Mid-term evaluation on Phase I of ACP-EU Development Minerals Programme

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Title Mid-term evaluation on Phase I of ACP-EU Development Minerals Programme
Atlas Project Number:
Evaluation Plan: 2018-2021, Bureau for Policy and Programme Support
Evaluation Type: Mid Term Project
Status: Completed
Completion Date: 05/2018
Planned End Date: 03/2018
Management Response: Yes
Corporate Outcome and Output (UNDP Strategic Plan 2018-2021)
  • 1. Output 1.4.1 Solutions scaled up for sustainable management of natural resources, including sustainable commodities and green and inclusive value chains
Evaluation Budget(US $): 68,000
Source of Funding: EU-UNDP Contribution Agreement
Evaluation Expenditure(US $): 68,000
Joint Programme: No
Joint Evaluation: No
Evaluation Team members:
Name Title Email Nationality
Seán J. Burke Author info@frontierservices.eu
GEF Evaluation: No
Key Stakeholders: European Union; African, Caribbean and Pacific Group of States
Countries: GLOBAL
Lessons
1.

Regarding lessons learned, the project has provided a valuable laboratory in which learning can be distilled from a number of the activities carried out. Firstly, on the capacity development side, the project has shown the value of having a framework for capacity development that targets the different levels (individual, organisational and enabling environment. Moreover, the project’s focus on cost-efficiency and value for money has shown that significant capacity development can be accomplished without a corresponding proportionate increasing funding resources, through identifying key impact and leverage factors such as motivation, train-the-trainer approaches and follow-on training, and of course the Programme’s excellent Return to Work Plan concept. UNDP’s work with, and the supporting of, the Programme’s Country Delivery Teams, has also provided real value, and shown the importance of an organisation that understands the national environment, and it has played an important role in helping the Programme to become operational quickly in the Focus Countries.


2.

The DMP has provided evidence of some clear good practice. One horizontal good practice was the sheer scale of reach the Programme has achieved, in terms of the numbers of DM sector actors reached across the project activities, including consultations on baseline studies, capacity building across a wide range of topics, and supporting the development or roadmaps. A related good practice has been the Programme’s focus on extensive national consultation, dialogue and building of local ownership, which as mentioned has created a significant level of national ownership and thus developed a strong ‘sustainability asset’ that can be built upon in a successor Phase 2. A third good practice, has been the relatively logical process which has been followed by the Programme delivery team, for example in first focussing on evidence-based/fact-driven baseline studies to provide real information and argument for increased awareness of the sector and supporting advocacy. In addition to the high output productivity of this project, another good practice has been its adaptive capacity to the specific local needs and circumstances in each of the 6 focus countries.  


Findings
1.

PART III - EVALUATION FINDINGS

3. Relevance, Programme Strategy & Design

3.1. DMP Relevance to ACP Policies and Strategies Over the past decade, the minerals sector including the low-value mining and quarrying sub-sector has gained increased attention from policy makers in the ACP region. Not only has the Development Minerals sector contributed to economic development of ACP countries nourishing both domestic and international supply chains, but also has become an important source of employment in various ACP countries. However, despite this growing interest in the sector, the small-scale minerals sector still suffers from the lack of attention and priority in public policy and lack of established and functioning institutions devoted to the DM sector. With the purpose of developing the mineral resources industry in support to the sustainable development of ACP countries and to contribute to poverty reduction and social development in the mining sector, ACP Ministries in charge of the Mineral Resources Industry gathered for the first time in Brussels on 13, 14 and 15 December 2010. This meeting was attended by representatives of ACP Member States and regional organisations, development partners, including the European Commission, international governmental and non-governmental institutions to discuss and adopt the following: i) Recommendations from the First Meeting of ACP Ministries responsible for the development of the Mineral Resources Industry (ACP/89/007/10); and ii) Brussels Declaration on the Sustainable Development and Management of the Mineral Resources Industry of the ACP States (ACP/89/008/10). These documents provide the basis of the ACP Framework of Action on the Development of Mineral Resources Sector. The table below provides an overview of the strategic focus areas of the Framework and the specific objectives of the DMP. 


Tag: Natural Resouce management Relevance Policies & Procedures Programme/Project Design Bilateral partners Inclusive economic growth Jobs and Livelihoods Poverty Reduction

2.

3. Relevance, Programme Strategy & Design (continuation)

3.3. DMP Relevance to UNDP Development Objectives UNDP as a renowned UN agency in development is currently involved in more than 500 projects and programmes in more than 100 countries whose initiatives are supporting sustainable businesses including MSMEs, promoting inclusive markets, corporate social responsibility and environmental sustainability. These initiatives have often included a focus on institutional capacity development support to sector ministries and regulatory agencies. Through its work in support of enterprise development, UNDP has worked with other specialized UN agencies such as UNIDO, UNCTAD and ILO. UNDP has for example been active especially in the area of MSME capacity development in Africa, Caribbean and Pacific region. In Nigeria, for example, UNDP has been supporting the national SME agency for designing national SME development policy; and in Malawi UNDP has supported the Government in developing a National Export Strategy and new industrial policy that favours local enterprises, MSMEs and other sustainable businesses. In Uganda, UNDP has supported the ‘Enterprise Uganda’ initiative which ran a business linkage initiative establishing several successful supply chain and out-grower schemes between large companies and small suppliers, strengthening capacities of small enterprises as part of the process. UNDP has also been engaging with the mining and quarrying sector in ACP countries after the concept of smallscale mining’ was first introduced to the international development lexicon over 40 years ago . Examples of UNDP’s more recent programmes that are relevant to the Development Minerals Programme include:


Tag: Natural Resouce management Relevance Knowledge management Programme/Project Design Strategic Positioning UN Agencies Jobs and Livelihoods Poverty Reduction Capacity Building National Institutions Private Sector

3.

3. Relevance, Programme Strategy & Design (continuation)

3.5. Programme Strategy and Approach

The evaluation findings show a clear Programme Strategy and Approach. A core tenet of this approach is a capacity development programme that is both systematic and participatory in nature, as summarised in Figure 3.1 below: As can be seen in Figure 3.1, UNDP’s supporting capacity development is a process comprising five key steps: 1) engaging stakeholders, 2) assessing capacity assets and needs, 3) formulating a capacity development response, 4) implementing the response, and 5) evaluating capacity development. The UNDP capacity development approach includes not only the enhancing of individual capacities but also actions at the organizational level and in support of the creation of an enabling environment. 

This approach has been used by the Development Minerals Programme, as it includes– i) capacity building at the Individual level, where capacity is developed through regional and country level training and workshop events that include coaching and mentorship, site visits and demonstrations; ii) capacity building at the Organisation level, where capacity development facilitation is undertaken through the provision of technical support; small grants; sector assessments (e.g. profile of the sector, socio-economic and environmental analysis, market analysis); and establishing dialogue processes for grievance management and resolution of conflicts; and iii) Improving the enabling environment which involves sector-wide, system capacity development through actions to support the improvement of policy, legal and regulatory frameworks. This is demonstrated through the development of Return-To-Work projects (RWPs) from training/workshop participants aimed at institutionalization of collective actions.


Tag: Natural Resouce management Relevance Communication Knowledge management Policies & Procedures Programme/Project Design Project and Programme management Results-Based Management Capacity Building

4.

4. Effectiveness (Progress towards Results and Achievements)

This section provides an overview of the following: - Project Results and Achievements against Target Objectives (4.1) - Policy Dialogues on Development Minerals (4.2) - National Consultations and Sector Roadmaps (4.3) - Progress with regard to Partnerships (4.4) - Capacity Development and Return to Work Plans (4.5) - Progress with regard to the Gender Dimension and Gender Targets (4.6) - Major factors influencing the achievement or non-achievement of the objectives (4.7). This section considers the effectiveness of the project in reaching the targeted outcomes.

4.1. Results and Achievements against Objectives and Target Outcomes

The table below sets out some of the key achievements for both 2017 and for the Programme implementation period since the project commencement up to the end of 2017. As can be seen, many of the results are impressive, and reflect the striking performance of this Programme in its scale of reach and attainment of quantified targets.

