UNDAF Mid-term Evaluation

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Evaluation Plan:
2016-2020, Uganda
Evaluation Type:
UNDAF
Planned End Date:
12/2018
Completion Date:
02/2019
Status:
Completed
Management Response:
Yes
Evaluation Budget(US $):
90,000

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Title UNDAF Mid-term Evaluation
Atlas Project Number: 00092241
Evaluation Plan: 2016-2020, Uganda
Evaluation Type: UNDAF
Status: Completed
Completion Date: 02/2019
Planned End Date: 12/2018
Management Response: Yes
UNDP Signature Solution:
  • 1. Governance
  • 2. Gender
Corporate Outcome and Output (UNDP Strategic Plan 2018-2021)
  • 1. Output 1.1.1 Capacities developed across the whole of government to integrate the 2030 Agenda, the Paris Agreement and other international agreements in development plans and budgets, and to analyse progress towards the SDGs, using innovative and data-driven solutions
  • 2. Output 1.1.2 Marginalised groups, particularly the poor, women, people with disabilities and displaced are empowered to gain universal access to basic services and financial and non-financial assets to build productive capacities and benefit from sustainable livelihoods and jobs
  • 3. Output 1.4.1 Solutions scaled up for sustainable management of natural resources, including sustainable commodities and green and inclusive value chains
  • 4. Output 1.6.1 Country-led measures accelerated to advance gender equality and women’s empowerment
  • 5. Output 2.1.1 Low emission and climate resilient objectives addressed in national, sub-national and sectoral development plans and policies to promote economic diversification and green growth
  • 6. Output 2.2.2 Constitution-making, electoral and parliamentary processes and institutions strengthened to promote inclusion, transparency and accountability
  • 7. Output 2.2.3 Capacities, functions and financing of rule of law and national human rights institutions and systems strengthened to expand access to justice and combat discrimination, with a focus on women and other marginalised groups
  • 8. Output 3.1.1 Core government functions and inclusive basic services4 restored post-crisis for stabilisation, durable solutions to displacement and return to sustainable development pathways within the framework of national policies and priorities
  • 9. Output 3.2.1 National capacities strengthened for reintegration, reconciliation, peaceful management of conflict and prevention of violent extremism in response to national policies and priorities
  • 10. Output 3.3.1 Evidence-based assessment and planning tools and mechanisms applied to enable implementation of gender-sensitive and risk-informed prevention and preparedness to limit the impact of natural hazards and pandemics and promote peaceful, just and inclusive societies
  • 11. Organisational Output 3.2 UNDP support to integrated SDG delivery
SDG Goal
  • Goal 1. End poverty in all its forms everywhere
  • Goal 16. Promote peaceful and inclusive societies for sustainable development, provide access to justice for all and build effective, accountable and inclusive institutions at all levels
  • Goal 17. Strengthen the means of implementation and revitalize the Global Partnership for Sustainable Development
  • Goal 5. Achieve gender equality and empower all women and girls
SDG Target
  • 1.4 By 2030, ensure that all men and women, in particular the poor and the vulnerable, have equal rights to economic resources, as well as access to basic services, ownership and control over land and other forms of property, inheritance, natural resources, appropriate new technology and financial services, including microfinance
  • 1.b Create sound policy frameworks at the national, regional and international levels, based on pro-poor and gender-sensitive development strategies, to support accelerated investment in poverty eradication actions
  • 16.6 Develop effective, accountable and transparent institutions at all levels
  • 17.14 Enhance policy coherence for sustainable development
  • 5.5 Ensure women’s full and effective participation and equal opportunities for leadership at all levels of decision-making in political, economic and public life
Evaluation Budget(US $): 90,000
Source of Funding: Core resources from partner agencies
Evaluation Expenditure(US $): 90,000
Joint Programme: No
Joint Evaluation: No
Evaluation Team members:
Name Title Email Nationality
Julian Bagyendera Consultant julian@provide-equip.com UGANDA
GEF Evaluation: No
Key Stakeholders:
Countries: UGANDA
Comments:

UNDP country office in consultation with the RBA have agreed to have UNDAF mid-term evaluation instead of having both UNDAF and CPD evaluation at the same time.   UNDAF2016-2020  has 3 key pillars and two of those pillars are led by UNDP. Thus the planned CPD mid-term evaluation has been substituted with UNDAF mid-term evaluation so as not to duplicate effort.

