Terminal Evaluation (TE) Report Solomon Islands Water Sector Adaptation Project

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Evaluation Plan:
2018-2022, Fiji
Evaluation Type:
Final Project
Planned End Date:
09/2019
Completion Date:
07/2019
Status:
Completed
Management Response:
Yes
Evaluation Budget(US $):
40,000

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Title Terminal Evaluation (TE) Report Solomon Islands Water Sector Adaptation Project
Atlas Project Number: 00088631
Evaluation Plan: 2018-2022, Fiji
Evaluation Type: Final Project
Status: Completed
Completion Date: 07/2019
Planned End Date: 09/2019
Management Response: Yes
Corporate Outcome and Output (UNDP Strategic Plan 2018-2021)
  • 1. Output 2.1.1 Low emission and climate resilient objectives addressed in national, sub-national and sectoral development plans and policies to promote economic diversification and green growth
Evaluation Budget(US $): 40,000
Source of Funding: GEF
Evaluation Expenditure(US $): 22,234
Joint Programme: No
Joint Evaluation: No
Evaluation Team members:
Name Title Email Nationality
William Parairato Parairato@yahoo.com
Steve Raaymakers
GEF Evaluation: Yes
GEF Project Title: Solomon Islands Water Sector Adaptation Project
Evaluation Type: Terminal Evaluation
Focal Area: Climate Change
Project Type: FSP
GEF Phase: GEF-5
GEF Project ID: 4725
PIMS Number: 4568
Key Stakeholders: Ministry of Mines, Energy and Rural Electrification (MMERE), Ministry of Environment, Climate Change and disaster management
Countries: FIJI
Lessons
Findings
1.

As outlined in section 2.5 the ProDoc included a comprehensive and well-developed Project Results Framework (PRF). Our evaluation of the PRF is that it is fundamentally sound and contains the usual components of a properly designed PRF; including both quantitative and qualitative indicators, description of the baseline situation, end-of-project targets, risks and assumptions and me

Some of indicators and targets are found to be unrealistic or unclear, and the to their credit, in part to address this the PMU developed supplementary, scientifically based technical performance criteria including minimum water supply to population ratios, and used these for project planning and monitoring and evaluation (M&E).

The Mid Term Review (MTR) also recommended some refinements to the PRF, especially indicators and targets, and the PMU took these on and effectively adapted the PRF.


Tag: Monitoring and Evaluation Programme/Project Design Results-Based Management Theory of Change

2.

Compared with many other similar projects it appears that for this project, significant effort was made during the project design to incorporate lessons from previous and other relevant projects, which has been a significant positive factor in ensuring that the project design is sensible, logical and practical, and which has assisted greatly in the successful implementation of the Project.

The Director of the Water Resources Division of MMERE was heavily involved in the project design and as he had been and was still involved in many other water sector projects in the Solomon Islands, was able to bring these experiences to influence the design of SIWSAP.

Learning lessons from other projects, the design of SIWSAP departed from the all-to-common practice of projects working in isolation and rather embraced a more collaborative model, seeking to cooperate, coordinate and even integrate with the efforts of other related initiatives. Such an approach allows synergies, efficiencies, leveraging and multiplier effects to be achieved.


Tag: Knowledge management Ownership Programme Synergy Programme/Project Design

3.

Effective stakeholder participation was one of the significant successes of SIWSAP, and was effected both through the inter-ministerial membership of the Project Board and the cross-sectoral membership of the existing SIG WASH Working Group (which for efficiency the Project worked through instead of establishing a PAG as envisioned in the ProDoc), as well as through the Community Water Committees. The PMs and PMU staff also appear to have made significant efforts to foster stakeholder participation through professional and personal contacts and efforts in the water and development sectors.

 


Tag: Drinking water supply Sanitation Water resources Partnership Civil Societies and NGOs

4.

For some Provinces, beneficiary communities reported poor engagement, communication and support from both the UNDP-contracted Provincial Project Officers (PPOs) and from the Provincial Governments (PGs) themselves.


