Low Carbon Development Strategy Amerindian Development Fund: Village Economy Development Phase II under Guyana Redd+ Investment Fund

Report Cover Image
Evaluation Plan:
2017-2021, Guyana
Evaluation Type:
Final Project
Planned End Date:
04/2019
Completion Date:
07/2019
Status:
Completed
Management Response:
Yes
Evaluation Budget(US $):
30,000

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Title Low Carbon Development Strategy Amerindian Development Fund: Village Economy Development Phase II under Guyana Redd+ Investment Fund
Atlas Project Number: 00083605
Evaluation Plan: 2017-2021, Guyana
Evaluation Type: Final Project
Status: Completed
Completion Date: 07/2019
Planned End Date: 04/2019
Management Response: Yes
Corporate Outcome and Output (UNDP Strategic Plan 2018-2021)
  • 1. Output 1.1.2 Marginalised groups, particularly the poor, women, people with disabilities and displaced are empowered to gain universal access to basic services and financial and non-financial assets to build productive capacities and benefit from sustainable livelihoods and jobs
SDG Goal
  • Goal 1. End poverty in all its forms everywhere
SDG Target
  • 1.4 By 2030, ensure that all men and women, in particular the poor and the vulnerable, have equal rights to economic resources, as well as access to basic services, ownership and control over land and other forms of property, inheritance, natural resources, appropriate new technology and financial services, including microfinance
Evaluation Budget(US $): 30,000
Source of Funding: Project
Evaluation Expenditure(US $): 20,256
Joint Programme: No
Joint Evaluation: No
Evaluation Team members:
Name Title Email Nationality
Oscar Huertas oscarhuertas77@gmail.com COLOMBIA
GEF Evaluation: No
Key Stakeholders:
Countries: GUYANA
Lessons
Findings
1.

The evaluation concludes that the project was relevant from the beginning and continues to be so because it focuses on a national priority of local development for indigenous communities, which is aligned with the interests of UNDP, Norway, the Government of Guyana, and local communities. This is especially the case for poor and vulnerable populations that depend directly on natural resources.

 


Tag: Vulnerable Natural Resouce management Relevance Civil Societies and NGOs Country Government Donor UNDP Management UNDP management Indigenous people Poverty Reduction

2.

The evaluation found that the design of the project presented some deficiencies that affected its implementation. The sources consulted stated that the design of the project was very ambitious due to the magnitude of the goals, the variety of topics and the coverage of 161 indigenous communities in different geographic, social and cultural contexts. The indigenous context of the indigenous communities is quite complex, which constitutes a great challenge for the project.

 


Tag: Rural development Challenges Civic Engagement Local Governance Private Sector Capacity Building Indigenous people Micro-credit Trade and Development

3.

Given the high cost of activity implementation in most villages, due to high costs of transportation, limited markets and production costs in these communities, the value of the grant may have been too low to be able to significantly impact local economic development. Also, deciding to disburse the same amount of money to all villages affected those with higher transportation costs and larger populations.
 


Tag: Rural development Impact Small Grants Programme Economic Recovery Indigenous people Trade and Development

4.

The project design implied that each community received a low budget for investment and transportation, and makes it difficult to achieve results, affecting planning and decision making. The project document indicators selected initially, in some cases, were not relevant because they were not directly related to the results products, but mostly to progress and implementation.


Tag: Challenges Relevance Small Grants Programme Human and Financial resources Monitoring and Evaluation Operational Efficiency Programme/Project Design Results-Based Management

5.

The ADF GRIF Phase II project design didn’t benefit from the lessons learned from past evaluation. The final evaluation of the ADF Phase I project was finalized in February 2016, when the Phase II had already started. This evaluation recommended actions in different aspects: 4) Advisory support to CDPs, 4a. Marketing and economies of scale, 4c. Increased allocation of resources to training, 5b. Technical support to communities, 5d. Linking Hinterland Employment Youth Service to CDPs. In order to follow the recommendations, the project made some efforts towards capacity building: the project initially had 2-3 days training by the ADF PMU; following that, and in response to the recommendation, there was a more extensive one week cluster training by UNDP which the field mission also confirmed. Technical support to communities was provided by partnering with agencies including Guyana Livestock and Development Agency, National Agricultural Research and Extension Institute, Fisheries Department, Guyana Forestry Commission and Guyana Tourism Authority. Efforts were made to link the Hinterland Employment Youth Services to the CDPs but with limited success.