Lessons
1.

The following aspects of UNDAF worked well during the period under review:

  1. Joint planning, budgeting, monitoring and evaluation, reporting, programming and implementation of interventions yields better results, particularly in joint programmes where it is easier to mobilise resources and implement a comprehensive programme.
  2. Partnerships and collaborations with government MDAs, districts and CSOs enhances synergy, reduces resource wastage, thus increasing effectiveness and efficiency.
  3. Working through existing GoU structures of MDAs and districts reduces costs and ensures sustainability of benefits.
  4. Working through cultural and religious institutions yields better results, especially for behavioural change interventions.
  5. It is possible to address underlying causes of inequalities and discrimination through strategic upstream interventions. For example, the gender and equity certificate, which is a requirement being implemented by MDAs through MoFPED with the advice of the EOC, is already being followed in planning and budgeting.

 

The following aspects of UNDAF did not work well:

  1. Although individual agency and joint fundraising modalities are complementary, through clear mandates such as MoUs and Letters of Understanding (LoUs) which ensure that roles and responsibilities within the UNDAF framework are clear, the undertaking of fundraising at individual agency for UNDAF interventions limits the oneness of UN.
  2. The overlapping interventions of some UN agencies undermine the DaO principles.
  3. The GoU low absorption capacity and limits implementation of interventions.
  4. The perceived limited flexibility and bureaucratic tendencies within UN results into delayed implementation which limits achievement of programme results.
  5. The limited information flow in MDAs regarding UNDAF limits awareness on UNDAF.
  6. Lack of effective communication between IPs limits successful implementation of programs and learning from best practices.
  7. Working with GoU institutions requires patience since the operation modalities and systems are different from the UN and CSOs.

 


Findings
1.

FINDINGS AND CONCLUSIONS

 

Relevance: The UNDAF is still relevant, justified and appropriate in relation to GoU development agenda and is aligned to NDP II, Vision 2040 and SDGs. It addresses beneficiary needs, although some stakeholders feel that at implementation level there is limited support for interventions prioritized under sector and district work-plans. The four UNDG programming principles leaving no one behind, human rights, gender equality and women’s empowerment, sustainability and resilience and accountability are mainstreamed in the UNDAF design and implementation. The UNDAF theory of change (ToC) is still largely deemed relevant and valid, although some assumptions and timelines need to be revisited. The ToC portrays the logical link between inputs, outputs and outcomes that are essential to enable the realization of the desired impact. The UNDAF was flexible in responding to emerging issues including the refugee influx, disease outbreaks, and landslides, among others.

 

Effectiveness: Overall, 18 out of 33 (54.5%) of the UNDAF outcomes indicators have been achieved[1] and likely to be achieved while 15 indicators (45.5%) are less likely to be achieved or could not be measured due to absence of data. 

 

  1. Governance: Progress has been made on a number of governance indicators; however, the governance pillar is less likely to achieve the intended results by 2020 unless there is fast-tracking of key governance interventions that are directly linked to intended governance outcomes such as electoral reforms that promote free and fair election and separation of powers. Five (5) out of 11 of outcome indicators (45.5%) are already achieved or likely to be achieved. The percentage of people who think Uganda has democracy reduced from 52% (2012) to 46% (2017) partly owing to monetization of elections, voter bribery and voter intimidation among others. The innovations put in place by JLOs with UN support towards improving rule of law such as plea-bargaining, small claims procedures, the rule of law day has in part led to increase in trust in courts of law from 64% (2010/11) to 66% (2017). Although representation of women in the Parliament stagnated at 35%, the absolute number of women members of Parliament increased from 132 (2011) to 158 (2017), and 43% of Uganda parliamentary committees are chaired by women. In addition, the percentage of women representation at local government was 43%. The Sexual Offenses Bill and the Legal Aid Bill have been tabled before Parliament while the Succession Amendment Act has been gazetted. Corruption index stagnated at 26% since the baseline year 2013. The proportion of people who think GoU is handling the fight against corruption very well increased from 4% (2014) to 26% (2017). Only 16% were aware of any Government efforts to fight bribery while 10% were aware of the fight against embezzlement/diversion of funds. The score for political stability and absence of violence/terrorism increased slightly from 20% (2013) to 23% (2016) against the target of 40%. Uganda is partially compliant to international human rights and standards and reported on 4 out of 12 human rights instruments. Key milestones have been achieved against gender discriminatory laws.