Tag: Challenges Civic Engagement Local Governance Communication Project and Programme management Country Government UNDP Management UNDP management

5.

Replication of model practices and achievements demonstrated at the initial six Pilot Sites was a core part of the Project design – however the design intention was that the Pilot Sites would catalyze much broader provincial-level replication, including development, adoption and implementation of Provincial water sector climate change adaptation response plans. Unfortunately, for various reasons this was not achieved and the replication effort was reduced to implementing some restricted actions at six Replica Sites from mid 2018 onwards. The six Replica Sites are all in the same Provinces as the Pilot Sites, and in many cases in immediately neighbouring communities to the Pilot Sites.


Tag: Challenges Sustainability Local Governance Programme/Project Design Sustainability Technical Support

6.

The comparative advantage of UNDP as the GEF Implementing Agency for this Project is based on the long-standing physical presence of UNDP in the Pacific including a presence in the Solomon Islands, with a long history of UN support to SIG on sustainable development issues. The UNDP has well established and effective working relationships with relevant Central and Provincial Government agencies, as well as international experience with capacity development programs, and an ability to access international expertise on water resources and sanitation issues. The UNDP local presence is also effectively supported UNDP Regional Technical Adviser (RTA) for climate change adaptation located in Sydney (but reporting to the UNDP Regional Hub in Bangkok), adding to the agency’s comparative advantage.


Tag: Drinking water supply Sanitation Water resources Effectiveness Global Environment Facility fund Knowledge management Country Government UNDP Management UNDP management Technical Support Agenda 2030

7.

3.1.6 Linkages between project & other interventions within the sector
1. As outlined above the design of SIWSAP departed from the all-to-common practice of projects working in isolation and rather embraced a more collaborative model, seeking to cooperate, coordinate and even integrate with the efforts of other related initiatives. Such an approach allows synergies, efficiencies, leveraging and multiplier effects to be achieved.Other related interventions in the Solomon Islands water sector that SIWSAP has coordinated with include:

a) The multi-donor Rural Development Programme (RDP).
b) The EU-EDF10 and DFAT funded Rural-WASH programme executed through the Ministry of Health & Medical Services.
c) The World Bank-GEF funded Community Resilience to Climate and Disaster Risk Project (CRISP).
d) Various NGOs, including Save the Children, who are also delivering water sector activities in the country.


Tag: Effectiveness Global Environment Facility fund Multi Donor Trust Funds Harmonization Integration Programme Synergy Civil Societies and NGOs Country Government UNDP Management UNDP management

8.

3.1.7 Evaluation of project management arrangements
1. The project management arrangements as envisioned in the ProDoc are described in section 2.6 above. While these are fairly standard for UNDP-GEF projects, including (various different terms are used depending on the project), an Implementing Agency (for GEF purposes), an Executing Agency (for in-country implementation), a Project Board, a Project Advisory group, a Project Management Unit with project staff, and ancillary groups (in this case Community Water Committees). We find a number of problems and deficiencies with the project management arrangements, both in terms of design and in terms of implementation, as follows:

a) As found by the MTR, while the MECDM, MHMS-EHD and MDPAC are listed as Responsible Parties in the ProDoc, their roles and responsibilities were not well defined.

b) Despite the infrastructure focus of the Project, including in relation to improving sanitation, the Project design did not include a Civil Engineer as a PMU staff position. It was not until November 2017 (more than 3 years after project start), after much lobbying by the PM, that a Civil Engineer was engaged. Had this position been in place from project start, greater progress might have been made.

c) The structure and staffing of the PMU was highly fluid and changed significantly over time, with no less than seven different structures over four years, and a very high rate of staff turnover, as shown in Figures 4 and Table 4. To be effective during a time constrained four year project, PMU staffing needs to remain as constant as possible.

