Youth Employment Programme (YEP-FE)

Report Cover Image
Evaluation Plan:
2018-2022, Samoa
Evaluation Type:
Final Project
Planned End Date:
06/2019
Completion Date:
07/2019
Status:
Completed
Management Response:
No
Evaluation Budget(US $):
20,000

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Title Youth Employment Programme (YEP-FE)
Atlas Project Number: 00087395
Evaluation Plan: 2018-2022, Samoa
Evaluation Type: Final Project
Status: Completed
Completion Date: 07/2019
Planned End Date: 06/2019
Management Response: Yes
UNDP Signature Solution:
  • 1. Governance
Corporate Outcome and Output (UNDP Strategic Plan 2018-2021)
  • 1. Output 1.1.1 Capacities developed across the whole of government to integrate the 2030 Agenda, the Paris Agreement and other international agreements in development plans and budgets, and to analyse progress towards the SDGs, using innovative and data-driven solutions
SDG Goal
  • Goal 16. Promote peaceful and inclusive societies for sustainable development, provide access to justice for all and build effective, accountable and inclusive institutions at all levels
  • Goal 8. Promote sustained, inclusive and sustainable economic growth, full and productive employment and decent work for all
SDG Target
  • 16.7 Ensure responsive, inclusive, participatory and representative decision-making at all levels
  • 8.6 By 2020, substantially reduce the proportion of youth not in employment, education or training
Evaluation Budget(US $): 20,000
Source of Funding: TRAC
Evaluation Expenditure(US $): 15,000
Joint Programme: No
Joint Evaluation: Yes
  • Joint with UN Agencies
Evaluation Team members:
Name Title Email Nationality
Omer Awan Evaluation Consultant omerahmedawan@yahoo.com PAKISTAN
GEF Evaluation: No
Key Stakeholders: GoS, CSOs, NGOs,ILO, UNV, UNESCO, FAO, IFAD
Countries: SAMOA
Lessons
Findings
1.

4.1 Relevance

Relevance of the Youth Employment programme with the regional and country level priorities and policies is one of the strongest attributes of the programme. 4.1.1 Relevance with the National Level Priorities The Youth Employment Programme is highly aligned and relevant with the Samoan national strategy and development priorities on Youth. Samoa has developed a focused and comprehensive National Youth Policy (2011-2015) and related National Youth Employment Action Plan (SNAP). YEP is linked with these overall guiding national policies and documents. More specifically, direct linkages can be drawn with2 ; Outcome 1.2: A system is in place for labor market training to provide relevant skills and experience leading to employment for young job-seekers. (YEP-Output 1 & Output 2) Outcome 2.2: A system is established to promote youth entrepreneurship. (Output 3) Moreover, YEP’s additional activity of internship programme is also directly linked with the: Outcome 1.3: Young people have access to career development services.


Tag: Relevance National Jobs and Livelihoods Capacity Building Youth

2.

4.1.2 Relevance with the Regional Level Priorities

The United Nations Development Assistance Framework (UNDAF)3 for the Pacific Sub-Region is a five-year strategic programme framework that outlines the collective response of the UN system to development challenges and national priorities in fourteen Pacific Island Countries and Territories (PICT s), namely Cook Islands, Fiji, Federated States of Micronesia, Kiribati, Nauru, Niue, Palau, Marshall Islands, Samoa, Solomon Islands, Tokelau, Tonga, Tuvalu and Vanuatu for the period 2013- 2017. YEP- Samoa is directly linked and aligned with the outcome 3.1 of regional UNDAF that states: Outcome 3.1- By 2017, inclusive economic growth is enhanced, poverty is reduced, sustainable employment is improved and increased, livelihood opportunities and food security are expanded for women, youth and vulnerable groups and social safety nets are enhanced for all citizens.


Tag: Relevance Regional Inclusive economic growth Jobs and Livelihoods Capacity Building Women and gilrs Youth

3.

