Strengthening the Electoral Cycle in the Solomon Islands Project Final Evaluation Report

Report Cover Image
Evaluation Plan:
2013-2017, Fiji
Evaluation Type:
Final Project
Planned End Date:
12/2017
Completion Date:
12/2017
Status:
Completed
Management Response:
Yes
Evaluation Budget(US $):
25,466

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Title Strengthening the Electoral Cycle in the Solomon Islands Project Final Evaluation Report
Atlas Project Number: 00085818,00072774
Evaluation Plan: 2013-2017, Fiji
Evaluation Type: Final Project
Status: Completed
Completion Date: 12/2017
Planned End Date: 12/2017
Management Response: Yes
Focus Area:
  • 1. Democratic Governance
  • 2. Others
Corporate Outcome and Output (UNDP Strategic Plan 2014-2017)
  • 1. Output 2.1. Parliaments, constitution making bodies and electoral institutions enabled to perform core functions for improved accountability, participation and representation, including for peaceful transitions
Evaluation Budget(US $): 25,466
Source of Funding: EU
Evaluation Expenditure(US $): 25,466
Joint Programme: No
Joint Evaluation: No
Evaluation Team members:
Name Title Email Nationality
GEF Evaluation: No
Key Stakeholders: Solomon Islands Electoral Commission (SIEC) and its Secretariat, and the Office of the Solomon Islands Electoral Commission (OSIEC)
Countries: FIJI
Comments:

The Strengthening the Electoral Cycle Project in the Solomon Islands (SECSIP) was designed as a USD 8,948,198 project to strengthen the electoral cycle in the Solomon Islands from 2012 to 2015. The overarching goal of the project was to enhance the electoral inclusiveness of the Solomon Islands. This included support for the development of a new voter registry for the 2014 national elections. It also aimed at strengthening national authority and civil society organization (CSO) capacity for voter education and electoral reform. Gender mainstreaming was added as an additional output in 2015.

The main partner was the Solomon Islands Electoral Commission (SIEC) and its secretariat, the Office of the Solomon Islands Electoral Commission (OSIEC). The project was amended in 2015 and extended to June 2017. It was funded by the Australian Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade (DFAT), the European Union (EU) and the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP).The project used a direct implementation modality (DIM) and was managed by a Chief Technical Adviser (CTA) under the guidance of the SIEC and a Project Board.

Lessons
1.

Lack of joint programming and information sharing with other assistance efforts for the same institution leads to confusion and disjointed efforts, adversely affecting potential performance of both projects.


Tag: Operational Efficiency Partnership

2.

Electoral assistance is provided within a time bound process. Recruitment of staff, procurement and payments require timely processing for a project to be able to maintain its relevance.


Tag: Operational Efficiency

3.

Technical solutions alone will not resolve problems that are political in nature and require policy engagement. Projects should provide electoral political analysis to facilitate such engagement and inform programming.


Tag: Risk Management Sustainability

4.

The scope of assistance needs to be in scale with the size and capacity of the institutions being assisted or it crowds out local capacity and marginalizes local ownership.


Tag: Sustainability

5.

Gender equality and women’s political participation is a larger issue than elections management and needs relationships and synergies with relevant institutions and partner


Tag: Partnership

6.

Supply side reform assistance needs programmatic synergies with advocacy efforts to complement and supplement the effort and to help push the processes forward.


Tag: Knowledge management Partnership

7.

Reliance on a single person (CTA) as the main advisor, project manager and monitor is unrealistic and affects the quality of work for all of those tasks. It also heightens the risk for the project if something happens to that person or s/he takes leave.


Findings
1.

3. EVALUATION FINDINGS

3.1. Sustainable voter registration system created

The original objective of Output 1 was Sustainable voter registration created to strengthen the inclusiveness and integrity of the electoral cycle. This was shortened to Sustainable Voter Registration system created in the 2015 project revision. As part of this, SECSIP planned to complete preparations for voter registration exercise (Output 1.1); successfully implement the voter registration exercise (Output 1.2); and, enhance the sustainability of and inclusiveness of the registration system (Output 1.3). This effort was intended to complement the anticipated SIG investment of SID 10 million in 2012.22 The project intended to support SIG efforts to introduce a new voter registration system by supporting its planning (budgeting, procurement, logistics) and implementation (training, implementation, review of data) as well as assisting with its updating, and ensuring its inclusiveness and lessons learned. It also anticipated developing a strategy to create and implement a civil registry based on the voter registry experience. This was to be done through the provision of a long term voter registration consultant, consultants for the BRV’s updating and strategy development, training, facilitation for OSIEC’s work (travel, meetings, workshops), advertising and monitoring.23 The main partner for Output 1 was the SIEC, OSIEC and the Provincial Governments. Output 1 was allocated USD 2,365,000 in the original budget estimates listed in the project document. This included USD 535,000 for preparation, USD 1.53 million for registration and USD 220,000 for subsequent updating.24 The actual expenditures as of May 2017 were USD 800,154 (Table 2), most of these for the actual implementation of the BVR


Tag: Effectiveness Election Human rights Rule of law Knowledge management Policies & Procedures Project and Programme management Capacity Building Institutional Strengthening Civil Societies and NGOs National Institutions

2.

3. EVALUATION FINDINGS -3.1. Sustainable voter registration system created (continuation)

As 11% of the BVR centres were not operational and did not register voters, SECSIP recommended a comprehensive voter’s audit be done of the registry after the elections to ensure its quality. A short-term consultant was provided in 2015 who did a data-driven evaluation of the BVR database and who found no major data quality issues. According to the observer reports, “the new register of electors for this election represents a significant improvement. The registration of approximately 85% of the eligible electorate is a significant achievement for the Commission.” The new registry allowed for more accurate planning for the OSIEC for election day, reduced the opportunities for voter fraud and the number of complaints related to fraud, and strengthened public confidence in the SIEC and the voter registry. The observers did raise concerns about the need to registers those who were out of the country during the registration period and for those who turned 18 in the six months between registration and the elections. However, this was not done and the BVR has not been updated since it was created. This needs to be done or it will disenfranchise all of those who have moved or become 18 since April 2014. 


Tag: Effectiveness Election Human rights Rule of law Knowledge management Policies & Procedures Data and Statistics

3.