Tag: Agriculture Fishery Forestry Livestock Small Grants Programme Civil Societies and NGOs Capacity Building Economic Recovery Trade and Development Technical Support

6.

The project document also identified key challenges when working with indigenous communities in Guyana: “Emerging lessons suggest that even the distribution of a micro capital grant for business development to Amerindian communities should not be considered a panacea, even though it has the potential to stimulate further economic activities. The cost inefficiencies associated with community remoteness, as well as the challenges of searching for and accessing markets, and information asymmetry, among other things, are barriers that cannot be overcome solely by such a grant or even by clustering their economic ventures. These prohibitive costs and other barriers must be addressed through a combination of creative and innovative techniques if socio-economic development is to be secured.” This final evaluation found that the project did a broad risk analysis but countermeasures were not implemented in some cases. For example, the Risk Log identified “the absence of resident training and trainers: the remoteness of some villages does not allow for quick reaction to technical difficulties of implementation. Arduous terrain (and infrastructure challenges) makes it costly too.”, the risk log identified the mitigation solution as: “Constantly engage communities, and facilitate an efficient means and mode of communication to keep abreast and monitor challenges that might derail project expectations”, nevertheless, the scarce human resource at the PMU made this constant engagement almost unfeasible. Also, the project didn’t identify the observed community governance issues as a risk.


Tag: Rural development Challenges Efficiency Small Grants Programme Innovation Operational Efficiency Risk Management

7.

Although a logical framework was developed in the project document, the evaluation could not find clear links between the inputs, activities, outputs and expected results. That is, the project did not have a detailed theory of change that would allow identifying a chain of effects and causality in the intervention.


Tag: Impact Monitoring and Evaluation Programme/Project Design Results-Based Management Theory of Change Technical Support

8.

The evaluation observed that the project performed efficiently, taking into account that the PMU staff had to cover 161 CDPs, the number of activities for monitoring, training and administrative workload. Each staff member was assigned 42 villages to do training, monitoring visits and administrative duties including purchases, disbursements, communications, and logistics. The MTE also found that “The role, structure, and operation of the PMU and performance of the PM are good, given the extensive geographical and sector coverage for their task.”10

 


Tag: Efficiency Monitoring and Evaluation Oversight Procurement Project and Programme management Cash Transfers Jobs and Livelihoods Youth

9.

As mentioned before, all communities that were consulted demanded further training and technical assistance. The evaluation found that given the understaffing, the PMU couldn’t provide enough training and technical support. Capacity building is pivotal for an effective intervention, especially with indigenous communities that do not have the experience or skills for managing businesses.

 


Tag: Effectiveness Civic Engagement Human and Financial resources Knowledge management Project and Programme management Capacity Building Indigenous people Jobs and Livelihoods Technical Support

10.

The project needed a time extension due to lagging delivery but taking into account the scope of the project this evaluation concludes that the delivery rates were positive overall. As of October 2018, the project executed $5,925,376 out of $6,259,414 which represents a 94.6% of delivery in total.


Tag: Challenges Efficiency Human and Financial resources Project and Programme management

11.

The ADF-PMU has partnered with several state and non-state agencies and actors for the implementation of the ADF. These include, Guyana Tourism Authority (GTA), Guyana Livestock and Development Authority (GLDA), National Agricultural Research and Extension Institute (NAREI), Guyana Fisheries Department, Guyana Forestry Commission, Forest Products Development & Marketing Council of Guyana Inc (FPDMC), North Rupununi Distict Development Board (NRDDB), Guyana Technical Institute (GTI), Global Seafood Distributors, Georgetown Chambers of Commerce (GCCI), Guyana Energy Agency (GEA), New Guyana Marketing Co-operation, the Regional Democratic Councils and the Small Business Bureau. The initial idea for these partnerships was the provision of technical services for the CMTs and communities to improve project implementation. The usefulness from these partnerships was mixed, for example, the collaboration with the GLDA has resulted in two Regional Extension Officer being placed in different regions.


Tag: Human and Financial resources Implementation Modality Civil Societies and NGOs Country Government Technical Support

12.