4.1.3 Relevance with the SDGs

Objectives and outcomes of the YEP are directly linked and contributing to the SDG 8: ‘Promote sustained, inclusive and sustainable economic growth, full and productive employment and decent work for all’. More specifically, YEP is aligned with the: • Target 8.3 Promote development-oriented policies that support productive activities, decent job creation, entrepreneurship, creativity and innovation, and encourage formalization and growth of micro-, small- and medium-sized enterprises including through access to financial services. • Target 8.5 By 2030, achieve full and productive employment and decent work for all women and men, including for young people and persons with disabilities, and equal pay for work of equal value. • Target 8.6 By 2020, substantially reduce the proportion of youth not in employment, education or training.


Tag: Relevance Inclusive economic growth Capacity Building Agenda 2030 Youth

4.

4.1.3 Relevance with the SDGs

Objectives and outcomes of the YEP are directly linked and contributing to the SDG 8: ‘Promote sustained, inclusive and sustainable economic growth, full and productive employment and decent work for all’. More specifically, YEP is aligned with the: • Target 8.3 Promote development-oriented policies that support productive activities, decent job creation, entrepreneurship, creativity and innovation, and encourage formalization and growth of micro-, small- and medium-sized enterprises including through access to financial services. • Target 8.5 By 2030, achieve full and productive employment and decent work for all women and men, including for young people and persons with disabilities, and equal pay for work of equal value. • Target 8.6 By 2020, substantially reduce the proportion of youth not in employment, education or training.

Overall Rating: Relevant


Tag: Relevance Inclusive economic growth Capacity Building Agenda 2030 Youth

5.

4.2 Effectiveness and Impact

During the evaluation exercise, YEP’s results framework, defined in the YEP project document provided the basis for the assessment of YEP’s effectiveness and impact. It is worth mentioning that the YEP’s results framework has a clearly and well defined set of outcomes, outputs with specific baseline and target indicators. Keeping in view the overall initially planned duration of the programme, some of the targets can arguably be categorized as ambitious, however it was countered by an extension of the programme for a year. Overall, YEP has contributed in providing job skills training and the placement of vulnerable and drop out youth in jobs. Some of the key summary of these achievements include; Output 1- 100+ youth got Internships and 100+ got employment (including skill matching/ manual YEN registration). Output 2- Almost 1000+ youth were provided training in variety of job/sector related skills such as value chain, creative industries, soft skills, computer, TVET etc. Output 3- 90+ vulnerable families were provided support in their small businesses (23 are led by youth). However, the results and related indicators/targets in 3 outputs of the YEP results framework are partially achieved with some of the targets are underachieved. Overall Rating: Moderately Satisfactory


Tag: Effectiveness Impact Jobs and Livelihoods Capacity Building Vulnerable Youth

6.

4.2.1-Output 1- Youth Employment Network (YEN)

Overall, most of the results and related targets and indicators for the Youth Employment Network (YEN) were underachieved. Similar finding was initially found in the midterm review whereby it was noted that YEN has shown minimal progress, with indications of limited demonstrated progress, at practical levels. This has been marked with incomplete provision of specific technical support services required to make the eplatform fully functional and user-friendly.YEN is though developed and functional to a certain extent, it is currently under a revamping process to integrate it with a similar online database (Labor Market Information System-LMIS) of job seekers that was separately developed and managed by the MCIL. Data from the document review, field mission as well as observation by visiting the website yielded following findings: Indciator1 -The stakeholder consultation processes indicated that since the inception of the YEN, 180+ youth were registered on YEN. However no specific data could be found on how many of them have got jobs through YEN and what is the current status of those profiles. It is worth mentioning that MWCSD has completed 700+ manual registrations as an alternative approach out of which approximately half of them got jobs. Nevertheless, the basic purpose of concept of providing an online/digital platform for youth employment is significantly under achieved. Indicator 2 – Like the basis of any other digital platform and as indicated in the indicator above, YEN was envisaged to be an ‘interactive online platform’ whereby job seekers and business can directly interact without any role of an intermediary, the current status of YEN (at the time of the evaluation) do not provide any direct interactive facility between youth and businesses at all. Indicator 3 - The field mission validated that Initial training of YEN was provided to SNYC and other stakeholders. However a National Youth Volunteer Scheme (NYVS) has not been started yet. Output 1 Overall Rating: Moderately Unsatisfactory