3.1.2. Enhanced capacity of the SIEC to manage an electoral cycle

The objective for Output 2 was enhanced capacity of the SIEC to manage an electoral cycle. This was revised from the original objective of more efficient and effective administrative procedures designed and implemented for the SIEC to fulfil its mandate. According to the project revision, the rewording was done to “better reflect institutional change.” SECSIP intended to strengthen SIEC capacity through the design and implementation of more efficient and effective administrative procedures (Output 2.1) and improved infrastructures for more efficient electoral management (Output 2.2). Output 3.1, Coordination, communication and planning ability of the SIEC strengthened, was eliminated in the revised project document with coordination activities merged into Outputs 3 and 4. However, coordination-related activities were planned and reported under this output until then. The project intended to strengthen the knowledge and skills of the electoral commissioners and staff through undertaking: a capacity needs assessment; developing training and work plans; supporting training; updating job descriptions; team building; strengthening IT skills; creating a basic SIEC website that could display results; and developing a results management system that could coordinate and match data with the voter registration system. It also looked to purchase GPS units and support the mapping of polling stations and constituency boundaries, upgrade OSIEC office facilities and create storage facilities. Coordination was to be supported through the creation of various task forces with different stakeholders such as the political parties, CSOs, police, donors and Ministry of Education, Human Resources and Development (MEHRD). 


Tag: Effectiveness Efficiency Communication Human and Financial resources Knowledge management Project and Programme management Institutional Strengthening National Institutions

4.

3.1.2. Enhanced capacity of the SIEC to manage an electoral cycle (continuation)

Another issue that affected implementation for this output as well as for Output 1 was the late start up for the project. This pushed most of the pre-electoral activities into the electoral period where many were overcome by events and the need to help deliver the BVR and elections. One of these was the capacity assessment which had been intended to inform the training for Outputs 1 and 2. This was not done until 2016. Nevertheless, the project did provide significant amounts of support to the SIEC/OSIEC for the 2014 elections.The Midterm Review felt this was “another success of SECSIP” (the other was the BVR) and that it had made an important contribution in terms of “supporting capacity development, [but} in some cases supplementing OSIEC capacity.” It noted this support was most notable in the areas of procurement, training of electoral officials and manual updating.

SECSIP did procure a large number of critical items for the elections including the ballot boxes, voting booths, indelible ink, polling station kits, and some of the computers for the results management, as well as printing for the training manuals and procuring helicopter support for the transport of ballot boxes. Procurement costs for these items was almost USD 523,000. 


Tag: Effectiveness Efficiency Election Human rights Human and Financial resources Policies & Procedures Project and Programme management Quality Assurance Results-Based Management Institutional Strengthening National Institutions

5.

3.1.2. Enhanced capacity of the SIEC to manage an electoral cycle (continuation)

SECSIP also supported the development of the SIEC’s website. In the lead up to the elections, it received 21,636 visits, 13,014 of these in November 2014. The most visited elements were the list of candidates and nominations, the election results, voting locations and omissions and objections pages. This provided parties, candidates, CSOs, voters and others with timely information that could not be found elsewhere, such as the list of candidates and voting locations. It also supported the Facebook page, which had up to 1,000 interactions during the election time. Use is down significantly since, with about 148 unique views of the home page between 21 March 2017 – 20 April 2017. Information is dated, with most of the site developed in 2014 and two articles added in 2016 (EMB visit to Nepal and the Regional Conference on Political Stability). Each of these received roughly 4,000 and 2,500 visits respectively. Currently the project is working with a national IT expert to rejuvenate the webpage. The SIEC website was hacked in 2016 through the interactive feature that allowed voters to check their registration and polling sites and the feature was turned off. According to interviews, the review is progressing slowly as the interaction and feedback needed by the expert with the OSIEC has been sporadic and late. This consultancy also includes training for OSIEC staff to help the institution maintain and update its website in the future assuming this staff remains with the institution.  

The project undertook the long overdue capacity assessment of the electoral institutions in 2016, done by a very experienced electoral expert. It included the identification of different scenarios and measures needed to strengthen EMB capacity, including reforms. These findings and recommendations were presented to the Prime Minister and likely fed into the efforts undertaken by the Electoral Reform Task Force that is discussed in Section 3.1.4. 


Tag: Effectiveness Efficiency Election Human rights Human and Financial resources Oversight Partnership Institutional Strengthening South-South Cooperation National Institutions

6.

3.1.2. Enhanced capacity of the SIEC to manage an electoral cycle (continuation)

The project did provide some infrastructure support for the OSIEC. This included upgrading its internet connection, providing containers for temporary storage of non-sensitive materials, and upgrading its electoral system to make it safer and able to handle the institutional electoral load. It also developed terms of reference to develop renovation plans for the OSIEC building. This was put on hold pending the Government’s decision on the premises. This was appropriate given the plans to merge the PPIC with the OSIEC which will likely change the needs considerably from those identified in 2016. It is difficult to assess output results without better performance data. However, for the 2014 elections, the observer reports were generally positive. The Commonwealth stated: We commend the professionalism and diligence demonstrated by the SIEC, despite some operational challenges. .. The SIEC’s efforts to facilitate accuracy of information and transparency in its management and conduct of the polls were commendable. The competent management of election day activities represents further progress for the country in strengthening its democratic practices. It did recommend enhanced training of election officials to ensure greater consistency in the application of procedures and for the SIEC to undertake a lessons learned to strengthen its management of the elections. This lessons learned exercise was supported by the project in 2015. There were a number of issues identified in the different reports that affected the quality of the trainings. This included: late OSIEC decisions on policies and procedures which were made after the training manuals were completed; not completing the recruitment for the Returning Officers before their training, which SECSIP felt had almost derailed the training as the trainees were angry that they did not yet know their terms of reference or rates of pay; and the low rate of female participation. For instance, there were only four women among the 50 Returning Officers.


Tag: Effectiveness Efficiency Election Human rights Public administration reform Rule of law Communication Human and Financial resources Knowledge management Technology Institutional Strengthening National Institutions

7.

3.1.3. Voter awareness and engagement

The objective for this output was for national authorities and local networks to have better capacity to train and educate the population on voter awareness and civic engagement. SECSIP intended to do this through enhancing the strategic ability of the SIEC to conduct and coordinate a public awareness campaign (Output 3.1) and by increasing implementation of civic and voter education strategies (Output 3.2). Coordination was added to this output in the 2015 revision of the project document.

