Mid-term Evaluation of Disaster Response and Recovery Facility (DRRF) project

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Evaluation Plan:
2017-2021, Bangladesh
Evaluation Type:
Mid Term Project
Planned End Date:
12/2021
Completion Date:
12/2021
Status:
Completed
Management Response:
Yes
Evaluation Budget(US $):
30,000

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Title Mid-term Evaluation of Disaster Response and Recovery Facility (DRRF) project
Atlas Project Number: 113842
Evaluation Plan: 2017-2021, Bangladesh
Evaluation Type: Mid Term Project
Status: Completed
Completion Date: 12/2021
Planned End Date: 12/2021
Management Response: Yes
Focus Area:
  • 1. Others
Corporate Outcome and Output (UNDP Strategic Plan 2018-2021)
  • 1. Output 1.3.1 National capacities and evidence-based assessment and planning tools enable gender-responsive and risk-informed development investments, including for response to and recovery from crisis
  • 2. Output 3.1.1 Core government functions and inclusive basic services4 restored post-crisis for stabilisation, durable solutions to displacement and return to sustainable development pathways within the framework of national policies and priorities
  • 3. Output 3.6.1 Energy access re-established for crisis-affected populations, with a focus on gender-sensitive, risk-informed and sustainable recovery
Evaluation Budget(US $): 30,000
Source of Funding: Project budget
Evaluation Expenditure(US $): 17,771
Joint Programme: No
Joint Evaluation: No
Evaluation Team members:
Name Title Nationality
Stephanie Jill Hodge International Evaluation Specialist
Mohammad Abdul Wazed National Evaluation Consultant
GEF Evaluation: No
Key Stakeholders:
Countries: BANGLADESH
Lessons
1.

Funding mechanism:

DRRF is built on pre-approved funding mechanisms, flexible operational procedures and an active pool of implementing partners and professional human resources. For ensuring timely support to the government in need, the Facility can follow Direct Implementation Modality (DIM) of UNDP.


2.

Need and priority based dynamic and flexible system:

As a quick standby financing and emergency recovery assistance including capacity building and learning about early recovery DRRF provides support to the government and local NGOs by an increased focus on early recovery and risk-informed development.


3.

Global relevance and global corporate requirement:

The accelerator lab global learning network fits well with DRRF intention to support global learning about the context of emerging disasters. The UNDP country representative should provide greater delegation of power for the DRRF to work effectively and per the nature of level of risk of Bangladesh risk profile and geography.


4.

DRRF modality is a bridge between the humanitarian support and development:

DRRF is a nimble and effective financing modality for emergency response, early recovery and learning about the recovery. Through the experience, it aspires to identify needs for capacity building and to advocates policy changes in the national DRR activities. As a direct action modality, it is built to support a dynamic shifting country context with protracted emergencies.


5.

Planned partnership and stakeholder participation:

The project advisory board is a good mechanism to engage UNDP leadership, key strategic donors, and government partners to become more programmatically engaged in emergency response and recovery.


6.

Localization of responses and leveraging of technology:

The current phase of the DRRF 2018 -2020 was built on decades of UNDP and GOB early recovery and humanitarian engagements and partnership with NGOs towards DRM full-cycle governance and resilience. There is an expectation that these local NGOs will play a larger role. This new context requires localization (capacity building) of the response. For instance, leveraging of technology, the greater digitation of the response measure through digital cash transfer to the beneficiaries. DRRF has started better use of technology by transfer of grant (for shelter re-construction) and wages (cash for work), and by developing database for beneficiary selection and Disaster and Pandemic Data Management for IDPs and Migrants.


7.

Robust performance per plan:

DRRF implemented response and recovery programmes including shelter support, creation of emergency employment activities, transferring cash grants and wages to the beneficiary workers, mostly women, through mobile banking. The women headed households expressed their full satisfaction on receiving shelter materials and cash. So in an emergency situation, for example during flood, the households can break their shelters into pieces to shift in a safe place.


8.

