Final Evaluation of Community Infrastructure and Livelihood Recovery Project (CILRP)

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Evaluation Plan:
2018-2022, Nepal
Evaluation Type:
Final Project
Planned End Date:
02/2021
Completion Date:
02/2021
Status:
Completed
Management Response:
Yes
Evaluation Budget(US $):
10,000

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Title Final Evaluation of Community Infrastructure and Livelihood Recovery Project (CILRP)
Atlas Project Number: 00057322
Evaluation Plan: 2018-2022, Nepal
Evaluation Type: Final Project
Status: Completed
Completion Date: 02/2021
Planned End Date: 02/2021
Management Response: Yes
UNDP Signature Solution:
  • 1. Poverty
  • 2. Governance
Corporate Outcome and Output (UNDP Strategic Plan 2018-2021)
  • 1. Output 1.1.2 Marginalised groups, particularly the poor, women, people with disabilities and displaced are empowered to gain universal access to basic services and financial and non-financial assets to build productive capacities and benefit from sustainable livelihoods and jobs
  • 2. Output 3.1.1 Core government functions and inclusive basic services4 restored post-crisis for stabilisation, durable solutions to displacement and return to sustainable development pathways within the framework of national policies and priorities
SDG Goal
  • Goal 1. End poverty in all its forms everywhere
  • Goal 11. Make cities and human settlements inclusive, safe, resilient and sustainable
  • Goal 13. Take urgent action to combat climate change and its impacts
  • Goal 6. Ensure availability and sustainable management of water and sanitation for all
  • Goal 8. Promote sustained, inclusive and sustainable economic growth, full and productive employment and decent work for all
SDG Target
  • 1.2 By 2030, reduce at least by half the proportion of men, women and children of all ages living in poverty in all its dimensions according to national definitions
  • 1.4 By 2030, ensure that all men and women, in particular the poor and the vulnerable, have equal rights to economic resources, as well as access to basic services, ownership and control over land and other forms of property, inheritance, natural resources, appropriate new technology and financial services, including microfinance
  • 1.5 By 2030, build the resilience of the poor and those in vulnerable situations and reduce their exposure and vulnerability to climate-related extreme events and other economic, social and environmental shocks and disasters
  • 11.b By 2020, substantially increase the number of cities and human settlements adopting and implementing integrated policies and plans towards inclusion, resource efficiency, mitigation and adaptation to climate change, resilience to disasters, and develop and implement, in line with the Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction 2015-2030, holistic disaster risk management at all levels
  • 13.1 Strengthen resilience and adaptive capacity to climate-related hazards and natural disasters in all countries
  • 6.1 By 2030, achieve universal and equitable access to safe and affordable drinking water for all
  • 6.b Support and strengthen the participation of local communities in improving water and sanitation management
  • 8.3 Promote development-oriented policies that support productive activities, decent job creation, entrepreneurship, creativity and innovation, and encourage the formalization and growth of micro-, small- and medium-sized enterprises, including through access to financial services
Evaluation Budget(US $): 10,000
Source of Funding: Project Budget
Evaluation Expenditure(US $): 14,500
Joint Programme: No
Joint Evaluation: No
Evaluation Team members:
Name Title Email Nationality
Dr. Dhruba Gautam Team Leader drrgautam@gmail.com
Pustak Raj Ojha Team member pustak.acdc@gmail.com
GEF Evaluation: No
Key Stakeholders: UNDP, Donors, CSOs, Local Governments etc
Countries: NEPAL
Lessons
Findings
Recommendations
1

Impart induction, capacity-building and emphasize institutionalization: Design at least one-month "development phase" for induction on the project's details, orientation on contributions required and sustainability planning (O&M funds, etc.), sharing standard criteria for selecting schemes from municipalities, forming or reforming committees, registering those committees, and imparting technical training. Develop and share human resources modalities from the beginning in order to curtail possible disputes. Build local government capacity in implementing an inclusive and rights-based development approach and a deliberative decision-making process. Support to induct and roll out the guidelines to work using the users’ committee approach developed by the MoFAGA at the local government level to reduce contradictions between the rules of NGOs and those of UCs in the settlements of expenses. Ensure that at least 5% of total project's cost is allocated to an O&M fund to ensure the sustainability of the schemes during the development phase.