 

  1. Human Capital Development (HCD): Generally, the UNDAF is on-track to achieve the HCD results, notwithstanding the need to scale-up critical interventions under learning and skills development and social protection. Nine (9) out of 14 outcome indicators (64.3%) are already achieved or likely to be achieved while 5 outcome indicators (35.7%) are less likely to be achieved or could not be measured due to missing data. Learning outcomes increased at upper primary level where as it reduced at lower primary.  Learning literacy and numeracy increased at Primary (P.6) from 38.3% to 51.9% and 39.4% to 52.6% respectively. However, learning literacy and numeracy at P.3 reduced from 64.2 % to 60.2% and 72.7% to 71.2% respectively.  The primary school retention rate stagnated at 32% against a planned target of 50%.  The transition rate to Senior 1 reduced from 69.9% to 69.2%. The reduction is partly explained by UN focus on long-term up stream interventions which may not have direct effect on classroom-based performance in the two and half years under review. Progress was registered on all health indicators. By the design of UNDAF, the UDHS 2016 report was not yet available, and baseline was based on UDHS 2011 data hence earlier achievement of health targets which necessitates revision of targets.  Public expenditure on health as a percentage of national budget increased from 8.7% in 2013/14 to 9.6% in 2018/19 though still lower than the recommended 15% (the Abuja Declaration). The institutional delivery rate[2]  increased from 58% (2011) to 73% at MTE. Modern contraceptive prevalence rate (CPR) among married women aged 15-49 years for modern family planning (FP) methods increased by 9% from 26% (2011) to 35% (2018).

 

Although public expenditure on social protection (SP) as a percentage of GDP increased from 0.75% at baseline (2014) to 0.9% at MTE, this is still below the UNDAF target of 1%. The percentage of people who experienced physical violence in the past 12 months significantly reduced from 56% (2011) to 44% (females) and 26% (males) at MTE (2016). However, there was a negative trend in the prevalence of physical violence among male children. For instance, 7 in 10 male children (68%) experience physical violence during their childhood, with nearly half experiencing it at the hands of parents or adult caregivers (National Violence against Children survey 2018). The percentage of women and men who experienced sexual violence in the past 12 months has significantly reduced from 27% (females) and 9% (males) in 2011 to 13% (females) and 4% (males) in 2016. Percentage of all women and men aged 15-49 who agree that a husband is justified in hitting or beating his wife for specified reasons reduced from 44% (males) and 58% (females) at baseline (2011) to 41% (males) and 50% (females) at MTE. The new HIV infections reduced significantly from 137,000 (2011) to 50,000 (2018), above the target of 107,068. There are 1.3 million people living with HIV and AIDS, of which 73% know their HIV status: 67% are on ART and 60% had their viral load suppressed. Prevention of Mother-to-Child Transmission (PMTCT) services was scaled up, with more than 95% of mothers accessing the services. AIDS-related deaths reduced from 63,000 in 2011 to 26,000 in 2017, HIV prevalence rate reduced from 7.3% to 6% (2017).

 