Ready response to a situation not known as a disaster but disaster:

DRRF extends its full support to Forcibly Displaced Myanmar Nationals and host communities in Cox’s Bazar. The project has been working to build coherence and peaceful co-existence so long the Forcibly Displaced Myanmar Nationals are staying. Another success story is about support in fight back COVID 19 pandemic in the country. In response to the outbreak of the COVID19 pandemic, DRRF has undertaken several initiatives, including raising awareness on preventive measures, distribution of PPE among cleaning workers of municipalities, support to develop volunteer groups in city corporations and municipalities for awareness-raising on the safe burial of COVID-19 deceased, etc.


9.

Capacity building efforts:

DRRF has provided training to high officials of the MoDMR and technical support to the Fire Service and Civil Defense (FSCD) towards its reform initiatives. DRRF supported the NRP project in formulating the National Plan for Disaster Management (NPDM) for 2021-2025 and the development of the Post-disaster Recovery Planning for Cyclone Amphan and Flood 2020. DRRF supports the Ministry of Disaster Management and Relief (MoDMR) in developing a data management system on "Digitalization in beneficiary Selection." The DRRF had also undertaken a joint initiative with IOM on Disaster and Pandemic Data Management for IDPs and Migrants.


10.

‘Build back better’ concept:

DRRF project has ensured tremendous benefit and resulted in restoring the community infrastructure which is critical for quick recovery following ‘build back better’ concept of Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction (SFDRR 2016-2030) by repairing fragile embankment in the coastal strips protecting tidal and saline water intrusion in post-cyclone situation, saving poor and vulnerable communities from loss and damage of their livelihoods and assets.


Findings
1.

Relevance

Needs-Based and Priority

  • Bangladesh is a disaster-prone country, and impacts of climate change are enabling intensifying and more frequency in the disaster event. Secondly, the severity of the disaster, i.e., rapid onset, and nature of the disaster are changing and increasing. Hence, the rationale for quick standby financing as response to disasters and emergency recovery assistance including capacity building and knowledge sharing is justified based on the dynamic emergency context.

 

  • DRRF provides support to the government and the HCTT as Shelter and Early Recovery Cluster lead. In respect of financial, technical and capacity building support DRRF has shown a significant risk reduction and early recovery actions. The flexibility of the DIM modality helps DRRF to deal with humanitarian support effectively and quickly.

2.

Localization of DRR activities

  • The localization of the response and recovery activities, e.g., capacity building support to GoB implementing agencies and NGOs at the operation level, digitation of the response measure, leveraging technology, e.g., mobile banking for cash transfer to the beneficiaries, developing database for beneficiary selection and Disaster and Pandemic Data Management for IDPs and Migrants are relevant and important areas of DRRF.

3.

COVID 19 Learning and Rohngya influx

  • As standby facility and ready response mechanism DRRF has undertaken several laudable initiatives on outbreak of COVID-19 pandemic, including raising awareness on preventive measures, distribution of PPE among cleaners of municipalities, support to develop volunteer groups in city corporations and municipalities for awareness-raising and support to Al-Markazul Islam Bangladesh for safe burial of COVID-19 deceased, etc. DRRF also extends its full support to Forcibly Displaced Myanmar Nationals people and host communities in Cox’s Bazar to build coherence and peaceful co-existence.

 

  • In the new complexity arisen as effects of COVID 19 pandemic that seriously disrupted the delivery of the planned activities including capacity building activities and mobilization of remain  56% of the ‘disaster window fund’. DRRF, as a project working for strengthening the disaster recovery capabilities of the country, should soberly consider this new dimension of the recovery issues and would provide the necessary guidance to face a situation which was not estimated before. Hence, an extension of 2-3 years may be required to accomplish the rest of of the result outcomes under 2 and 3.

4.

Effectiveness

Performance per plans

  • The overall actual performance per plan has been robust during the period. DRRF has implemented response and recovery work, e.g., cash for work, household equipment and cash grant for re-construction of shelters to flood and cyclone affected female-headed households. DRRF project has ensured tremendous benefit and result in restoring the community infrastructure which are critical for quick recovery following ‘build back better’ concept of SFDRR 2015-30 by repairing the fragile embankment in the coast to protect tidal surge and saline water intrusion saving poor and vulnerable people’s livelihood and asset. More than half (55%) of the KIs interviewed revealed that project had delivered excellent results while the rest of the respondents (45%) mentioned the project was able to deliver good results while 91% expressed their full satisfaction with the projects in meeting the needs of disaster affected communities.