2

Enhance internal and external coherence for synergy: Promote a mechanism to ensure internal and external coherence from the very beginning of the programme by mapping the agencies and actors working in the project areas to promote the idea- and resource-sharing and synergy. While designing livelihood schemes, use the years-long experience of the MEDEP in entrepreneurship development for sustainable and market-led livelihood promotion. Design a flexible approach to selecting enterprises so that they can be either group-based or individual as contexts, needs and interests might differ, and a group approach might not be always feasible. Use the technical expertise of the enterprise development facilitators of the MEDPA in the selection and promotion of enterprises.

3

Synchronize project planning with local government planning: Synchronize project planning with local government planning and the budgeting cycle so that matching funds can be ensured right from the beginning. Synchronization may also reduce political influence in project selection. Inform authorities of the UNDP’s programmatic priorities during the municipal planning phase in order to help to align municipal plans with UNDP's priorities and SDGs. Design livelihood schemes to match micro-climate conditions, seasonality, the proven experiences of people, the local resources available, and the guaranteed market infrastructures determined by a thorough assessment. Design livelihood schemes that are compatible with the government's already defined agriculture-and-livestock pocket areas for resource-sharing, synergy and sustainability. A six-month project cycle is too short to (i) manage preliminary work (induction, sensitization, community preparedness, etc.), and (ii) institutional capacity-building. Design a "recovery project" that lasts at least 10 to 12-month duration to ensure systematic service delivery, good-quality work, the institutionalization of communities and UCs and the sustainability of the schemes.

4

Reach previously unreached sections: Take poverty pockets and marginalized and unreached areas as identified by MoLMCPA and reflected in municipal level disaster risk management plan to prioritize projects and to target beneficiaries to ensure inclusive and rights-based development. Conduct vulnerability assessments and barrier analysis to ensure that women and the most vulnerable sections of the society benefit from the programme. Develop a mechanism to link each of the scheme with DRM and CCA plan at local levels.

5

Conduct vulnerability assessment and barrier analysis: Conduct this assessment and analysis to ensure that women and the most vulnerable sections of the society benefit from the program. Coordinate with the National Planning Commission, MoLMCPA and MoALD to explore already prepared poverty mapping and identified pockets of poverty as well as of agriculture and livestock pocket areas to integrate project implementation.

6

Manage resources through public-private partnerships: Many local governments requested the UNDP to increase the budget ceilings of sub-projects so that more households could be covered, and tangible results could be demonstrated in an integrated way. In the future, instead of developing small sub-projects, design a few but very strategic projects with increased unit budgets so that local government resources could be harvested to develop a resilient and inclusive economic recovery model village. This mechanism would also reduce the administrative and management costs of the project. Emphasize the provision of co-funding from the private sector as per the spirit of Nepal government's poverty reduction strategies and the third priority area of the Sendai Framework of DRR (2016-2030).

7

Modify technologies to reap maximum benefits from livelihoods: Encourage women’s groups to promote secondary and tertiary products processed from their farm products by providing support for simple processing and post-harvest technologies that add value. Install solar dryers for drying agricultural products like ginger and turmeric because they are a cheap, women-friendly technology that costs little to run (and, with subsidies, to buy) and have many uses and benefits, including the reduction of drudgery.   

8

Emphasize the creation of employment and entrepreneurial opportunities for youths: In order to reduce the trend of migration and link the project’s short-term and quick-impact livelihood schemes with the government's long-term programs like the Youth Self-Employment Program. In order to encourage women farmers to participate in livelihood schemes, provide fellowship for the best women entrepreneurs so that they will retain their interest in promoting their businesses.

9

Continue some of the good practices while designing future projects: Continue some of the good practices viz. (i) tripartite partnership approach; (ii) provision of matching funds; and (iii) selection of low-cost, labor-intensive and simple technology-based schemes with blend of structural and non-structural activities targeting to women and PwDs while designing the future similar interventions.