  1. Sustainable and Inclusive Economic Development (SIED): Under the SIED pillar, 4 out of 8 outcome indicators (50%) are already achieved and or likely to be achieved. Infrastructure production and trade as well as employment outcomes are likely to be achieved although strengthening natural resource management and climate change resilience outcome target is not likely to be achieved due to high population growth rate, deforestation, and wetland degradation. The population with access to electricity increased from 14.8% in 2013 to 20.4% in 2017, which was higher than anticipated in the NDP II (2016=16%, 2017=17%, 2018=18%). A lot of effort such as free connections, rural electrification programmes  among others have been put in place to increase access to electricity though its use in cooking is still very low (1.9%) partly because of the high unit cost of power. The use of modern cooking energy is 6%, lower than the baseline (10%) due to limited awareness among communities and affordability. However, the population which has access to modern cooking stoves is 21%. Land under forest cover reduced from 11% in 2013 to 9% in 2017 due to deforestation, increased population characterised the greedy, needy and ignorant people as well as weak law enforcement. The wetland cover was maintained at 10.9%. Economic loss from natural and climate change hazards increased from $3.1m in 2013 to $3.6m in 2017. There was a slight growth in the agricultural sector from 1.3% in 2013 to 1.6% in 2017. The annual growth rate in the mining sector decreased from -0.4 in 2013 to -4.5% in 2018. Manufacturing annual growth rate also reduced from 5.7% in 2013 to 2.5% in 2018. The reduction attributed to the importation of cheap goods that discourages consumption of locally made products. Exports of maize increased from 122,107MT in 2013 to 268,465 MT in 2016, far beyond the 2020 target of 146,000MT. There was also a significant increase in export of beans from 37,785MT in 2013 to 128,147MT, which was above the 2020 target of 44,000MT. The increased export of maize and beans was attributed to ready and better market in South Sudan. Sesame exports reduced from 22,055MT in 2013 to 16,171MT in 2016. Coffee exports reduced from 220,546MT in 2013 to 212,622 MT by mid-2018.Women's share of non-agricultural informal employment increased from 32.3% (2011/12) to 47.2% in 2018.

 

Efficiency: The total expenditure for the UNDAF period 2016-2017 was USD 227million, representing 24% execution of the UNDAF budget USD 954 million. The budget allocation per pillar was: HCD $442,738,348 (46%); SIED $339,615,717 (36%) and Governance $171,799,330 (18%). Governance spent 49% of its allocated budget. HCD spent 26% and SIED spent 8%. This is in line with the GoU ToC where it is envisaged that early realization of good governance is a pre-condition for achievement of HCD and SIED. The UNCT has a range of mechanisms to maximise efficiency gains in UNDAF implementation.  For instance, core elements of Delivering as One (DaO) including a Communications Group, an empowered Operations Management Team and a Business Operations Strategy among others are in place. Joint programmes are implemented. The UNDAF has a well-documented management, coordination and implementation structure (including the existence of Advisory Groups such as the Human Rights and Gender Group; Programme Reference Group; and Disaster Risk management group), which is largely deemed appropriate although practical implementation of the coordination structure is weak and limits efficiency.

 

Efficiency is also hampered by the absence of a joint resource mobilization strategy and limited use of available tools such as Knowledge Management System (KMS) and Pulse Lab Kampala. In addition, DaO was perceived to be more theoretical and working better at policy than implementation level. In addition, the dual role of the UN Resident Coordinator (RC) as UNDP Resident Representative appears to have created a perception that the RC’s Office (RCO) may not be impartial especially in allocating resources mobilised. Coordination by the RCO was perceived to be done often by less senior staff limiting the level of compliance among UN agencies to RCO requests.  The low absorption of funds and delayed accountabilities by MDAs, as inconsistent and irregular use of the coordination structures and lack of knowledge/limited orientation of staff on UNDAF in part hampered the attainment of UNDAF results.

 

Impact: Although it is still early to measure the impact of UNDAF, there are pointers of progress towards achieving the impact indicator targets.  For example, there was an improvement in rule of law rating 44% at baseline to 45.67% at MTE. Similarly, there was a slight improvement in regulatory quality rating from 44.5% at baseline to 46.15% at MTE. On the other hand, voice of accountability rating reduced from 30.8% to 27.1%; GoU effectiveness rating reduced from 33% to 32.2% and control of corruption rating reduced from 14% to 13%. There was a positive change on all impact level indicators under health. Maternal Mortality Rate (MMR) reduced from 438 in 2011 to 336 in 2016. Over 70% of pregnant women now deliver with the help of a skilled service provider and at a health facility. Infant mortality rate (IMR) reduced from 54 to 44. Total fertility rate (TFR) reduced from 6.2 to 5.4 children per woman. There was a slight reduction in child stunting from 33.4% to 29%. Similarly, under HIV and AIDS, there was improvement on all indicators: new HIV infections from 137,000 to 50,000, AIDS-related deaths from 63,000 to 26,000 and HIV/AIDS prevalence from 7.2 to 6. The prevalence of sexual violence has gone down from 28% (females) and 9% (males) at baseline (2011) to 22% (females) and 8% (males) at MTE (2016). Social tolerance for wife battering reduced from 44% to 41% for males, and from 58% to 50% for males. The Gini coefficient worsened from 0.395 at baseline to 0.42 at MTE. The number of people dying from disasters reduced due to improved early warning systems (150 people died in one landslide in 2010 whereas no death occurred in 6 landslides by July 2018).

