Energy Efficient Production and Utilization of Charcoal through Innovative Technologies and Private sector involvement in Sierra Leone

Report Cover Image
Evaluation Plan:
2015-2019, Sierra Leone
Evaluation Type:
Mid Term Project
Planned End Date:
01/2019
Completion Date:
11/2018
Status:
Completed
Management Response:
Yes
Evaluation Budget(US $):
34,836

Share

Document Type Language Size Status Downloads
Download document ToR for the MTR_Energy project.pdf tor English 945.82 KB Posted 48
Download document Final MTR Report of EEPUC project.docx report English 1069.04 KB Posted 63
Title Energy Efficient Production and Utilization of Charcoal through Innovative Technologies and Private sector involvement in Sierra Leone
Atlas Project Number: 00071102
Evaluation Plan: 2015-2019, Sierra Leone
Evaluation Type: Mid Term Project
Status: Completed
Completion Date: 11/2018
Planned End Date: 01/2019
Management Response: Yes
Corporate Outcome and Output (UNDP Strategic Plan 2018-2021)
  • 1. Output 1.4.1 Solutions scaled up for sustainable management of natural resources, including sustainable commodities and green and inclusive value chains
Evaluation Budget(US $): 34,836
Source of Funding: GEF, UNDP
Evaluation Expenditure(US $): 34,836
Joint Programme: No
Joint Evaluation: No
Evaluation Team members:
Name Title Email Nationality
GEF Evaluation: Yes
GEF Project Title: Energy Efficient Production and Utilization of Charcoal through Innovative Technologies and Private sector involvement in Sierra Leone
Evaluation Type: Mid-term Review
Focal Area: Climate Change
Project Type: EA
GEF Phase: GEF-1
GEF Project ID:
PIMS Number: 5164
Key Stakeholders: UNDP, Ministry of Energy
Countries: SIERRA LEONE
Comments:

The Evaluation has been completed and final report submitted to UNDP CO.

Lessons
1.
  • Implementation constraints and/or challenges encountered during PPG are: lack of good baseline data and survey on fuelwood and charcoal usage by the household and industrial sector; focal person on RE and EE at MoE has just been appointed; danger of duplications and overlaps with other projects (EU-REDD+, GERES, ICRAF); lack of private sector investment suitable as co-funding; government see cookstove and charcoal as old fashion non aspirational technology; how to translate policy and input based approaches into output-based and market-based approach for ensuring program sustainability.   
  • Lessons learned regarding planning and overall project design: good analysis of baseline initiatives to avoid overlaps and optimize synergies; use participatory approach to create country ownership; remind government that improved cookstove and clean charcoal are interim ‘stop gap’ solution for accessing modern energy services to get good buy in.   
  • Lessons learned regarding implementation and M&E approaches: select the right institution to be developed as the Center of Excellence and to own M and E system;  
  • Lessons learned regarding key partnerships, stakeholder participation and management arrangements: clear explanation of outcomes, outputs and activities to key public, private and CSO stakeholders to get good buy in and optimized synergies. 
  • Lessons learned from addressing challenges and knowledge gained from evaluations/audits and studies that have taken place in the course of the year: engage consultants that are able to identify problems quickly and provide pragmatic solutions.

 

 


Findings
1.

3.1    Project Design/Formulation

The project was designed to address the problem by improving/establishing institutions to reduce GHG emissions, make biomass resources production and utilisation sustainable, and promote sustainable biomass energy technologies in Sierra Leone using market based approaches. The design of the RRF was clear with clear outputs milestones (except for Mid-term level milestones missing and indicators not disaggregated gender wise), activities for each outputs and SMART indicators to monitor implementation and achievements. The project was designed to work at both a macro level (national government scale, national level private sector) and a micro level (local government and local communities). On the national level, it aimed to identify policy gaps and recommend legislative needs, establish institutional set up and enhance capacity of these institutions and promote evidence based planning. Similarly, at the micro level it aimed to work at community level in establishing community managed woodlots, train communities on improved charcoal kilns and cook stoves and train to repair these devices etc. Similarly, to provide additional income, project also supported to plant fruit trees inter-cropped with vegetables and ground nuts.