10

Emphasis on knowledge management: Strengthen learning and sharing within the programme (from one district to another district and from one partner to another partner), among different programs within the UNDP (e.g. MEDPA, CMDP, VCDP) and beyond. Develop proper guidelines for the selection of livelihood schemes and use the mechanisms and strategies followed by other livelihood programs implemented by development partners within the recovery phase. Carry out detailed documentation of good practices and lessons learned from CILRP as many innovations are already in place and could be replicated in new areas so that other agencies working in recovery through community infrastructures and livelihood interventions could also benefit. Without documentation, practices may erode after sometimes Develop an exit strategy to ensure the sustainability of the project’s schemes.

11

Practice safety and the transfer of risk: Safety, security, risk reduction, and risk transfer are a prerequisite for the success of early recovery projects. To achieve these ends, follow the occupational safety and health guidelines (2017) in construction projects and provide at least minimal safety gear (helmets, boots, gloves, reflective jackets, personal protective equipment, etc.) to construction workers and skilled masons to reduce the risk. Provide group insurance for risk transfer in collaboration with the PMEP and insurance companies. At operation level, the local government could develop occupational safety procedure and manage necessary safety gears at its disposal.

12

Develop dedicated log-frame along with outcome and impact level indicators: The quantitative data were not adequately refined using SMART indicators at outcome or impact level. It was because, project specific logical framework and indicator specific baseline value were not available which also limited the comparative analysis of the findings. In the future, while designing the such programme, develop dedicated log-frame strictly along with outcome and impact level indicators in order to gauze the programme results in the periodic basis.

13

Mainstream GESI in the programmatic cycle: The programme addressed gender issues and the issues of marginalized groups from the beginning. But there were several rooms to mainstream GESI from the beginning. In order to distribute the projects benefits to all people irrespective of gender and caste/ethnicity, mainstream GESI in the programmatic cycle i.e. collecting baseline data, designing, implementing and monitoring the project.

14

Mainstream disaster and climate risks in the designs of Community Infrastructure and Livelihood Interventions: Mainstream disaster and climate risk reduction feature in the design as well as the subsequent implementation to ensure the benefits acquired from project-initiated schemes. Ensure that there are safety features in community infrastructures as well as appropriate and cost-effective measures.

1. Recommendation:

Impart induction, capacity-building and emphasize institutionalization: Design at least one-month "development phase" for induction on the project's details, orientation on contributions required and sustainability planning (O&M funds, etc.), sharing standard criteria for selecting schemes from municipalities, forming or reforming committees, registering those committees, and imparting technical training. Develop and share human resources modalities from the beginning in order to curtail possible disputes. Build local government capacity in implementing an inclusive and rights-based development approach and a deliberative decision-making process. Support to induct and roll out the guidelines to work using the users’ committee approach developed by the MoFAGA at the local government level to reduce contradictions between the rules of NGOs and those of UCs in the settlements of expenses. Ensure that at least 5% of total project's cost is allocated to an O&M fund to ensure the sustainability of the schemes during the development phase.

Management Response: [Added: 2021/03/29]

Agreed. CILRP has developed and implemented ten screening criteria and provisioned to orient the UC on financial and technical aspects of project implementation. Though, due to time limitation, the process may be shortened in some schemes. While CILRP is being closed as a project, in future interventions UNDP will develop and share human resources modalities from the beginning. CILRP closely worked with local government while implementing its interventions and provide technical support to them from planning to implementation phase. There is practice of tripartite agreement between, local government, UC and UNDP (NGO), mentioning the process and criteria to be followed in the implementation.  Allocating 5% of O&M fund of total project’s cost is already in practice which will be made mandatory in future project design and implementations.

