRH.

The project will seek to keep involving the related secretary working group, with a clear work plan.

Discussions about cost-sharing of thematic training modules and take-over of bagh training by aimags (see above) are first steps toward this direction.

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
Support to aimag / district CRHs to develop and approve their training plans, based on model plan. Support to related secretary working group in preparing their annual work plan, and follow-up on it.
[Added: 2019/04/27] [Last Updated: 2020/01/01]
SRBM 2019/12 Completed The effectiveness of SRBM’s interventions can be seen by the increased number of self-initiated public hearings by CRHs across Mongolia as well as the willingness of 18 aimags to share costs for thematic trainings for CRHs organized by SRBM. • 20 CRHs independently and 12 CRHs jointly with six NGOs implemented initiatives to improve their oversight functions in health, education, environment, local budgeting and to increase youth participation in local decision-making with the small grants provided by the project. History
8. Recommendation:

8.2 Strengthening training for hurals

8. It would not be appropriate at this point to do a country wide roll out of the Performance management framework for hurals as evidently proposed by the Consultants. The methodology and the content can be first piloted in a sample of aimags and soums, as already indicated in the project document and focus on indices that disclose member performance on fundamentals of their participation. The Consultants should have “consultations with the Central government, hurals, subject matter experts, and citizens and check against the existing reporting requirements”.

Management Response: [Added: 2019/04/27] [Last Updated: 2021/02/07]

Fully accepted.

The project acknowledges the need for a gradual approach for take-up of the Performance management framework.

First consultations with the Central government, hurals, subject matter experts, and citizens and a check against the existing reporting requirements were completed by the consultants.

The next steps will focus on discussing the framework with the Cabinet Secretariat and pilot it with a few CRHs. Further steps toward take-up of the framework will be taken (AWP 2.6).

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
First consultations with the Central government, hurals, subject matter experts, and citizens and a check against the existing reporting requirements.
[Added: 2019/04/27]
SRBM 2019/01 Completed Consultancy is completed.
Further consultations to be conducted with Cabinet Secretariat, etc. while piloting the framework. Pilot the framework with a few CRHs and revise / fine-tune it with involvement of the secretary working group. Next steps toward adoption to be taken then (AWP 2.6).
[Added: 2019/04/27] [Last Updated: 2020/01/01]
SRBM 2019/12 Completed As per the approved AWP item #2.6, the planned intervention is implemented in consultation with the Cabinet Secretariat. History
9. Recommendation:

8.3 Small grants scheme

9. Small grants have significantly contributed to Hural capacity development and greater citizen engagement. Given the difficulties that some hurals have faced in the present round of small grant projects, it is recommended that hurals be twinned with appropriate NGOs or local resource person/s to support project implementation. This would contribute to drawing on local resources and in connecting them even more in the change process.

Management Response: [Added: 2019/04/27] [Last Updated: 2021/02/07]

This recommendation is partially accepted.

Twinning of CRH grantees with NGOs is already implemented under NGO grants.

The project supports the solution to leverage local trainers as resource persons for coaching CRHs on small grant proposal writing and implementation.

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
Local trainers to be leveraged as resource persons for coaching CRHs on small grant proposal writing and implementation.
[Added: 2019/04/27] [Last Updated: 2020/09/16]
SRBM 2020/09 Completed Local trainers are used as resource persons for CRHs. Encouraging partnership between NGOs and local CRHs as well as exposing the network of trainers in practice have affected positively thein the quality of small grant project formulation and implementation. In 2020, 14 CRHs individually and 8 CRHs in partnership with 5 NGOs have improved their internal procedures and practices through pilots and innovations implemented with the small grants, bringing the total beneficiary numbers to 73 CRHs and 23 NGOs since 2017. History
10. Recommendation:

8.3 Small grants scheme

10. The grants made available to NGOs by the small grant scheme need to be increased. From discussion with NGOs it became evident that they had difficulties in completing commitments with the approved funds. It is recommended that the project makes available fewer grants, but larger amounts with multi-year applicability. This needs to be done without increasing transactions costs. This support to hurals “in order to increase pro-poor focus of its interventions, oversee the executive’s performance in delivering the services and implementation of government programmes aimed at poverty reduction” for women, young people, the poor and vulnerable groups would provide strategic direction. Such support over a longer period of time would increase citizen awareness.

Management Response: [Added: 2019/04/27] [Last Updated: 2021/02/07]

Recommendation partially accepted.

 

While the multi-year approach for NGO grants has some potential, keeping the one-year duration of the NGO grant cycle allows for new NGOs to compete every year and is hence fairer.

For the remainder of the duration of the project, one single grant cycle of extended duration will be implemented, from Spring 2019 to Spring 2020 (before the elections). This will apply to both the NGO and CRH grants. In addition, NGO grantees should continue carrying out capacity-building activities under the grant scheme after the October 2020 elections, thus targeting some newly elected CRHs as well.