 

The implementing and executing institutions were involved in the project from the project design phase. The project design involved a thorough analysis of capacities of various partners and their interests. Project design has incorporated lessons learned from several relevant projects in other countries and also its own experiences from earlier projects in Sierra Leone. Roles and responsibilities of implementing partner and other institutions were very clearly defined in the project design. During project formulation, gender issues were discussed and development interaction also included women. The indicator of the project does not specify gender wise disaggregated results but within the community women will also benefit from the outcome of the project. Hence to address these problems, the project was designed to apply following approaches:

 

 

3.1.1    Analysis of Logical Framework

The log frame has a single development objective, three components and 3 outcomes. The extensive activities are also listed in full, complete with their own indicators. The objectives, components and outputs are clear and appropriate to the issues and also designed considering the timeframe of the project. Project also utilised lessons from other projects related to forest, firewood, cookstoves, kilns and energy (see in 3.1.4) and also capacity of executing/implementing agencies considered while developing project activities (see 3.1.5 - 3.1.7).  Project design sufficiently analysed potential risks and assumptions (see 3.1.2) related to the project and it is well articulated in the PIF. Roles and responsibilities of the partners were made clear from the project design phase (see 3.1.7 & 3.2.2). The logical framework was revised in 2015 but no change was made in indicators. There has not been any change in number of outputs or activities from the original logframe. But inception workshop suggested to add an activity to establish woodlots to strengthen supply side for reducing pressure on the forest because ICRAF and EU-REDD+ programmes which focus on the supply side, in partnership with FD and Charcoal Producers Association and local Chiefdom had left the country as a result of the Ebola crisis and had never returned.

The indicators of the logframe are all SMART (Specific; Measurable; Achievable and attributable; Relevant and realistic; Time-bound, timely, trackable and targeted) and are relevant and precise. All are based on sound scientific monitoring protocols using the most relevant measures for a given criteria. But only drawback of the logframe was that it did not have mid-term target indicators and indicators are not gender disaggregated.

3.1.2    Assumptions and Risks

The key risks identified at project formulation phase are as follows:

 

  • Legislative delay that may go beyond the project life span.
  • Inability of members and low buy in of the Sierra Leonean Parliament to fully understand the entire concept of energy efficiency and the importance thus may not show much interest in the issues.
  • Slow/delayed adoption of the new law and policy by the Sierra Leonean government.
  • The mandates of SSE and other relevant agencies to the project are not revised timely. This may pose a threat to the project.
  • Lack of project ownership
  • The willingness of the staff of these institutions to adopt new knowledge and practice
  • insufficient training of laboratories staff, manufacturers, importers and retailers in the implementation of the labeling program
  • Lack of adequate training of key stakeholders to the project
  • Inadequate training on procedures for energy consumption measuring, calculation of energy efficiency index and enforcement procedures.
  • The Sierra Leonean economy is highly dependent on oil import. Any increase in the price of oil in the international market may have significant impacts on the volume of economic activities in Sierra Leone. The current and future price of fossil fuel could influence the uptake and buy in of bioenergy options. A drop in international and regional oil prices would diminish the attractiveness of bioenergy measures and therefore could likely threaten the willingness of the stakeholders to engage in the proposed bioenergy reform & strategy.
  • Political upheaval and instability could affect economic development and the uptake of bioenergy technology
  • The Government and many of these development partners may be unwilling to put in this quantum of investment.
  • The unstable nature of the exchange rates of both local and foreign currencies and high interest rates.
  • The higher upfront cost of bioenergy appliances (improved cookstove, kiln) may be a deterrent to consumers.
  • Insufficient numbers of households purchase alternative energy technologies to conduct useful analysis
  • The anomalies in the Sierra Leone marketing/distribution system such as the proliferation of traditional and substandard products, monopoly of distribution etc., may pose a potential danger to the success of the project. This makes the current business environment not conducive to the development of bioenergy.
  • There is low level of awareness on the potentials of bioenergy solutions to bring about economic development and environmental sustainability.
  • There is also lack of thorough communication with key policy makers.
  • More also, there is lack of an accurate reporting of existing legal and regulatory framework.
  • Not many Sierra Leoneans have information on the existence and availability of bioenergy appliances.
  • Illiteracy and general low capacity among households in target areas poses challenges in terms of data collection and impact measurement