 

Sustainability: Generally, there is evidence of sustainability strategies having been adopted for UNDAF results. For instance, the UN provides support to the GoU in terms of development of policies, strategies and framework/guidelines that enable GoU to roll out many of the interventions. The UN has also opted for a National Implementation Modality (NIM) that entails a working relationship with government MDAs that take the lead in the implementation in UNDAF interventions. In addition, UNDAF was found to have a range of national capacity building programmes including through South-South and Triangular Cooperation. The UN also built partnerships with MDAs, districts, cultural and religious institutions, academia, CSOs and private sector. The UN, together with Uganda AIDS Commission (UAC) and other AIDS Development Partners, advocated for a GOU contribution to the HIV/AIDS fund through commitment by each MDA and LG to contribute 0.1% of their respective budgets towards HIV mainstreaming, these local fundraising initiatives are likely to continue.

 


[1] Attained 100% of the target                  = Achieved

Attained 70-99% of the target = Most likely to be achieved

Attained 25-69% of the target = Likely to be achieved

Attained less than 25% of target              = Not likely to be achieved

[2] Percentage of mothers delivering at health facilities


Recommendations
1

Relevance: The UN through SIP heads and ORGs should: i) strengthen the coordination mechanism by regularly involving MDAs and LGs in UNDAF annual planning, implementation, review, monitoring and reporting for increased participation for stronger alignment to sector work-plans and DDPs; ii) review the theory of change under HCD and Governance to ensure logical link between some interventions, outputs and outcomes for, particularly, the interventions under learning and skills development and revise the assumptions and targets under Governance in relation to the timeframe to make them more realistic;  iii) support implementation and financing of the SDG roadmap.

 

2

Improving Effectiveness under Governance Pillar:

 

1. Enhance support for strengthening the rule of law in Uganda. UN should support Parliament and the Law Reform Commission to fast-track implementation of interventions such as those supporting electoral reforms (key constitutional reforms, Electoral Commission Act, Presidential Parliamentary Elections Act and the Local Governments Act) and separation of powers through rolling out think tanks to enhance achievement of governance outcomes. To increase women representation in Parliament, the UN should scale up interventions that target prospective women leaders such as training in leadership, negotiation and advocacy. The MoJCA and MoLG with support from UN should fast-track capacity strengthening of LC Is and IIs on their roles and respective laws in order to strengthen linkages between formal and informal justice systems. GoU, UN and other stakeholders such as religious and cultural institutions should identify multiple strategies to address the negative social norms and beliefs hindering women participation in governance. The UN should fast-track i) innovations to enhance accountability at institutional level including the e-case management to address corruption; ii) planned interventions that has not been implemented such as reviewing party constitutions to promote women representation. The EC should scale up civic education including aspects of voter bribery and the Police should enhance enforcement of laws against voter bribery.

3

Improving Effectiveness under Governance Pillar:

 

2. Capacity strengthening. The UN through ORGs should dialogue with MDAs to identify each other’s concerns with regard to absorption challenges and jointly forge a shared way forward.  The UN through the governance SIP should support GoU in building the capacity of the institutions such as Electoral Commission, JLOS, Police, CSOs, mediators, eminent persons, political and opinion leaders to promote peaceful political and electoral processes and enhance youth and women’s participation in legal and policy formulation on peace building and governance. Additionally, the UN should support GoU to address cross-border issues that would threaten regional peace and stability especially while aware that the universality of the 2030 Agenda requires a rigorous approach to address shared challenges and solutions within and across countries, regions and around the world that go beyond national policy-making to result in more international collective action.

4

Scale up support for afforestation and wetland recovery.  The UN through the SIED pillar should support MWE and MAAIF in large scale afforestation and wetland recovery across the country; and support creation of more green jobs related to tree planting, conservation and re-use.

 

5

Increase support for strengthening livelihoods. The UN should support MAAIF and MWE to scale up interventions geared towards increasing agricultural production and productivity as well as strengthening the agriculture value chain such as supply of improved varieties, improved post-harvest handling facilities, linkage to markets and supporting value addition. MGLSD, with support from the UN, should establish affirmative action to recognize the issue of culture, unpaid care and domestic work, support campaigns for redistribution of roles and responsibilities within households to promote women’s effective participation in economic and other opportunities by ensuring more absorption of women within salaried employment. Majority staff for all contractors should be nationals, of who at least one third are women.