For Outcome 1 “The small-scale operators in African, Caribbean and Pacific (ACP) countries operating in the Low Value Minerals and Materials (LVMM) sector have the technical and entrepreneurial capacity to enhance productivity”, a significant number of activities has been undertaken in 2017. This resulted in 6 ACP countries where artisanal, small-scale private operators, supported by public institutions, having better access to markets and operating more safely and sustainably in 2017. A significant emphasis was put on improving operating standards and technologies in mines and quarries, with 588 artisanal and small-scale enterprise trainees with improved operating standards and technologies in mine and quarry management in 2017. Likewise, 588 artisanal and small-scale mining enterprises were provided with improved access to capital and equipment, compared to 350 in 2016. Efforts were also made at the institutional level, with 6 public institutions demonstrating improved regulations and processes to support mine and quarry management in 2017. Overall, Outcome 1 is highly satisfactory, with impressive results achieved in 2017. Operating standards and access to capital and markets have been improved for a significant number of artisanal and small-scale enterprises, and most of the indicators have already achieved the initial targets set. Such performances should continue in 2018, with particular attention given to making sure these improvements are extended to more ACP countries.


Tag: Effectiveness Policies & Procedures Results-Based Management Jobs and Livelihoods Private Sector

5.

4. Effectiveness (Progress towards Results and Achievements) (continuation)

4.1. Results and Achievements against Objectives and Target Outcomes (continuation)

Regarding Outcome 3: “Public institutions in ACP countries in charge of the mining sector and mineral policies have capacities to regulate and create an enabling environment for small-scale private operators and their representatives”, numerous activities implemented by the ACP-EU Development Minerals Programme in 2017 addressed it, with significant performances compared to 2016. 265 public stakeholders have been trained on improved operating standards and technologies in mine and quarry management to increase sector knowledge in 2017. They also all have been involved in capacity building of mine and quarry operators on standards and technologies in 2017. With respects to the public institutions, 34 of them demonstrated improved regulations, processes and monitoring mechanisms to support mine and quarry management and operators. Numerous activities were also carried on under Output 5 “Access to geo-data in mining”, including 10 products and maps with geo data produced in 2017, as well as 10 systems put in place for access to sale and geo data. Overall, impressive efforts have been made with regards to Outcome 3 in 2017. The results are highly satisfactory, with a significant number of activities implemented in 2017 addressing all relevant outputs. A vast majority of the initial target set are already met, highlighting the effectiveness of the DMP for Outcome 3. 


Tag: Environmental impact assessment Effectiveness Communication Knowledge management Monitoring and Evaluation Policies & Procedures Technology Capacity Building Data and Statistics Civil Societies and NGOs Indigenous people Private Sector

6.

4. Effectiveness (Progress towards Results and Achievements) (continuation)

4.2. Policy Dialogue and National Consultation and Sector Roadmaps

Policy Dialogue is an important dimension of the ACP Development Minerals Programme, not least because of the traditional lack of focus of national public policy on this sector given its relative historical neglect and the association lack of awareness and understanding of the sector by policy stakeholders. As mentioned earlier, interest in the Development Minerals sector has often been either non-existent or only focussed on more valuable minerals (e.g. precious stones), while it is understood that no donor country or international organisation had previously been interested in implementing a systematic capacity building project/programme in the Development Minerals sector in the ACP prior to the ACP-EU DMP.

In this context the ACP-EU Development Minerals Programme has been playing an important role in attracting more attention to the sector at national, regional and international level. For example, the relevant Ministers in Nigeria and Sudan expressed a written interest to become more deeply involved in the Programme. Interviews carried out during the EC ROM monitoring exercise also confirmed high interest levels and expectations from ACP governments for the successful implementation of the Programme. The ACP-EU Development Minerals Programme has generated commitments at the highest political level to encourage development of the sector at the national level. In Zambia, Uganda and Cameroon, relevant ministers committed to allocate either government contributions or location licenses to small scale miners to pursue the development of the DM sector roused by the ACP-EU Development Minerals Programme. The impact of the policy dialogue and advocacy is considered in more detail in Section 6. Overall, the core approach used by the Programme, with its broad reach and participatory approach, has been an important success factor in in this process, with one of the initial key actions in each Focus Country been a work effort to organise a significant national consultation exercise through a national consultation workshop.

Regional-level and ‘global’ events have also contributed in an important manner to raising awareness and creating a climate more conducive to carrying out national policy dialogue and advocacy. An example is the ACP Development Minerals Programme Showcase Event (ACP-EU DMP Showcase Event – Development Minerals: Transforming a Neglected Sector in Africa, the Caribbean and the Pacific), held on 2 December 2016 at ACP House in Brussels promoting the outcomes of the DMP’s trainings and capacity building activities with SMEs, governments, CSOs and other stakeholders from 40 ACP countries. The event was organised by the ACP-EU Development Minerals Programme and hosted by the ACP Secretariat, with support from the European Commission’s DG DEVCO (Department of International Cooperation and Development) and DG GROW (Internal Market, Industry, Entrepreneurship and SMEs), as part of EU Raw Materials Week. The Showcase event provided a place for policy dialogues among programme partners, wider stakeholders, European citizens and ACP countries by generating media coverage and presenting informative content. The Showcase also provided anopportunity for the Ambassadors of the participating countries of the Programme to learn about the activities and outcomes and to specifically share programme implementation achievements as well as the planned activities in the focus country activities. In this kind of event, the role of the ACP Secretariat as convenor and ‘Ambassador’ of the Development Minerals ‘message’ has also been an important asset.


Tag: Extractive Industries Natural Resouce management Effectiveness Donor relations Ownership Policies & Procedures Advocacy Institutional Strengthening Policy Advisory

7.

4. Effectiveness (Progress towards Results and Achievements) (continuation)

4.4 Progress with Regard to Partnerships

Partnerships are a core tenet of the ACP Development Minerals Programme approach. To-date the Programme team has strengthened collaboration with its established partnerships in addition to the formulation of new ones for joint implementation of activities. The partnerships have included i) Partnerships with 14 regional bodies and institutions in the ACP that have a convening role aimed at organizing and hosting the regional training programmes; ii) Partnerships with 33 academic and business development institutions have been established (for instance, universities and business development institutions in the ACP region have been engaged to provide extension services and support for formalisation, as well as training and teaching); iii) 5 other specialized institutions/government agencieshave partnered with the Programme to deliver country-level training on enterprise skills, market analysis, investment promotion and value-addition; iv) Additional partnerships were established with 2 globally recognized institutions/agencies in the period under review, to enhance the profile of Development Minerals in various high-level for a; and v) Mining and quarry associations, which have been directly involved in the Training of Trainer (ToT) workshops and sensitization at the country-level, with their return to work plans centred on cascading the training themes to their membership at all levels including at the grass-roots. The Table below demonstrates direct involvement of mining and quarry associations in ToT workshops at the country-level:


Tag: Extractive Industries Natural Resouce management Effectiveness Gender Mainstreaming National Regional Partnership Institutional Strengthening Civil Societies and NGOs National Institutions Private Sector

8.

4. Effectiveness (Progress towards Results and Achievements) (continuation)

4.5 Capacity Building and Return to Work Plans

As highlighted in the Progress Reports, the evaluation forms filled-in by the training participants in the different regional training workshops express high level of satisfaction regarding both the training content and the knowledge exchange. This demonstrates the effectiveness and impact of the training undertaken so far. Regarding the Return-to-Work Plans (RWPs), progress has been significant, with a total of 163 RWPs submitted from 4 regional events and 37 national events by end of 2017. The benchmarking exercise implemented by the Programme with the International Mining for Development Centre exhibited RWPs response rate of 75% and RWPs update (after 6 months) of 35%, impressive results considering conjectural factors (maternity leaves, fallouts etc.).