5.

Capacity Building Efforts and Partnering

  • As a part of capacity building for effective disaster management, DRRF has provided training to GoB officials, technical support to the Fire Service and Civil Defence (FSCD) towards its reform initiatives, support in formulating the National Plan for Disaster Management (NPDM) 2021-2025, in developing Post-disaster Recovery Planning for Cyclone Amphan and Flood 2020, developing a data management system for MoDMR on Digitalization in beneficiary selection and has undertaken a joint initiative with IOM on Disaster and Pandemic Data Management for displaced persons. Partners interviewed including major donors who are receptive to being included programmatically with UNDP/ DRRF

6.

Identify funding partners for recovery programmes in hot spots

  • While the Cox Bazar, due to programmes for the Forcibly Displaced Myanmar Nationals and host communities, has received most of the DRRF funding to date 80%, it has also shown, that as a humanitarian and vulnerability hot spot, there is a clear division of responsibilities with government and other partners. The donor/ development partners need to be appraised keeping their commitment to Rohingya issues, that they should acknowledge the chronic disaster and climate change vulnerabilities of the people of other parts of the country where DRRF should have large interventions to supplement the government interventions and humanitarian needs.

 

  • Financial partnerships should be mobilized in ‘new normal’ since slow mobilization of resources (only 44% of disaster window fund) might be the result of the impact of COVID 19 pandemic. Mobilization will also be a challenge due to shrunken donor funding. Hence an extension of DRRF will be helpful to proper usages of the opportunity of the ‘disaster window fund’ and completion of planned activities.

7.

Efficiency

  • The DRRF has been expressing value added through its programmes of training and human resources in addition to coordination of the humanitarian and inter-sectoral inputs for better and quick recovery. DRRF has done global work on cash transfers through mobile, and on stimulating the local economies in post disaster period. Mapping out hotspots and vulnerable communities before emergencies have been found very efficient. However, DRRF needs to build monitoring skills to see how the benefits are flowing and use this for greater results.

8.

Sustainability

  • With long-term advantages for the community in question, the current assessment has proven that the DRRF is both ecologically and fiscally sustainable. The current study also assesses all considerable factors that reveal a clear picture of the sustainability of DRRF. In terms of the effectiveness of gender mainstreaming and sustainability, women have been empowered and have proved their potentiality to do cash for work along with men. The study also finds that the project has ensured effective coordination between government and NGOs while ensuring women are in prime participation.

Recommendations
1

With regards to the DRRF logical framework and monitoring plan, the DRRF management can improve the DRRF performance metrics especially for early recovery to resilience capacity building. Multi-year monitoring and performance metrics are needed for expected results.  This can be achieved with more systemic capacity-building activities for early recovery and to resilience planning with UNDP’s other related projects, particularly the NRP, and including the relevant vested donors. 

2

To rise UNDP to its comparative advantage – coordination and convening and to better position the DRRF for results, management must focus on rising visibility about the work that it is doing with regards to the capacity-building resourcing needs for early recovery.

3

The DRRF management can better raise UNDP as a platform for coordination of intersectoral stakeholders across humanitarian and emergency spaces with stronger focus on monitoring for learning, for early recovery policy learning, and for capacity development and learning and knowledge management.

4

DRRF should undertake projects/schemes in line with SFDRR and related SDGs for disaster risk reduction and mainstreaming DRR, gender equity, and justice, upholding the rights of persons with disability for which DRRF is accountable. 

5

As a project working for strengthening the disaster recovery capabilities of the country, DRRF should soberly consider the new dimension of the recovery issues that arose due to the effect of the COVID 19 pandemic and should provide the necessary guidance to address this situation. Moreover, DRRF needs to complete several unfinished capacity-building related activities that will add value in achieving the intended outcomes and try to mobilize the remaining 56% of the targeted ‘Disaster Window Fund’. Considering these realities, an extension of the project is required, and the UNDP may go for an extension of 2-3 years.

6

The DRRF integration with the UNDP program can be operationalized much better. In this regard, the project management team can include UNDP senior management in all aspects of the oversight, work planning through the project board and map out how the UNDP back-office services that might support results.