6
  1. Support climate proofing of infrastructure in Uganda.  The UN and MWE should carry out climate screening, climate risk assessment and adaptation assessment in key sectors such as agriculture, transport, health and water to ensure climate proofing of infrastructure.

 

7

Enhance disaster preparedness, response and management. The OPM and UN should strengthen investment and budgeting towards disaster preparedness, response and management. MDAs should allocate a percentage of their budgets towards emergency preparedness. 

8

Enhance enforcement of environmental laws. The UN should support MWE and other MDAs such as NFA and NEMA to scale up environmental monitoring, inspection and prosecution of environmental abusers.  Environmental law enforcers should be provided with the necessary resources to ease enforcement activities.

9

Strengthen community awareness and sensitisation. MWE with support from UN should increase public awareness and sensitisation about environmental management, modern cooking energies and technologies through various media such as radio and music dance and drama among others. Enhance the use of renewable energy sources like solar, biogas, geothermal, mini-hydro plants and peat, by making them accessible and cheaper.

10

Improving Efficiency:??????? Improve harmonization and reduce duplication. The UNDAF pillar heads should facilitate greater harmonization of planned interventions at ORG level to realize greater efficiency gains. Planning for the subsequent year at ORG level should be done well in advance by October before the year begins, agency work-plans should be based on UNDAF. The UNDAF pillar heads should map out key strategic multi-sectoral interventions for increased joint planning, programming and implementation of activities and field monitoring.

11
  1. Reduce time between requisition and disbursement of funds. The UNCT should review the length of time between requisition and disbursement of funds to enhance efficiency in line with the HACT framework and procedural requirements.
12

Improving Sustainability and Transformative Approach: Increase involvement and participation of MDAs in UNDAF planning, implementation and monitoring. The UN through ORGs should engage MDAs and LGs more in UNDAF activities at all levels including implementation, review meetings and field monitoring of interventions. In addition, UN should continue strengthening the technical and institutional capacity for MDAs, LGs and IPs.

1. Recommendation:

Relevance: The UN through SIP heads and ORGs should: i) strengthen the coordination mechanism by regularly involving MDAs and LGs in UNDAF annual planning, implementation, review, monitoring and reporting for increased participation for stronger alignment to sector work-plans and DDPs; ii) review the theory of change under HCD and Governance to ensure logical link between some interventions, outputs and outcomes for, particularly, the interventions under learning and skills development and revise the assumptions and targets under Governance in relation to the timeframe to make them more realistic;  iii) support implementation and financing of the SDG roadmap.

 

Management Response: [Added: 2018/12/10]

Agree

Key Actions:

2. Recommendation:

Improving Effectiveness under Governance Pillar:

 

1. Enhance support for strengthening the rule of law in Uganda. UN should support Parliament and the Law Reform Commission to fast-track implementation of interventions such as those supporting electoral reforms (key constitutional reforms, Electoral Commission Act, Presidential Parliamentary Elections Act and the Local Governments Act) and separation of powers through rolling out think tanks to enhance achievement of governance outcomes. To increase women representation in Parliament, the UN should scale up interventions that target prospective women leaders such as training in leadership, negotiation and advocacy. The MoJCA and MoLG with support from UN should fast-track capacity strengthening of LC Is and IIs on their roles and respective laws in order to strengthen linkages between formal and informal justice systems. GoU, UN and other stakeholders such as religious and cultural institutions should identify multiple strategies to address the negative social norms and beliefs hindering women participation in governance. The UN should fast-track i) innovations to enhance accountability at institutional level including the e-case management to address corruption; ii) planned interventions that has not been implemented such as reviewing party constitutions to promote women representation. The EC should scale up civic education including aspects of voter bribery and the Police should enhance enforcement of laws against voter bribery.