 

Of these risks, only financial risk like unwillingness of government and partners to put in this quantum of investment, higher upfront cost of bioenergy appliances may discourage consumer and unstable exchange rate of local and foreign currencies and high interest rates are of high level of risks. Project made strategy of promoting public-private partnership, complementing adequate structures, mechanism, policy and legislation to encourage investment. Sierra Leone is dependent on oil imported from international market and changes in oil price in the international market will have impact on the bioenergy measures and this is considered as medium level risk to the project intervention. The forecast of oil price in international market indicates towards stable high price for some time so chances of this risk is also minimum. Similarly political instability could also be a medium level risk but recent past indicates that there is very low chances of such risk. Remaining other risks identified in the project documents are of low level.

 

3.1.3    Relevance

The Agenda for Prosperity (AfP) 2013-2017 intends to drive Sierra Leone to an inclusive middle income country by 2035 with low emissions, climate resilient, gender sensitive and sustainable growth trajectory. It also commits to establish inclusive development with the goals of creating opportunities for all in a fair, equitable and inclusive manner.

 

This project is also in line with the GEF climate change mitigation objective 2: Promote market transformation for energy efficiency in industry and the building sector and is designed to remove the barriers to access the affordable alternative energy by introducing the necessary legal, institutional and regulatory frameworks for scaling up of bioenergy solutions. It has activities to remove the technical barriers by providing government agencies, manufacturers and importers with technical assistance and a certified independent testing facility to measure the energy consumption of end-use appliances. It will also address the information barriers with a component to carry out outreach programs designed to sensitize the Sierra Leone populace on bioenergy and energy efficiency concepts and its potential for socio-economic development.

 

 

3.1.4    Lessons from other Relevant Projects incorporated into Project Design

Project development reviewed local, national, regional and international lessons learned in the scaling up of bioenergy solutions as inclusive business and value chain financing. This helped to design, adapt, adopt and recommend proven and tested fiscal, economic and value chain incentives that reward hard work, productivity and innovation. Project development also investigated the financial mechanisms of similar programs as the EEPUC in Sierra Leone as well as other countries. It was found that technology led and input-based approach can be ineffective and inefficient in developing public goods and services and appliances given free often do not install ownership. Project also drew lessons regarding addressing barriers from the former and existing projects like the Participatory Rural Energy Project and Second National Communication.

 

3.1.5    Planned Stakeholder Participation

At the project development phase, the project development team undertook extensive consultations with a wide range of stakeholders from National government bodies, Non-government institutions, research institutions, regional government bodies, large industries and university through a series of opinion polls, presentations, interviews, group discussion and workshops. These wide-ranging consultations were undertaken to ensure that stakeholders at all levels are aware of the project and its objectives and that they assist in the monitoring, measuring and reporting emissions. A thorough assessment of relevancy, experience and capacity of implementing partner and other implementing stakeholders was also conducted. This assessment also helped to understand and utilise strength of the implementing partners and also develop capacity enhancement programs. Project design, criteria for potential sites and site selection for piloting was carried out with the stakeholders’ participation. Planned stakeholders and their expertise and potential role in the project is explained in section 2.4 of this report and also in Annex B, page 116 of the ProDoc.

