Independent Country Programme Evaluation: Guinea-Bissau

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Evaluation Plan:
2018-2021, Independent Evaluation Office
Evaluation Type:
ICPE/ADR
Planned End Date:
12/2019
Completion Date:
11/2019
Status:
Completed
Management Response:
Yes
Evaluation Budget(US $):
50,000

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Title Independent Country Programme Evaluation: Guinea-Bissau
Atlas Project Number:
Evaluation Plan: 2018-2021, Independent Evaluation Office
Evaluation Type: ICPE/ADR
Status: Completed
Completion Date: 11/2019
Planned End Date: 12/2019
Management Response: Yes
Focus Area:
  • 1. Poverty
  • 2. Governance
  • 3. Others
Corporate Outcome and Output (UNDP Strategic Plan 2018-2021)
  • 1. Output 1.1.1 Capacities developed across the whole of government to integrate the 2030 Agenda, the Paris Agreement and other international agreements in development plans and budgets, and to analyse progress towards the SDGs, using innovative and data-driven solutions
  • 2. Output 1.1.2 Marginalised groups, particularly the poor, women, people with disabilities and displaced are empowered to gain universal access to basic services and financial and non-financial assets to build productive capacities and benefit from sustainable livelihoods and jobs
  • 3. Output 1.2.1 Capacities at national and sub-national levels strengthened to promote inclusive local economic development and deliver basic services including HIV and related services
  • 4. Output 2.2.2 Constitution-making, electoral and parliamentary processes and institutions strengthened to promote inclusion, transparency and accountability
  • 5. Output 2.2.3 Capacities, functions and financing of rule of law and national human rights institutions and systems strengthened to expand access to justice and combat discrimination, with a focus on women and other marginalised groups
Evaluation Budget(US $): 50,000
Source of Funding:
Evaluation Expenditure(US $): 48,000
Joint Programme: No
Joint Evaluation: No
Evaluation Team members:
Name Title Nationality
Mar Guinot Aguado lead Evaluator
Ana Rosa Soares Associate lead Evaluator
Carl de Faria Consultant
Raul Mendes Fernandes Consultatn
GEF Evaluation: No
Key Stakeholders:
Countries: GUINEA-BISSAU
Lessons
Findings
1.

Finding 1. UNDP has not been able to adapt its projects and strategy to the context of protracted political instability and institutional crisis in Guinea-Bissau, affecting the relevance of its programmatic offer in the country. Effective contributions to the achievement of expected outcomes were limited. UNDP approaches and investments have not been based on sound context- and conflict- analyses and risk assessments. RBA oversight has mostly focused on financial delivery instead of timely programmatic oversight to help the country office adapt its programme to the country’s context.


Tag: Programme Synergy Efficiency Relevance Technical Support

2.

Finding 2. UNDP provided continuous investments in capacity building and institutional strengthening to the judiciary system to improve service delivery and the rule of law. Given the political instability and institutional fragility of the country, and a lack of coordination in the justice sector, the planned UNDP support was overambitious, particularly to anti-corruption. Sustainability is not clear for any results. Given the limited human and financial resources of UNDP, it is highly unlikely that it could to take over the work of UNIOGBIS after withdrawal.


Tag: Capacity Building Anti-corruption Rule of law Effectiveness Sustainability Technical Support

3.

Finding 3. UNDP interventions contributed to a total of 12,000 vulnerable people benefiting from free legal aid services and access to formal justice over the past nine years. The construction of district courts and centres for access to justice has allowed for justice services to be closer to citizens, but the focus has been on court buildings rather than their functioning.


Tag: Justice system Rule of law Operational Efficiency Effectiveness Technical Support

4.

Finding 4. The country office did not engage strategically in raising the awareness of local traditional justice actors on human rights, gender and alternative dispute resolution methodologies. The UNDP exit strategy for CAJ was inadequately implemented and has put nine years of investment at risk.

 


Tag: Human rights Justice system Rule of law Gender-Based Violence Conflict resolution Effectiveness Technical Support

5.

Finding 5. UNDP engagement in strengthening the capacities of oversight institutions and NGOs to oversee public policy, budget and government expenditure has produced very limited results. While these types of intervention are relevant to a stable context, UNDP should have refrained from investing in this area without a strategy that adequately considered the risks emerging from the country’s chronic political instability.


Tag: Capacity Building Public administration reform Effectiveness South-South Cooperation

6.

Finding 6. UNDP credibility and support were fundamental to mobilise resources and effectively manage a donor basket fund for the organisation of the 2018 national elections. UNDP support to elections did not, however, adequately consider a more sustainable approach to reduce the cost of elections and improve data reliability through an integrated registration system and/ or a single citizenship identification and registration mechanism.


Tag: Operational Efficiency Strategic Positioning Resource mobilization Relevance Technical Support

7.