As mentioned earlier, one of the key features of the Programme’s training is the Return-to-Work Plans (RWPs). RWPs are plans on projects participants are required to develop on their return to work, building up on the skills and knowledge gained from the training workshops. The results of these RWPs demonstrate strong performance. In 2017, from 4 regional events and 37 national events, a total of 163 individual and group RWPs were submitted (Progress Report 2017, p.13). The response rate from participants, required to provide periodic updates on the progress of their project implementation, shows strong levels of satisfaction. The benchmarking exercise implemented by the Programme with the International Mining for Development Centre exhibited RWPs response rate of 75% and RWPs update (after 6 months) of 35%, impressive results considering conjectural factors (maternity leave, fall-outs etc.). Some Return-to-Work Plans projects which achieved impressive results are highlighted below


Tag: Extractive Industries Effectiveness Gender Equality Gender Mainstreaming Women's Empowerment Policies & Procedures Project and Programme management Institutional Strengthening

9.

4. Effectiveness (Progress towards Results and Achievements) (continuation)

4.7. Major Factors Influencing Achievement or Non-achievement of Programme Objectives

Regarding factors that have influenced the non-achievement of the objectives, the evaluation research and consultation has identified a number of factors. Firstly, delays in project team recruitment which in turn caused overall delay of the DMP implementation was an important initial factor, but where significant mitigation actions were undertaken (this is discussed in Section 5). A second factor has been the difficulty of bringing immediate changes in regulatory system and building the long term and sustainable consensus with governments. Unavailable or scarce information on the Development Minerals sector when starting the programme has also been a challenge that has required time and resources. Regarding factors that have facilitated the achievement of Programme objectives an important factor has been the high interests and expectations for the successful implementation of the Programme from all stakeholders. 


Tag: Extractive Industries Effectiveness Efficiency Human and Financial resources Partnership Policies & Procedures Results-Based Management Capacity Building Institutional Strengthening National Institutions Private Sector

10.

5. Evaluation Findings - Efficiency

This section provides an overview of the following: ? Overall Efficiency of Project Management (6.1) ? Cost and Time Efficiency of the Project Implementation (6.2) ? Programme Monitoring, Reporting and Evaluation Mechanism (6.3)

5.1. Programme Governance

The Development Minerals Programme management has involved three principal bodies: i) the Programme Steering Committee (PSC), ii) the Programme Technical Committee (PTC), and iii) the UNDP Programme Management Team (PMT). Overall project implementation was supervised by the Programme Steering Committee (PSC), which provides strategic and policy guidance, taking management decisions and guiding project implementation and monitoring progress. Following the 2nd Programme Steering Committee Meeting (ACP House Brussels, 11 December 2015) financial, human resources, procurement, management, workspace and administration systems were established and streamlined, and Regular ACP-EU-UNDP progress meetings and technical meetings held to ensure smooth implementation of the programme. 


Tag: Efficiency Communication Human and Financial resources Knowledge management Oversight Project and Programme management Institutional Strengthening

11.

5.2. Timely Implementation of Programme Activities

In terms of timely implementation, the biggest challenge (and weakness) was UNDP’s delay in recruiting the project team. This hindered the timely commencement and implementation of Programme activities. Even though UNDP began recruitment of the four-person team upon the signing of the funding agreement, the full recruitment was delayed by 8 months. The table below summarises the schedule of the team recruitment. The table below shows the difference between the initial timing and actual timing of the recruitment. It should be pointed out that the expected schedule was probably not completely realistic, in terms of getting the core team recruited and contracted within 2-3 months. A longer inception phase might be a learning point for future, to ensure the project plan can up updated as necessary (for example, the project plan expected the country consultations & roadmap as well as training to be delivered within 3 months of contract signing which would not for example provide adequate time for inception activities). In this respect, the delay would be shorter than that mentioned above.

It should also be noted that a number of measures were taken to mitigate this delay. Firstly, other UNDP staff undertook tasks at the beginning of the Programme implementation which included selecting the 40 participating countries and initiating background studies. Secondly, a number of training participants were sponsored to participate in workshops to facilitate a rapid start of the training activities in the Q3-Q4 of 2015. Thirdly, an indepth project inception workshop was also organised rapidly, which not only helped to start making up for time lost but also started the project in a participatory manner with key stakeholders from the Development Minerals Sector. By end of 2017, the Programme Team was showing a strong record in achieving and/or exceeding targets, and 2017 showed a continued significant growth in the number and scale of project activities and an overall picture of strong momentum. The no-cost extension put in place until October 2018 has also allowed the team further latitude to meet other targets, and in many cases exceed them. This request for a formal no-cost extension (and modified work plan) on the 20th December 2016 was accepted and was motivated in part by the desire to avoid any negative impact by the recruitment delays, while a second factor was that the selection of the programme focus countries including the recruitment of country coordinators took 5-6 months longer than originally envisaged.


Tag: Efficiency Human and Financial resources Operational Efficiency Project and Programme management Bilateral partners Capacity Building

12.

5. Evaluation Findings - Efficiency (continuation)

5.4. Efficiency of the Programme Management Team 

The MTE findings show a Programme Management Team that has been able to manage an impressive range of activities across the Focus Countries and the Participating Countries, with significant reach across a wide range of stakeholders from the Development Minerals Sector. The project has a well-developed document management system and has invested considerable time in monitoring progress on project outputs and outcomes, as can been seen in the Programme’s progress reporting. At the level of the Country Delivery Teams, the Programme Management Team has done a good job in getting the country co-ordinators and support staff operational, as well as tracking the work in the countries. This is a management challenge in itself, as most of the Brussels-based management team and the country teams have not worked together before, and this has required the core Brussels-based management team to develop productive and effective working relationships with the Country Delivery Teams and understanding each team member’s strengths and weaknesses. The Programme Management Team has also developed good working relationships with the UNDP Country senior management teams and invested the time to explain the project and the potential of the development minerals sectors. This was noticeable in the evaluation field missions to Cameroun and Jamaica, in terms of the appreciation of the UNDP Country Offices to the ACP Secretariat and the EC for this ACP Development Minerals Programme, and their interest and commitment to seeing the momentum build up during the Programme not to be lost but rather to go to the next level.


Tag: Extractive Industries Efficiency Human and Financial resources Monitoring and Evaluation Project and Programme management Results-Based Management Country Government UN Country Team Institutional Strengthening

13.

6. Impact and Sustainability

The Programme had a significant positive impact in the ACP region, in particular in building awareness and broadening the involvement from different actors of the Development Minerals sector at the regional level. The different activities implemented by the DMP were recognised as significantly valuable by countries and regional institutions of the ACP Group of States, and such enthusiasm resulted in strong demand for programme interventions at both regional and country level. Various Regional Training Workshops held in 2017 were over-subscribed in terms of applications against positions available, such as the Curricula Sprint on Environment, Community, Health and Safety of Development Minerals (233%) or the training on Value-Addition of Development Minerals in Northern Cameroon (328%). Moreover, Botswana, Swaziland and Sudan attended regional training workshop on Environment, Community, Health and Safety as self-sponsoring countries. This overall enthusiasm and demand for programme interventions was also highlighted by the ROM report, which concluded that “there is an enormous (quite rare) interest for this programme expressed by all stakeholders in the countries as well as in the regional and central organisations involved,” and that the Programme is “very well-designed”, with “a high level of ownership”, “demand driven and strong alignment with national policies.” 

The interested generated by the Programme has resulted in commitment by high-level officials to support in-country interventions on the Development Minerals sector, and also enabled regulatory improvements at the regional level. For instance, the African Union endorsed the Development Minerals Programme in May 2016 and adopted four recommendations related to the Programme. In Zambia, Uganda and Cameroon, national governments also committed to allocate either government contributions or location licenses to small scale miners to pursue the development of the DM sector roused by the ACP-EU Development Minerals Programme.  Table 6.1 - Selected Examples of DM Programme’s Contribution to Policy and Regulatory Development.


Tag: Extractive Industries Impact Sustainability National Regional Communication Knowledge management Awareness raising Institutional Strengthening

14.

6. Impact and Sustainability (continuation)

Regarding the additional seven countries that participated in DMP workshops, these seven countries participated in the following events: Table 6.2: ACP DMP Events/Workshops where Additional Seven Countries Participated.