d) Of particular note, after departure of the initial CTA in July 2015 (after only six months of duty), the project was without a CTA for nearly two years, until a new CTA commenced in June 2017. It is understood that the reason for this critical gap was that SIG was staunchly opposed to engaging a replacement CTA, because it is an international position (UN level P4). These positions consume a significant part of the project budget, which SIG preferred to allocate to in-country activities. However, given the highly technical nature of the Project, including the sanitation components, there is no doubt that lack of a CTA would have been a major factor in lack of Project delivery. The TE considers that it was a strategic error to have left this key position unfilled for so long.

e) The PPOs, who were based remotely in the Provincial capitals and not in the Pilot Sites (except where the two coincide such as Taro and Gizo), were not always effective. For some Provinces, beneficiary communities reported poor engagement, communication and support from the PPOs.


Tag: Challenges Effectiveness Global Environment Facility fund Human and Financial resources Project and Programme management Strategic Positioning

9.

3.2.1 Adaptive management
1. The PMU and UNDP more generally, as well as the relevant SIG agencies, demonstrated an outstanding capacity for adaptive management in response to changing circumstances and unexpected developments, which is essential for successful project execution.


Tag: Crisis Response Natural Disaster Natural Resouce management Monitoring and Evaluation Project and Programme management Country Government UNDP Management UNDP management

10.

number of significant financial issued are noted by the TE team as follows:

According to UNDP, in December 2018, the PMU developed an AWP budget of $818,000 for 2019 for based on remaining project balance after AWP 2018 was to be completed. However, when the financial reports for 2018 were finalized it was realized that the balance for the LDCF resources for the project was $195,000. There were multiple analyses conducted to understand why there was such a discrepancy and it was realized that in the last quarter of 2018 some Purchase Orders (POs) that had been open from 2017 were closed incurring additional expenditure. These PO figures were not incorporated in the 2018 AWP. Furthermore, there appeared to be overspent in the travel budget code due to higher travel costs than anticipated. The issue was discussed with the Project Board members to arrive at a solution.


Tag: Challenges Human and Financial resources Project and Programme management

11.

It was also reported that the Project budget in the project design failed to properly account for the very high costs of freight transport in the Solomon Islands, despite the fact that the Project required shipping large numbers of rainwater tanks and building materials to remote areas. Project budgets as contained in the Project design should be properly aligned and costed to the planned activities (Figure 5).


Tag: Challenges Anti-corruption Human and Financial resources Programme/Project Design

12.

With regard to co-financing, right from the TE inception phase the TE team requested the PMU to provide co-financing data in the standard UNDP-GEF co-financing table format – however this was only partially provided and with conflicting figures and lack of supporting explanation. The MTR report made a specific recommendation for the PMU to better track and report co-financing data – however this does not appear to have been implemented.


Tag: Government Cost-sharing Anti-corruption Monitoring and Evaluation Project and Programme management

13.

The Project Document (ProDoc) and its Project Results Framework (PRF) included a comprehensive, well developed M&E Plan with clearly articulated baselines and end-of-project targets and embracing both quantitative and qualitative indicators. The M&E framework set out in the PRF was aligned with the GEF Climate Change Adaptation Tracking Took (the Adaptation Monitoring & Assessment Tool - AMAT) and broader UNDP M&E Frameworks.


Tag: Global Environment Facility fund Monitoring and Evaluation

14.

The Project Management Unit (PMU) generally adhered to the M&E Plan including reporting indicators and targets against the baselines as contained in the ProDoc / PRF. A number of significant strengths and positives in the way that the M&E Plan was implemented included:

a) The PMU closely monitored and reviewed progress of site activities and sub-projects.
b) The PMU developed scientifically-based technical performance criteria including minimum water supply to population ratios and used these for project planning and M&E.
c) The PMU routinely collected, analysed and reported gender aggregated data to support M&E.
d) The PMU produced the required Quarterly Progress Reports (QPRs), Annual Progress Reports (APRs) and Project Implementation Reviews (PIRs).
e) A Mid Term Review (MTR) was undertaken in May 2017 and this Terminal Evaluation was undertaken in June 2019 in accordance with UNDP-GEF requirements.