The project intended to hire an international civic education advisor for two years to mentor and work with SIEC on this output. Intended activities included support for civic education planning and strategy development, communications planning, developing educational materials, and supporting the voter education efforts of Returning Officers and polling officials through the provision of resources and training. Increasing women’s and youth political participation were to be key themes as well as creating awareness on introducing TSMs. SECSIP also intended to support the Ministry of Education to introduce democracy and national identity information in the school curriculum, and to support CSOs in developing voter education materials and strategies. The provision of subgrants to implement a national public awareness strategy was added in 2015. The anticipated budget for Output 3 was USD 1,740,000. Actual expenditures were USD 1,797,559 (Table 5). 


Tag: Effectiveness Civic Engagement Election Human rights Communication Knowledge management Education Advocacy Awareness raising Institutional Strengthening National Institutions Women and gilrs Youth

8.

3.1.3. Voter awareness and engagement (continuation)

Nevertheless, the survey did find that the most remembered voter education efforts were the posters and the SIEC awareness groups in both urban and rural contexts (73%), and that the face-toface method was the most trusted way (70%) to pass election information. Text messages and SMS were not well recalled in the survey, with only 10% of the respondents able to recall a voter message. The project spent half of the funds captured in Table 655 on SMS for the BVR awareness efforts. In the electoral period it increased its funding emphasis on posters, from 7% during the BVR to 72% for the elections, which might account for the better recall of the posters a year later. Radio had a 50% recall among respondents, although the higher percentages were from urban areas where the population has better access to media. The project had decreased its emphasis on radio messages from 18% of the expenditures captured in Table 6 for the BVR to 12% for the elections. The amount spent on face-to-face efforts was not available to compare with the other methods used (Table 6)


Tag: Communication Knowledge management Education Technology Advocacy Awareness raising Technical Support Youth

9.

3.1.3. Voter awareness and engagement (continuation)

Subgrants: Eight CSOs were provided sub-grants through a competitive process in 2016. Four of these were for general voter awareness, and the other four to promote women’s political participation (Table 7). Although the voter survey found that only 9% of the respondents could recall messages provided through CSOs, it was still a good addition for the project, at least for a pilot exercise to see how useful and effective subgrants could be. In general, facilitating relevant CSO activities helps to build the constructive engagement of civil society in the electoral process and increases their interest in its quality and results. Several of the subgrantees seemed to be well known organizations that have done other similar efforts, while others were generally unknown and worked further from the capital, which was one of the intentions for this effort. A manual for voter awareness was prepared and UNDP provided compliance training on reporting and other grantee requirements which seemed to be needed by most of them. The project also undertook monitoring missions with the responsible OSIEC officer to check on the implementation of the subgrants and to gather feedback from the participants. The efforts and focus seemed rather disparate, however according to the project, the subgrants were issued pursuant to the OSIEC voter education strategy. Two other larger grants were in the process of being issued to Transparency Solomon Islands and the Media Association of the Solomon Islands (MASI) during the Final Evaluation. Care needs to be taken to ensure that all of the subgrants issued in the future also directly contribute to the higher level outcomes sought by the project. Scattering funds across different activities or needs can be helpful to the recipients, but if the activity does not directly contribute towards achieving the project’s objectives, it limits the project’s relevance, effectiveness and its potential impact. SECSIP should also ensure that it adequate addresses the sustainability elements inherent in the funding of any core institutional staff of grantees, and that these subgrants include an exit strategy for the project. 


Tag: Effectiveness Election Communication Knowledge management Advocacy Awareness raising Capacity Building Civil Societies and NGOs Youth

10.

3.1.3. Voter awareness and engagement (continuation)

School projects. The project implemented two pilot projects in mid to late 2016 with the Ministry of Education. One was an essay contest on women’s political leadership that is discussed in Section 3.1.5. The other was a School Election Project which provided practical experience on the voting process for students in five schools, three in the capital and one each in Malaita and Waimapuru provinces. SECSIP, OSIEC and the Curriculum Division of MEHRD developed the training materials for Year 8 teachers and students along with supplemental material on election penalties and the BVR process which were areas identified as needs in a 2015 review of the national voter education curriculum. OSIEC and SECSIP conducted the two-day awareness effort which included mock elections for student leaders. The activity was well received by the teachers, schools and the Ministry according to reports and interviews. It seems to have reached about 300 students for the first day, and about 220 – 286 students the second day according to the number of student evaluations collected. These asked students to state their level of confidence in understanding the information provided. Overall, 81% of the students said they were confident that they understood the topics, while 16% thought they understood but were not certain. Three percent said they did not understand it. The topics with the most confidence shown were on the voting process (94%,) vote counting (93%) and importance of voting (90%). The least confidence was expressed for understanding the role of the MPs (60%). The participatory aspects of the mock voting likely accounted for the high confidence rate for the actions related to polling.


Tag: Effectiveness Election Human rights Communication Knowledge management Country Government Education Advocacy Awareness raising Capacity Building Youth

11.

3.1.4 Electoral reform

The original intention for this output was to support electoral and legal reform to contribute to a stronger electoral commission and representative democracy. This was shorted for “simplicity and clarity” in the 2015 revision to support electoral and legal reform. The project originally intended to do this through strengthening the legal capacity of the SIEC (Output 4.1) with the provision of a national legal adviser for the duration of the project. The adviser would review SIEC procedures, relevant legislation, provide options for the legal and electoral reforms and for the adoption of TSMs for the representation of women in Parliament. The legal adviser was also to “create a dialogue on democracy and representation in the Solomon Islands through workshops.”

This output was amended in the project revision to improving the SIEC’s legal reform coordination capacity. It expected to continue work “with the ESSP” to support the SIEC to help “interpret the legal framework within its operational procedures.” It also intended to provide comparative models of electoral administration, primarily to the SIEC Commissioners and the CEO’s Office, which included a focus on “universal principles, international standards and best practices for democratic elections.” It also expected to provide support to the Electoral Reform Taskforce created in 2015, and continue assistance to the SIEC for its regulation development. The 2015 revision also added a second output to enhance the reform initiatives of the PPIC (Output 4.2) in order to expand SECSIP’s work with the PPIC as another important EMB body. This was to include institutional capacity support as well as assistance with the PPIC’s electoral reform efforts.61 The estimated budget for Output 4 was USD 351,000. Actual expenditures were USD 291,260 (Table 8)


Tag: Effectiveness Gender Equality Women's Empowerment Election Justice system Public administration reform Rule of law Institutional Strengthening Technical Support National Institutions

12.