UNDP role in the project was decisive for different reasons; capacity building was a key area where UNDP initially did a capacity assessment of the MoIPA during ADF Phase 1, this analysis led to a series of trainings and technical assistance. UNDP helped to develop the CDPs from the onset, and UNDP also developed one-week trainings with UNVs through 2016 and 2017 on topics such as project management, finance, and reporting. UNDP conducted training with CDOs in 2015 and 2018, to orient them towards the project.
On the project implementation, UNDP assisted the PMU with quality assurance on the projects´ products, the drafting of the narrative report, and resolving implementation problems and bottlenecks.


Tag: Country Support Platform Human and Financial resources Project and Programme management UNDP Management UNDP management Capacity Building Technical Support

13.

The evaluation did not find any duplication of efforts amongst UNDP´s interventions since the ADF project is unique within the UNDP portfolio, even more, there is no other agency providing funding, capacity building to Amerindian Communities on the scale of the ADF. However, the project could have benefited from key partnerships with other government initiatives such as the HEYS or the Small Business Bureau. There were some linkages like some HEYS students sitting on CMTs, and some joint activities, but there was no formal partnership with a signed MoU to synergize both initiatives.


Tag: Efficiency Resource mobilization Implementation Modality Programme Synergy Country Government

14.

The project faced many challenges since it is a pioneering and challenging intervention in Guyana. At the institutional level, the wealth of knowledge is perhaps the most remarkable achievement the project has accomplished. By working with many different indigenous communities, the ADF PMU has gained exceptional experience and knowledge that can be highly valuable for the government as a whole, and each of the Ministries and agencies working in the field nation-wide. Thanks to the ADF, the MoIPA has now a clearer idea of the context, challenges, but also the great potential of working with indigenous communities.


Tag: Challenges Effectiveness Knowledge management Programme/Project Design Country Government Indigenous people

15.

Also, according to MoIPA staff and directives, the institution has gained a lot of expertise around business management in remote communities. The ADF provided a detailed picture of entrepreneurship matters in the communities, and a better understanding of the challenges for making businesses, markets, products, transportation, production costs, income, profit, etc.


Tag: Crop production Livestock Rural development Tourism Capacity Building Inclusive economic growth Jobs and Livelihoods

16.

Out of the 154 villages with projects underway, 91% received the full disbursement of the G$5,000,000 grant. The evaluation found that the project made relevant efforts to improve the quality of life for indigenous communities. Safeguarding food security in 33 communities with crops, 14 communities with poultry, 6 with fisheries, and 33 more with cattle rearing is an essential need, and a basic step forward to local development. Also, the dispersed communities do not have transportation means to go to health centres, or food markets, and that is why the project aimed at providing transportation projects for 20 communities. Another basic need for distant communities is groceries and provisions, most of the time indigenous communities do not have access to basic products, and the project developed 21 village shops.


Tag: Crop production Fishery Livestock Effectiveness Access to Medicines Food Security Indigenous people Poverty Reduction

17.

As mentioned before, the ADF project worked through partnerships with key institutions. GLDA, NAREI, GTA, and others provided support to the CMTs formed in each community to oversee implementation of the respective projects at the cost of the ADF. On the other hand, the added value from MoIPA CDOs 13was not evident in the implementation of the ADF. During field visits to communities, in some cases CDO´s mentioned that they have transportation problems, but in other cases the PMU identified serious issues regarding the challenges to execute their duties. This is particularly important because CDOs are the MoIPA eyes and ears.


Tag: Challenges Effectiveness Small Grants Programme Civic Engagement Knowledge management Monitoring and Evaluation Country Government Micro-credit

18.

Out of the 6 indicators for output one, two were not achieved and four were partially achieved.

For Output two the ADF focused on “improved linkages with the private sector to further develop value chains” in which village enterprises are active. There has been no systematic attempt to implement the activities outlined in the Project Document. The ADF PMU has not systematically supported marketing, market linkages or the integration in market value chains.


Tag: Efficiency Private Sector Jobs and Livelihoods Trade and Development

19.

Regarding Output three, the project hired an individual consultancy, to deliver recommendations for private sector linkages, and the enabling policy environment. The aim was to strengthen the institutional framework to support local economies, but none of the envisioned activities have been completed. This consultancy is also aimed at delivering output 2.