Finding 7. With the Global Fund, UNDP contributed to health outcomes through: enhanced monitoring of the medication supply chain; enhanced prevention, diagnostic and treatment capacity of health centres; and health sensitisation and information. Challenges remain to ensure coordination with partners and transfer capacities to national counterparts to promote behaviour change and avoid disruption of the timely availability and distribution of medication and supplies.


Tag: Health Crises Operational Efficiency Global Fund Effectiveness Technical Support

8.

Finding 8. The country office did not invest in poverty reduction, developing economic opportunities, inclusive financing and the sustainable transformation of the economy, despite their relevance to development results and the UNDAF and UNDP core mandate. The country office did not follow the wider corporate shift towards an integrated sustainable development approach, instead focusing on poverty reduction and environmental protection as two separate areas.


Tag: Inclusive economic growth Poverty Reduction Sustainability Efficiency Technical Support

9.

Finding 9. For the past ten years, UNDP has worked to strengthen the capacity of the public administration in Guinea-Bissau to deliver basic services and coordinate development aid. Results have been limited by a fragmented and over-ambitious approach, which proved inadequate to operationalise the necessary mechanisms and systems for an effective public administration and economic governance.


Tag: Capacity Building Public administration reform Programme Synergy Effectiveness Efficiency Technical Support

10.

Finding 10. UNDP supported mainstreaming of the SDGs into the national development strategy. However, strategies for SDG acceleration areas were based on a scenario which was not adequately sensitive to the fragile context and did not adequately analyse risk or contemplate possible deterioration in the country context.


Tag: Strategic Positioning Sustainability Coherence Relevance Technical Support

11.

Finding 11. UNDP investments in local governance have contributed to participatory development planning processes. This has not translated into local economic development results, given the overambitious focus on replicating multiple planning processes before implementing plans. Given the protracted political crisis, sustainability remains to be ensured with the approval of the legal framework for decentralisation and funding for implementation of the development plans.


Tag: Local Governance Operational Efficiency Effectiveness Technical Support

12.

Finding 12. The upstream work of UNDP on environmental and natural resource management was designed to respond to international commitments and improve national policy instruments and tools. However, it presented limited adaptation and consideration to the country’s challenging institutional circumstances, compromising its sustainability.


Tag: Operational Efficiency Environment Policy Natural Resouce management Effectiveness Technical Support

13.

Finding 13. UNDP contributed to the establishment of two terrestrial protected areas and three biological corridors in Guinea-Bissau and the related institutional framework. However, the sustainability and effectiveness of results is affected by the limited efforts to develop alternative sustainable livelihoods to adequately protect the areas. Sustainable financing and management of an expanded national protected area system remains a concern.


Tag: Sustainability Biodiversity Protected Areas Effectiveness Technical Support

14.

Finding 14. UNDP support to climate and disaster resilience has been fragmented, with limited results. The country office did not attempt to scale up climate resilience, livelihoods and risk management initiatives to bring multiplier development effects.


Tag: Climate Change Adaptation Disaster Risk Reduction Resilience building Operational Efficiency Effectiveness Technical Support

15.

Finding 15. The corporate financial sustainability exercise that led to a reduction in the number of staff has negatively impacted human resources, leaving an inadequate country office team to effectively implement the programme and respond to the country’s needs. In addition, the country office has faced important challenges in attracting and retaining talent. This has generated risks in terms of internal control and accountability at senior management level; bottlenecks and inefficiencies in the operations team; an over-burden of work in both programmes and operations; and limited synergies across thematic areas and units with projects being implemented mostly in isolation.


Tag: Operational Efficiency Human and Financial resources Sustainability Effectiveness Operational Services

16.

Finding 16. The UNDP country office has not established an effective results-based management (RBM) system across the programme portfolio. This has led to programme activities not being underpinned by theories of change and clear results frameworks, limiting timely adaptation of the programme to respond to systematically identified risks and enable the achievement of results.

 


Tag: Results-Based Management Efficiency Operational Services

17.

Finding 17. UNDP has shown low capacity and commitment to mainstream gender, youth and human rights issues in the programme and has not focused on transformative approaches to address the root causes of inequality. UNDP has made some steps with regard to including gender considerations in some projects, but results have been limited and remain only gender-targeted.


Tag: Youth Human rights Gender Mainstreaming Operational Efficiency Effectiveness Operational Services

Recommendations
1

Risk and conflict analysis – UNDP must ensure that its new CPD and initiatives in Guinea-Bissau are based on sound risk and conflict analysis. This will enable improved and more realistic entry points for programming, more effective and sustainable results and timely adaptation to the fragile context. It will require a better balance between upstream and downstream initiatives and between short-term responsiveness to government requests and long-term development objectives, until a more stable political environment is in place.

Applying a business-as-usual approach, with capacity building of Government and upstream work at the centre of the UNDP strategy, has not proven to be conducive for effective and sustainable results in the Guinea-Bissau context of protracted political and institutional crisis. UNDP should refrain from investing in these approaches without embedding its strategies in adequate consideration of risk and political scenarios. In addition, the country office should advocate for the deployment of a Development Peace Advisor to help UNDP reposition and undertake strong risk management to improve the relevance and effectiveness of its actions in an unstable environment.