Tag: Challenges Effectiveness Communication Partnership Project and Programme management Jobs and Livelihoods Awareness raising Technical Support Youth

7.

4.2.2-Output 2- Knowledge & Skills to Access Employment Opportunities

Overall, YEP has shown good progress on the training component of the output, considerable overall progress on the job placement (with limited sustainability), the employment targets are though significantly underachieved. It is worth mentioning here, that in addition to the three identified key areas/sectors of training that are value chain, community based tourism and creative industries, YEP has added an additional training and placement component as ‘internship programme’. Observed by the midterm evaluation and review by the Michigan University’s researchers4 as well, the internship programme was the most targeted of all Phase I initiatives towards the unemployed youth. It aimed to empower vulnerable youth, successfully equipping them with basic professional skills that led to steady employment through a robust partnership with the private sector. However the follow up after trainings, achieving the overall targets of job placements , continuation and sustainability of employment of those trainees who graduated from the YEP training programmes have imposed considerable challenges to the overall effectiveness of the YEP output. Moreover, unavailability of mechanism to validate the numbers of trainees and related job placements due to lack of centralized, structured and robust monitoring system was observed as a big challenge during the evaluation mission. It resulted in relying on the data of PMU and partial validation through stakeholder consultation and FGD. Similarly, no specific mechanism of formally accredited trainings (as mentioned in the results framework) was identified in the data collection. Although certificates were provided to the trainees at the end of the training programme, they did not necessarily fulfill the requirement of a formal certification as specified by SQA or other formal entities. This further limits the future probabilities of job placement for the youth. Following are some of the key features and outcomes of the YEP’s training component:


Tag: Agriculture Climate change governance Resilience building Partnership Jobs and Livelihoods Value Chain Capacity Building Youth

8.

Output 2- Key challenges & Lessons Learned

As indicated above, although some progress towards the results and targets of training and job placement components was made, overall targets were under achieved. The optimum progress was hindered by few key challenges and issues that can be addressed in Phase II. • Inconsistent and unaligned trainings: Although more systematic and coherent training approach was adopted in the earlier years of the YEP implementation, various training components were not fully aligned with the targets of the results framework later, resulting in missing key results/targets. For instance no clear results based (as defined in the results framework) trainings were adopted in the areas of creative industries and community based tourism. The component of ‘Farm to Table’ trainings through SDG fund had no results oriented monitoring and reporting system. • Inadequate Training Needs Assessment: Adequate and focused demands needs assessment was vital whereby; the high priority skills required by the employers/market will increase the involvement of the employers and long term sustainability of the youth employment. It was a consistent observation during the stakeholder consultation that lack of/inadequate demand driven training/skills needs assessment resulted in the less relevant/demanded skills trainings for the youth. It led to the limited success in placing the trained youth in the job market. For instance requirement for the “Soft” Skills was consistently highlighted by the stakeholder as a major missing link the YEP trained youth such as professional appearance and hygiene, timelines to work, communication skills with and overall professional ethics. • Lack of Robust M&E Mechanism: Lack of dedicated and specific M&E team at the PMU hinders the optimum monitoring of the youth who got employment/internship and validation of other training related data.


Tag: Challenges Effectiveness Monitoring and Evaluation Project and Programme management Jobs and Livelihoods Youth

9.