Tag: Challenges Efficiency Private Sector Economic Recovery Inclusive economic growth

20.

The evaluation found that there were different factors for success or failure of the CDP projects. All communities expressed the lack of training as a major issue, and this is a consequence of targeting all communities at the same time with limited human resources. The project provided an initial 2-3 days training, and in some cases, there was an additional week cluster training, but Indigenous communities require a dedicated capacity building strategy with a sustained-in-time approach where technical assistance and training is provided in different topics ranging from leadership, social cohesion, governance, business management, finance accounting, cost analysis, and marketing. The MTE also mentioned that “Labor and management skills were also limitations together with market access, production scale which leads to low competitiveness and market power for both purchases and marketing, and, in some cases, access to capital and credit, the latter was raised in some cases, since there is still need to raise financial literacy in many villages.” “Progressive job and management skills training throughout the implementation period should be done allowing for the targeted beneficiaries absorptive capacity that will improve its effectiveness and efficiency.”19


Tag: Effectiveness Efficiency Human and Financial resources Capacity Building Indigenous people Jobs and Livelihoods Technical Support

21.

Recent studies show that, in normal business conditions, startups death rate is 50% after two years.20 It is also important to note that the CDPs were designed years ago, and there are market dynamics that may affect the businesses; for example, in a couple of communities the business relied on the mining activity as miners were the target clients, but mining activity left some regions and affected businesses. Also, the crop prices are changing due to supply and demand. Many interviewees expressed that developing businesses in Guyana is challenging, and especially with indigenous communities with no assets, no infrastructure, low academic background, no literacy, and even less literacy in business management. The CDPs as the core of the project could potentially have more impact had they been conceived of and implemented as one element in a holistic process including preparedness assessments, capacity building, linkages to markets and value chains for promoting the economic development of Amerindian communities. The adoption of a project, as opposed to a programme approach, has reduced the scope for the intervention to have an impact on Amerindian communities. This has been due to insufficient attention to removing external risks that have the potential for undermining the viability of initiated activities.


Tag: Challenges Efficiency Risk Management Country Government Capacity Building Inclusive economic growth Indigenous people Jobs and Livelihoods

22.

The evaluation found feasibility studies were conducted to allow a suitable project identification, prioritization, and approval. In some cases, project ideas came from the communities´ experience, but not from appropriate market analysis, and sometimes market changes made business analysis outdated. This is in line with the Amerindian Act that demands respect to the indigenous communities’ autonomy but suitable technical advisories to communities could have been provided if there was enough human resource within the PMU. This is even more important taking into account that production costs in remote areas are too high, not many clients available, and communities often produce the same products raising the supply. Community consultation and technical support was possible: in some cases where production cost analysis did not add up, the PMU pointed it out, for example in Phillipai the community asked for a boat, but income from transportation was not enough so the PMU suggested to switch to fuel selling, and the project is now making money.23 Also in Toka, Region 9, the community wanted a credit scheme, there were several discussions because the Ministry already had several unsuccessful credit schemes in the region, so the CDP project was changed.


Tag: Efficiency Human and Financial resources Implementation Modality Country Government Indigenous people Jobs and Livelihoods Micro-credit Technical Support

23.

The project identification also lacked a social diagnostic and a detailed needs assessment, identifying power relationships, governance issues, and the relationship between the Toshao, CDC Chair, Village Council, and CMT. Some communities are traditionally communitarian, more willing to do volunteering, and others are more individualistic. Transparency has been an issue for CDP implementation in some cases; the project report says that “The major issue that affects the disbursement of grants has been the lack of transparency and accountability of funds.”24 Transparency and reporting are key success factors; during the field visits the consultant witnessed some cases where the CMT was transparent and reporting accordingly, but in other cases this was not the case.


Tag: Small Grants Programme Anti-corruption Civic Engagement Implementation Modality Project and Programme management

24.

The transition plan report identified four types of challenges for CDPs as follows; (i) People: These are challenges rooted in the relationship between people (e.g., CMT members amongst themselves, or between CMT members and the Village Council), including governance issues, (ii) Markets: Challenges related to identifying, accessing or serving markets, (iii) Product or Service: Challenges related to generating products or services for sale, usually assumed to be technological issues, and (iv) Money Matters: This category captures challenges related to accountability, but also to book-keeping and pricing. The workshop participants identified people as the main challenge for CDPs, followed by markets, money matters, and product or service (in that order).