 

Project was planned to implement following the UNDP DIM modality in close coordination with the Ministry of Energy, Sierra Leone. But Project failed to receive support from several stakeholders e.g. BRAC and few other who stepped back at the implementation phase. Similarly, project was not able to receive quick response from the project board and project board meetings were not held on scheduled time. As a result annual work-plan development, approval, procurements were delayed and these delayed implementation of activities. BRAC which was identified in ProDoc for co-financing and partnering in the implementation of the loan, grant and rebate stepped back at the implementation phase and to address this problem, the loan aspects was subdued into the grant scheme but for this the Project Management Unit waited long on the GEF Regional Office for GEF policy guideline on grant and rebate scheme as it was being reviewed. In managing this risk, the Project Management Unit (PMU) is soliciting technical support from consultancy services for Chief Technical Advisor (CTA) and Financial Engineering Expert (FEE).

 

3.1.6 UNDP Comparative Advantage

In the inception workshop, UNDP’s project assurance role was presented and discussed in detail. The Participants endorsed the assurance role described in the approved project document. Enhancement of capacities at the national and sub-national levels has been considered by UNDP to be essential to its strategy for Climate Change risk reduction. Accordingly, and in line with the government’s national priorities, support to enhance capacities and make planning evidence based in the fields of energy efficiency improvement, forest and biodiversity conservation and environment management was also a priority area. The EEPUC Project deemed to congruent with these priorities as elaborated in the Sustainable Development Goal where ensuring environment sustainability is one of the priority programme areas for Sierra Leone; second UNDAF priority for Government institutions, the private sector, and local communities manage natural resources in a more equitable and sustainable way, the third UNDP Strategic Plan Environment and Sustainable Development for expanding access to environmental and energy services for the poor, the fourth Country Program to access to support sustainable energy and livelihoods for remote Chiefdoms (Sub-districts/blocks) improved and the fifth, UNDP Strategic Plan and UN Development Assistance Framework for Sierra Leone (2015-2018) to Strengthen national capacities to mainstream environment and energy concerns into national development plans and implementation systems. The project is in line with the pillars of technical and financial assistance which form the foundation from which risks of Climate Change can be reduced in Sierra Leone. Specifically, the project will help realise four pillars identified by UNDP:

 

  • Development of the capacity of the National and regional government to adapt best practices on climate change threats;
  • Establish knowledge base and assure access to the information to encourage evidence based planning;
  • Engagement of National and local government and Private sector to reduce risk of climate change;
  • Networking with national and regional organisations working in the field of environment and climate change.

 

In Sierra Leone, UNDP has been working in the field of Natural Resources Management (biodiversity conservation, environment protection), sustainable land management, disaster risk reduction, Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency, Climate Change (including Climate Change Mitigation, Climate Change Adaptation), Poverty Reduction, Conflict Prevention and Democratic Governance. UNDP has a lot experience in these areas. The project has benefited from UNDP experience from the project development phase to implementation.


Recommendations
1

Project provided support to review and update the National Energy Policy 2009 but it is still in draft form. Hence it is recommended to follow up with the Ministry of Energy for approval and endorsement. After approval, there should be activities to make people aware of the policy and the important provisions that supports people Assistance to support this national programme

2

Establish RKLCC and install equipment of the lab and train staffs so that research and certification activities could be initiated
 

3

 To develop standard for Cookstoves, furnaces, Kilns and charcoal project does not have to wait for establishment of the CCDC and lab. Lab is needed to test for certifying but standard could be developed using references of neighbouring countries and available scientific documents. Hence project should immediately start process of developing National Standard of Charcoal, kiln, stoves and furnaces.
 

4

As per project plan, after accomplishment of first round of work of production and distribution of kilns and cook stoves and also implementation of the loan and rebate scheme, monitoring and evaluation should have been done to provide feedback for improvement in technology and also scheme and replicate new areas. Project is pushed far behind so need to initiate remaining activities immediately and also follow implementation with standard monitoring and evaluation. Within the remaining one year period, project should meet its targeted activities of financial scheme implementation, kiln establishment and stove production and trainings. 