Tag: Effectiveness Gender Mainstreaming Monitoring and Evaluation Project and Programme management Data and Statistics

15.

However, there were some key deficiencies with M&E Plan implementation, including:
a) While an Inception Workshop was held and is a significant part of the M&E process, the workshop did not did not review and revise the PRF, GEF Tracking Tool (AMAT) and M&E Plan, considering possible changes in indicators, baseline situation, targets, risk and assumptions and means of verification since project design. It was therefore not until after the MTR in May 2017 that the PRF and M&E Plan were reviewed and revised.


Tag: Challenges Human and Financial resources Monitoring and Evaluation Project and Programme management

16.

a) Both the UNDP Solomons Office and the PMU were highly active in driving and supporting the Project Board (PB) and were fully engaged in all aspects of the project from design and inception onwards, providing strong levels of support ranging from high-level strategic issues to detailed technical and administrative issues.


Tag: Effectiveness Human and Financial resources Implementation Modality Project and Programme management Technical Support

17.

Without fail every stakeholder that was consulted during the TE identified slow and bureaucratic UNDP recruitment and procurement practices as being the most significant cause of delay to project implementation – with some processes taking many months. This was most likely a main contributing factor to the non-achievement of key project components such as sanitation (see below).


Tag: Challenges Human and Financial resources Implementation Modality Procurement Project and Programme management UNDP Management UNDP management

18.

As outlined in Table A in the Executive Summary, of a total of 23 targets (Target 2.1 is split into two for this assessment), 12 targets have been fully achieved, 8 targets have been partially achieved, and 3 targets have not (and will not) be achieved by Project-end. This represents:
• a full achievement rate of 52%
• a partial achievement rate of 35%
• a failure rate of 13%


Tag: Effectiveness Programme/Project Design Results-Based Management Theory of Change

19.

The main area of under-achievement was a general lack of progress with the project targets relating to sanitation. It was difficult for the TE team to establish the exact reasons for this lack of progress however the following appear to have been key contributing factors:


Tag: Sanitation Challenges Effectiveness Human and Financial resources Programme/Project Design

20.

There was also opposition from some communities to some sanitation solutions proposed by SIWSAP for cultural reasons – for example compositing toilets where there is opposition to having to handle by-products, even though they are completely safe. Some communities also stated that communal toilets are not appropriate due to lack of ownership which means that cleaning and maintenance become a problem – they said that each household needs to have their own toilet, which they own and therefore care for. On Aurigi (Santa Catalina) Island we were shown a previous community toilet project which had failed for these reasons (Figure 11).


Tag: Sanitation Challenges Civic Engagement Shared Services

21.

The other main area where the Project under-achieved was a general lack of uptake and replication of SIWSAP successes and best practices at the Provincial and National levels. The exact reasons for this are also not clear but almost certainly include some of the factors listed for sanitation above. Given the highly ambitious overall workload, it was also necessary for the PMU to focus heavily on the pilot and replica sites in order to make good progress there, at the expense of Provincial and National level activities. This is a lesson for project design and adequate resourcing.


Tag: Sanitation Sustainability Resource mobilization Programme/Project Design Sustainability

22.

1. All project components, outcomes & outputs are assessed as being highly relevant to:


Tag: Relevance Global Environment Facility fund Country Government UN Agencies Agenda 2030

23.

1. It is very clear that the Project has been extremely effective in achieving the overall objective to improve the resilience of water resources to the impacts of climate change in order to improve health, sanitation and quality of life, and sustain livelihoods, in the targeted vulnerable areas.


Tag: Climate Change Adaptation Resilience building Vulnerable Drinking water supply Sanitation Water resources Effectiveness Non-Communicable Diseases

24.

Overall it appears that the Project has been reasonably efficient, including:
a) Co-opting all relevant government agencies through cross-sectoral, inter-ministerial arrangements.
b) Strong utilization of community commitment and energy (although expecting too much without payment can back-fire later).
c) At least at some sites, good integration with other related initiatives (Figure 18).