3.1.4 Electoral reform (continuation)

SECSIP did contract some well-known senior experts for this output and their expertise and insight was appreciated by the Government and other participants. In particular, the workshop in 2015,  which included other non-SECSIP experts and ESSP, was said to have set the foundations for the current reform efforts. A recent options paper was seen as ‘brilliant,’ but so brilliant that most asked for it to be put into simpler terms and tied closer to the SI context to make it more understandable and useful for them. One of the SIEC Commissioners suggested that the modified version then be translated and disseminated. However, care needs to be taken first to be sure that the paper has not already been overcome by events and is still relevant and needed given the state of the reform process since it was done. The EU now also has a bilateral expert working on drafting the amended electoral act and a revised version of the Political Party Integrity Act which the Government expected to present to Cabinet in July as of the time of this Evaluation. 


Tag: Effectiveness Efficiency Election Public administration reform Rule of law Communication Human and Financial resources Policies & Procedures Country Government Institutional Strengthening National Institutions

13.

3.1.4 Electoral reform (continuation)

Issues related to elections and strengthening women’s political participation are brought up within that context. However, SECSIP still has a technical and activity-based approach to achieving its outputs, and most electoral policy issues are raised only intermittently or at opportune moments. It also supported the current effort to support dialogue onelectoral reform, but its role was largely administrative. These efforts could be strengthened considerably by having SECSIP and the ESSP work with the SIEC to develop a strategic vision for strengthening the electoral processes and the integrity of the system at the policy levels, identify the policy changes that need to be done to achieve that vision and to come up with a common action plan for the advocacy and actions needed to achieve those changes. This should factor in the current reform effort and its anticipated outcomes, and leverage the comparative and strategic advantages of UNDP and SECSIP’s development partners. The intention to strengthen SECSIP II’s management staff should relieve the CTA from much of her current day-to-day administrative work which will leave more time for strategy development and policy engagement. Another issue that affected the relevance and efficacy of project performance is the parallel technical support provided by the ESSP. One of the ESSP senior advisers has played the role of legal adviser to the SIEC and other stakeholders for a long time, and his relationships predates the UNDP project. The project design did not adequately take this factor, or the political context, into account. Although the current CTA is a lawyer, the space for two legal advisers within the OSIEC is limited and she remains a largely untapped resource in this regard. Although coordination between ESSP and SECSIP has been a systemic issue noted throughout the project, coordination for the implementation of the recent consultations seemed to be good. Participants saw the conference as one cohesive effort which is much more effective than each project working in parallel.


Tag: Effectiveness Efficiency Gender Equality Women's Empowerment Election Strategic Positioning Advocacy Awareness raising Coordination Institutional Strengthening National Institutions

14.

3.1.4 Electoral reform (continuation)

The training of parties in 2016 and 2017 was a useful first step. The timing was appropriate as parties are consumed by election preparations closer to the electoral periods. The project funded two experienced political consultants to provide two multiparty trainings. These were based on a 2015 scoping mission they had undertaken directly for the PPIC. That mission identified two major areas for assistance: party capacity building and mentoring. The first training focused on the practical aspects of how to run a political party, campaign, organize, develop a manifesto and comply with regulations. The underlying premise was that if parties were stronger, governments would be stronger, last longer and could focus more on development issues. The target was for three to five of the 13 registered parties to absorb the lessons and develop stronger, more issues based campaigns. 

The parties thought this was an extremely useful event and it got universally good reviews in interviews. However, the second training intended for party trainer of trainers (TOT) was pushed back for several months because of a political crisis. This delay broke the momentum for the effort. Fewer parties and representative attended the second training, and the PPIC Director was absent. Instead of doing the intended training for party members in two provincial capitals, they did a TOT in Honiara for the seven parties that showed up, and gave each, plus an eighth party, individual mentoring. They also discovered during the training that a simultaneous BRIDGE training was being done by the AEC for parties on a political party code of conduct, and that some of the participants from the first training did not even know that their second training was taking place. This unfortunately illustrates the recurrent implementation issues of coordination and national ownership that affected the efficacy, potential impact and sustainability of project efforts. 


Tag: Effectiveness Efficiency Resource mobilization Gender Equality Gender Mainstreaming Women's Empowerment Election Communication Knowledge management Policies & Procedures Disabilities Institutional Strengthening National Institutions

15.

3.1.5. Mainstreaming gender (continuation)

Electoral period. Most of the gender work in the electoral period was ad hoc, taking advantage of windows of opportunity as they arose during the process. The initial gender adviser arrived so late in 2014 that most of the training materials had already been developed leaving little room for modifications. Election personnel had also been recruited, done with “little or no regard” for gender. Less than 30% of the electoral staff recruited in 2014 were women, most of these at polling assistant level. This was down 5.4% from the number hired in 2010. However, the project report states that it was still able to ensure that some voter awareness materials targeted marginalized voters (PWD, battered women and first time voters) and that some showed women in powerful positions, such as polling officers. This was a visible way to highlight women’s in leadership roles in the process. SECSIP also supported a short session with all of the female candidates to provide a “safe space for the candidates to express their concerns and to feel more confident to contest the election in an extremely patriarchal context.” Results beyond holding the activity and providing an opportunity for the women to discuss issues among themselves and with the OSIEC are unknown but likely limited. It was a one-time effort without any follow up visible at this point in time that could have determined its results or provided further support for women’s political participation in the electoral period. The same is likely the case for the half day session held with the media on gender-sensitive reporting. There is no data available to know if this resulted in better reporting or more coverage of women’s participation issues. The Midterm Review, done in March 2015 found that the project still had not engaged in gender issues in a substantive way.


Tag: Effectiveness Efficiency Gender Equality Gender Mainstreaming Women's Empowerment Election Communication Human and Financial resources Policies & Procedures Awareness raising Institutional Strengthening Civil Societies and NGOs National Institutions

16.

3.1.5. Mainstreaming gender (continuation)

The technical advisers in mid-to-late 2016 helped the OSIEC to develop a draft gender policy and reviewed all of the institutional procedures with a gender perceptive. The policy was formally adopted in the SIEC commission meeting held in May 2017. With the OSIEC, SECSIP also organized a student essay competition on Women’s Leadership and Political Participation in partnership with the MEHRD. Although the participation rate by the schools was disappointing, with only 41 essays received for the four age groups, the award ceremony was a high profile event. The Prime Minister was the key note speaker and winners were brought to Honiara and given computers. The project ensured the effort was covered by the national media and broadcast on television. This visibility and the tangible nature of the award are likely to increase school and student interest in the next competition. SECSIP also supported a lessons learned on the exercise which should help to increase its efficacy for 2017. Sustainability for the contest in the near term is doubtful without SECSIP driving the effort. Officials in MEHRD liked the contest but were waiting for SECSIP/OSIEC to initiate the next moves. Impact of the competition on the schools and participating students is unknown as follow up data has not been collected. In 2015, OSIEC/SECIP met with women’s organizations and leaders in five provinces to discuss the development of an action plan targeting women’s leadership and gender awareness raising. This ultimately resulted in the issuance of the sub-grants for women’s participation (Table 7). Some of the grantees were well-known CSOs that have run similar programmes for other projects and donors, while others were less known. In this, some of the grantees had been trained as TOT by UN Women in 2013 on transformational leadership, and they used those trainers and materials to help implement their micro-grant activities. 