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
1.1 Conduction of project roll out events
[Added: 2021/04/04]
UNDP 2021/12 Not Initiated This action is not applicable for now. Once the next project is formulated, the action will be implemented.
1.2 Build capacity of local governments on participatory design and O&M
[Added: 2021/04/04]
UNDP 2021/06 Not Initiated This will be done as part of initiation plan.
2. Recommendation:

Enhance internal and external coherence for synergy: Promote a mechanism to ensure internal and external coherence from the very beginning of the programme by mapping the agencies and actors working in the project areas to promote the idea- and resource-sharing and synergy. While designing livelihood schemes, use the years-long experience of the MEDEP in entrepreneurship development for sustainable and market-led livelihood promotion. Design a flexible approach to selecting enterprises so that they can be either group-based or individual as contexts, needs and interests might differ, and a group approach might not be always feasible. Use the technical expertise of the enterprise development facilitators of the MEDPA in the selection and promotion of enterprises.

Management Response: [Added: 2021/03/29]

Agreed. CILRP worked with local government under the leadership of community. The majority of the livelihood schemes were selected based on local government’s priority with joint funding from local government and CILRP including contribution from beneficiary communities. CILRP promoted group-based interventions rather than individual as MEDEP. CILRP closely worked with CMDP and activities are complementary to each other in overlapped project areas. Since CILRP project is closed and this is a final project evaluation, therefore, UNDP will ensure synergy with other similar projects in its future programming for sharing the experience, resources, and expertise. 

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
2.1 Organise coordination meetings with other projects/programme at the inception of new project to strengthen internal coherence.
[Added: 2021/04/05]
UNDP 2021/12 Not Initiated Not applicable for this time. If there is a future project, the action will be implemented. History
3. Recommendation:

Synchronize project planning with local government planning: Synchronize project planning with local government planning and the budgeting cycle so that matching funds can be ensured right from the beginning. Synchronization may also reduce political influence in project selection. Inform authorities of the UNDP’s programmatic priorities during the municipal planning phase in order to help to align municipal plans with UNDP's priorities and SDGs. Design livelihood schemes to match micro-climate conditions, seasonality, the proven experiences of people, the local resources available, and the guaranteed market infrastructures determined by a thorough assessment. Design livelihood schemes that are compatible with the government's already defined agriculture-and-livestock pocket areas for resource-sharing, synergy and sustainability. A six-month project cycle is too short to (i) manage preliminary work (induction, sensitization, community preparedness, etc.), and (ii) institutional capacity-building. Design a "recovery project" that lasts at least 10 to 12-month duration to ensure systematic service delivery, good-quality work, the institutionalization of communities and UCs and the sustainability of the schemes.

Management Response: [Added: 2021/03/29]

Partially Agreed. CILRP implemented demand driven activities and short project cycle of six months for quick recovery. Schemes were selected based on the project enlisted in municipality programme and budget that has given room for synchronization. Nonetheless, given the preparatory period prior to municipality annual planning schedule will yield better results. UNDP will consider this recommendation in future programmes and projects and promote collaborative initiatives with local governments.

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
3.1 Develop implementation packages for Palikas for the local infrastructure project cycle for different types of infrastructure prioritised by Palikas
[Added: 2021/04/05]
UNDP 2021/12 Not Initiated Not applicable for this time. It will be implemented once the future project is designed and implemented.
3.2 Analyse Palika capacity gaps for the local infrastructure project cycles of different types of infrastructure.
[Added: 2021/04/05]
UNDP 2021/12 Not Initiated Not applicable for now but this action will be considered if the next phase is designed.
3.3 Analyse User Groups capacity requirements and gaps.
[Added: 2021/04/05]
UNDP 2021/12 Not Initiated This action will be implemented if the next phase is designed.
3.4 Develop corresponding implementation guidelines, training packages and other Capacity Development support packages for palikas and user groups.
[Added: 2021/04/05]
UNDP 2021/12 Not Initiated This action will be implemented once there will be next phase programming.
4. Recommendation:

Reach previously unreached sections: Take poverty pockets and marginalized and unreached areas as identified by MoLMCPA and reflected in municipal level disaster risk management plan to prioritize projects and to target beneficiaries to ensure inclusive and rights-based development. Conduct vulnerability assessments and barrier analysis to ensure that women and the most vulnerable sections of the society benefit from the programme. Develop a mechanism to link each of the scheme with DRM and CCA plan at local levels.