The Development Minerals Programme has recorded some important outcomes in terms of securing some sustained impact after the current Programme ends. The broad reach of the Programme to try and include all key stakeholders, and in particular the participatory and country-led approach to building country-level ownership for the development of the sector, have been important contributory factors that have helped increase the Programme’s results and impact and prospects for sustained impact after the project ends. One example is the multi-stakeholder Country Working Group that was established in each Focus Country, while the participatory discussion and approval process for Country Baseline Studies and Country Roadmaps also means that these results will likely continue to influence national discussion and actions regarding the Development Minerals sector long after the current Programme ends. 

Furthermore, in some Programme Focus Countries (e.g. Jamaica, Zambia), the Programme Country Coordinator has been based in the national ministry office (or other designated national body for the sector), creating further sustained impact as well as ensuring a higher profile for the ACP Development Minerals Programme and the sector in general than might reasonably have been expected. The Programme’s capacity building approach and results are also an important contributor to the sustainability legacy in each of the Focus Countries, with the trainers trained under the Training of Trainers (ToT) approach representing a continuing source of expertise, motivation and leverage point to continue to build local awareness, knowledge and capacities related to Development Minerals. The size of this corps of trained trainers is also significant, for example 370 trainees in Zambia, 323 trainees in Uganda, 254 trainees in Uganda and 179 in Cameroon.


Tag: Impact Sustainability National Knowledge management Ownership Institutional Strengthening National Institutions

15.

6. Impact and Sustainability (continuation)

In Jamaica, the April 2016 National Consultation Workshop organised by the Programme was also the starting point for the formulation of a road map for the sector. The ACP Development Minerals Programme has also been active in contributing to the recent updating of national mining policy, with key priority areas being the diversification of the mineral sector institutions to include better oversight, support and recognition of the quarry sector and the mining of Development Minerals. While the updated mining policy is awaiting Cabinet approval, the prospects for improved compliance with the new policy can only have increased thanks to the effort of the Programme, which played a leadership role in publishing an Environmental Handbook aimed at raising the awareness of industry practitioners on these new regulatory changes, as well as organising awareness-raising events on the new regulations that were attended by someone-hundred and seventy-eight (178) quarry operators.

In Guinea, an important sustainability outcome has been the national Initiative for Responsible Minerals Development Initiative (RMDI)’s decision to adopt the Capacity Development Roadmap developed under the ACP-EU Development Minerals Programme implementation as part of the Initiative’s work plan. This inbuilt sustainability of the ACP-EU Development Minerals Programme will help ensure that activities continue being implemented after Programme closure.


Tag: Extractive Industries Impact Sustainability Knowledge management Policies & Procedures Theory of Change Awareness raising Institutional Strengthening National Institutions Private Sector

16.

6. Impact and Sustainability (continuation)

Regarding risks to sustainability, one potential risk to the sustained impact of the Development Minerals sector might be control of parts of it being acquired by foreign actors, not least China. While very difficult to assess, there is also likely to be a risk that China will see increasing potential and opportunity to act in the sector through its increased engagement in the infrastructure and construction sectors in the ACP region, not least as it would play to some of China’s core competitive strengths such as large-scale organisational capabilities, a significant pool of cheap labour, and an opportunity to capture economic gains from moving up the value chain. China’s own worker ecosystem vis-à-vis the local employment potential of the sector would likely be significantly be at odds with any aim of ensuring that the development potential of this sector to maximise its contribution to local socio-economic development. The Field Visit programme also provided a valuable opportunity to assess impact and need on the ground.

In Cameron, a real strength of the programme was very evident in Cameroon where support is being provided to formalize informal quarry workers through cooperatives. This is a laudable effort as the ASM sector in Cameroon is largely informal, therefore formalization efforts need to be enlarged in the second phase of the ACP-EU Development Minerals Programme. Significant potential to create local market demand was observed, where programme beneficiaries are getting trained on the production of superior indigenous products (e.g. traditional clay brick production in Maroua where clay brick housing is considered safer and stronger in the advent of an attack from militants such as Boko Haram as has happened previously. One of the multiplier effects of the schools built out of clay brick is that they provide access to education for those who would ordinarily not have this access, with improved comfort, quality of life and scholastic performance.


Tag: Extractive Industries Impact Sustainability Business Model Knowledge management Policies & Procedures Programme Synergy Risk Management Inclusive economic growth Jobs and Livelihoods Poverty Reduction Capacity Building National Institutions Private Sector

17.

6. Impact and Sustainability (continuation)

While the situation of the sector in Jamaica is more advanced and operates in a much more formalised setting, there are common challenges even if the nature of the challenge differs. A key challenge witnessed during the field visit is that many quarry operators and working at a subsistence level. Furthermore, the local business support ecosystem for the Development Minerals sector is still in its infancy and thus weak. For instance, the Jamaica Business Development Corporation (JBDC) support to the Development Minerals sector is small-scale and relatively artisanal in scope; Financing for the sector is still a very huge challenge; the “go it alone” culture in Jamaica is a hindrance to association movement building and support; sectoral organization and representation in key enterprise development and investment promotion fora has been traditionally weak. The ACP-EU Development Minerals Programme in Jamaica has made a contribution in the revitalization of a defunct Mining and Quarrying Association. 


Tag: Extractive Industries Impact Sustainability Policies & Procedures Programme Synergy

Recommendations
1

Evaluation recommendation 1: Place increased focus on extracting and distilling learning from the current project during the last 7 months of the project’s duration.

2

Evaluation recommendation 2: Use the remaining period of the current Programme to start large-scale preparatory work on key aspects of a Successor Phase 2 Programme.

3

Evaluation recommendation 3: Develop and chart a clear timing and plan for the finalization of a Phase 2 programme concept and launch of this Phase 2 ACP-EU Development Minerals Programme.

4

Evaluation recommendation 4: Develop a Development Minerals Business Acceleration and Support System as a Core Component of a Phase 2 Programme.

5

Evaluation recommendation 5: Develop a Development Minerals Capacity Development Strategy and Work Programme for a scaled-up Successor Programme.

6

Evaluation recommendation 6: Develop a medium-term Framework for the Development Minerals Programme.

7

Evaluation recommendation 7: Carry out detailed and intensive formulation work on the Financing and Investment Component and the Business Acceleration Component (including in-country pilots).

8

9.1. Overview of Recommendations

This section sets out the evaluation recommendations, building on the evaluation findings and conclusions in the previous report sections. Each of the above Recommendations (R1-R5) are set out in the pages that follow, with each Recommendation containing five types of information: 

1. Recommendation No (Rec X)

2. Recommendation Summary: The core recommendation

3. Detailed Recommendation: A more detailed elaboration of the recommendation, sometimes including a repeat of the rationale, and sometimes setting out example activities or next steps 4. Recommendation Addressed to: Which stakeholders the recommendation is addressed to

5. Timeframe: Recommended/suggested timeframe for implementing the recommendation

The recommendations in many respects are set out as points for reflection and consideration, as the issues are complex. Their core purpose is to build on some of the strengths and good results of the project under evaluation, as well as to provide suggestions on how some design and implementation weaknesses can be addressed. 

As requested, the recommendations also have a forward-looking perspective, and are divided into two categories: i) Category 1 - Recommendations relating to the current Development Minerals Programme; and ii) Recommendations relating to a successor Phase 2 Programme. 

Regarding Recommendations relating to the current Development Minerals Programme (Category 1 Recommendations), a first recommendation (R1) is for the DMP to place increased focus on extracting and distilling learning from the current project during the last 7 months of the project’s duration, and to address lessons learned in more depth in the project reporting.

9

A second recommendation (R2), and the most important, is that the remaining implementation period of the DMP be used to start preparing the transition to a second phase, in particular starting the significant preparatory work for a systemic and large-scale business support and acceleration programme.

A last recommendation (R3) is to chart a clear path and planning towards the development and launch of the foreseen successor ACP-EU Development Minerals Programme, in order to avoid unnecessary loss of momentum and also in particular follow through on the ownership and expectation that has been generated by the current DMP. 

Regarding Recommendations relating to the Successor Phase 2 Development Minerals Programme (Category 2 Recommendations), a fourth recommendation (R4) is to develop a significant large-scale business support and acceleration model as a key Phase 2 programme component, in order to start realising the potential of the sector and secure a quantum leap in DM sector productivity growth.