4.2.3-Output 3- Youth Led Entrepreneurship and Small Business Incubator

Keeping in view the clearly defined indicators of the YEP’s results framework mentioned in the table above, YEP has significantly underachieved the targets. The key component of the output 3 that was, Youth Small Business Incubator (With Walls) based on the PPP modality could not be established at all. That resulted in major underachievement of the targets. However an alternative approach of ‘Without the Walls’ was adopted under the output 3 whereby vulnerable families with dire need of income were identified with the help of Village Council representatives. The family leader were provided trainings in setting up small business, improved financial literacy skills, understanding of a profit model, methodologies to properly plant, grow, maintain, and harvest crops beyond individual use etc. Financial literacy skills training was a significant and well demanded step to reduce the gap of enabling vulnerable families to start their own businesses. If the intervention is analyzed as a standalone activity, it yielded some considerable progress whereby 93 families were directly benefited in setting up their businesses, however if the ‘Without Walls’ project activity is assessed in the context of the YEP and its focus on promoting ‘youth led entrepreneurship’, it has its own challenges and shortcomings. For instance, out of these 93 benefited families with small businesses, only 23 of them were led by youth and only 10+ youth have practically started their businesses. The observation was validated through a FGD with the beneficiaries of this activity. More than 80% participants of FGD did not represent youth.


Tag: Partnership Jobs and Livelihoods Capacity Building Technical Support Youth

10.

4.3.4 Additional Activities

Apart from the programmatic output and activities of YEP, there were few activities that were generated from the un programmed funds. Two of the major projects include: i) Savaii KOKO- A unique programme on Cocoa farming whereby a cooperative administrative team recruits interested farmers. Farmers receive a supply of young cocoa trees, an amount determined by their own capacity, for free. Cocoa trees take about three years to grow to maturity and to ready its first fruitful harvest. During this three-year period, farmers must diligently care for the cocoa plants and the cooperative provides monitoring and evaluation. When the cocoa is ready for harvesting, farmers sell the cocoa back to the cooperative. The Page 35 of 63 cooperative then sells the cocoa to foreign markets, including New Zealand, Australia and Japan etc. Many families are benefitted from this initiative. However it is worth mentioning here that youth is not the direct beneficiary of this intervention as well as the cooperative is not led by a young entrepreneur/businessman. Most of the registered farmers are not youth. It has potential of long term benefit but continuous motivation is a big challenge as well as seasonal work for the youth. There is limited financial incentive in the short term. Overall, the programme is not directly aligned with YEP as youth is not the direct beneficiary. In Phase II, it is recommended that selection criteria of any un programmed activity should ensure that project/business lead and direct beneficiary, both should represent youth. ii) TVET Student Placement- The project activity is financed by the un programmed Funds whereby, 119 youth were provided support for TVET Training and 24 of them got employed.


Tag: Agriculture co-operatives Effectiveness Jobs and Livelihoods Capacity Building Youth

11.

4.3 Efficiency

Overall, YEP implementation efficiency can be divided into 3 distinct phases. In the first phase of the programme, the implementation progress started at a slower pace as compared to the AWPs of initial two years. In the second phase until the end of year 2017, the programme implementation efficiency was considerably enhanced. It also allowed an extension of the programme for a year. In the third phase of the programme that was based on the extension year the efficiency pattern was moderate. 6 Similarly the efficiency of implementation also varied from one output to the other. For instance, the implementation of output 1, (YEN) was significantly inefficient whereby most of the targets were not achieved. Similarly under the output 3, progress on development of a youth led SBI did not kick start after an initial draft design7 as well as the disbursement of funds for the 2nd tranche of ‘Without the Walls’ beneficiaries was consistently indicated as a very slow process, though the training component was clearly efficient. The overall level of implementation efficiency for the output 2 (trainings and job placements) has been comparatively high.

Overall Efficiency Rating: Moderately Satisfactory


Tag: Efficiency Jobs and Livelihoods Youth

12.