Tag: Effectiveness Impact Sustainability Gender Equality Gender Mainstreaming Women's Empowerment Election Communication Knowledge management Policies & Procedures Technology Awareness raising Capacity Building Youth

17.

3.1.5. Mainstreaming gender (continuation)

The subgrants seemed to be a good addition, however, care needs to be taken to ensure that they contribute directly to the objectives of the project and are incorporated into the larger programmatic effort to strengthen the electoral process and women’s participation and leadership in those processes. There also needs to be sufficient follow up with the participants, and synergies with other efforts that can increase their reach and effectiveness. As an example, Vois Blo Mere targeted 20 teachers in Honiara for one of their transformational leadership trainings, seeing teachers as agent of change. If information on the school awareness pilot and essay contest were included in their workshop, it could help raise awareness among the participants of these school initiatives and expanded their reach and effectiveness for the 2017 efforts. Linkages with UN Women and other efforts to support women’s leadership and equality seemed limited to some information sharing and joint participation in some of the workshops and electionera efforts. Increasing programmatic synergies and planning with UN Women, especially for the efforts to support women candidates and reforms in the lead up to the 2018/2019 elections, could help strengthen the efforts of both SECSIP and UN Women. 


Tag: Effectiveness Efficiency Gender Equality Gender Mainstreaming Women's Empowerment Election Human and Financial resources Monitoring and Evaluation Project and Programme management Results-Based Management Capacity Building Civil Societies and NGOs Youth

18.

3.2. SESCIP design and management

3.2.1 Project design

The project design provided the framework for an integrated programme of assistance focused on strengthening the ‘electoral cycle.’ It was based on a 2011 request from the SIEC Chairman for UN assistance to implement its 2011-2015 operational plan. This was the first time that the SIG had requested UN assistance for the elections. Previously UNDP had coordinated international observers (2010) and the UN had fielded an Election Expert Monitoring Team (2001). SECSIP’s design was based on the findings of the NAM subsequently done by the EAD and UNDP which approved the provision of UN elections assistance to the Solomon Islands. SECSIP also intended to contribute to the National Development Plan of the Solomon Islands (Box 8).The use of an electoral cycle approach for an elections assistance project is a best practice. This allows for the project to work on sensitive issues, such as electoral law reform, and development issues, such as capacity building for electoral staff, in the quieter times between elections. The design’s framework for assistance was holistic and covers the essential tasks needed for a strengthened EMB, electoral system and voter participation. However, the design seemed to rely on the ‘cycle approach’ for its theory of change, while a cycle approach only means that the assistance is targeted at the process over time rather than provided punctually for a topical event such as an election.  


Tag: Effectiveness Relevance Gender Mainstreaming Election Public administration reform Rule of law Programme/Project Design Results-Based Management Theory of Change Institutional Strengthening Technical Support National Institutions

19.

3.2.1 Project design (continuation)

The ultimate purpose for the project is also listed once as to “help the Solomon Islands and SIEC strengthen their democratic processes in accordance with their own needs.” Missing in this are references to the expected standards. It is also notable that the project revision eliminated the overarching purposes for Outputs 1 and 4. These were “to strengthen the inclusiveness and integrity of the electoral cycle” (Output 1) and to “contribute to a stronger electoral commission and representative democracy” (Output 4). Although this was done for ‘simplicity and clarity’, articulating standards in a project document and results framework is important. As noted in UNDP’s guide for electoral assistance, “UN electoral assistance has two primary goals: to assist Member States in their efforts to hold credible and legitimate elections in accordance with internationally recognized standards; and to contribute to building, in the recipient country, a sustainable institutional capacity to organize democratic elections that are genuine and periodic and have the full confidence of the contending parties and the electorate.


Tag: Efficiency Relevance Election Human and Financial resources Programme/Project Design Results-Based Management Theory of Change

20.

3.3.2 Programme implementation and management

The project had a late start up, funding, and difficulties filling positions. It was not signed until almost a year after the NAM and the CTA did not start until little more than a year before the 2014 elections date. Donor funding also arrived late, and the project was started up with funds advanced by UNDP. The initial CTA was also out of the country for periods of time, and the gaps were filled with a series of short term electoral management experts. All were experienced and knowledgeable, however this affected the continuity of the project and its programmatic coherence as the CTA was the primary advisor and manager for the project. The outputs selected provided a broad framework to support an electoral process, and adding in the PPIC and political party system provided entry points for more strategically focused assistance. There was some programmatic logic behind the choices for most activities, both in the design and during implementation despite the project’s lack of a theory of change. However, the programmatic aspects were largely undeveloped, and implementation remained mainly at the activity level which is where most of the results are found. The project was also implemented narrowly, focused on the activities and technical assistance. This is insufficient when the problems are larger than technical. The Midterm Review consistently raised the need for more attention to the broader contextual issues and to electoral reform by the project and UNDP senior management in order to increase the project’s relevance and effectiveness. Current UNDP and project management are more active in this area, and especially UNDP in its peacebuilding activities which could provide a model and lessons learned for more strategic engagement for SECSIP II. 


Tag: Efficiency Election Donor relations Partnership Project and Programme management Results-Based Management Theory of Change Country Government

21.

3.3.2 Programme implementation and management (continuation)

The issue of project ownership was noted throughout project reports and the Midterm Review. The Review discussed the “non-participation” of the SIG and SIEC in project board and Technical Advisory Committee (TAC) meetings and the fact that the CEO had not attended any project board meetings  in 2014. This was a significant indicator that needed to have been more aggressively addressed at the policy level at the time by the SIG, UNDP and development partners as recommended by the Review. Not only was the OSIEC the main partner for the project, it was an election year when the project was actively engaged in helping that institution to deliver the elections. Although the CEO has since left, remaining OSIEC staff are only nominally engaged in the project in areas that are not perceived as their institutional priorities or for issues that are “not in line with the readiness of the commission.