Management Response: [Added: 2021/03/29]

Partially Agreed. Project took systematic measures in reaching to unreached population in coordination with District Disaster Relief Committee (DDRC), municipalities and ministries. Project activities were implemented in remote areas with positive discrimination to include differently able peoples, marginalized and deprived section of the community.  This is a final project evaluation. Therefore, good practices, lessons learned of the project will be replicated in the future project and programme design.

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
4.1 Coordinate with local government and verify the recommended areas to ensure the inclusion.
[Added: 2021/04/05]
UNDP 2021/12 Not Initiated Not applicable. It will be implemented if the next phase is designed.
4.2 Analyse Palika annual plan and budgeting cycle for resilient local infrastructure works.
[Added: 2021/04/05]
UNDP 2021/12 Not Initiated Not applicable for now but it will be considered during designing of the future project.
4.3 Support to update the local planning process guidelines with requirements for resilience and sustainability of infrastructure works.
[Added: 2021/04/05]
UNDP 2021/12 Not Initiated If the future project is designed, this action will be implemented.
5. Recommendation:

Conduct vulnerability assessment and barrier analysis: Conduct this assessment and analysis to ensure that women and the most vulnerable sections of the society benefit from the program. Coordinate with the National Planning Commission, MoLMCPA and MoALD to explore already prepared poverty mapping and identified pockets of poverty as well as of agriculture and livestock pocket areas to integrate project implementation.

Management Response: [Added: 2021/03/29]

Partially Agreed Being a short-term project cycle CILRP built its activities in the already identified target groups, areas by local municipalities, DDRC and other thematic assessments instead of separate self-conduction of vulnerability assessment and barrier analysis. Project supported the implementation of local government prioritized projects and DDRC recommended areas.  Ministry of Land Reform, Cooperative and Poverty Alleviation has prepared poverty mapping and identified poverty pocket areas. UNDP will consider those poverty pockets in future project/ programme design for similar nature of the project.

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
5.1 Compilation of poverty pocket areas during programme implementation.
[Added: 2021/04/05]
UNDP 2021/12 Not Initiated Not applicable for this time but the action is implemented in future programming.
6. Recommendation:

Manage resources through public-private partnerships: Many local governments requested the UNDP to increase the budget ceilings of sub-projects so that more households could be covered, and tangible results could be demonstrated in an integrated way. In the future, instead of developing small sub-projects, design a few but very strategic projects with increased unit budgets so that local government resources could be harvested to develop a resilient and inclusive economic recovery model village. This mechanism would also reduce the administrative and management costs of the project. Emphasize the provision of co-funding from the private sector as per the spirit of Nepal government's poverty reduction strategies and the third priority area of the Sendai Framework of DRR (2016-2030).

Management Response: [Added: 2021/03/29]

Agreed. CILRP has partnered with local government and other development partners in project implementation. This has resulted in synergy in resources and bigger size schemes implemented under the leadership of community. Moreover, project was successful in getting cost contribution from communities and cooperatives, who also represent the private sector. However, organized private sectors are less interested in development partnership and always asked for business partnership. For this, project joined hands with private organization in many cases for market linkages and technology transfer in many livelihood promotion activities. However, there is gap in partnership with private sectors, which will be considered during the future project design and interventions.

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
6.1 Creation of Public private and community interaction forum.
[Added: 2021/04/05]
UNDP 2021/12 Not Initiated This will be implemented in future programming.
7. Recommendation:

Modify technologies to reap maximum benefits from livelihoods: Encourage women’s groups to promote secondary and tertiary products processed from their farm products by providing support for simple processing and post-harvest technologies that add value. Install solar dryers for drying agricultural products like ginger and turmeric because they are a cheap, women-friendly technology that costs little to run (and, with subsidies, to buy) and have many uses and benefits, including the reduction of drudgery.   