2

Programme design – UNDP should review its approach to programming through the lens of a complex systems approach and co-evolutionary processes. This requires an adaptive management approach to build long-term capabilities, moving the focus from form to function and from imitation to effective innovation, through an iterative process of localised solutions before scale-up.

UNDP initiatives should refrain from building infrastructure without adequate consideration for its function or importing models from other countries which encourage imitation such as ambitious Government reform projects or study tours which are not adapted to the pace of progress or state capabilities in fragile settings. The country office should consider exploring pockets of effectiveness and localised solutions through an iterative process, such as in livelihood development and local economic development, before scaling up to promote incremental change.

3

Poverty reduction – UNDP should prioritise efforts for poverty reduction and employment creation through an integrated sustainable development approach to ensure that the next programme responds adequately to the most critical needs of the population in alignment with the UNDP mandate to “eradicate poverty and build resilience to crisis and shocks”.

At least until there is greater political stability in the country, UNDP should invest more strategically in localised solutions for inclusive growth, employment and sustainable livelihoods to generate scalable and transformative solutions through an iterative process of learning, with adequate consideration for women and youth. The country office should better integrate the Strategic Policy Unit into programmes to help reposition and lead the work on poverty reduction and economic growth, including a shift in approach from separate environment and poverty work towards integrated sustainable development. The country office should ensure more consistent collaborative engagement to address the immediate needs of the population, taking advantage of its access to partners in the country, particularly in its work on local planning, biodiversity protection, livelihoods and resilience.

4

Programme approach and knowledge management – Country office senior management should promote a coherent and integrated programme approach and ensure that evaluation recommendations are implemented, lessons are incorporated into the programme and projects, and concrete steps are taken to ensure sustainability before completing projects and terminating assistance.

Steps taken by the country office to move away from isolated projects have been insufficient. Country office senior management should promote more integrated efforts, explore new ways of working and ensure projects clearly contribute to planned outputs and outcomes, with a clear results chain and better focus on sustainability strategies. The country office should take serious action on previous evaluation recommendations to improve its programming and strengthen understanding of results-based management, risk assessments and theories of change with clear stakeholder mapping. UNDP should systematically reaffirm and strongly encourage the Government to move from commitments to clear concrete steps to promote continued and viable efforts. This could include advocating for a functioning professional public civil service to limit the effects of instability and turnover. Attention should always be paid to first sustainability planning and ownership, based on a committed exit strategy for when concrete results are delivered.

5

Oversight, human and financial resources – RBA should help UNDP Guinea-Bissau to review its human resources and financial structures, to increase its capacity to adequately respond to the needs and challenges of the country. RBA should progressively shift its demand-driven, financial delivery-focused approach to one of continuous and systematic programmatic oversight to identify and respond to strategic guidance and support needs.

The country office should promptly increase and, in alignment with programme growth, adapt the capacity of the operations team to be more efficient, learning from the Global Fund experience. The RBA drive for high country office delivery should be balanced with country office ability to flexibly adapt its structure to respond to administrative and programmatic delays and needs, given that its funding sources cannot be much diversified due to limited donor interest in the country. Considering limited donor engagement, RBA should support the country office to develop a strong resource mobilisation strategy, complemented by appropriate RBA oversight to support the country office to acquire and retain a more permanent senior management team with adequate skills (including languages) to ensure appropriate

6

Human rights, women and youth – UNDP Guinea-Bissau should seek to systematically mainstream gender, youth and human rights into its programming. This requires designing and investing in pilots to create opportunities for women and youth to more actively and effectively participate in economic life, and identifying approaches to effectively promote behaviour change, including on masculinities and cultural norms. UNDP work on access to justice and health should, if continued, focus on increasing awareness of gender and human rights issues, aimed at behaviour change. As initially planned, specific projects should be developed with the economic empowerment of women and youth at their core, strengthening their capacities to take advantage of market opportunities with due attention to social and cultural conventions. In addition, UNDP should build the capacity of the office to mainstream youth, gender and human rights approaches in all programmatic initiatives and not rely on one gender focal point, thus ensuring that the entire office is invested in, and capable of, promoting transformational change.

1. Recommendation:

Risk and conflict analysis – UNDP must ensure that its new CPD and initiatives in Guinea-Bissau are based on sound risk and conflict analysis. This will enable improved and more realistic entry points for programming, more effective and sustainable results and timely adaptation to the fragile context. It will require a better balance between upstream and downstream initiatives and between short-term responsiveness to government requests and long-term development objectives, until a more stable political environment is in place.

Applying a business-as-usual approach, with capacity building of Government and upstream work at the centre of the UNDP strategy, has not proven to be conducive for effective and sustainable results in the Guinea-Bissau context of protracted political and institutional crisis. UNDP should refrain from investing in these approaches without embedding its strategies in adequate consideration of risk and political scenarios. In addition, the country office should advocate for the deployment of a Development Peace Advisor to help UNDP reposition and undertake strong risk management to improve the relevance and effectiveness of its actions in an unstable environment.