5

Also establish targeted number of kilns and produce targeted number of cook stoves in the targeted areas i.e. rural communities within the coming one year.

6

Project also has activities of upscaling based on monitoring of first phase of implementation. But for the upscaling and impact assessment part of the project activities, time may not be sufficient. Hence it is recommended to extent project for one additional year without additional cost i.e. no cost extension. 

7

 Project should consider to establish bigger woodlots for demonstration (piloting) of rotational harvest for wood supply for charcoal production and wood for cooking stoves. Woodlot program should include other income generation activities e.g. agro-forestry with cash crops.

8

Immediately start training and awareness campaign on the use, maintenance and benefits of energy-efficient kilns and cook stoves for village level producers and consumers as they are the target group of the project.

9

Communities were asking for food for work program to manage woodlot. This practice will not make program sustainable beyond the project life. Hence awareness activities should include information to make communities understand that those woodlots are for their use and they are the beneficiaries so they also have to contribute their time and effort. Monitoring of woodlots by few people may not be possible as they also have to work for earning food so they could make plan where all of the members will contribute certain hours in a week in rotational basis. By making such arrangement, individuals do not have to spend much time. There was also scarcity of water in the woodlot areas, if it is possible for the project then should arrange water.

10

M&E activities were weak. Implementing agency should immediately establish M&E mechanism so that project activities could be monitored closely and feedback is provided on time to strengthen adaptive management. They should also permanently arrange qualified expert in the Ministry of Agriculture, Forest and Food Security to assess the carbon sink and also in Ministry of Energy to assess emission reductions from improved stoves and kilns because these activities need to be carried out on regular basis even beyond the project life. Such monitoring and verification will support DNA of the government with the data (quantity of carbon stock information and decrease in emissions) to claim from carbon finance. Besides, as provisioned in the project activities, it is necessary to conduct impact assessment to see the impact of project intervention.
Since large amount of works are not accomplished, remaining time will not be sufficient so it is recommended to make one year no cost extension (alreeady mentioned in recommendation no. 6) 

11

Continuous technical support is needed for the community members and producers of charcoal and cookstoves to continue their activities beyond the project life and for that, Ministry of Energy and Ministry of Agriculture, Forestry and Food Security has to allocate budget for the additional staff needed to provide technical support to the rural communities and also producers of charcoal and cook stoves.

1. Recommendation:

Project provided support to review and update the National Energy Policy 2009 but it is still in draft form. Hence it is recommended to follow up with the Ministry of Energy for approval and endorsement. After approval, there should be activities to make people aware of the policy and the important provisions that supports people Assistance to support this national programme

Management Response: [Added: 2019/03/27]

This activity is possible.The draft review copy is already with the Director of Energy in the Ministry of Energy (MoE) to facilitate the Government approval and endorsement 

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
SL Government has approved and endorsed the National energy Policy and awareness raising has been conducted by MOE
[Added: 2019/03/28] [Last Updated: 2019/09/10]
Project manager at UNDP and MoE 2019/05 Completed National Energy policy has been approved by the GOSL History
2. Recommendation:

Establish RKLCC and install equipment of the lab and train staffs so that research and certification activities could be initiated
 

Management Response: [Added: 2019/03/27]

 The process of setting of the Lab, installation and the training of the GTI staff is on course

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
Contract to be signed for the construction of lab and installation of lab equipment
[Added: 2019/03/28] [Last Updated: 2019/09/10]
Procurement unit at UNDP 2019/08 Completed The Evaluation of bid for the construction of the Lab structure and the installation of Lab Equipment has been complemented. History
Consultancy work for the Installation of the Lab energy equipment to be adertised
[Added: 2019/03/28] [Last Updated: 2019/09/04]
Project Manager 2019/08 Completed The contract has been signed with the consultant for the installation of the lab. The installation will commence in November 2019. History
3. Recommendation:

 To develop standard for Cookstoves, furnaces, Kilns and charcoal project does not have to wait for establishment of the CCDC and lab. Lab is needed to test for certifying but standard could be developed using references of neighbouring countries and available scientific documents. Hence project should immediately start process of developing National Standard of Charcoal, kiln, stoves and furnaces.
 