NGOs should work toward linking marginalized groups to CRHs (see recommendations 8.3.3 and 8.4.1).

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
Implementation of small grant program with modified duration.
[Added: 2019/04/27] [Last Updated: 2020/09/16]
SRBM 2020/09 Completed As a result of the small grants, participation of youth and women in local decision-making is improving. In 2020, 14 CRHs individually and 8 CRHs in partnership with 5 NGOs have improved their internal procedures and practices through pilots and innovations implemented with the small grants, bringing the total beneficiary numbers to 73 CRHs and 23 NGOs since 2017. The CRHs became more responsive to the needs of marginalized groups and creating precedents for participatory decision-making, budgeting and oversight as a result of the small grant projects, demonstrated by an evaluation (Output Indicator 2.3 ). The achievements and innovative approaches created by the small grant projects are now serving as motivational leverage among the CRHs in implementing their legal mandates. This includes creation of citizens’ monitoring voluntary group next to the CRH to oversee the quality and compliance of the constructions built with the funding of the Local Development Fund (Tumurbulag soum, Khuvsgul aimag) and an inclusive policy-making mechanism to address children’s needs and concerns (Bayankhongor aimag). A total of 230 good practices and examples of CRHs were collected in 2020 and made available for horizontal learning and replication. Moreover, an organic exchange of peer-learning and capacity development facilitating a seamless sharing of knowledge, skills, operational pilots, and innovations is observed (Output Indicator 3.3 ). History
11. Recommendation:

8.3 Small grants scheme

11. The criteria for hural / NGO selection must be reviewed to boost effectiveness, sustainability and relevance. Small grants must reinforce project priorities of increasing pro-poor focus of its interventions and developing public hearings initiated by hurals on general oversight.

Management Response: [Added: 2019/04/27] [Last Updated: 2021/02/07]

Fully accepted.

The pro-poor focus of grants will be reinforced in the call for proposals and review of applications.

Other criteria for selection will be reviewed too, in accordance with the recommendations and past experiences, consulting with UNDP’s Operational Guide on Grants.

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
Revision of the criteria of selection for small grants (including: increased pro-poor orientation).
[Added: 2019/04/27] [Last Updated: 2019/11/02]
SRBM 2019/09 Completed The new criteria is introduced and approved by the Parliament Secretariat in consultation with UNDP. History
12. Recommendation:

8.4 Youth, vulnerable and marginalised

12. The project’s aims with regards to improving inclusiveness should be clarified first before strategic entry points are identified. It is recommended to establish synergies with existing projects that target the poor and marginalized. This could e.g. be envisioned through the grant scheme under Output 2 or in the frame of the planned activities towards increasing citizens’ awareness about their elected representatives. It may provide a catalyst to greater participation by youth. The appropriate time is now. The grant scheme might provide for opportunities to address issues of inclusion more prominently.

Management Response: [Added: 2019/04/27] [Last Updated: 2021/02/07]

Fully accepted.

Further synergies as well as initiatives targeting these target groups will be sought after. For instance, an inclusiveness component (i.e., need for elected representatives to involve marginalized groups) will be embedded in follow-up activities of the WLT (AWP 3.1).

Regarding the small grant scheme, see above comments. CRH good practices for engaging (with) youth will be disseminated.

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
Inclusiveness component (i.e., need for elected representatives to involve marginalized groups) to be embedded in follow-up activities of the WLT (AWP 3.1). Further synergies / entry points for more inclusiveness to be leveraged. Strengthening of inclusiveness component in small grant scheme (see above). CRH good practices for engaging (with) youth will be disseminated.
[Added: 2019/04/27] [Last Updated: 2020/01/01]
SRBM 2019/12 Completed • As a result of leadership trainings delivered by SRBM, local women politicians have been serving the needs of local communities in a more responsive way and with more commitment. Their good practices for improving access to safe water, medical services, pre-school education, monitoring of public services and small loan funds, combating domestic violence and air pollution, waste recycling, community mobilisation, improving community facilities such as street basketball yard, library and street lights, and using social media for online community meetings were compiled, shared and celebrated at a national forum on women leadership which brought together women politicians from all political levels as well as an international audience. History
13. Recommendation:

8.5 Institutionalisation of www.khural.mn

13. The website evidently needs further updating and technical support. The working group tasked with the working of the website can propose actions necessary to ensure that the website fulfils the invaluable dissemination need with enhanced technological competence and transparency. The website is the most visible dimension of hural developments and actions and adds value to the effectiveness of project dissemination.

Management Response: [Added: 2019/04/27] [Last Updated: 2021/02/07]

Fully accepted.

The technical issues experienced in the months leading up to the MTR have now been fixed by the Cabinet Secretariat.