Management Response: [Added: 2021/03/29]

Partially agreed. CILRP has provided support to target community to be equipped with improved technologies to ease their workload and efficient operation. These supports have increased their product volume to make commercially viable. Construction of collection centres and value addition processing unit support to their local produces were in completely aligned with this. Moreover, introduction modern commercial energy powered agricultural tools, processing units, solar lifting pump have enhanced productivity and profitability in local economy. In addition, these improve technologies helped to reduce their workload specially of women.  This will be continued in future interventions and incorporated in the new project of similar nature.

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
7.1 Support to the farmers for improved technologies.
[Added: 2021/04/05]
UNDP 2022/12 Not Initiated Not applicable for now but will be implemented if there be future project of similar nature .
8. Recommendation:

Emphasize the creation of employment and entrepreneurial opportunities for youths: In order to reduce the trend of migration and link the project’s short-term and quick-impact livelihood schemes with the government's long-term programs like the Youth Self-Employment Program. In order to encourage women farmers to participate in livelihood schemes, provide fellowship for the best women entrepreneurs so that they will retain their interest in promoting their businesses.

Management Response: [Added: 2021/03/29]

Agreed. CIRLP did take steps to ensure the participation of youth and women in project implementation.  CILRP emphasized on the youth and women friendly community enterprises for marking of their products marketable by linking with businesses.  UNDP will further strengthen this initiation to develop compatible business units to local youths and women in future projects and programme of similar nature.

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
8.1 Introduce youth focused project/activities/ideas.
[Added: 2021/04/05]
UNDP 2022/06 Not Initiated Not applicable for now but will be implemented if there be future project of similar nature.
8.2 Develop master women farmers through training, technology support and exposure.
[Added: 2021/04/05]
UNDP 2022/06 Not Initiated Not applicable for now but will be implemented if there be future project of similar nature.
9. Recommendation:

Continue some of the good practices while designing future projects: Continue some of the good practices viz. (i) tripartite partnership approach; (ii) provision of matching funds; and (iii) selection of low-cost, labor-intensive and simple technology-based schemes with blend of structural and non-structural activities targeting to women and PwDs while designing the future similar interventions.

Management Response: [Added: 2021/03/29]

Agreed. This model has already been adopted in UNDP’s projects of similar objectives. CMDP, VCDP and SDG localization projects adopted the partnership approaches.  Those good practices will be considered in future project design as well.

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
9.1 Dissemination of Lesson learned and good practice.
[Added: 2021/04/05]
UNDP 2021/12 Not Initiated
10. Recommendation:

Emphasis on knowledge management: Strengthen learning and sharing within the programme (from one district to another district and from one partner to another partner), among different programs within the UNDP (e.g. MEDPA, CMDP, VCDP) and beyond. Develop proper guidelines for the selection of livelihood schemes and use the mechanisms and strategies followed by other livelihood programs implemented by development partners within the recovery phase. Carry out detailed documentation of good practices and lessons learned from CILRP as many innovations are already in place and could be replicated in new areas so that other agencies working in recovery through community infrastructures and livelihood interventions could also benefit. Without documentation, practices may erode after sometimes Develop an exit strategy to ensure the sustainability of the project’s schemes.

Management Response: [Added: 2021/03/29]

Agreed. CILRP/UNDP conducted cross learning and sharing events for partner NGOs, municipalities, and other concerned projects. Internally, CILRP shared its lesson learned to other projects in the firm of discussion, presentation, and comments. Moreover, Project published brochure, factsheet, story books, video documentary and news coverage clips. These Knowledge management products were published and distributed electronically as well as printing.

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
10.1 Documentation of good practices and lessons learned and sharing.
[Added: 2021/04/05]
UNDP 2021/12 Not Initiated
11. Recommendation:

Practice safety and the transfer of risk: Safety, security, risk reduction, and risk transfer are a prerequisite for the success of early recovery projects. To achieve these ends, follow the occupational safety and health guidelines (2017) in construction projects and provide at least minimal safety gear (helmets, boots, gloves, reflective jackets, personal protective equipment, etc.) to construction workers and skilled masons to reduce the risk. Provide group insurance for risk transfer in collaboration with the PMEP and insurance companies. At operation level, the local government could develop occupational safety procedure and manage necessary safety gears at its disposal.