Management Response: [Added: 2020/03/03] [Last Updated: 2022/01/27]

Accepted

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
1.1 Ensure issues related to risk and conflict analysis are considered during the CPD preparation process.
[Added: 2022/01/08] [Last Updated: 2022/01/25]
Senior Management 2020/11 Completed UNIOGBIS coordinated the formulation of a conflict analysis study that served as the basis for development of the theory of change of the UNSDCF and the CPD and resulted in a specific outcome that considers all peacebuilding priorities. Risks were equally considered in development of the theory of change (TOC) for the UNSDCF and CPD processes. See attached conflict analysis, new CPD and UNSDCF. History
1.2 Carry out consultations on economic development and on leaving no one behind to better inform the CPD formulation process.
[Added: 2022/01/08] [Last Updated: 2022/01/25]
Economic Unit 2021/08 Completed UNDP coordinated formulation of one study on Economic Development and another on Leave no One Behind; these studies have been used to inform both the UNSDCF and CPD formulation process. See also attached PRODOC for "Building an integrated modern national identification system in Guinea-Bissau". History
1.3 Ensure a balanced dosage of capacity building of Government and upstream work initiatives in the new programme to be formulated, as prospects of a new phase of political stability are being envisaged.
[Added: 2022/01/08]
Senior Management 2021/12 Completed Capacity building is an important part of the new programme. Both the RCO and UNDP have coordinated formulation of a capacity assessment exercise at both the UNCT and the UNDP levels. The reports resulting from these capacity assessment exercises, which obviously also include our government partners, were used in formulation of the CPD as well as of new programmes.
1.4 Implement participatory and innovative methods during programme and projects design.
[Added: 2022/01/08] [Last Updated: 2022/01/25]
Accelerator Lab 2021/12 Completed Innovation has been identified as one of the core elements of the new programme. UNDP is devoting its core budget to delivering new innovative solutions to development challenges, thus helping reduce the gap between current approaches and 21st century challenges by turning ideas into testable hypothesis and scaling them up. The newly established Accelerator Lab is providing leadership on this. UNDP will refocus from being partners in development not implementers for donors. UNDP is making better use of a systemic approach to innovation and the digital space with the aim of building sustained digital and non-digital ecosystems. UNDP is also using a more human-centered design approach to develop programs and allow for better incentive system inside UNDP. History
1.5 Create a typology offering options for scaling up in response to covariate shocks according to each intervention area.
[Added: 2022/01/08] [Last Updated: 2022/01/25]
Senior Management 2021/12 Completed In formulation of its 2022-2026 CPD, UNDP has considered the major shocks that may disturb programme implementation. They are, among others, (i) the COVID-19 pandemic and (ii) the continuation of the political crisis. UNDP was the technical arm in formulation and implementation of the UNCT led COVID-19 Socio Economic Response Plan. UNDP has also prepared its own COVID-19 Offer 2.0. On the other hand, UNDP has been the major actor behind implementation of the peace building priorities, that intend to address the issues around the ongoing political crisis. History
1.6 Advocate in the UNCT for the deployment of a Peace and Development Advisor.
[Added: 2022/01/08] [Last Updated: 2022/01/25]
Senior Management 2021/12 Completed UNDP has been strongly advocating for a PDA. The process of recruitment of a PDA is totally dependent on the Resident Coordinator Office. UNDP will keep on advocating for the recruitment of a PDA. History
2. Recommendation:

Programme design – UNDP should review its approach to programming through the lens of a complex systems approach and co-evolutionary processes. This requires an adaptive management approach to build long-term capabilities, moving the focus from form to function and from imitation to effective innovation, through an iterative process of localised solutions before scale-up.

UNDP initiatives should refrain from building infrastructure without adequate consideration for its function or importing models from other countries which encourage imitation such as ambitious Government reform projects or study tours which are not adapted to the pace of progress or state capabilities in fragile settings. The country office should consider exploring pockets of effectiveness and localised solutions through an iterative process, such as in livelihood development and local economic development, before scaling up to promote incremental change.

Management Response: [Added: 2020/03/03] [Last Updated: 2022/01/27]