A full upgrade of the website is planned in 2019 via consultancy (AWP 2.5). Training of website admins planned in 2019 AWP (2.5). Further involvement of the related secretary working group is planned.

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
Full upgrade of the website via consultancy (AWP 2.5). Training of website admins (AWP 2.5). Support to related secretary working group in preparing their annual work plan, and follow-up on it.
[Added: 2019/04/27] [Last Updated: 2020/01/01]
SRBM 2019/12 Completed As per the approved AWP, the website upgrade and trainings were organized. History
14. Recommendation:

8.6 Project communication

14. It is recommended that a comprehensive MIS on the number of participants who have undergone training by level of hurals, by region, kind of programme, gender, age, etc. be prepared. This would also provide a baseline for future. The project has a number of reports, surveys etc. but not a comprehensive data picture across all participants. It can then be incorporated with the Training hub proposed by NAoG

Management Response: [Added: 2019/04/27] [Last Updated: 2021/02/07]

This recommendation is partially accepted.

Comprehensive data on the profile of CRH representatives has already been collected by the project. A comprehensive picture of the number and profile of training participants as suggested could be given based on this data (because the different trainings organized so far were organized for all CRHs country-wide and with very high attendance). This data gathering could make especially sense for the remaining years, since thematic trainings are provided on a demand basis.

The Local Governance Research and Innovation Hub to be set up at NAoG (AWP 3.9) could be instrumental in this regard for data collection and storage.

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
Data gathering concerning participants to different trainings organized by the project. Support to establishment of Local Governance Research and Innovation Hub at NAoG and steering of their work for data collection and storage (AWP 3.9).
[Added: 2019/04/27] [Last Updated: 2020/01/01]
SRBM 2019/12 Completed Support provided to the establishment of Local Governance Research and Innovation Hub at NAoG. History
15. Recommendation:

8.6 Project communication

The project has achieved much in capacity building. A document that captures the journey of capacity building in strengthening representative bodies, in building individual and institutional capacities and its impact on the functioning of hurals, is necessary for institutional memory, for dissemination and for reflection. Documentation must include stories of change at the individual and institutional levels backed by evidence of change at the behavioural, attitudinal, and functional levels. Evidence from the Performance management framework and hural survey would be relevant for this documentation.

Management Response: [Added: 2019/04/27] [Last Updated: 2021/02/07]

Recommendation fully accepted.    

The need for a more systematic picture of the capacity-building journey beyond anecdotal / isolated reports is acknowledged.

A compilation of good practices and results is planned in 2019 (AWP 2.4). Accordingly, stories of change at the individual and institutional level will be collected from existing and new documentation and reports.

The final knowledge and communications product can include lessons learnt to be disseminated to the government of Mongolia, to the general audience via social media as well as to other countries (via UNDP and SDC networks).

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
Compilation of good practices and results (stories of change at the individual and institutional level), including lessons learned (AWP 2.4). Dissemination of knowledge and communications product to domestic and international audience.
[Added: 2019/04/27] [Last Updated: 2020/01/01]
SRBM 2019/12 Completed The good practices for improving access to safe water, medical services, pre-school education, monitoring of public services and small loan funds, combating domestic violence and air pollution, waste recycling, community mobilisation, improving community facilities such as street basketball yard, library and street lights, and using social media for online community meetings were compiled, shared and celebrated at a national forum on women leadership which brought together women politicians from all political levels as well as an international audience. History
16. Recommendation:

8.6 Project communication

16. The PIU requires technical support for strengthening both M&E and communication.

Management Response: [Added: 2019/04/27] [Last Updated: 2021/02/07]

Fully accepted.

See below, recommendation 8.7.3 (ad-hoc short term support to be considered).

A specific support and advisory system for the project M&E and Communications will be established at the UNDP CO M&E and Communications unit. A coaching / peer-to-peer arrangement and the plan will be developed in consultation with the UNDP Human Resources

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
Ad-hoc support. Support and advisory system to be set up for the project M&E and Communications.
[Added: 2019/04/27] [Last Updated: 2020/11/30]
SRBM, CO M&E 2020/12 Completed Throughout the year, several in-person discussions and structured sessions through peer2peer support conducted to strengthen the project RBM. Peer-to-peer system works well and it continues in 2021. History
17. Recommendation:

8.7 Project management 

17. It is recommended that to further strengthen capacities in technical guidance and advocacy in local governance in the project, a senior professional be appointed as an Advisor / Consultant. The individual should have a strong background in local governance and be well acquainted with Mongolian law and practice. The individual should preferably be a Mongolian national. This not is suggested as a permanent advisor/ consultant, but to provide critical backstopping support when required.

Management Response: [Added: 2019/04/27] [Last Updated: 2021/02/07]

This recommendation is fully accepted.