A fifth recommendation (R5) is to develop a Development Minerals Capacity Development Strategy and Work Programme for a Scaled-up Successor Programme.

A sixth recommendation (R6) is to develop a mediumterm Framework for the Development Minerals Programme.

A final seventh recommendation (R7) is to carry out as a matter of urgency detailed and intensive formulation work on the Financing and Investment Component and the Business Acceleration Component and (including in country pilots for the business acceleration component).

10

9.2. Recommendations with regard to the Current Programme

This section sets out the recommendations with regard to a current ACP Development Minerals Programme:

R1. Recommendation Summary: Place increased focus on extracting and distilling learning from the current project during the last 7 months of the project’s duration 

Detailed Recommendation: In order to maximise the learning value of the current ACP Development Minerals Programme, it is recommended that the Project Partners, and in particular the Project Management Team place increased focus on extracting and distilling learning from the current project during the last 7 months of the project’s duration.

Such a focus already exists in the Programme, and the project team has invested significant effort in documenting the very large number of activities in the Progress Reporting, and the related results and outcomes from these. However, it is likely that there is scope to further reflect on and distil key learning, or at least this is given more focus in the progress reporting. 

Recommendation Addressed to: UNDP as Implementing Party

Implementation Timeframe: May – October 2018 

11

R2 . Recommendation Summary: Use the remaining period of the current Programme to start large- scale preparatory work on key aspects of a Successor Phase 2 Programme.

Detailed Recommendation: In order to maximise the impact of a successor ACP Development Minerals Programme, it is recommended that the Project Partners, and in particular the project management team, utilise the remaining implementation period of the DMP be used to start preparing the transition to a second phase.

Specifically, this would include starting the significant preparatory work for:

a. Developing and testing a systemic and large-scale business support and acceleration programme.

b. Developing a scaled-up Capacity Development Strategy, Programme and Delivery Capacity Part of the Capacity Development Strategy, Programme and Delivery Capacity could include formalizing a role for Phase 1 regional Focus countries to disseminate the learning curricula and knowledge of Phase 1 in the ACP ccountries of each Region identified. This is something that has also been requested by ACP Secretariat and has a number of important merits. 

Phase I curricula and learning (focus and scope): However, it is recommended first to collate the key curricula and learning from Phase 1 into overall capacity development and resources toolkit and compendium, and ten consider how this could be efficiently delivered. Secondly, if Focus Countries are to lead this dissemination effort, it would likely require some investment on their side to master all of the capacity development curricula and learning material.

Dissemination workshop delivery: A third consideration would be considering what is the most costefficient delivery mechanism (e.g. country-specific workshops vs regional workshops for example?), although it is likely that country-specific workshops would be more cost-efficient. 

Application and selection process: Such workshops could also be organised on a demand basis, with Focus Countries need to apply to hose such a workshop and i) showing clear needs/interest statement from one or more countries in their ACP region; ii) presenting a variant of a return-towork plan where they and the interested host country(ies) show what will be the follow-up actions and impact of the workshop in the following six months. 

Recommendation Addressed to: UNDP as Implementing Party

Implementation Timeframe: May – October 2018 

12

R3. Recommendation Summary: Develop and chart a clear timing and plan for the finalisation of a Phase 2 Programme Concept and launch of this Phase 2 ACP-EU Development Minerals Programme.

Detailed Recommendation: In order to fully harness the potential of the ACP Development Minerals sector, the ACP-EU Development Minerals Programme Partners need to proceed to a Phase 2 Successor Programme. The EC has already communicated its need to advance significantly on this during the coming three months, and a draft concept has been under preparation by UNDP for the Programme Partners. 

It is recommended that the Programme Partners develop and chart a clear timing and plan for the review and finalisation of a concept, and the launch of the foreseen successor ACP Development Minerals Programme (Phase 2). This is important in order to full take account of the internal steps of each Partner and avoid any unnecessary loss of momentum that would be generated by a delay in the launch of a successor programme, all the more given the significant expectations across Development Minerals stakeholders across the ACP region.

Recommendation Addressed to: ACP Secretariat, European Commission, UNDP

Implementation Timeframe: May – October 2018 

13

9.3. Recommendations with regard to a Future Phase 2 Programme

This section sets out the recommendations with regard to a successor Phase 2 Programme.

R4. Recommendation Summary: Develop a Development Minerals Business Acceleration and Support System as a Core Component of a Phase 2 Programme

Detailed Recommendation: In order to fully harness the potential of the ACP Development Minerals sector, the ACP-EU Development Minerals Programme needs to create a system for developing local Development Minerals artisans/workers/cooperatives/companies and supporting their growth and contribution to local economies.

This will require developing a Development Minerals business acceleration and support system that will then need to tested in a selection of country environments, and in the light of this testing, be further adapted and refined as appropriate. This will involve taking the ASM through a structured business acceleration package in three stages as follows:

a. Stage 1: Work formalization / Company SWOTs / Diagnostic b. Stage 2: Structuring and support c. Stage 3: Business support and acceleration i. Management ii. Financing iii. Capital Equipment purchase / rental iv. Market support (e.g. Cameroon – local; Jamaica: possibly a bigger focus on the export market) v. Other (Research and innovation, technology transfer) 

Regarding timeframe for implementation, it is strongly recommended that the Development Minerals Programme uses the remaining time of the current programme to start designing the system and to start testing in 2-3 country environments. 

Recommendation Addressed to: All Partners but UNDP in particular as Implementing Party. Implementation Timeframe: Development and Testing (ASAP – e.g. May 2018 to October 2018) and Phase 2 (November 2018 -) Implementation: Phase 2 (November 2018 - )

14

R5. Recommendation Summary: Develop a Development Minerals Capacity Development Strategy and Work Programme for a Scaled-up Successor Programme

Detailed Recommendation: The Capacity Development Approach of the Development Minerals has reached a significant body of stakeholders and has been part of the wider success of the Programme. In the context of a significant scaled up programme during a follow-on Phase 2, it will be important to consider how the Programme can continue to innovate and do more with less, with the objective of creating a best-of-class capacity development programme.

This will require developing a Development Minerals Capacity Development Strategy and Work Programme (including content, delivery modalities and processes, and business acceleration and support system that will then need to tested in a selection of country environments, and then adapted as necessary). This will involve taking the ASM through a structured business acceleration package in three stages as follows:

a. Defining the core capacity development focus areas for each core stakeholder group, and developing new content and/or collating existing content into a ready-to-go series b. Seeing how capacity development impact can continue to be multiplied through further take up of existing Good Practice such as the Return to Work Plans c. Developing full-system delivery processes (pedagogical guidance, quality guidance, management guidance etc.) to allow Training of Trainers and enabling such Trainers to replicate the training d. Leveraging technology to support scaling – Importantly, considering how much more capacity development can be delivered online or in blended online and creating the content and delivery platform to support a scaled-up capacity development programme. e. Creating a trainer qualification and certification process that can drive the capacity development process in the target countries f. Regarding specific national contexts, seeing how specific actors and organisations can play a role (e.g. national University delivering a new course programme on development minerals, structured student work placement/ internship programme between local University and mining and quarrying businesses and cooperatives. g. Monitoring toolkits to allow trainers and Capacity Development actors to monitor results and impact. 

Part of the Capacity Development Strategy, Programme and Delivery Capacity could include formalizing a role for Phase 1 regional Focus countries to disseminate the learning curricula and knowledge of Phase 1 in the ACP countries of each region identified. This is something that has also been requested by ACP Secretariat and has a number of important merits. Phase I curricula and learning (focus and scope): However, it is recommended first to collate the key curricula and learning from Phase 1 into overall capacity development and resources toolkit and compendium, and then consider how this could be efficiently delivered. Secondly, if Focus Countries are to lead this dissemination effort, it would likely require some investment on their side to master all of the capacity development curricula and learning material. Dissemination workshop delivery: A third consideration would be considering what is the most costefficient delivery mechanism (e.g. country-specific workshops vs regional workshops for example), although it is likely that country-specific workshops would be more cost-efficient.