Accepted

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
2.1 CO will utilize the program and project steering committee program review and project management and the project quality assurance process to adapt to the permanent changing development condition in Guinea-Bissau. Moreover, the CO needs to create a culture of designing and implementing processes that allow for out-of-the-box solutions that focus on accelerating innovations on the ground.
[Added: 2022/01/08] [Last Updated: 2022/01/25]
Accelerator Lab 2021/12 Completed UNDP is devoting its core budget to delivering new innovative solutions to development challenges, thus helping reduce the gap between current approaches and 21st century challenges by turning ideas into testable hypothesis and scale them up. The newly established Accelerator Lab is providing leadership on this. UNDP will refocus from being partners in development not implementers for donors. UNDP is making better use of a systemic approach to innovation and the digital space with the aim of building sustained digital and non-digital ecosystems. UNDP is also using a more human-centered design approach to develop programs and allow for better incentive system inside UNDP. History
2.2 The CO will be considering mapping innovative local solutions and support local actors to develop and scale them up. Cross-cluster design and implementation is needed in order to focus on tangible results in programming. A more focused geographical approach is needed to showcase advances in poverty reduction/wealth creation efforts through innovative approaches.
[Added: 2022/01/08] [Last Updated: 2022/01/25]
Communications Team 2020/12 Completed The CO developed a community support platform that serves as an online infrastructure to map institutions, identify local solutions and support their replication and scale up throughout the country. See attached concept note from the platform and PRODOC. History
2.3 CO will encourage and advise and mobilize resources the government to deliver services to the citizens through the better use of the existing infrastructure and help the government. Infrastructure projects should only be considered in order to jumpstart a process targeting specific deficiencies and showcasing a model that can be emulated by the government.
[Added: 2022/01/08] [Last Updated: 2022/01/25]
Communications Team 2021/12 Completed UNDP has developed a partnership and communication strategy with a focus on resource mobilization. It has recruited an iUNV in charge of resource mobilization. UNDP is also conducting a resource mobilization study targeting the Transition process, which has provided important elements for supporting the office in mobilizing the resources necessary to deal with the Transition and new peacebuilding challenges. See attached PCAP (Partnerships and Communications Strategy and Action Plan). History
3. Recommendation:

Poverty reduction – UNDP should prioritise efforts for poverty reduction and employment creation through an integrated sustainable development approach to ensure that the next programme responds adequately to the most critical needs of the population in alignment with the UNDP mandate to “eradicate poverty and build resilience to crisis and shocks”.

At least until there is greater political stability in the country, UNDP should invest more strategically in localised solutions for inclusive growth, employment and sustainable livelihoods to generate scalable and transformative solutions through an iterative process of learning, with adequate consideration for women and youth. The country office should better integrate the Strategic Policy Unit into programmes to help reposition and lead the work on poverty reduction and economic growth, including a shift in approach from separate environment and poverty work towards integrated sustainable development. The country office should ensure more consistent collaborative engagement to address the immediate needs of the population, taking advantage of its access to partners in the country, particularly in its work on local planning, biodiversity protection, livelihoods and resilience.

Management Response: [Added: 2020/03/03] [Last Updated: 2022/01/27]

Accepted

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
3.1 Promote greater integration of the economy and strategic unit with other programmatic units, mainly the sustainable development and governance clusters, leading to improved design and implementation of initiatives as well as rename the unit to manifest its focus on both economic development and inclusive wealth creation
[Added: 2022/01/08]
Jose Levy 2022/06 Overdue-Initiated The Country office has prepared a plan and has received approval from RBA for preparations leading to a revision of the overall office organigramme. In terms of planning, one single CPD outcome was identified for initiatives concerning both the Economic and Sustainable development clusters. Many projects, mainly those dealing with the blue economy, have been prepared with very close collaboration.
3.2 Promote greater emphasis on inclusive wealth creation/ poverty reduction / youth employment / sustainable livelihoods, mainly among youth and women, including pilots to test new program approaches
[Added: 2022/01/08] [Last Updated: 2022/01/25]
Senior Management 2021/12 Completed The CO has placed great emphasis on its new 2022-2026 CPD, that includes initiatives aiming at supporting the private sector, wealth creation and improvement of the quality of businesses implemented by micro, small and medium enterprises. Youth and women will be specifically targeted through initiatives that will directly benefit them. See attached CPD, PRODOCS and Blue Economy event Agenda. History
3.3 Take advantage of new GEF funded programmes to promote sustainable livelihoods while environment conservation measures are implemented.
[Added: 2022/01/08] [Last Updated: 2022/01/25]
Sustainable Development Team 2021/12 Completed In the CPD document formulation process, UNDP decided to merge the areas of environment conservation and economic growth in one single outcome that would translate the need to foster economic growth while sustainable livelihoods are promoted. Several outputs and indicators in Outcome 2 attest to this fact. History
3.4 Take advantage of new initiatives in rural areas to promote local development and creation of sustainable initiatives for the benefit of the vulnerable population; focusing on pilot regions that allow for better results.
[Added: 2022/01/08] [Last Updated: 2022/01/25]
Sustainable Development Team 2021/12 Completed UNDP has identified and has started implementation of several projects that take advantage of new initiatives in rural areas to promote local development and creation of sustainable initiatives for the benefit of the vulnerable population. This is being done through the coastal area management project, the Relief and Recovery for Guinea-Bissau’s MSMEs and Private Sector in Response to Covid-19 project, among others. UNDP specifically formulated the document titled Leave No One Behind in Guinea-Bissau, to inform its actions in formulation of its new 2022-2026 CPD. History
3.5 During the new Common Country Assessment/ UNDAF/CPD process, ensure a focus on job creation and inclusive growth in the comparative advantages exercise
[Added: 2022/01/08] [Last Updated: 2022/01/25]
Senior Management 2021/12 Completed The CPD document has been submitted to the Executive Office and will be presented at the January 2022 session of the Executive Board. The issue of job creation and inclusive growth was appropriately taken care of in the CPD. Outcome 2 reads like this: By 2026, Guinea-Bissau has achieved structural economic transformation driven by enhanced productive capacity, value addition, blue economy and inclusive green growth that leaves no one behind, while capitalizing on small island developing States (SIDS) characteristics and ensuring sustainable use and protection of natural resources. Several outputs and indicators in Outcome 2 attest to this fact. History
4. Recommendation:

Programme approach and knowledge management – Country office senior management should promote a coherent and integrated programme approach and ensure that evaluation recommendations are implemented, lessons are incorporated into the programme and projects, and concrete steps are taken to ensure sustainability before completing projects and terminating assistance.

Steps taken by the country office to move away from isolated projects have been insufficient. Country office senior management should promote more integrated efforts, explore new ways of working and ensure projects clearly contribute to planned outputs and outcomes, with a clear results chain and better focus on sustainability strategies. The country office should take serious action on previous evaluation recommendations to improve its programming and strengthen understanding of results-based management, risk assessments and theories of change with clear stakeholder mapping. UNDP should systematically reaffirm and strongly encourage the Government to move from commitments to clear concrete steps to promote continued and viable efforts. This could include advocating for a functioning professional public civil service to limit the effects of instability and turnover. Attention should always be paid to first sustainability planning and ownership, based on a committed exit strategy for when concrete results are delivered.

Management Response: [Added: 2020/03/03] [Last Updated: 2022/01/27]

Accepted

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
4.2 Ensure management responses from project evaluations are well formulated and implemented
[Added: 2022/01/08]
Sirajo Seidi 2022/06 Overdue-Initiated There are still delays in finalizing management responses from project evaluations. This is currently an office priority. The office will ensure all management responses are finalized in a well manner and implemented in the first quarter of 2022.
4.3 Build staff capacity in results-based management, risk assessments and theories of change with clear stakeholders mapping; clear emphasis on mitigation of risk considering lack of ownership
[Added: 2022/01/08]
Sirajo Seidi 2022/06 Overdue-Initiated Training in RBM and risk assessment has been planned for 2021. However, weaknesses in the Office’s M&E section have delayed implementation of these plans. The Office’s M&E section has been boosted from one to three staff. Training in these areas has been scheduled for the second quarter of 2022, latest. Training of staff on theory of change has taken place during implementation of both the UNSDCF and the CPD
4.4 Ensure programmes / projects have strong national ownership, clear exit strategies and scalability capabilities
[Added: 2022/01/08]
Jose Levy 2022/12 Initiated Guinea-Bissau has been going through a long cycle of political crises, characterized by constant changes in Government, staff mobility at all levels and erosion of trained capacity. As a result, national ownership, clear exit strategies and scalability capabilities, even though being part of planned programmes, are difficult to implement. The CO, through its new 2022-2026 CPD, has taken steps to deal with these issues, among others, through increased CO participation in management of projects, increased discussion and planning at the highest levels in Government.
4.5 Plan training in RBM, program/project management and HACT for partner ministries, local authorities and all responsible parties (NGOs, associations and Civil society)
[Added: 2022/01/08]
Sirajo Seidi 2022/06 Overdue-Initiated Training in RBM and HACT has been planned for the past year. However, weaknesses in the Office’s M&E section have delayed implementation of these plans. The Office’s M&E section has been boosted from one to three staff. Training in these areas has been scheduled for the second quarter of 2022, latest.
4.1. Take additional steps for greater proximity and collaboration among programmatic units in programme /project design, and implementation; common formulation of theories of change and improve methodologies applied.
[Added: 2022/01/08] [Last Updated: 2022/01/25]
Senior Management 2021/12 Completed The UNDP CO has identified several ideas about processes and activities that are needed to renew the organization, including improving collaboration among programmatic units and promoting innovative approaches to the design of new projects. An immediate priority was to train UNDP staff in program sensing, system thinking, foresight and theory of change (on the occasion fo formulation of both the new UNSDCF and CPD). UNDP is also reviewing the physical space within which UNDP operates. This should allow to break existing silos within the office and develop closer interaction and collaboration. It is expected that this training will allow UNDP staff to better understand what is happening and/or emerging as key issues in the society and the country development process, to identify signals and patterns of change, to understand and make better use of collective intelligence to identify existing or new solutions, to identify and engage with new partners and agent of changes. UNDP has also been part of the new wave of Accelerator Labs. This unit has provided the CO with an additional capacity to diagnose problems and to tackle them in an accelerated way. History
5. Recommendation:

Oversight, human and financial resources – RBA should help UNDP Guinea-Bissau to review its human resources and financial structures, to increase its capacity to adequately respond to the needs and challenges of the country. RBA should progressively shift its demand-driven, financial delivery-focused approach to one of continuous and systematic programmatic oversight to identify and respond to strategic guidance and support needs.