An advisor on local governance is strongly needed and on an urgent basis, given the planned timeline for LATUG draft / revision (AWP 1.8).

Additionally, an international consultant is planned to be hired for a short-term assignment to provide input on the final draft of the revised LATUG (AWP 1.2).

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
Hiring of a local governance advisor (AWP 1.8). Hiring of an international consultant for the final LATUG draft (AWP 1.2).
[Added: 2019/04/27] [Last Updated: 2020/06/05]
SRBM 2020/05 No Longer Applicable [Justification: The draft law has been developed and submitted to the Parliament already based on comparative legal research by the drafting team. So international consultant was no longer needed.]
History
18. Recommendation:

8.7 Project management 

18. For strengthening ownership of the PS in activities that needs its attention, such activities may be included in the work plan of the Parliament with allotted responsibilities

Management Response: [Added: 2019/04/27] [Last Updated: 2021/02/07]

This recommendation is fully accepted.

Discussions were held with the respective Heads of the Legal Department and Information, Monitoring and Evaluation Department of the Parliament Secretariat regarding alignment with their annual plans.

A comprehensive work plan was shared by the PS concerning the cooperation with the Swiss Parliamentary Services (SPS). Furthermore, the development of an evaluation methodology, which should benefit support by the SPS, has been included in the 2019 work plan of the PS.

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
Discussions with the respective Heads of the Legal Department and Information, Monitoring and Evaluation Department of the Parliament Secretariat regarding alignment with their annual plans – including for the cooperation with the Swiss Parliamentary Services (SPS).
[Added: 2019/04/27]
SRBM, PS 2019/02 Completed
19. Recommendation:

8.7 Project management

19. The present UNV leaves early next year. It is strongly recommended that the process for recruitment of the new UNV be initiated at the earliest and that the individual be appointed a full month ahead of the departure of the present UNV. This would make for a better handing over and integration into the project.

Management Response: [Added: 2019/04/27] [Last Updated: 2021/02/07]

Fully accepted.

Recruitment for the next UNV will be done asap.

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
Recruitment for the next UNV
[Added: 2019/04/27] [Last Updated: 2019/08/12]
SRBM, UNDP CO 2019/08 Completed Recruited the UNV who is on board from 12 August. History
Management Response: [Added: 2019/04/27] [Last Updated: 2021/02/07]

Partially accepted.

SRBM already has an M&E officer as well as a UNV working on knowledge management. Short term consultancy for final reports and specific assignments may be considered. UNDP CO support will be arranged through specific coaching schedules. 

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
Short term consultancy for final reports and specific assignments considered on a needs basis. UNDP CO support to be arranged through specific coaching schedules.
[Added: 2019/04/27] [Last Updated: 2020/11/30]
SRBM and CO 2020/12 Completed RBM strengthening sessions through peer-to-peer system are organized throughout the year. The project hired a short-term consultant to support in the final reports. History
21. Recommendation:

8.7 Project management

21. Support staff should be recruited as per the project need.

Management Response: [Added: 2019/04/27] [Last Updated: 2021/02/07]

Fully accepted.

Grants assistant is planned to be hired.

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
Hiring grants assistant.
[Added: 2019/04/27] [Last Updated: 2020/04/01]
PS/SRBM 2020/04 No Longer Applicable [Justification: This action is canceled as the new management in the Parliament Secretariat did not approve the hiring of additional support staff.]
This action is canceled as the new management in the Parliament Secretariat did not approve it. History
22. Recommendation:

8.8 The Parliament Secretariat 

21. The ownership of the PS in activities under its oversight needs to be more manifest to stakeholders. Greater visibility of its contribution and leadership to strengthening hurals as representative bodies would immensely serve sustainability and motivate greater participation of stakeholders.

The great value of this project rests in its perceptive and discerning inputs to strengthen local government. The support to buttress the legal framework, enhance capacities of the key institutions, build abilities of the elected and promote citizen participation, is an amazing encompass. That this is done in fullest partnership with the state, roots the effort in reality. Such partnerships inevitably will have operational and ideational differences. What matters is that dialogue is always ongoing. The project has done this. That is to the credit of all the key actors. The progress made would like look small steps today. But the groundwork done till now has long term “significance for equitable and sustainable social and economic and effective, efficient and fair local governments, satisfied citizens, and a genuinely representative and effective civil society”. The next two years must consolidate the gains and utilise the opportunities. 

Management Response: [Added: 2019/04/27] [Last Updated: 2021/02/07]

Fully accepted.

Addressed in recommendation 8.7.2.

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
Discussions with the respective Heads of the Legal Department and Information, Monitoring and Evaluation Department of the Parliament Secretariat regarding alignment with their annual plans – including for the cooperation with the Swiss Parliamentary Services (SPS). (same as 8.7.2)
[Added: 2019/04/27]
SRBM 2019/02 Completed

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