4.3.1 Implementation Arrangement & PMU

Overall project implementation mechanism is aligned with the planned project document and it is based on multi layered mechanism.

i) Project Board ‘Community Economic Empowerment Development Sub Sector Committee (Youth Sub Sector Committee)’ was the high level project board that was responsible for 3 key functions (Executive, Senior Suppliers, and Senior Beneficiaries). The minutes of the committee meetings indicated that the board had frequent meetings to assess the progress of the programme, especially in year 2017 & 20188 . The committee performed the roles of due diligence and guiding the programme effectively on the basis of the presented AWPs.

ii) Project Assurance role was planned to support the Project Board Executive / Youth Subsector Committee by carrying out objective and independent project oversight and monitoring functions. The Head of the UNDP Governance and Poverty Reduction Unit was assigned to play the role of Project Assurance in this UN Joint Programme. No clear or specific data on the role could be gathered as the position was vacant at the time of the terminal evaluation. However Programme Analyst was currently managing the coordination function from UN. However, within UN agencies, an internal YEP focused coordination mechanism is very important, but currently missing. This resulted in continuous challenge of having a structured, consolidated and centralized data on the contribution of UN agencies in the programmes.

iii) The PMU/ Programme Coordinator- the PMU, primarily managed by the Programme Coordinator was responsible to run the programme on a day-to-day basis on behalf of the Implementing Partner within the constraints laid down by the Project Board / Youth Subsector Steering Committee. PMU has very limited resources to manage a programme of this scale. The Programme Coordinator was clearly overburdened with multi level activities that led to inefficiency and slow paced implementation of various programme activities.


Tag: Efficiency Implementation Modality Joint UN Programme Project and Programme management Jobs and Livelihoods Youth

13.

4.3.1 Implementation Arrangement & PMU

Overall project implementation mechanism is aligned with the planned project document and it is based on multi layered mechanism.

i) Project Board ‘Community Economic Empowerment Development Sub Sector Committee (Youth Sub Sector Committee)’ was the high level project board that was responsible for 3 key functions (Executive, Senior Suppliers, and Senior Beneficiaries). The minutes of the committee meetings indicated that the board had frequent meetings to assess the progress of the programme, especially in year 2017 & 20188 . The committee performed the roles of due diligence and guiding the programme effectively on the basis of the presented AWPs.

ii) Project Assurance role was planned to support the Project Board Executive / Youth Subsector Committee by carrying out objective and independent project oversight and monitoring functions. The Head of the UNDP Governance and Poverty Reduction Unit was assigned to play the role of Project Assurance in this UN Joint Programme. No clear or specific data on the role could be gathered as the position was vacant at the time of the terminal evaluation. However Programme Analyst was currently managing the coordination function from UN. However, within UN agencies, an internal YEP focused coordination mechanism is very important, but currently missing. This resulted in continuous challenge of having a structured, consolidated and centralized data on the contribution of UN agencies in the programmes.


Tag: Efficiency Implementation Modality Joint UN Programme Project and Programme management Jobs and Livelihoods Youth

14.

4.3.2 Monitoring and Evaluation

Following are some of the key findings on the M&E function of the programme:

• The M&E function of the programme was assessed as one of the weakest link of the programme implementation mechanism that was not based on the Results Based Management and it was clearly not aligned with the YEP’s Results Framework. • Although quarterly reports were produced and submitted to the project board, the format is very basic, not aligned with the results with limited details on the results and targets set by the YEP’s Results Framework. • Lack of consolidated, structured and centralized programme activities and financial/budgetary data at the PMU was a challenge for the effective M&E function as well as a gap that must be filled in the next phase of the project. • As indicated in the Project Document, The Annual Review Report was missing/never developed. An Annual Review Report (ARR) was guided to be prepared by the Programme Coordinator in partnership with the MWCSD and submitted to the Youth Development Sub-Sector Committee through the Project Assurance unit. The ARR would have helped in summarizing progress made against targets set for the year, identifying issues related to programme performance and making recommendations for changes to the programme design and/or work plan. The ARR would have brought together information from the QPRs as well as a summary of results achieved at the activity and output level. No Annual Review Report was one of the major reasons behind lack of consolidated and structured M&E data of the programme. Overall Rating: Unsatisfactory


Tag: Efficiency Monitoring and Evaluation Programme/Project Design Results-Based Management Jobs and Livelihoods Youth

15.