Tag: Challenges Efficiency Anti-corruption Civic Engagement Jobs and Livelihoods Technology Trade and Development

25.

Volunteering as a project implementation model seem to have many challenges in the communities. The evaluation observed successful cases where CMT and villagers volunteered willingly, but the overall finding is that in poor villages where income is scarce, volunteerism is not a realistic option. There needs to be a motivation scheme to reward the volunteers’ effort.


Tag: Challenges Resource mobilization Small Grants Programme Vertical Trust Funds Implementation Modality Project and Programme management Micro-credit Poverty Reduction

26.

From the different projects visited the most successful seem to be those in larger communities, with better governance schemes, prior community experience in the business, and accountability. In Laluni, population 430, the CDP project is a minibus, and the net sales are G$490,000 in six months working, the bus moves the produce of the farmers, and lowers costs to the community. The CMT is empowered and has changed the finance report to make it more understandable and useful for the community.


Tag: Women's Empowerment Local Governance Implementation Modality Programme/Project Design Inclusive economic growth Jobs and Livelihoods Trade and Development

27.

At the local level, the sustainability of the projects depends directly on the success rates of the CDPs. In some cases, the communities are making an income from the business, and are very well organized, with clear roles, responsibilities and transparent procedures. In other cases, the situation is not very promising; the funds provided to finance specific investments appear to have a limited potential impact, due to insufficient rigor in appraising and monitoring the selected CDPs. Project reports clearly identify high risks to the sustainability of project activities on such accounts as limited community ownership or marketing constraints. However, greater safeguards against risks in some communities needed to have been implemented though the small size of the PMU would have been a limiting factor.


Tag: Sustainability Small Grants Programme Anti-corruption Local Governance Implementation Modality Risk Management Capacity Building

28.

Sustainability is the main point of attention that the evaluation has about this project; if the political commitment and institutional arrangements of a sustained-in-time support to the CDP projects is not given, it is very likely that the expected impact of socio-economic development will not be achieved, especially in those communities considered as red or yellow.

The evaluation found that the sustainability of the project has not been integrated into the project design, nor is there a clear exit strategy with specific goals and commitments. The project has made a late effort to enter a transition phase and let the MoIPA absorb the ADF projects. The transition report clearly says that “The ADF programme document does not contain an exit strategy, although there are indicators related to closure of the programme. To achieve the sustainable objective of the project, the ADF programme proposes to establish a Transition Action Plan.” Nevertheless, the PMU hired a consultant to help in the design of a Transition phase, where the MoIPA will absorb the ADF projects. The consultant facilitated workshop sessions with CDOs from all regions to provide insights into the transition.


Tag: Challenges Sustainability Resource mobilization Small Grants Programme Human and Financial resources Programme/Project Design Service delivery Country Government

29.

Gender equity and women empowerment and mainstreaming were addressed by the project. Regarding the gender and human rights approach, the evaluation highlights that the project focused on highly vulnerable communities, even though there was no specific gender strategy. Projects that aim for food security, transportation, and village shops directly benefit women because women have to walk miles to get food for their children, go to the doctor whenever a relative gets sick, or get provisions. Although equitable participation in the project was sought by men and women, some sectors are widely developed by men (boat management, fishing). Although the prodoc analysis made recommendations to integrate the gender approach, the project missed a specific strategy to carry out positive gender activities based on a diagnosis of the needs of both men and women within the communities. The 1 week trainings did emphasize the importance, value and involvement of male and female managers, however, further gender activities including gender analysis, dedicated trainings on gender, and specific topics such as leadership for women and men, gender sensitivity, etc. would have been useful.


Tag: Gender Equality Gender Mainstreaming Women's Empowerment Civic Engagement Human rights Programme/Project Design Food Security Capacity Building Indigenous people

Recommendations
1
  • Together with ADF PMU, the NTC, APA, the MoIPA PMU, and relevant government agencies, UNDP should launch a rapid training strategy to be deployed in the remaining months of the project. This capacity building strategy should focus on regions 9 and 1, and cover key topics such as business management, marketing, advertising, cost analysis, stock management, and technical aspects.
    • Consider experience exchanges between communities, CMT visits to other projects, training amongst peers as a strategy.
2

UNDP can assist the MoIPA to establish an online M&E system to assess progress and results in a rigorous and transparent manner. The project finalization is a good opportunity to collect data with the M&E tool developed by the UNDP and PMU, and build a data base with key information from all communities.