Management Response: [Added: 2019/03/27]

This has been discussed and has been recommended to partners and  relevant Institutions to move on with this activity 

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
To sign LOA with Government Technical Institute (GTI) to implement this activity
[Added: 2019/03/28] [Last Updated: 2019/09/10]
UNDP 2019/06 Completed LOA has been signed with GTI to implement this activity History
4. Recommendation:

As per project plan, after accomplishment of first round of work of production and distribution of kilns and cook stoves and also implementation of the loan and rebate scheme, monitoring and evaluation should have been done to provide feedback for improvement in technology and also scheme and replicate new areas. Project is pushed far behind so need to initiate remaining activities immediately and also follow implementation with standard monitoring and evaluation. Within the remaining one year period, project should meet its targeted activities of financial scheme implementation, kiln establishment and stove production and trainings. 

Management Response: [Added: 2019/03/28]

Remaining project activities have been well planned in 2019 AWP with a well monitoring and Evaluation framework in place to ensure that project implementation activities are regularly monitored for effective delivery and results 

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
To engage regional office on the implementation modality for the loan and rebate scheme for the production and distribution of kilns and cookstoves.
[Added: 2019/03/28] [Last Updated: 2019/09/10]
Project Manager/Team Leader 2019/03 Completed It has been agreed with Regional Office that ITB be sent out for the implementtion of this activtity. Once the production and distribtion is done, the implementation of standard monitoring and evaluation will be followed History
To ensure that standard M&E procedure are enshrined in planned activities
[Added: 2019/03/28]
Project Manager/M&E 2019/03 Completed Done
5. Recommendation:

Also establish targeted number of kilns and produce targeted number of cook stoves in the targeted areas i.e. rural communities within the coming one year.

Management Response: [Added: 2019/03/28]

This has also been noted and recommendations discussed with partners and other  relevant Institutions to move on with this activity

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
The procurement team to send out ITB document for the production of Kilns and Cookstoves
[Added: 2019/03/28] [Last Updated: 2019/09/10]
Cluster Team Leader 2019/10 Completed The process is underway History
6. Recommendation:

Project also has activities of upscaling based on monitoring of first phase of implementation. But for the upscaling and impact assessment part of the project activities, time may not be sufficient. Hence it is recommended to extent project for one additional year without additional cost i.e. no cost extension. 

Management Response: [Added: 2019/03/28]

The project  ends in  December 2019 and may not be renewed until with a strong justification for renewal 

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
To be discussed with Cluster Team Leader
[Added: 2019/03/28] [Last Updated: 2019/09/04]
Project Manager 2019/08 Completed The CO is Putting together all required documentation for non cost extension request until June 2020. History
7. Recommendation:

 Project should consider to establish bigger woodlots for demonstration (piloting) of rotational harvest for wood supply for charcoal production and wood for cooking stoves. Woodlot program should include other income generation activities e.g. agro-forestry with cash crops.

Management Response: [Added: 2019/03/28]

The  woodlots establishment was not part of the project activity but came up during the project inception meeting which led to the establishment of the 36 acres woodlots. It was agreed that no further wood lot be established

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
Regular under-brushing to be done to maintain the woodlot
[Added: 2019/03/28] [Last Updated: 2019/09/04]
Project communities/UNDP 2019/09 No Longer Applicable [Justification: The project board has decided to increase the size of woodlots and the woodlot communities have indicated willingness to do the planting once the seedlings are supplied.]
Request Letter has been sent to the Ministry of Agriculture and Forestry for seedling supplies to Makolerr, Roban, Moyamba Junction and Mawoma Woodlots History
8. Recommendation:

Immediately start training and awareness campaign on the use, maintenance and benefits of energy-efficient kilns and cook stoves for village level producers and consumers as they are the target group of the project.