Tag: Efficiency Human and Financial resources Oversight Ownership Project and Programme management Results-Based Management Risk Management Coordination

22.

3.3.2 Programme implementation and management (continuation)

At the time of the Final Evaluation field work, everyone seemed to be waiting for the electoral reforms to be enacted so that the OSIEC as an institution could be strengthened through a merger with the PPIC. This seemed to be near and may help with the issues of the scale and provide for a more substantial institution as a counterpart, especially with the gearing up expected in the next year for the 2018/2019 elections. But for a project that goes beyond the next election, a more balanced approach is needed for the time in between the election events, one that is more in line with the scale of the institution.  

The choice of a direct execution modality for the project was appropriate in the context but more efficient project management and monitoring systems are needed. The project document had a long list of planned activities and a very small management and advisory team (Box 2). The initial CTA had a compressed timeframe in which to work and deliver support for the 2014 elections, and the current CTA has been consumed by the administrative efforts for the activities undertaken. UNDP has stringent quality controls and administrative requirements, all of which take a considerable level of effort. Before changes made in 2016, administration was also complicated by the fact that the UNDP office in the Solomon Islands was part of the UNDP Pacific Regional Office which operates out of Fiji. This added another layer of administrative approvals, and processing times although UNDP Solomon Islands always had the authority to directly recruit consultants and issue contracts. 


Tag: Efficiency Resource mobilization Election Human rights Public administration reform Implementation Modality Monitoring and Evaluation Operational Efficiency Project and Programme management

23.

3.3.2 Programme implementation and management (continuation)

The new project currently being discussed anticipates strengthening the project management unit. This is expected to include a P3 international project manager which should help to alleviate much of the administrative burden for the CTA and increase project efficiency. There is already a new programme assistance recruited and a short-term administrative assistant (Box 9). The CTA has started a weekly meeting to share information, however with a larger staff, coordination within the project should be strengthened and the weekly meeting expanded to include the relevant UNDP programmatic and administrative offices so that they are aware of upcoming activities and can help develop programmatic synergies (for the programme side) and plan accordingly (for the administrative side). This can help to ensure more cohesive planning and information sharing within the SECSIP team and facilitate project management and monitoring. The project should also ensure the UNDP governance office and country management are informed of critical issues and activities and advised on areas where UNDP can be supportive at the policy level. 


Tag: Efficiency Human and Financial resources Operational Efficiency Programme/Project Design Project and Programme management Results-Based Management

24.

3.3.3. Programme monitoring and reporting

Project reporting was generally timely and regular. There are annual reports for every year since 2013, as well as some quarterly and monthly reports. These provide a good overview of the project’s activities, organized by outputs. Current reports provide text boxes with project progress and follow-up actions needed which is a useful summary of activity results. The reports also provide information on project management. The 2014 report, which includes information on the BVR and elections, is the most comprehensive. It provided some disaggregated data about training participants, lists of items procured for the BVR and elections, and the type and number of voter education materials produced. It also provided expenditure data by outputs and for some components within them, such as voter education materials. Providing expenditure data is an important element of performance reporting and for understanding how the project funding was used and if the efforts were cost-effective for the results reported. That report was also very frank about the constraints encountered and lessons learned. Subsequent reports are not as comprehensive and could be significantly strengthened by including: the expenditures by output for that year and previous years; reporting on progress made against targets from the results and resource framework (in this case from 2015 since this element was  incomplete in the original project document); providing disaggregated data by gender/location/organization for participants/trainees etc; and by aggregating the data to show the total amount of persons reached by the output and project. All of this information is important and needed to assess project reach, performance and results. 


Tag: Challenges Efficiency Election Human and Financial resources Monitoring and Evaluation Results-Based Management Data and Statistics

25.

3.3.3. Programme monitoring and reporting (continuation)

However, this has not been easy. For instance, during the lead up to the 2014 elections, SECSIP/OSIEC arranged with the Australian civilian officers assigned to each provincial office to report back on the quality of the trainings done by the Returning Officers. This was a good idea from an elections management perspective as well as from a project evaluation perspective. However, the annual report noted the significant amount of effort that had gone into developing the evaluation protocols which apparently were completed and returned. However, it goes on to state that this qualitative and quantitative data was not collated or analyzed which negated the entire effort.


Tag: Effectiveness Efficiency Human and Financial resources Monitoring and Evaluation Project and Programme management Results-Based Management

Recommendations
1

4.2. Recommendations

Continued support to the institutions and principles of strengthening the electoral processes in the Solomon Islands.

 Work still needs to be done to improve the quality of the electoral process, electoral administration, competition and representation, EMB oversight, political party accountability and the fairness of the electoral system among others. The project should also complete the work started on the reform process and help the state institutions implement those reforms. 

2

Clearly articulate the strategic vision for the project in the project document and ensure that the project maintains that focus during implementation.

 Ensure that all activities selected directly contribute towards achieving the strategic vision, and that this vision is shared by the partner institutions. Use the project’s M&E plan to monitor progress towards achieving the strategic level outcomes as well as the implementation of outputs. 

3

Adopt a strategic and programmatic focus for project delivery by synergizing project activities and building on activities to increase performance and contributions towards the higher level outcomes.

Include synergies to other projects to extent project reach and strengthen effectiveness. Other projects could include: women’s empowerment, civic education, transparency/accountability/anti-corruption, watchdog, media, parliament, justice, peacebuilding, public service, and reforms. 

4

Take ESSP and the planned AEC assistance into consideration in the design of SECSIP II and avoid duplication of efforts.

Strengthen coordination between technical assistance efforts and undertake joint work planning and strategy development for the duration of the assistance. Ensure design efforts for SECSIP II are inclusive and include the ESSP, OSIEC, PPIC and other actors to improve relevance and the longer term prospects for sustainable outcomes. Maintain the flexibility of the subgrant component but use it strategically to contribute to the higher level outcomes. Increase emphasis on the PPIC and strengthening the political party system. Ensure appropriate scale and scope of assistance to institutions according to the needs of the cycle and nature of the institution. 

5

Maximize UNDP’s strategic advantage including its ability to convene and provide a safe space for discussions to advance the policy dialogue and leverage the policy work being done through other related projects uch as the peacebuilding project, to strengthen the electoral system and institutions which have the same objectives. 

Link the policy dialogue and advocacy efforts for electoral reforms to the objectives of the SDGs and the national discussions on how to achieve those goals. In particular, for SDG 5 (gender equality) and SDG 16 (Peace, Justice and Strong Institutions) which have the same objectives as SECSIP. 