3

The PMU should take advantage of the next CDO monitoring visits, within the transition process, and elaborate a detailed stakeholder analysis and projects mapping with basic information of each project about social context, governance issues, training needs, technical issues, technical assistance needs, project situation, and market.

Furthermore, the PMU should elaborate socio-economic indicators in each village, and share it with other government agencies including the PMO in the Ministry of the Presidency.

The PMU needs to elaborate key project messages aimed at key audiences in the government institutions to present this experience, the best practices and lessons learned when working with indigenous communities in Guyana.

The video project documentary that is about to be filmed should serve to present the project but also share lessons learned and best practices.

The PMU should present a brief internal report to the MoIPA with a performance analysis of the CDOs.

4

The role of the Community Development Officers (CDOs), who work for MoIPA, is highly relevant, since they are always on the ground, and shall provide support and be the linkage with other agencies and projects. However, they lack sufficient financial support and motivation. Therefore, a strengthening strategy needs to be defined. The capacity of CDOs should also be built so in return they can build the capacity of CMTs.

It is essential to do performance assessments of the CDOs and consult the communities’ opinion and satisfaction with the CDOs assistance.29

5

An overall institutional assessment and preparedness strategy need to be put in place to assume the challenges of the ADF transition process. This strategy shall include detailed budgets, human resources, goals, deadlines and key performance indicators.

6

The MoIPA should have an online Monitoring and Evaluation system with progress and results indicators, at the output and outcome level, to register data from all MoIPA projects with indigenous communities. CDOs shall provide data from different means (online, emails, phone calls, meetings) and the MoIPA M&E officer shall validate, consolidate and upload into the system.

The MoIPA should arrange a series of inter institutional arrangements to formalize a sustained in time strategy that can provide continuous assistance to indigenous communities. This strategy shall involve the key agencies from the ADF.

Urgently, the MoIPA should facilitate an inter-sectorial event, inviting other Ministries and agencies along to present the project results, the lessons learned, and the great potential that represents supporting local development with the indigenous communities.

  • This event can be useful to present the ADF PMU key messages, the findings from this evaluation, the project documentary, the data from all communities, and the transition strategy together with the institutional commitments.

 

7

For the design of future interventions with the indigenous communities, MoIPA should involve the NTC, APA and other specialized NGOs from the onset to include their insights and experience.

  • All projects need a capacity assessment to identify topics to cover. Examples can be technical aspects (e.g. cattle rearing, tourism management, etc.), business management, finances, accounting, reporting, conflict resolution, etc. Also, it is important to establish the need for technical assistance, peer-to-peer exchanges, internships, testimonials, community exchanges, business fairs, expos. All capacity building strategies must include baseline skills and knowledge tests, and follow-up tests to assess evolution of weaknesses and strengths.
  • When building capacity - peer-to-peer sessions, best practices sharing, and field visits to other successful communities seem to be very effective in indigenous communities
  • Money allocation should not be the same for all communities; the amounts for each community should consider different criteria such as transportation costs, community strength, population size, etc.

Perhaps, a mapping of potential sectors for each community village will allow identifying alternative sectors to be selected based on potential markets, competitiveness as well as other economic, social and environmental conditions augmenting the potential impact, and sustainability of these projects.

In order to transfer capacities and achieve sustainability, all projects, and project teams should be embedded in the MoIPA from the onset, not separate.

1. Recommendation:
  • Together with ADF PMU, the NTC, APA, the MoIPA PMU, and relevant government agencies, UNDP should launch a rapid training strategy to be deployed in the remaining months of the project. This capacity building strategy should focus on regions 9 and 1, and cover key topics such as business management, marketing, advertising, cost analysis, stock management, and technical aspects.
    • Consider experience exchanges between communities, CMT visits to other projects, training amongst peers as a strategy.
Management Response: [Added: 2019/07/16] [Last Updated: 2020/11/21]

Noted

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
Launch rapid training strategy in support of CDPs
[Added: 2019/07/16]
UNDP 2019/07 Completed Training strategy including cluster trainings for CDPs was completed. History
2. Recommendation:

UNDP can assist the MoIPA to establish an online M&E system to assess progress and results in a rigorous and transparent manner. The project finalization is a good opportunity to collect data with the M&E tool developed by the UNDP and PMU, and build a data base with key information from all communities.