Management Response: [Added: 2019/03/28]

This activity is possible and discussion with relevant stakeholder will be done

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
Hold consultation meeting with community stakeholders to facilitate the training and awareness raising on the use, maintenance and benefits of energy-efficient kilns and cook stoves for village level producers and consumers
[Added: 2019/03/28] [Last Updated: 2019/09/04]
Project Manager 2019/08 Completed The consultation meeting and training with community stakeholders conducted to raise awareness on the use and maintenance of the energy-efficient stoves. History
9. Recommendation:

Communities were asking for food for work program to manage woodlot. This practice will not make program sustainable beyond the project life. Hence awareness activities should include information to make communities understand that those woodlots are for their use and they are the beneficiaries so they also have to contribute their time and effort. Monitoring of woodlots by few people may not be possible as they also have to work for earning food so they could make plan where all of the members will contribute certain hours in a week in rotational basis. By making such arrangement, individuals do not have to spend much time. There was also scarcity of water in the woodlot areas, if it is possible for the project then should arrange water.

Management Response: [Added: 2019/03/28]

Food for work will not sustian the project beyoung the end of the project. Therefore, More awareness raising should be done for the community members to be aware of the benefit of the wood lots. 

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
UNDP and the Environment Protection Agency (EPA-SL) to conduct awareness raising campaign in project communities on their obligation and the benefit the stand to gain from the woodlots.
[Added: 2019/03/28] [Last Updated: 2019/09/04]
UNDP, EPA-SL 2019/07 Completed Woodlot management committee has been formed for all the four woodlots and duties and responsibilities established gearing towards community ownership and awareness on the benefit and use of the woodlots. History
10. Recommendation:

M&E activities were weak. Implementing agency should immediately establish M&E mechanism so that project activities could be monitored closely and feedback is provided on time to strengthen adaptive management. They should also permanently arrange qualified expert in the Ministry of Agriculture, Forest and Food Security to assess the carbon sink and also in Ministry of Energy to assess emission reductions from improved stoves and kilns because these activities need to be carried out on regular basis even beyond the project life. Such monitoring and verification will support DNA of the government with the data (quantity of carbon stock information and decrease in emissions) to claim from carbon finance. Besides, as provisioned in the project activities, it is necessary to conduct impact assessment to see the impact of project intervention.
Since large amount of works are not accomplished, remaining time will not be sufficient so it is recommended to make one year no cost extension (alreeady mentioned in recommendation no. 6) 

Management Response: [Added: 2019/03/28]

The Monitoring budget has been increased to support regular monitoring

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
Monitoring to be conducted on a regular basis with support from the unit M&E focal point
[Added: 2019/03/28]
Project Manager 2019/03 Completed This is an ongoing activity until the project closes
11. Recommendation:

Continuous technical support is needed for the community members and producers of charcoal and cookstoves to continue their activities beyond the project life and for that, Ministry of Energy and Ministry of Agriculture, Forestry and Food Security has to allocate budget for the additional staff needed to provide technical support to the rural communities and also producers of charcoal and cook stoves.

Management Response: [Added: 2019/03/28]

The woodlot is own by the community, however the management is a role which will be transferred to the Forestry Division of the Ministry of Agriculture and Forestry after the completion of the project 

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
The project team to meet with the Forest Division of the Ministry of Agriculture and Forestry to discuss transfer of ownership of UNDP established woodlots
[Added: 2019/03/28] [Last Updated: 2020/02/05]
Project Management team 2019/12 Completed The project team has already started engaging the Forestry Division of the Ministry of Agriculture and Forestry on how this will be done and this was also discussed at last quarter 2019 steering committee meeting. History

Latest Evaluations

Contact us

1 UN Plaza
DC1-20th Floor
New York, NY 10017
Tel. +1 646 781 4200
Fax. +1 646 781 4213
erc.support@undp.org