Tag: Efficiency Civic Engagement Integration Country Government

25.

However, some significant in-efficiencies were noted, e.g.:
a) Long delays (up to months) with UNDP recruitment and procurement processes.
b) Repetitive, piece-meal contracting procedures to do similar work (vs Standing Panel arrangement from beginning of project).
c) No preference given to using local contractors and labour (also social disruption issues when contractors came into communities from other areas).
d) Co-financing may not have met original commitment (US$43.6 million) with a massive shortfall of $43.3 million.


Tag: Challenges Efficiency Government Cost-sharing Human and Financial resources Procurement

26.

Apart from Rennell Island where the bauxite mining company assisted with transporting and installing rainwater tanks, there was almost no engagement with private sector (private sector was only engaged as a supplier, not as a contributing partner).


Tag: Efficiency Partnership Procurement Project and Programme management Private Sector

27.

Poverty alleviation: While the Project is not explicitly designed to address poverty alleviation, sanitation and water security and resilience to climate change are fundamental precursors to poverty alleviation. Improved water security in communities increases economic productivity as less time needs to be spent seeking and obtaining water. Improved water security in communities also allows diversification of economic livelihoods, including for some sites such as Aurigi (Santa Catalina), increased culture-based tourism. The Project has also contributed directly to poverty alleviation in the short-term but employing local contractors and labour in the communities.


Tag: Procurement Jobs and Livelihoods Poverty Reduction

28.

Improved governance: The Project has supported some improvements in governance relating to sanitation and water resources security and resilience, including by providing best-practice models, stimulating greater cooperation between various government ministries and divisions and stimulating national-level interactions, debate and discussion through the two National Water Forums held in 2016, 2017 and 2018, which all stakeholders have hailed an highly successful and beneficial events, that should continue to be held (Figure 2). However, the Project’s impact in improving water governance at the broader provincial and national levels, in terms of formalizing mandated governance arrangements, has not been as great as envisioned in the ProDoc.


Tag: Drinking water supply Sanitation Water resources Local Governance Coordination

29.

Natural disasters: In addition to building water sector resilience to climate change, the Project has also built water sector resilience to natural disasters, including the 2015 El-Nino related prolonged drought, and the 2017 eruption of Tinakula Volcano in Temotu Province. During the eruption the SIWSAP groundwater desalination plant at Tuwo ensured water security for several neighbouring islands where water supplies had been contaminated by volcanic ash.


Tag: Disaster risk management Natural Disaster Resilience building Drinking water supply Water resources

30.

Gender: It appears that gender involvement in all SIWSAP activities has been well balanced and in fact has often been unbalanced towards greater involvement of females, including in the PMU. At the community level women and girls have benefited significantly by having secure water sources immediately adjacent to or much closer to their residences, reducing time and workload fetching water and also improving security. Women consulted during the TE expressed high satisfaction and appreciation for this outcome. Other social groups including the disabled have benefited from much more convenient access to secure water.


Tag: Drinking water supply Gender Equality Gender Parity

31.

Overall, the TE assesses that the Project is well mainstreamed with other UNDP priorities. In addition, while not required by the TE ToR, an assessment of how the UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) are relevant to and mainstreamed by the Project is presented below in Table 12. This finds that nearly all SDGs are relevant to highly relevant and have been effectively mainstreamed in the Project.


Tag: Programme/Project Design Strategic Positioning UNDP Management UNDP management Agenda 2030

32.

3.3.6.1 Financial sustainability
1. The TE team could find no evidence that National and Provincial Governments have committed sufficient financial resources to ensure ongoing, long-term (10-20 year) operation and maintenance of the facilities that have been installed at the 12 pilot and replica sites under SIWSAP.


Tag: Sustainability Government Cost-sharing Local Governance

33.

3.3.6.2 Socio-political sustainability
1. Given the extremely high level of satisfaction with the Project that was expressed by all community stakeholders consulted during the TE, and the fundamental importance of water security and resilience, as well as sanitation, to all levels of society, it is likely that there will continue to be ongoing, strong socio-political support for sustaining the SIWSAP achievements – especially at the community level.