Management Response: [Added: 2020/11/21]

Key Actions:

3. Recommendation:

The PMU should take advantage of the next CDO monitoring visits, within the transition process, and elaborate a detailed stakeholder analysis and projects mapping with basic information of each project about social context, governance issues, training needs, technical issues, technical assistance needs, project situation, and market.

Furthermore, the PMU should elaborate socio-economic indicators in each village, and share it with other government agencies including the PMO in the Ministry of the Presidency.

The PMU needs to elaborate key project messages aimed at key audiences in the government institutions to present this experience, the best practices and lessons learned when working with indigenous communities in Guyana.

The video project documentary that is about to be filmed should serve to present the project but also share lessons learned and best practices.

The PMU should present a brief internal report to the MoIPA with a performance analysis of the CDOs.

Management Response: [Added: 2020/11/21]

Key Actions:

4. Recommendation:

The role of the Community Development Officers (CDOs), who work for MoIPA, is highly relevant, since they are always on the ground, and shall provide support and be the linkage with other agencies and projects. However, they lack sufficient financial support and motivation. Therefore, a strengthening strategy needs to be defined. The capacity of CDOs should also be built so in return they can build the capacity of CMTs.

It is essential to do performance assessments of the CDOs and consult the communities’ opinion and satisfaction with the CDOs assistance.29

Management Response: [Added: 2020/11/21]

Key Actions:

5. Recommendation:

An overall institutional assessment and preparedness strategy need to be put in place to assume the challenges of the ADF transition process. This strategy shall include detailed budgets, human resources, goals, deadlines and key performance indicators.

Management Response: [Added: 2020/11/21]

Key Actions:

6. Recommendation:

The MoIPA should have an online Monitoring and Evaluation system with progress and results indicators, at the output and outcome level, to register data from all MoIPA projects with indigenous communities. CDOs shall provide data from different means (online, emails, phone calls, meetings) and the MoIPA M&E officer shall validate, consolidate and upload into the system.

The MoIPA should arrange a series of inter institutional arrangements to formalize a sustained in time strategy that can provide continuous assistance to indigenous communities. This strategy shall involve the key agencies from the ADF.

Urgently, the MoIPA should facilitate an inter-sectorial event, inviting other Ministries and agencies along to present the project results, the lessons learned, and the great potential that represents supporting local development with the indigenous communities.

  • This event can be useful to present the ADF PMU key messages, the findings from this evaluation, the project documentary, the data from all communities, and the transition strategy together with the institutional commitments.

 

Management Response: [Added: 2020/11/21]

Key Actions:

7. Recommendation:

For the design of future interventions with the indigenous communities, MoIPA should involve the NTC, APA and other specialized NGOs from the onset to include their insights and experience.

  • All projects need a capacity assessment to identify topics to cover. Examples can be technical aspects (e.g. cattle rearing, tourism management, etc.), business management, finances, accounting, reporting, conflict resolution, etc. Also, it is important to establish the need for technical assistance, peer-to-peer exchanges, internships, testimonials, community exchanges, business fairs, expos. All capacity building strategies must include baseline skills and knowledge tests, and follow-up tests to assess evolution of weaknesses and strengths.
  • When building capacity - peer-to-peer sessions, best practices sharing, and field visits to other successful communities seem to be very effective in indigenous communities
  • Money allocation should not be the same for all communities; the amounts for each community should consider different criteria such as transportation costs, community strength, population size, etc.

Perhaps, a mapping of potential sectors for each community village will allow identifying alternative sectors to be selected based on potential markets, competitiveness as well as other economic, social and environmental conditions augmenting the potential impact, and sustainability of these projects.

In order to transfer capacities and achieve sustainability, all projects, and project teams should be embedded in the MoIPA from the onset, not separate.

Management Response: [Added: 2020/11/21]

Key Actions:

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