 

6

Increase focus on the sustainability elements of assistance.

Avoid one-off efforts and supporting activities that create a dependence on external assistance for their continuity, including for large subgrants. Build an exit strategy into the follow on phase

7

Strengthen project management and M&E efforts.

The addition of a project manager for the follow on project should help relieve some of the immediate pressures. However, ensure timely attention to planning and to the financial and procurement needs of the project, especially for the upcoming elections period. Ensure systematic tracking and monitoring of project performance beyond achievement of activity outputs and develop adequate baselines, targets and indicators early on in the follow-on project. 

8

Provide opportunities for the Government of Solomon Islands (GSI) to reaffirm its commitment to improving the integrity of the electoral process and its administration, and for the measures needed to ensure that integrity (legal reforms, electoral justice and the provision of adequate resources for the EMBs and processes).

1. Recommendation:

4.2. Recommendations

Continued support to the institutions and principles of strengthening the electoral processes in the Solomon Islands.

 Work still needs to be done to improve the quality of the electoral process, electoral administration, competition and representation, EMB oversight, political party accountability and the fairness of the electoral system among others. The project should also complete the work started on the reform process and help the state institutions implement those reforms. 

Management Response: [Added: 2017/12/11] [Last Updated: 2021/01/30]

The recommendation is relevant and we agree with it. Given the fact that improving the quality of the electoral process will encompasses several competing but important areas (voter registration, electoral administration including voter education and electoral reform process) which cannot be addressed within a short period, therefore it is essential that support is continued for these key electoral institutions and processes in Solomon Islands throughout the electoral cycle.

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
The support for key areas to improve the quality of the electoral process (voter registration, electoral administration including voter education and electoral reform process) are continued in phase II of the project.
[Added: 2017/12/11] [Last Updated: 2020/04/15]
Implementing Partner (UNDP) 2020/04 Completed Marked as completed. This key action is continuously implemented under the SECSIP Phase 2 History
2. Recommendation:

Clearly articulate the strategic vision for the project in the project document and ensure that the project maintains that focus during implementation.

 Ensure that all activities selected directly contribute towards achieving the strategic vision, and that this vision is shared by the partner institutions. Use the project’s M&E plan to monitor progress towards achieving the strategic level outcomes as well as the implementation of outputs. 

Management Response: [Added: 2017/12/11] [Last Updated: 2021/01/30]

Agree with the recommendation. The OSIEC corporate plan 2015-2018 provides the framework for achieving the strategic vision of the project which are aligned to the agreed key components of the project. This will ensure that the project maintains the focus of implementation throughout the life of the project, SECSIP Phase II project identifies activities with a general electoral focus and those with a long term focus which should continue to be addressed as are considered necessary to continue building on the enhancement of electoral capacities as required by the electoral cycle approach

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
The agreed five components of the project when implemented will contribute to a stronger electoral commission and representative democracy through sustainable voter registration system, electoral, legal and administrative reforms and capacity building of national and local networks for civic engagement and voter awareness including coordinating mechanisms for enhancement of women’s political.
[Added: 2017/12/11] [Last Updated: 2020/04/15]
Implementing Partner (UNDP) 2020/04 Completed Marked as completed. This key action is continuously implemented under the SECSIP Phase 2 History
3. Recommendation:

Adopt a strategic and programmatic focus for project delivery by synergizing project activities and building on activities to increase performance and contributions towards the higher level outcomes.

Include synergies to other projects to extent project reach and strengthen effectiveness. Other projects could include: women’s empowerment, civic education, transparency/accountability/anti-corruption, watchdog, media, parliament, justice, peacebuilding, public service, and reforms. 

Management Response: [Added: 2017/12/11] [Last Updated: 2021/01/30]

Agree with recommendation. A strategic and programmatic focus for project delivery will be adopted to create synergies amongst related projects, especially in voters civic education components of the project and other related ones such as peace building project and anti-corruption project to increase performance to project outcome.  With the transition after RAMSI exit, consolidation of peace dividends after the ethnic tensions will contribute to enhancing inclusiveness and credibility of national general election outcomes. For example, in activities engaging youth, SECSIP has already started collaborating with the Peacebuilding project with a strong focus on youth and innovation, to identify stakeholders and capitalize on existing activities. SECSIP continues to enhance its cooperation with other UNDP Regional Projects supporting the consolidation of a multi-party system. Additionally, efforts are being made to enhance collaboration with other international partners including EU in particular areas including civil society and media.

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
Initiate proactive discussions with other UNDP governance projects (anti-corruption and peacebuilding project) on a regular basis, first through regular monthly meeting organized and led by the Effective Governance Team Leader. Periodical meetings with the UNDP Governance regional projects including those focusing on the support to parliament, multi-party system and women’s leadership have been also established.
[Added: 2017/12/11] [Last Updated: 2020/04/15]
Implementing Partner 2020/04 Completed Marked as completed. This key action is continuously implemented under the SECSIP Phase 2 History
4. Recommendation:

Take ESSP and the planned AEC assistance into consideration in the design of SECSIP II and avoid duplication of efforts.

Strengthen coordination between technical assistance efforts and undertake joint work planning and strategy development for the duration of the assistance. Ensure design efforts for SECSIP II are inclusive and include the ESSP, OSIEC, PPIC and other actors to improve relevance and the longer term prospects for sustainable outcomes. Maintain the flexibility of the subgrant component but use it strategically to contribute to the higher level outcomes. Increase emphasis on the PPIC and strengthening the political party system. Ensure appropriate scale and scope of assistance to institutions according to the needs of the cycle and nature of the institution. 

Management Response: [Added: 2017/12/11] [Last Updated: 2021/01/30]

Agree with the recommendation. Initial meetings of the two projects have already taken place facilitated by UNDP and DFAT. TORs and workplans of the ESSP advisors were also shared for the first time with SECSIP. ESSP Advisers have been invited to observe the procurement process for the engagement of SECSIP consultants and have collaborated in the drafting of ToRs.

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
The design of SECSIP II was inclusive of ESSP, and other electoral actors to improve relevance and longer-term prospects for sustainable outcomes for the project and established mechanisms to enhance coordination. This includes the on-going regular attendance of ESSP advisers to SECSIP project staff weekly meetings. Additionally, an internal information sharing amongst advisers on biweekly basis is ongoing and more formally, on monthly basis to harmonize multi-lateral and bi-lateral electoral assistance.
[Added: 2017/12/11]
Implementing Partner 2017/06 Completed History
5. Recommendation:

Maximize UNDP’s strategic advantage including its ability to convene and provide a safe space for discussions to advance the policy dialogue and leverage the policy work being done through other related projects uch as the peacebuilding project, to strengthen the electoral system and institutions which have the same objectives. 