2. However, this is likely to be constrained by lack of financial and technical resources and support, especially given the highly technical nature of some of the equipment that has been installed (desalination plants etc).


Tag: Challenges Sustainability Civic Engagement Human and Financial resources

34.

3.3.6.3 Institutional & governance framework
1. The Project developed an Impact & Sustainability Plan as well as MoUs with National and Provincial Governments and the communities, which are designed to provide the institutional and governance framework for the long-term sustainability of the SIWSAP achievements.

 


Tag: Sustainability Partnership Capacity Building

35.

3.3.6.4 Environmental sustainability
1. Apart from unsustainable logging in water catchments, the main environmental threat to water security in the Solomon Islands is climate change.


2. Adapting to and building resilience against climate change is the primary objective of this Project, which has been well achieved at the 12 pilot and replica sites, thereby boding well for the environmental sustainability of the Project.


Tag: Climate Change Adaptation Resilience building Drinking water supply Water resources Sustainability

36.

It is very clear that the Project has had a very significant impact in improving water security and resilience to climate change at the individual community level (12 pilot and replica sites)

The Project has not had any impact with regard to its sanitation targets and has had very little impact at the broader Provincial and National levels (which raises the vital need for a Phase 2 Project to facilitate upscaling and Provincial and National level replication of Phase 1 successes).


Tag: Climate Change Adaptation Resilience building Drinking water supply Water resources Impact Local Governance

Recommendations
1

UNDP Implementation efficiency

It is strongly recommended that UNDP should take a very serious look at streamlining its project management, recruitment and procurement procedures to drastically improve the efficiency and timeliness of delivery of such projects.

2

Forensic financial audit

  • Given the significance of the unexplained 2018 over-spend, it is strongly recommended that at closure the Project should be subjected to a highly detailed, forensic financial audit by independent, external auditors, including tracing all expenditure trails.
  • The audit findings should be used to inform appropriate response actions, including funds recovery and punitive action should any wrongdoing be identified.
3

Enhanced training before project closure

In order to enhance the prospects for long-term sustainability, is strongly recommended that the need for additional training be addressed before project closure.

4

Lessons for future similar projects

It is recommended that the lessons gained from SIWSAP as outlined in the left-hand column should be adopted and applied by both UNDP and SIG for future similar projects.

5

Need for Phase 2 project

  • In order to build on the outstanding achievements and best-practice models established by SIWSAP in relation to community-level water security and climate change resilience, and to also address the lack of progress with some targets, it is strongly recommended that UNDP work with SIG to develop a Phase 2 project to facilitate up-scaling and Provincial and National level replication of Phase 1 successes.
  •  Given the strong climate adaptation focus of SIWSAP, the Green Climate Fund (GCF) might be a suitable partner for a much larger SIWSAP Phase 2 (circa US$50 million), and Annex 6 of this report contains the GCF Concept Note template, for consideration and potential use by UNDP and SIG.
1. Recommendation:

UNDP Implementation efficiency

It is strongly recommended that UNDP should take a very serious look at streamlining its project management, recruitment and procurement procedures to drastically improve the efficiency and timeliness of delivery of such projects.

Management Response: [Added: 2020/01/15] [Last Updated: 2020/11/27]

Agreed

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
1. It is strongly recommended that UNDP should take a very serious look at streamlining its project management, recruitment and procurement procedures to drastically improve the efficiency and timeliness of delivery of such projects.
[Added: 2020/01/15]
UNDP 2019/12 Completed The new Management team (DRR and OM) assumed their duties in late July 2019, and since then, have introduced rigorous review of procedures to increase efficiency. Weekly Programme and Operations meetings identify and resolve delivery bottlenecks.
2. Recommendation:

Forensic financial audit

  • Given the significance of the unexplained 2018 over-spend, it is strongly recommended that at closure the Project should be subjected to a highly detailed, forensic financial audit by independent, external auditors, including tracing all expenditure trails.
  • The audit findings should be used to inform appropriate response actions, including funds recovery and punitive action should any wrongdoing be identified.
Management Response: [Added: 2020/01/15] [Last Updated: 2020/11/27]

Agreed

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
1. Given the significance of the unexplained 2018 over-spend, it is strongly recommended that at closure the Project should be subjected to a highly detailed, forensic financial audit by independent, external auditors, including tracing all expenditure trails. 2. The audit findings should be used to inform appropriate response actions, including funds recovery and punitive action should any wrongdoing be identified.
[Added: 2020/01/15]
UNDP 2019/12 Completed The matter was addressed in consultation with key Government partners and UNDP in 2018/19. Audit recommendations and lessons learned will guide all programmatic interventions
3. Recommendation:

Enhanced training before project closure

In order to enhance the prospects for long-term sustainability, is strongly recommended that the need for additional training be addressed before project closure.

Management Response: [Added: 2020/01/15] [Last Updated: 2020/11/27]

In order to enhance the prospects for long-term sustainability, is strongly recommended that the need for additional training be addressed before project closure

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
1. In order to enhance the prospects for long-term sustainability, is strongly recommended that the need for additional training be addressed before project closure
[Added: 2020/01/15] [Last Updated: 2021/01/06]
MMERE Temotu Provincial Government Western Provincial Government Choiseul Provincial Government Makira/Ulawa Provincial Government Malaita Provincial Government Rennell & Bellona Provincial Government 2020/12 Completed Completed History
4. Recommendation:

Lessons for future similar projects

It is recommended that the lessons gained from SIWSAP as outlined in the left-hand column should be adopted and applied by both UNDP and SIG for future similar projects.

Management Response: [Added: 2020/01/15] [Last Updated: 2020/11/27]

Agreed

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
1. It is recommended that the lessons gained from SIWSAP as outlined in the left-hand column should be adopted and applied by both UNDP and SIG for future similar projects.
[Added: 2020/01/15]
UNDP MMERE 2019/12 No Longer Applicable [Justification: Government and UNDP are interested to cooperate in similar projects, drawing on SIWSAP lessons learned, but at present, no projects exist. Discussion with Gov-t and partners are ongoing. ]
Government and UNDP are interested to cooperate in similar projects, drawing on SIWSAP lessons learned, but at present, no projects exist. Discussion with Gov-t and partners are ongoing.
5. Recommendation:

Need for Phase 2 project

  • In order to build on the outstanding achievements and best-practice models established by SIWSAP in relation to community-level water security and climate change resilience, and to also address the lack of progress with some targets, it is strongly recommended that UNDP work with SIG to develop a Phase 2 project to facilitate up-scaling and Provincial and National level replication of Phase 1 successes.
  •  Given the strong climate adaptation focus of SIWSAP, the Green Climate Fund (GCF) might be a suitable partner for a much larger SIWSAP Phase 2 (circa US$50 million), and Annex 6 of this report contains the GCF Concept Note template, for consideration and potential use by UNDP and SIG.
Management Response: [Added: 2020/01/15] [Last Updated: 2020/11/27]

Agreed

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
1. In order to build on the outstanding achievements and best-practice models established by SIWSAP in relation to community-level water security and climate change resilience, and to also address the lack of progress with some targets, it is strongly recommended that UNDP work with SIG to develop a Phase 2 project to facilitate up-scaling and Provincial and National level replication of Phase 1 successes. 2. Given the strong climate adaptation focus of SIWSAP, the Green Climate Fund (GCF) might be a suitable partner for a much larger SIWSAP Phase 2 (circa US$50 million), and Annex 6 of this report contains the GCF Concept Note template, for consideration and potential use by UNDP and SIG
[Added: 2020/01/15] [Last Updated: 2021/01/06]
UNDP SIG (MMERE & MECDM) UNDP SIG (MMERE & MEC DM) 2021/12 Initiated History

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