The country office should promptly increase and, in alignment with programme growth, adapt the capacity of the operations team to be more efficient, learning from the Global Fund experience. The RBA drive for high country office delivery should be balanced with country office ability to flexibly adapt its structure to respond to administrative and programmatic delays and needs, given that its funding sources cannot be much diversified due to limited donor interest in the country. Considering limited donor engagement, RBA should support the country office to develop a strong resource mobilisation strategy, complemented by appropriate RBA oversight to support the country office to acquire and retain a more permanent senior management team with adequate skills (including languages) to ensure appropriate

Management Response: [Added: 2020/03/03] [Last Updated: 2022/01/27]

Accepted

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
5.1 Adjust the structure of the Office and its programmatic and operational staffing for the new challenges to be laid out in the CPD;
[Added: 2022/01/08]
Negar Arefi 2022/12 Initiated As a priority, the CO focused on boosting programmatic challenges, including drastically improving the quantity and quality of staff. Operational challenges will be addressed with greater focus in 2022.
5.2 Obtain support from the RBA for oversight and monitoring of activities at both the programmatic and operational levels and build up local capacity;
[Added: 2022/01/08] [Last Updated: 2022/01/25]
PMSU 2022/06 Overdue-Initiated UNDP has requested support from RBA COST, which dispatched a support mission in May 2021; several recommendations concerning oversight and monitoring of activities at both the programmatic and operational levels and building up of local capacity were formulated by the mission and are currently under implementation. History
5.5 Strengthen systematically the capacities of staff at all levels for improved delivery capacity and performance.
[Added: 2022/01/08] [Last Updated: 2022/01/25]
Senior Management 2022/09 Overdue-Initiated The CO has created several initiatives to improve delivery capacity and performance of staff. In collaboration with the Accelerator Lab, the CO is identifying new and innovative ways to increase synergies and reduce silos among programmatic and operational units. The portfolio systems approach is being introduced as the mechanism to go into the new CPD cycle. Other mechanisms for improved delivery capacity have been introduced such as Operations Clinics, Procurement / Programme monitoring clinics, M&E Clinics. History
5.3 Strengthen the capacities of the country office to promote innovative approaches to the design of new projects (labs, design thinking)
[Added: 2022/01/08] [Last Updated: 2022/01/25]
Accelerator Lab 2021/12 Completed The UNDP CO has identified several ideas about processes and activities that are needed to renew the organization, including promoting innovative approaches to the design of new projects. An immediate priority was to train UNDP staff in program sensing, system thinking, foresight, etc. UNDP is also reviewing the physical space within which UNDP operates. This should allow to break existing silos within the office and develop closer interaction and collaboration. It is expected that this training will allow UNDP staff to better understand what is happening and/or emerging as key issues in the society and the country development process, to identify signals and patterns of change, to understand and make better use of collective intelligence to identify existing or new solutions, to identify and engage with new partners and agent of changes. This way, UNDP will be able to design new programs and integrated projects that can better respond to the development challenges of Guinea Bissau. The objective being to increase the capacity of the country office staff and external stakeholders in the engagement and use of system transformation approaches that can drive innovation and engage partners and donors as peers in co-designers and co-investors. UNDP has also been part of the new wave of Accelerator Labs. This unit has provided the CO with an additional capacity to diagnose problems and to tackle them in an accelerated way. History
5.4 Implement the new resource mobilization and partnership strategy which has been initiated already
[Added: 2022/01/08] [Last Updated: 2022/01/10]
Senior Management 2020/12 Completed UNDP has taken new measures to improve its resource mobilization and partnership strategy. It has recruited a dedicated iUNV and has created a committee on partnership and resource mobilization, that meets biweekly. UNDP has commanded a new resource mobilization strategy study focused on the peace building priorities. Implementation of this strategy is taking place and the successes are visible. In 2020 UNDP GB was top rate in resource mobilization among the RBA countries. See attached ToR for the iUNV. History
6. Recommendation:

Human rights, women and youth – UNDP Guinea-Bissau should seek to systematically mainstream gender, youth and human rights into its programming. This requires designing and investing in pilots to create opportunities for women and youth to more actively and effectively participate in economic life, and identifying approaches to effectively promote behaviour change, including on masculinities and cultural norms. UNDP work on access to justice and health should, if continued, focus on increasing awareness of gender and human rights issues, aimed at behaviour change. As initially planned, specific projects should be developed with the economic empowerment of women and youth at their core, strengthening their capacities to take advantage of market opportunities with due attention to social and cultural conventions. In addition, UNDP should build the capacity of the office to mainstream youth, gender and human rights approaches in all programmatic initiatives and not rely on one gender focal point, thus ensuring that the entire office is invested in, and capable of, promoting transformational change.