Application and selection process: Such workshops could also be organised on a demand basis, with Focus Countries need to apply to hose such a workshop and i) showing clear needs/interest statement from one or more countries in their ACP region; ii) presenting a variant of a return-to-work plan where they and the interested host country(ies) show what will be the follow-up actions and impact of the workshop in the following six months. Regarding timeframe for implementation, it is strongly recommended that the Development Minerals Programme uses the remaining time of the current project to start developing this Capacity Development System. 

Recommendation Addressed to: All Partners but UNDP in particular as Implementing Party

Implementation Timeframe: Development and Testing (May 2018 to October 2018) and Phase 2 (November 2018 - ) Implementation: Phase 2 (November 2018 - )

15

R6. Recommendation Summary: Develop a medium-term Framework for the Development Minerals Programme

Detailed Recommendation: Fully harnessing the potential of the ACP-EU Development Minerals Programme would be positively helped by a medium-term vision and framework and provide clear models of intervention that can allow other development actors to support the development of the sector. For example, there are many policy and development benefits that can flow from complementary initiatives around a core Phase 2 Programme and developing models of intervention can bring significant added value and downstream development impact. Examples include:

- Development Minerals Models to Support Youth Employment and TVET - Development Minerals Models to Support gender-inclusive development and improve child welfare - Development Minerals Models to Support Skills Development and TVET 

Developing such models will likely help other donor actors see the range of opportunities and be more open to exploring cooperation. In the case of the EU and the European Development Fund (EDF) for example, such models may help secure follow-on impact by leading to new national EDF-funded projects in these or other areas.

Recommendation Addressed to: ACP Secretariat, European Commission, UNDP

Implementation Timeframe: May – October 2018 and beyond

16

R7. Recommendation Summary: Carry out detailed and intensive formulation work on the Financing and Investment Component and the Business Acceleration Component and (including in country pilots)

Detailed Recommendation: This is a cross-cutting recommendation that is related to all of the recommendations regarding the Phase 2 Development Minerals Programme. The evaluation strongly recommends using the remaining project implementation time to carry out detailed formation work on the new Programme, in particular defining and formulating in detail the business acceleration and improvement programme component (and related models) and the financing and investment facilitation component. Moreover, to the extent possible, the project team should look to start piloting these models, as this will help accelerate the learning and transition into a high impact Phase 2 Programme. Moreover, the detailed work on design and formation, with some in-country pilots and preparatory work on the local financing and investment landscape and actors, will greatly help in formulating the detailed Phase 2 Programme.

Recommendation Addressed to: ACP Secretariat, European Commission, UNDP

Implementation Timeframe: May – October 2018

1. Recommendation:

Evaluation recommendation 1: Place increased focus on extracting and distilling learning from the current project during the last 7 months of the project’s duration.

Management Response: [Added: 2018/12/17] [Last Updated: 2020/12/21]

During the project’s transition period covering November 2018-February 2019, country coordinators in the 6 focus countries are documenting emerging best practices and lessons learnt from in-country project implementation. At the regional level, the project’s implementation team is also compiling emerging best practices and lessons learnt, particularly in the implementation of the Return-to-Work projects by training alumni.

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
1.1 Country coordinators documenting emerging best practices and lessons learnt.
[Added: 2018/12/17] [Last Updated: 2020/12/17]
BPPS – LVMM project 2019/05 Completed The focus countries have captured the lessons learnt History
1.2 Regional project implementation team compiling emerging best practices and lessons learnt.
[Added: 2018/12/17] [Last Updated: 2020/12/17]
BPPS – LVMM project 2019/05 Completed The team has compiled the best practices and lessons learnt History
1.3 Inclusion of a dedicated session on emerging best practices and lessons learnt in the Final Project report.
[Added: 2018/12/17] [Last Updated: 2019/03/05]
BPPS – LVMM project 2019/05 Completed A dedicated section on emerging best practices and lessons learnt has been included in the Final Project report History
2. Recommendation:

Evaluation recommendation 2: Use the remaining period of the current Programme to start large-scale preparatory work on key aspects of a Successor Phase 2 Programme.

Management Response: [Added: 2018/12/17] [Last Updated: 2020/12/21]

The project has commenced with the development of a large-scale business support and acceleration programme, through a structured ASM formalisation programme in 4 focus countries as a first step. This effort is complemented by support from the small-grants disbursement to get the newly formed cooperatives and associations “business-ready”. A scaled-up capacity development strategy, programme and delivery capacity has been developed for the Phase 2 programme, with the Phase 1 focus countries expected to disseminate learning curricula and knowledge to ACP countries in their regions.

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
2.1 Compilation of an ASM formalisation guide for replication in other participating countries.
[Added: 2018/12/17] [Last Updated: 2019/03/05]
BPPS – LVMM project 2019/01 Completed See Conceptual Framework for ASM Formalisation in Annex 2 History
2.2 Compilation of key curricula and relevant resource materials into an overall capacity development and resources toolkit and/or compendium.
[Added: 2018/12/17] [Last Updated: 2019/03/05]
BPPS – LVMM project 2019/02 Completed Key curricula and relevant resource materials are compiled in Annex 3 History
2.3 Formalisation of the role of phase 1 focus countries to disseminate learning curricula and knowledge as part of south-south cooperation and knowledge sharing.
[Added: 2018/12/17] [Last Updated: 2019/03/05]
BPPS – LVMM project 2019/01 Completed The role of the phase 1 focus countries has been concretized in phase 2 as per the Project Document awaiting partner approval. History
3. Recommendation:

Evaluation recommendation 3: Develop and chart a clear timing and plan for the finalization of a Phase 2 programme concept and launch of this Phase 2 ACP-EU Development Minerals Programme.

Management Response: [Added: 2018/12/17] [Last Updated: 2020/12/21]

Specific milestones have been set and are being achieved in the finalization of a Phase 2 programme concept.

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
3.1 Development of a Phase 2 Action Document.
[Added: 2018/12/17]
BPPS – LVMM project 2018/08 Completed
3.2 Development of a Phase 2 Description of Action Document / Project proposal.
[Added: 2018/12/17] [Last Updated: 2019/03/05]
BPPS – LVMM project 2018/12 Completed The phase 2 Project Document is awaiting necessary partner approvals. History
3.3 Discussion of Phase 2 Action Document by EDF Committee.
[Added: 2018/12/17] [Last Updated: 2019/03/05]
BPPS – LVMM project 2018/12 Completed The EC’s EDF committee meeting held on 20 November approved the Action Document History
4. Recommendation:

Evaluation recommendation 4: Develop a Development Minerals Business Acceleration and Support System as a Core Component of a Phase 2 Programme.

Management Response: [Added: 2018/12/17] [Last Updated: 2020/12/21]

Phase 2 Action Document and Phase 2 Description of Action Document have developed the concept for a staged approach for the implementation of a Development Minerals Business Acceleration and Support System for Phase 2 ACP-EU Development Minerals Programme.

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
4.1 Development of a Phase 2 Action Document.
[Added: 2018/12/17] [Last Updated: 2019/03/05]
BPPS – LVMM project 2018/08 Completed The phase 2 Action Document was approved by the EC’s EDF committee History
4.2 Development of a Phase 2 Description of Action Document / Project proposal.
[Added: 2018/12/17] [Last Updated: 2019/03/05]
BPPS – LVMM project 2019/01 Completed The phase 2 Project Document is awaiting necessary partner approvals. History
4.3 Discussion of Phase 2 Action Document by EDF Committee.
[Added: 2018/12/17] [Last Updated: 2019/03/05]
BPPS – LVMM project 2019/01 Completed Meeting held on 20 November approved the Action Document History
5. Recommendation:

Evaluation recommendation 5: Develop a Development Minerals Capacity Development Strategy and Work Programme for a scaled-up Successor Programme.

Management Response: [Added: 2018/12/17] [Last Updated: 2020/12/21]

Building on the capacity development achievements in Phase 1 implementation, a scaled-up capacity development strategy, programme and delivery capacity has been developed for the phase 2 programme.