Link the policy dialogue and advocacy efforts for electoral reforms to the objectives of the SDGs and the national discussions on how to achieve those goals. In particular, for SDG 5 (gender equality) and SDG 16 (Peace, Justice and Strong Institutions) which have the same objectives as SECSIP. 

 

Management Response: [Added: 2017/12/11] [Last Updated: 2021/01/30]

Good recommendation and the SECSIP will build on the success of previous initiatives including the 2015 regional conferences on election systems and women’s participation and the more recent support to the Dialogues on options for a new election system held in 2016. The  idea of maximizing UNDP’s strategic advance and the link to national discussions is a step in the right direction, given the policy sensitive nature of the governance issues and ownership of implementing the SDGs (5 & 16) at national level. Can be implemented in partnership collaboration with other UN agencies and stakeholders.

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
This will provided through building/establishing partner initiatives with other UN actors (UN Women, UNICEF, World Bank), government agencies and civil society organizations. The project through the effective governance unit has established coordination mechanisms to increase linkages and synergies with activities of other UNDP actors including those being implemented by the Peace Building Project in Solomon Islands as well as with other regional projects from UNDP Pacific Office located in Suva working in the areas of parliamentary support, political parties and anti-corruption, as previously indicated.
[Added: 2017/12/11] [Last Updated: 2020/04/15]
Implementing Partner 2020/04 Completed Marked as completed. This key action is continuously implemented under the SECSIP Phase 2 History
6. Recommendation:

Increase focus on the sustainability elements of assistance.

Avoid one-off efforts and supporting activities that create a dependence on external assistance for their continuity, including for large subgrants. Build an exit strategy into the follow on phase

Management Response: [Added: 2017/12/11] [Last Updated: 2021/01/30]

Strongly agree in view of the need for increasing the sustainability and perhaps on a phased exit strategy approach given the complex nature and dynamics of promoting electoral inclusiveness in Solomon Islands.

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
A two year and a half broader graduate program is will be established would see employees rotated between the OSIEC, Parliament, the PPC and gain some experience in the provinces with special consideration should be given to the inclusion of women at all levels in the staffing structure of OSIEC. The first round of graduates would be able to directly support the 2019 General Elections
[Added: 2017/12/11] [Last Updated: 2020/04/15]
Implementing Partner 2020/04 Completed Marked as completed. This key action is continuously implemented under the SECSIP Phase 2 History
Hiring of national UNVs to fill relevant positions within OSIEC
[Added: 2017/12/11] [Last Updated: 2020/04/15]
Implementing Partner 2020/04 Completed Marked as completed. This key action is continuously implemented under the SECSIP Phase 2 History
7. Recommendation:

Strengthen project management and M&E efforts.

The addition of a project manager for the follow on project should help relieve some of the immediate pressures. However, ensure timely attention to planning and to the financial and procurement needs of the project, especially for the upcoming elections period. Ensure systematic tracking and monitoring of project performance beyond achievement of activity outputs and develop adequate baselines, targets and indicators early on in the follow-on project. 

Management Response: [Added: 2017/12/11] [Last Updated: 2021/01/30]

Strongly agree. Project governance and management arrangement for phase II has been improved with inclusion of additional officers both at the management and operational levels to ensure effective financial management for project implementation and tracking and monitoring of project performance.

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
In the second phase of the project, the PMU capacity has been considerably strengthened. In addition to the CTA and project assistant, a dedicated international P3 project coordinator position has been created to allow CTA to focus on technical advice. An M&E officer (IUNV) position has also been created to improve monitoring and reporting. Recruitment of Project Coordination Specialist and International UNV M&E Reporting Officer in phase II has been initiated and positions should be filled before November 2017.
[Added: 2017/12/11] [Last Updated: 2018/04/29]
Implementing Partner (UNDP) 2018/01 Completed Project Coordination Specialist is already on board since November 2017 thus now awaiting the Recruitment of UNV M&E officer pending shortlisting and interviews. Both Project Coordination Specialist and UNV M&E Officer have been recruited. History
8. Recommendation:

Provide opportunities for the Government of Solomon Islands (GSI) to reaffirm its commitment to improving the integrity of the electoral process and its administration, and for the measures needed to ensure that integrity (legal reforms, electoral justice and the provision of adequate resources for the EMBs and processes).

Management Response: [Added: 2017/12/11] [Last Updated: 2021/01/30]

Agree with recommendation. Since its commencement, the project’s technical assistance has contributed to enhance the measures concerning the integrity of the electoral process for example through the support to the BVR and operations. The project continues to focus on integrity aspects including support to the legislative reform through the engagement of a Legislative Drafter for the Electoral and Political Parties Bill and advocating for the allocation of resources for the effective implementation of the mandate of the EMB and the administration of elections. However, it is noted that ,  project activities may only have indirect impact on decision making process with respect to the legal reform. The project is committed to continue advocating, advising and encouraging GSI on the referred aspects.

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
Government officials (PPC & SIEC) and Political Party representatives’ participation in the Regional Political Parties Dialogue: Does the Pacific need Political Parties? held in Fiji.
[Added: 2017/12/11]
Implementing Partner (UNDP) 2017/09 Completed Pending Dialogue report from UNDP Fiji.
Round table discussions with Government official on specific related topics including in-country workshops.
[Added: 2017/12/11] [Last Updated: 2020/04/15]
Implementing Partner (UNDP) 2020/04 Completed Marked as completed. This key action is continuously implemented under the SECSIP Phase 2 History
Analysis of electoral procedures and manuals conducted by Senior Electoral Adviser Carlos Valenzuela in August 2017.
[Added: 2017/12/11]
Implementing Partner (UNDP) 2017/12 Completed Reports produced by Consultant are submitted to the project and Country office. History
Engagement of legislative drafter for the revision of the Electoral and Political Parties Act.
[Added: 2017/12/11] [Last Updated: 2018/04/29]
Implementing Partner (UNDP) 2018/03 Completed This has been completed in April. History
Use of the good offices of UNDP Senior Management for the identification of key issues and possible avenues
[Added: 2017/12/11] [Last Updated: 2020/04/15]
Implementing Partner (UNDP) 2020/04 Completed Marked as completed. This key action is continuously implemented under the SECSIP Phase 2 History

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