Management Response: [Added: 2020/03/03] [Last Updated: 2022/01/27]

Accepted

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
6.2 Ensure that the CO Gender Strategy and an Action Plan are in place and aligned with the next CPD cycle.
[Added: 2022/01/08] [Last Updated: 2022/01/25]
Jose Levy 2022/12 Initiated The 2019-2021 CO Gender Strategy and Action Plan are in place. However, due to an extension of the CPD into 2021, a new CO Gender Strategy and an Action Plan will need to be formulated for the new 2022-2026 CPD cycle. History
6.3 Continue upstream policy support and advice, and downstream gender empowerment interventions,
[Added: 2022/01/08]
Jose Levy 2022/12 Initiated The CO has applied and has been accepted into the new cohort of the Gender Equality Seal (GES). Under the action plan for this initiative, both upstream and downstream activities will be considered.
6.4 Develop and implement projects classified with gender marker 3 to promote female and young entrepreneurship for job creation in innovative areas.
[Added: 2022/01/08]
Jose Levy 2022/12 Initiated Most projects approved and implemented so far in the CO are under the gender marker 2 classification. In the new 2022-2026 CPD cycle, the CO will identify and approve gender marker 3 projects.
6.1. Review and learn from positive experiences within ongoing projects such as (i) the LED project, that has integrated gender and youth as part of its activities in the establishment of the Institutions of Participation and Community Consultation and (ii) the Global Fund Programme Management Unit that has promoted gender parity at the community level
[Added: 2022/01/08] [Last Updated: 2022/01/25]
GF PMU 2020/12 Completed Under the 2018-2020 Global Fund Malaria grant, the GF PMU led an action research methodology in collaboration with the Bandim Health Project to analyze gender inequalities across CHWs in order to increase the proportion of female CHWs (from the current ratio of 8/2 male/female). The results of the study have been considered during the revision of the national Community Health Strategy and in the formulation of the Global Fund 2021-2023 Malaria and TB-HIV grants. The LED project will very likely be followed by a Decentralization project in the new CPD cycle. Learning from the previous project will certainly be considered. See attached (1) Malaria Match Box; (2) Action Research on Community Health Worker Gender balance; and (3) PRODOC Innovation Hub. History
6.5 Empower the gender focus group and adjust the gender strategy and action plan to the new office challenges to improve gender mainstreaming in the program.
[Added: 2022/01/08] [Last Updated: 2022/01/25]
Senior Management 2021/12 Completed The Office has created a revamped gender committee, with monthly meetings. Meetings of the Gender Committee were expanded to include Heads of Clusters and other key people in the office. The Office decided to apply and has been accepted to the new cohort of the Gender Equality Seal. History
6.6 Continue to support the Ministry of Health in improving the access of vulnerable groups (women) to health and ensuring respect for human rights.
[Added: 2022/01/08] [Last Updated: 2022/01/19]
GF PMU 2021/12 Completed Under the Global Fund 2018-2020 Malaria Grant, the GF PMU provided support to the Malaria Match Box study (MMB) with the aim of identifying who is affected, by what barrier and drafting a health and human rights approach + gender sensitive plan as part of the next Global Fund grant (2021-2023). See attached Social Protection Strategy (draft) and Grant Confirmation. History
6.7 Support gender studies, which will support the development of content to be used in awareness programs, aimed at changing norms, power structures, attitudes and behaviors and eliminating the sources of existing inequalities.
[Added: 2022/01/08] [Last Updated: 2022/01/10]
Senior Management 2021/12 Completed To inform the new CPD formulation process, UNDP commanded a consultation on UNDP Guinea-Bissau Gender Analysis. This study was used to inform both the UNSDCF and CPD formulation processes. History
6.8 Strengthen the National Statistics Institute capacity to produce gender-disaggregated statistical data to enable knowledge of inequalities in all areas and improve gender mainstreaming in the office program, strengthening the link between gender equality, women's empowerment and development policies.
[Added: 2022/01/08] [Last Updated: 2022/01/19]
GF PMU 2021/12 Completed The National Health Management Information System, managed through the DHIS2 (District Health Information System) platform and run by the National Public Health Institute (INASA) has been strengthened by designing monitoring tools to include gender sensitive indicators with assistance from the University of Oslo/Saudigitus. Analysis of desagregated data by gender, sex and locality provides essential information for lifting barriers and empowering beneficiaries. Further to this, the GF PMU has supported INASA to: • publish the 2018 Statistics yearbook (a first for the country) • Pilot of Real Time Monitoring for Malaria + WHO Notifiable diseases (2018/2019) DHIS2 mobile Capture (routine aggregate health data collection) DHIS2 mobile Tracker (individual health data collection). • DHIS2 Campaign data- LLIN Mass Distribution Campaign + Seasonal Malaria Chimio Prevention for children <5 yrs (2020) • DHIS2 extension for COVID 19 (2020) and COVAX (2021) monitoring. Link to the DHIS2 platform: https://gbsis.hispmoz.org/covid/dhis-web-commons/security/login.action History

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