4.3.3 Allocated Budget vs. Actual Expenditure

As indicated in the evaluation limitation and under the M&E function above, inadequate, lack of structured and centralized budgetary/financial data, no regular results/output based consolidated financial data reporting at the PMU was a limitation for data analysis and validation that resulted in limited analysis/findings. Most of the financial data is based on parallel/separate funding streams of UN agencies whereby their specific projects are contributing to overall results of the YEP. Nevertheless, a structured and consolidated financial data and reporting for the YEP should have been a basic and mandatory function at the PMU. Some of the key findings on budgetary data include: • UNDP- Approved total Budget $ 1313900 (Including SDG-Fund of USD 500,000) UNDP Actual Expenses- $ 1018993 (Approx. 77.5% utilization) • FAO- $ 166,822 • ILO- $ 150,000 • UNESCO- $6,000

Overall Rating: U/A


Tag: Human and Financial resources Monitoring and Evaluation Operational Efficiency Project and Programme management

16.

4.3.4 One- UN Modality and Partnership Strategy

The YEP was based on One-UN Modality whereby UNDP, ILO, FAO and UNESCO were the key agencies for the design and implementation of the programme. Various partnerships were developed for each of the key outputs that involves both government and non government organizations such as MWCSD, MCIL, BOSA, SAME, SNYC etc. Following are some of the key findings in this regard: • Although each UN agency significantly contributed to the YEP activities through their parallel funding and respective projects, there is a clear lack of synergy and coherence found in the activities. Data collection indicated that inter UN agency awareness and knowledge of each other’s contribution towards YEP was extremely limited. This can be referred back to the same finding that lack of an internal coordination mechanism between UN agencies led to limited, unstructured and non-consolidated knowledge and data on YEP. Moreover it was also indicated that information for YEP receiving funds through MPTF was not clearly communicated to all UN agencies and there was neither any joint application for the fund, nor any discussion about it. Although UNCT meeting is a regular activity, it is not solely based on YEP. 


Tag: Communication Human and Financial resources Joint UN Programme Partnership Programme Synergy Jobs and Livelihoods Youth

17.

4.3.4 One- UN Modality and Partnership Strategy

The YEP was based on One-UN Modality whereby UNDP, ILO, FAO and UNESCO were the key agencies for the design and implementation of the programme. Various partnerships were developed for each of the key outputs that involves both government and non government organizations such as MWCSD, MCIL, BOSA, SAME, SNYC etc. Following are some of the key findings in this regard: • Although each UN agency significantly contributed to the YEP activities through their parallel funding and respective projects, there is a clear lack of synergy and coherence found in the activities. Data collection indicated that inter UN agency awareness and knowledge of each other’s contribution towards YEP was extremely limited. This can be referred back to the same finding that lack of an internal coordination mechanism between UN agencies led to limited, unstructured and non-consolidated knowledge and data on YEP. Moreover it was also indicated that information for YEP receiving funds through MPTF was not clearly communicated to all UN agencies and there was neither any joint application for the fund, nor any discussion about it. Although UNCT meeting is a regular activity, it is not solely based on YEP. 


Tag: Communication Human and Financial resources Joint UN Programme Partnership Programme Synergy Jobs and Livelihoods Youth

18.