Management Response: [Added: 2021/03/29]

Partially Agreed. Project kept the safety and security of the workers on top priority and taken necessary safety measures. Because of this project did not have recorded a single incidence of safety during the entire project period. However, blanket approach of distribution of safety gear to all community is not feasible for this types of short term project cycle and huge number of community participation for less than two weeks engagement. Considering the nature of scheme size, cost and number of people engagement, project has applied pragmatic way-out to keep worker safe and secured.   It should be noted that this is a final project evaluation. Therefore, safety and security measured will be considered based on the situation and exposure while designing and implementing the similar project in future.

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
11.1 Support local government to develop occupational safety procedure.
[Added: 2021/04/05]
UNDP 2021/12 Not Initiated Not applicable for now but will be implemented if there be future project of similar nature.
12. Recommendation:

Develop dedicated log-frame along with outcome and impact level indicators: The quantitative data were not adequately refined using SMART indicators at outcome or impact level. It was because, project specific logical framework and indicator specific baseline value were not available which also limited the comparative analysis of the findings. In the future, while designing the such programme, develop dedicated log-frame strictly along with outcome and impact level indicators in order to gauze the programme results in the periodic basis.

Management Response: [Added: 2021/03/29]

Agreed. Project implemented under demand driven with an objective of early recovery of earthquake and other disasters. Indicators were adopted from nationally generated indicators. Project contributed to broader national outcomes and impact rather than project itself. Project has maintained workable robust SMART database system to get input output information along with its contribution towards municipality and national recovery and development outcomes and impacts. However, while designing new project RRF will be developed with SMART indicators.

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
12.1 Development of RRF and SMART indicators while designing new programme.
[Added: 2021/04/05]
UNDP 2021/12 Not Initiated This action will be fully considered if the future project is designed.
13. Recommendation:

Mainstream GESI in the programmatic cycle: The programme addressed gender issues and the issues of marginalized groups from the beginning. But there were several rooms to mainstream GESI from the beginning. In order to distribute the projects benefits to all people irrespective of gender and caste/ethnicity, mainstream GESI in the programmatic cycle i.e. collecting baseline data, designing, implementing and monitoring the project.

Management Response: [Added: 2021/03/29]

Agreed. CILRP is consistent to UDNP global GESI policies and guidelines by reaching to marginal, deprived and vulnerable people and unreached people. CILRP systematically included the women, dalit, youth focused interventions as positive discrimination. Implementation of special activities in partnership with HI to reach to the differently abled people and women centric schemes were good example for mainstream GESI. This holistic approach could be good lessons for other projects and programmes. This will be continued in future project design as well.

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
13.1 Develop GESI indicators while designing the future project's RRF
[Added: 2021/04/05]
UNDP 2021/12 Not Initiated This will be done if the future project is being designed.
14. Recommendation:

Mainstream disaster and climate risks in the designs of Community Infrastructure and Livelihood Interventions: Mainstream disaster and climate risk reduction feature in the design as well as the subsequent implementation to ensure the benefits acquired from project-initiated schemes. Ensure that there are safety features in community infrastructures as well as appropriate and cost-effective measures.

Management Response: [Added: 2021/03/29]

Agreed.  Project was guided by livelihood recovery and inclusive economic growth, so poverty alleviation strategies and livelihood recovery was focused. However, project has considered DRR and CCA as a cross cutting issues and incorporated the risk reduction measures of disaster and climate change in design and implementation of its interventions.  It should be noted that this is a final project evaluation. Therefore, UNDP will take these recommendations/lessons into account and be guided by them in future project and programme design.

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
14.1 Analyse Palika annual plan for resilient local infrastructure works and support to update the local planning process guidelines with requirements for resilience and sustainability of infrastructure works
[Added: 2021/04/05]
UNDP 2021/12 Not Initiated Not applicable for now. This will be implemented if the future project of similar nature being designed.

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