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
5.1 Compilation of key curricula and relevant resource materials into an overall capacity development and resources toolkit and/or compendium to support Trained Trainers (ToT) from Phase 1 project implementation to replicate the trainings in phase 2.
[Added: 2018/12/17] [Last Updated: 2019/03/05]
BPPS – LVMM project 2019/02 Completed Key curricula and relevant resource materials are compiled in Annex 3 History
5.2 Monitoring the implementation of the adapted Development Minerals curricula by universities, research institutions and vocational training centres, through progress reports of Return-to-Work Projects (RWP).
[Added: 2018/12/17] [Last Updated: 2020/12/17]
BPPS – LVMM project 2019/05 Completed Jamaica and Fiji monitored the curricula delivered by the higher institutions. History
6. Recommendation:

Evaluation recommendation 6: Develop a medium-term Framework for the Development Minerals Programme.

Management Response: [Added: 2018/12/17] [Last Updated: 2020/12/21]

Phase 2 Description of Action Document has developed the concept for a medium-term Framework for the Development Minerals Programme that includes Development Minerals Models work with Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) institutions to support youth employment, skills development, gender-inclusive development and the improvement of child welfare .

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
6.1 Development of a Phase 2 Description of Action Document / Project proposal.
[Added: 2018/12/17] [Last Updated: 2019/03/05]
BPPS – LVMM project 2018/12 Completed The phase 2 Project Document is awaiting necessary partner approvals. History
7. Recommendation:

Evaluation recommendation 7: Carry out detailed and intensive formulation work on the Financing and Investment Component and the Business Acceleration Component (including in-country pilots).

Management Response: [Added: 2018/12/17] [Last Updated: 2020/12/21]

A compilation of case studies on the results and impact of the formalisation process and small-grants project is underway in the focus countries; and will greatly inform the business acceleration component of Phase 2. Similarly, data collection is underway in focus countries on access to finance for SMEs that took part and/or were visited as part of the training on inclusive finance for Development Minerals in 4 focus countries, to inform the financing and investment component of Phase 2.

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
7.1 Compilation of case studies on the results and impact of the formalisation process and small-grants project in the focus countries
[Added: 2018/12/17] [Last Updated: 2020/12/17]
BPPS – LVMM project 2019/05 Completed A formalisation process guide was produced and the impact of the small-grants was captured History
7.2 Data collection on access to finance for SMEs that took part in the training on inclusive finance for Development Minerals in 4 focus countries.
[Added: 2018/12/17] [Last Updated: 2020/12/17]
BPPS – LVMM project 2019/05 Completed In partnership with the Africa Guarantee Fund for SMEs (AGF), the programme has engaged financial institutions to facilitate inclusive finance and access to affordable credit for Development Minerals sector History
8. Recommendation:

9.1. Overview of Recommendations

This section sets out the evaluation recommendations, building on the evaluation findings and conclusions in the previous report sections. Each of the above Recommendations (R1-R5) are set out in the pages that follow, with each Recommendation containing five types of information: 

1. Recommendation No (Rec X)

2. Recommendation Summary: The core recommendation

3. Detailed Recommendation: A more detailed elaboration of the recommendation, sometimes including a repeat of the rationale, and sometimes setting out example activities or next steps 4. Recommendation Addressed to: Which stakeholders the recommendation is addressed to

5. Timeframe: Recommended/suggested timeframe for implementing the recommendation

The recommendations in many respects are set out as points for reflection and consideration, as the issues are complex. Their core purpose is to build on some of the strengths and good results of the project under evaluation, as well as to provide suggestions on how some design and implementation weaknesses can be addressed. 

As requested, the recommendations also have a forward-looking perspective, and are divided into two categories: i) Category 1 - Recommendations relating to the current Development Minerals Programme; and ii) Recommendations relating to a successor Phase 2 Programme. 

Regarding Recommendations relating to the current Development Minerals Programme (Category 1 Recommendations), a first recommendation (R1) is for the DMP to place increased focus on extracting and distilling learning from the current project during the last 7 months of the project’s duration, and to address lessons learned in more depth in the project reporting.

Management Response: [Added: 2020/12/16] [Last Updated: 2020/12/21]

Key Actions:

9. Recommendation:

A second recommendation (R2), and the most important, is that the remaining implementation period of the DMP be used to start preparing the transition to a second phase, in particular starting the significant preparatory work for a systemic and large-scale business support and acceleration programme.

A last recommendation (R3) is to chart a clear path and planning towards the development and launch of the foreseen successor ACP-EU Development Minerals Programme, in order to avoid unnecessary loss of momentum and also in particular follow through on the ownership and expectation that has been generated by the current DMP. 

Regarding Recommendations relating to the Successor Phase 2 Development Minerals Programme (Category 2 Recommendations), a fourth recommendation (R4) is to develop a significant large-scale business support and acceleration model as a key Phase 2 programme component, in order to start realising the potential of the sector and secure a quantum leap in DM sector productivity growth.

A fifth recommendation (R5) is to develop a Development Minerals Capacity Development Strategy and Work Programme for a Scaled-up Successor Programme.

A sixth recommendation (R6) is to develop a mediumterm Framework for the Development Minerals Programme.

A final seventh recommendation (R7) is to carry out as a matter of urgency detailed and intensive formulation work on the Financing and Investment Component and the Business Acceleration Component and (including in country pilots for the business acceleration component).

Management Response: [Added: 2020/12/16] [Last Updated: 2020/12/21]

Key Actions:

10. Recommendation:

9.2. Recommendations with regard to the Current Programme

This section sets out the recommendations with regard to a current ACP Development Minerals Programme:

R1. Recommendation Summary: Place increased focus on extracting and distilling learning from the current project during the last 7 months of the project’s duration 

Detailed Recommendation: In order to maximise the learning value of the current ACP Development Minerals Programme, it is recommended that the Project Partners, and in particular the Project Management Team place increased focus on extracting and distilling learning from the current project during the last 7 months of the project’s duration.

Such a focus already exists in the Programme, and the project team has invested significant effort in documenting the very large number of activities in the Progress Reporting, and the related results and outcomes from these. However, it is likely that there is scope to further reflect on and distil key learning, or at least this is given more focus in the progress reporting. 

Recommendation Addressed to: UNDP as Implementing Party

Implementation Timeframe: May – October 2018 

Management Response: [Added: 2020/12/16] [Last Updated: 2020/12/21]

Key Actions:

11. Recommendation:

R2 . Recommendation Summary: Use the remaining period of the current Programme to start large- scale preparatory work on key aspects of a Successor Phase 2 Programme.

Detailed Recommendation: In order to maximise the impact of a successor ACP Development Minerals Programme, it is recommended that the Project Partners, and in particular the project management team, utilise the remaining implementation period of the DMP be used to start preparing the transition to a second phase.

Specifically, this would include starting the significant preparatory work for:

a. Developing and testing a systemic and large-scale business support and acceleration programme.

b. Developing a scaled-up Capacity Development Strategy, Programme and Delivery Capacity Part of the Capacity Development Strategy, Programme and Delivery Capacity could include formalizing a role for Phase 1 regional Focus countries to disseminate the learning curricula and knowledge of Phase 1 in the ACP ccountries of each Region identified. This is something that has also been requested by ACP Secretariat and has a number of important merits. 

Phase I curricula and learning (focus and scope): However, it is recommended first to collate the key curricula and learning from Phase 1 into overall capacity development and resources toolkit and compendium, and ten consider how this could be efficiently delivered. Secondly, if Focus Countries are to lead this dissemination effort, it would likely require some investment on their side to master all of the capacity development curricula and learning material.

Dissemination workshop delivery: A third consideration would be considering what is the most costefficient delivery mechanism (e.g. country-specific workshops vs regional workshops for example?), although it is likely that country-specific workshops would be more cost-efficient. 

Application and selection process: Such workshops could also be organised on a demand basis, with Focus Countries need to apply to hose such a workshop and i) showing clear needs/interest statement from one or more countries in their ACP region; ii) presenting a variant of a return-towork plan where they and the interested host country(ies) show what will be the follow-up actions and impact of the workshop in the following six months. 