4.4 Sustainability

Overall, sustainability of the YEP is a strong component of the programme. First, the YEP proDoc has clearly outlined a sustainability and exit strategy for the programme. Moreover, institutional sustainability of YEP is very strong as Government’s ownership through SNAP for the Youth Employment is a high level commitment that enhances the sustainability of YEP in Phase II. The multiple partners based SNAP is an indication that the government and organizational willingness, capacity and ownership for youth employment strongly exist. Similarly built capacity of MWCSD during the Phase I of the programmed, commitment of including YEP’s outputs and activities in MWCSD’s annual workplan as well as ownership as the major Implementation partner also contributes to the overall sustainability of the YEP. During the phase 1, the built capacity and assistance provided to organizations through YEP like Women in Business Development Incorporated (WIBDI), the Samoa National Youth Council (SNYC), Samoa Business Enterprise Centre (SBEC) and the Chamber of Commerce etc will also assist in long term sustainability of the programme. As far as financial sustainability of the programme is concerned, a revised, focused and demand based Phase II interventions is required with a clear resource mobilization strategy to ensure sustained financial resources for the Phase II. Overall Sustainability Rating: Likely


Tag: Sustainability Joint UN Programme Financial Inclusion Jobs and Livelihoods Youth

19.

4.5 Gender Equality, Empowerment & Vulnerable Groups

Ensuring gender equality and focus on vulnerable groups were assessed to be the hallmarks and strong components of the programme. Both at the design and implementation stages, gender equality were given a central focus. For instance in the design stage, the gender responsive Results Framework ensured that 50% of the beneficiaries in all of the three outputs that are YEN, Skills Training and Employment and Youth Led SBI are females. Similarly in the implementation stage, the selection criteria and related data on beneficiaries validated that gender equality was ensured. For instance, out of the 93 beneficiaries of ‘Without the Walls’ small business support, 47 of them were females. Moreover, out of 670+ manual registrations of young job seekers for the YEN, 350+ were females. As far as focus on vulnerable groups is concerned, the stakeholder consultations and FGD validated the finding that vulnerable groups of youth (drop outs, rehabilitated, jobless) and vulnerable families (with dire need of money) were given priority in training & job placements and providing small business support respectively. Overall Rating: Satisfactory


Tag: Gender Equality Women's Empowerment Implementation Modality Programme/Project Design Jobs and Livelihoods Vulnerable Women and gilrs

Recommendations
1

Evaluation Recommendation or Issue 1: Revisit the overall scope and related Results Framework of the programme for Phase II. Clear, concise and focused Results Framework with less ambitious indicators and targets should be developed. Based on the lessons learned, those areas/sectors that are not in demand should be replaced by the high demand sectors. A continued training, awareness & communication campaign about the RF for all key stakeholders should be adopted throughout the programme cycle. 

2

Evaluation Recommendation or Issue 2: More focus should be given on public private partnerships (PPPs) to ensure demand driven and relevant programme results.

3

Evaluation Recommendation or Issue 3: It is recommended that only 2 outputs should be included in the YEP- Phase II. Output 1- Skills Training & Employment- (Including YEN as a sub-output). Output 2- Youth Led Entrepreneurship. It is recommended that both outputs should be based on 5 steps processes.

4

Implementation and Management

• PMU should be strengthened with more key staff. • A more robust ‘Results Based’ monitoring and reporting mechanism should be developed. • A thorough RBM training should be conducted for YEP PMU and other stakeholders throughout the programme cycle. • The programme data should be centralized and available at the YEP PMU throughout the programme cycle. • The overall all selection criteria for any unbudgeted activity should make stringent and only be focused on Youth as primary beneficiaries.

5

 Partnership and Coordination

• An internal UN team focused on YEP should be formed that can meet on periodic basis. • A well structured and outputs/results oriented based partnership strategy should be developed. • Either one-UN funding pot can be formed or if UN agencies will keep their funds for the YEP related activities separately, the PMU should have access to all budgetary and expenditure information related to the YEP activities.

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