Management Response: [Added: 2018/12/10]

Agree

Key Actions:

3. Recommendation:

Improving Effectiveness under Governance Pillar:

 

2. Capacity strengthening. The UN through ORGs should dialogue with MDAs to identify each other’s concerns with regard to absorption challenges and jointly forge a shared way forward.  The UN through the governance SIP should support GoU in building the capacity of the institutions such as Electoral Commission, JLOS, Police, CSOs, mediators, eminent persons, political and opinion leaders to promote peaceful political and electoral processes and enhance youth and women’s participation in legal and policy formulation on peace building and governance. Additionally, the UN should support GoU to address cross-border issues that would threaten regional peace and stability especially while aware that the universality of the 2030 Agenda requires a rigorous approach to address shared challenges and solutions within and across countries, regions and around the world that go beyond national policy-making to result in more international collective action.

Management Response: [Added: 2018/12/10]

Agree

Key Actions:

4. Recommendation:

Scale up support for afforestation and wetland recovery.  The UN through the SIED pillar should support MWE and MAAIF in large scale afforestation and wetland recovery across the country; and support creation of more green jobs related to tree planting, conservation and re-use.

 

Management Response: [Added: 2018/12/10]

Agree

Key Actions:

5. Recommendation:

Increase support for strengthening livelihoods. The UN should support MAAIF and MWE to scale up interventions geared towards increasing agricultural production and productivity as well as strengthening the agriculture value chain such as supply of improved varieties, improved post-harvest handling facilities, linkage to markets and supporting value addition. MGLSD, with support from the UN, should establish affirmative action to recognize the issue of culture, unpaid care and domestic work, support campaigns for redistribution of roles and responsibilities within households to promote women’s effective participation in economic and other opportunities by ensuring more absorption of women within salaried employment. Majority staff for all contractors should be nationals, of who at least one third are women.

Management Response: [Added: 2018/12/10]

Agree

Key Actions:

6. Recommendation:
  1. Support climate proofing of infrastructure in Uganda.  The UN and MWE should carry out climate screening, climate risk assessment and adaptation assessment in key sectors such as agriculture, transport, health and water to ensure climate proofing of infrastructure.

 

Management Response: [Added: 2018/12/10]

Agree

Key Actions:

7. Recommendation:

Enhance disaster preparedness, response and management. The OPM and UN should strengthen investment and budgeting towards disaster preparedness, response and management. MDAs should allocate a percentage of their budgets towards emergency preparedness. 

Management Response: [Added: 2018/12/10]

Agree

Key Actions:

8. Recommendation:

Enhance enforcement of environmental laws. The UN should support MWE and other MDAs such as NFA and NEMA to scale up environmental monitoring, inspection and prosecution of environmental abusers.  Environmental law enforcers should be provided with the necessary resources to ease enforcement activities.

Management Response: [Added: 2018/12/10]

Agree

Key Actions:

9. Recommendation:

Strengthen community awareness and sensitisation. MWE with support from UN should increase public awareness and sensitisation about environmental management, modern cooking energies and technologies through various media such as radio and music dance and drama among others. Enhance the use of renewable energy sources like solar, biogas, geothermal, mini-hydro plants and peat, by making them accessible and cheaper.

Management Response: [Added: 2018/12/10]

Agree

Key Actions:

10. Recommendation:

Improving Efficiency:??????? Improve harmonization and reduce duplication. The UNDAF pillar heads should facilitate greater harmonization of planned interventions at ORG level to realize greater efficiency gains. Planning for the subsequent year at ORG level should be done well in advance by October before the year begins, agency work-plans should be based on UNDAF. The UNDAF pillar heads should map out key strategic multi-sectoral interventions for increased joint planning, programming and implementation of activities and field monitoring.

Management Response: [Added: 2018/12/10]

Agree

Key Actions:

11. Recommendation:
  1. Reduce time between requisition and disbursement of funds. The UNCT should review the length of time between requisition and disbursement of funds to enhance efficiency in line with the HACT framework and procedural requirements.
Management Response: [Added: 2018/12/10]

Agree

Key Actions:

12. Recommendation:

Improving Sustainability and Transformative Approach: Increase involvement and participation of MDAs in UNDAF planning, implementation and monitoring. The UN through ORGs should engage MDAs and LGs more in UNDAF activities at all levels including implementation, review meetings and field monitoring of interventions. In addition, UN should continue strengthening the technical and institutional capacity for MDAs, LGs and IPs.

Management Response: [Added: 2018/12/10]

Agree

Key Actions:

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