Recommendation Addressed to: UNDP as Implementing Party

Implementation Timeframe: May – October 2018 

Management Response: [Added: 2020/12/16] [Last Updated: 2020/12/21]

Key Actions:

12. Recommendation:

R3. Recommendation Summary: Develop and chart a clear timing and plan for the finalisation of a Phase 2 Programme Concept and launch of this Phase 2 ACP-EU Development Minerals Programme.

Detailed Recommendation: In order to fully harness the potential of the ACP Development Minerals sector, the ACP-EU Development Minerals Programme Partners need to proceed to a Phase 2 Successor Programme. The EC has already communicated its need to advance significantly on this during the coming three months, and a draft concept has been under preparation by UNDP for the Programme Partners. 

It is recommended that the Programme Partners develop and chart a clear timing and plan for the review and finalisation of a concept, and the launch of the foreseen successor ACP Development Minerals Programme (Phase 2). This is important in order to full take account of the internal steps of each Partner and avoid any unnecessary loss of momentum that would be generated by a delay in the launch of a successor programme, all the more given the significant expectations across Development Minerals stakeholders across the ACP region.

Recommendation Addressed to: ACP Secretariat, European Commission, UNDP

Implementation Timeframe: May – October 2018 

Management Response: [Added: 2020/12/16] [Last Updated: 2020/12/21]

Key Actions:

13. Recommendation:

9.3. Recommendations with regard to a Future Phase 2 Programme

This section sets out the recommendations with regard to a successor Phase 2 Programme.

R4. Recommendation Summary: Develop a Development Minerals Business Acceleration and Support System as a Core Component of a Phase 2 Programme

Detailed Recommendation: In order to fully harness the potential of the ACP Development Minerals sector, the ACP-EU Development Minerals Programme needs to create a system for developing local Development Minerals artisans/workers/cooperatives/companies and supporting their growth and contribution to local economies.

This will require developing a Development Minerals business acceleration and support system that will then need to tested in a selection of country environments, and in the light of this testing, be further adapted and refined as appropriate. This will involve taking the ASM through a structured business acceleration package in three stages as follows:

a. Stage 1: Work formalization / Company SWOTs / Diagnostic b. Stage 2: Structuring and support c. Stage 3: Business support and acceleration i. Management ii. Financing iii. Capital Equipment purchase / rental iv. Market support (e.g. Cameroon – local; Jamaica: possibly a bigger focus on the export market) v. Other (Research and innovation, technology transfer) 

Regarding timeframe for implementation, it is strongly recommended that the Development Minerals Programme uses the remaining time of the current programme to start designing the system and to start testing in 2-3 country environments. 

Recommendation Addressed to: All Partners but UNDP in particular as Implementing Party. Implementation Timeframe: Development and Testing (ASAP – e.g. May 2018 to October 2018) and Phase 2 (November 2018 -) Implementation: Phase 2 (November 2018 - )

Management Response: [Added: 2020/12/16] [Last Updated: 2020/12/21]

Key Actions:

14. Recommendation:

R5. Recommendation Summary: Develop a Development Minerals Capacity Development Strategy and Work Programme for a Scaled-up Successor Programme

Detailed Recommendation: The Capacity Development Approach of the Development Minerals has reached a significant body of stakeholders and has been part of the wider success of the Programme. In the context of a significant scaled up programme during a follow-on Phase 2, it will be important to consider how the Programme can continue to innovate and do more with less, with the objective of creating a best-of-class capacity development programme.

This will require developing a Development Minerals Capacity Development Strategy and Work Programme (including content, delivery modalities and processes, and business acceleration and support system that will then need to tested in a selection of country environments, and then adapted as necessary). This will involve taking the ASM through a structured business acceleration package in three stages as follows:

a. Defining the core capacity development focus areas for each core stakeholder group, and developing new content and/or collating existing content into a ready-to-go series b. Seeing how capacity development impact can continue to be multiplied through further take up of existing Good Practice such as the Return to Work Plans c. Developing full-system delivery processes (pedagogical guidance, quality guidance, management guidance etc.) to allow Training of Trainers and enabling such Trainers to replicate the training d. Leveraging technology to support scaling – Importantly, considering how much more capacity development can be delivered online or in blended online and creating the content and delivery platform to support a scaled-up capacity development programme. e. Creating a trainer qualification and certification process that can drive the capacity development process in the target countries f. Regarding specific national contexts, seeing how specific actors and organisations can play a role (e.g. national University delivering a new course programme on development minerals, structured student work placement/ internship programme between local University and mining and quarrying businesses and cooperatives. g. Monitoring toolkits to allow trainers and Capacity Development actors to monitor results and impact. 

Part of the Capacity Development Strategy, Programme and Delivery Capacity could include formalizing a role for Phase 1 regional Focus countries to disseminate the learning curricula and knowledge of Phase 1 in the ACP countries of each region identified. This is something that has also been requested by ACP Secretariat and has a number of important merits. Phase I curricula and learning (focus and scope): However, it is recommended first to collate the key curricula and learning from Phase 1 into overall capacity development and resources toolkit and compendium, and then consider how this could be efficiently delivered. Secondly, if Focus Countries are to lead this dissemination effort, it would likely require some investment on their side to master all of the capacity development curricula and learning material. Dissemination workshop delivery: A third consideration would be considering what is the most costefficient delivery mechanism (e.g. country-specific workshops vs regional workshops for example), although it is likely that country-specific workshops would be more cost-efficient.

Application and selection process: Such workshops could also be organised on a demand basis, with Focus Countries need to apply to hose such a workshop and i) showing clear needs/interest statement from one or more countries in their ACP region; ii) presenting a variant of a return-to-work plan where they and the interested host country(ies) show what will be the follow-up actions and impact of the workshop in the following six months. Regarding timeframe for implementation, it is strongly recommended that the Development Minerals Programme uses the remaining time of the current project to start developing this Capacity Development System. 

Recommendation Addressed to: All Partners but UNDP in particular as Implementing Party

Implementation Timeframe: Development and Testing (May 2018 to October 2018) and Phase 2 (November 2018 - ) Implementation: Phase 2 (November 2018 - )

Management Response: [Added: 2020/12/16] [Last Updated: 2020/12/21]

Key Actions:

15. Recommendation:

R6. Recommendation Summary: Develop a medium-term Framework for the Development Minerals Programme

Detailed Recommendation: Fully harnessing the potential of the ACP-EU Development Minerals Programme would be positively helped by a medium-term vision and framework and provide clear models of intervention that can allow other development actors to support the development of the sector. For example, there are many policy and development benefits that can flow from complementary initiatives around a core Phase 2 Programme and developing models of intervention can bring significant added value and downstream development impact. Examples include:

- Development Minerals Models to Support Youth Employment and TVET - Development Minerals Models to Support gender-inclusive development and improve child welfare - Development Minerals Models to Support Skills Development and TVET 

Developing such models will likely help other donor actors see the range of opportunities and be more open to exploring cooperation. In the case of the EU and the European Development Fund (EDF) for example, such models may help secure follow-on impact by leading to new national EDF-funded projects in these or other areas.

Recommendation Addressed to: ACP Secretariat, European Commission, UNDP

Implementation Timeframe: May – October 2018 and beyond

Management Response: [Added: 2020/12/16] [Last Updated: 2020/12/21]

Key Actions:

16. Recommendation:

R7. Recommendation Summary: Carry out detailed and intensive formulation work on the Financing and Investment Component and the Business Acceleration Component and (including in country pilots)

Detailed Recommendation: This is a cross-cutting recommendation that is related to all of the recommendations regarding the Phase 2 Development Minerals Programme. The evaluation strongly recommends using the remaining project implementation time to carry out detailed formation work on the new Programme, in particular defining and formulating in detail the business acceleration and improvement programme component (and related models) and the financing and investment facilitation component. Moreover, to the extent possible, the project team should look to start piloting these models, as this will help accelerate the learning and transition into a high impact Phase 2 Programme. Moreover, the detailed work on design and formation, with some in-country pilots and preparatory work on the local financing and investment landscape and actors, will greatly help in formulating the detailed Phase 2 Programme.

Recommendation Addressed to: ACP Secretariat, European Commission, UNDP

Implementation Timeframe: May – October 2018

Management Response: [Added: 2020/12/16] [Last Updated: 2020/12/21]

Key Actions:

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