7

DRRF Risk Analysis including Social and Environmental Standards (Safeguards) should be done systematically. Interventions built on the learnings from other UNDP programmes are laudable as an alternative, but potential disasters, if any, must be identified with ‘build back better’ idea.

8

In terms of DRRF's overall work on knowledge management, policy advocacy, and other learning; the facility can do much more by systemically planning and partnering for resourcing. It needs a stronger performance matrix for planning and monitoring  its work on the capacity building across the humanitarian response and in the development space it covers, such as leveraging technology e.g., digital cash transfer, capacity building of local NGOs and mapping disaster hotspots across the country. 

9

Based on the need for more streamlining with the UNDP processes in protracted emergencies as to not overwhelm the procurement, SOPs (e.g., SOPS for procurement) and stand-by short-term support are needed.

10

To address a profound weak part of DRRF, UNDP management can augment the monitoring, communication and learning skills of DRRF. DRRF team can review capacities at UNDP and map out where it can move staff to do more effective monitoring and support the creation of knowledge and project ideas that might be shared broadly based on the emergencies to development space. A third party monitor as the  office is thinking might be instituted as well.

11

The DRRF partnership strategy needs to be revisited. Better partnering means giving visibility and inclusion to the partners. This will require inclusive DRRF activity work planning and monitoring and a learning plan for humanitarian actors and government with measures.

12

More donor resources for core capacity building and support activities, particularly UNDP work on early recovery, KM, and commutations. Though the development partners (DPs) interest comes first, UNDP/ DRRF should continue interactions with the DPs to spend their money to other disaster-affected areas.

13

DRRF must focus its renewed capacity development and partnering plan on an exit strategy to 2025 when Bangladesh becomes a mid-level developed country.

14

DRRF should continue with gender mainstreaming exploring the potentiality of women’s power to work along with men, e.g., cash for work, with equal wages in post-disaster early recovery period with proper attention to both ecologically and fiscally sustainable.  

1. Recommendation:

With regards to the DRRF logical framework and monitoring plan, the DRRF management can improve the DRRF performance metrics especially for early recovery to resilience capacity building. Multi-year monitoring and performance metrics are needed for expected results.  This can be achieved with more systemic capacity-building activities for early recovery and to resilience planning with UNDP’s other related projects, particularly the NRP, and including the relevant vested donors. 

Management Response: [Added: 2022/01/29]

Agreed.
Performance Metrics or Performance Indicators for early recovery to resilience capacity building can be incorporated in the M&E plan to measure how the humanitarian-development nexus is mainstreamed in attaining resilience through capacity-building initiatives planned by DRRF. The performance metrics may include measuring the effectiveness, efficiency, quality of training, and some resilient recovery-related characteristics for the capacity-building activities as per AWP.  If the performance is not good, a follow-up gap analysis can also be performed for improvement. More synergy will establish with NRP to conduct capacity-building events as per requirements.

At the same time considering the nature of the facility to provide support for response and recovery is uncertain and depends on the unpredicted weather calamities, so result matrix for this part of the facility needs to be flexible. 

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
Review M&E framework to include Performance Metrics or Performance Indicators for early recovery to resilience capacity building.
[Added: 2022/01/29] [Last Updated: 2022/08/28]
DRRF Team, M&E consultant 2022/10 Initiated Assessment of early recovery is underway. History
2. Recommendation:

To rise UNDP to its comparative advantage – coordination and convening and to better position the DRRF for results, management must focus on rising visibility about the work that it is doing with regards to the capacity-building resourcing needs for early recovery.

Management Response: [Added: 2022/01/29]

Agreed. 
DRRF will maintain a depository of its important initiatives and interventions on poverty and inequality, resilience, and gender equality. It will develop knowledge products and will also publish important case studies and stories as part of its communication strategy for visibility and outreach. Additional effort and resources will be allocated to improve this.   

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
Develop a communication plan and produce knowledge products for enhanced visibility
[Added: 2022/01/29]
DRRF Team, Capacity Building specialist 2022/09 Initiated
3. Recommendation:

The DRRF management can better raise UNDP as a platform for coordination of intersectoral stakeholders across humanitarian and emergency spaces with stronger focus on monitoring for learning, for early recovery policy learning, and for capacity development and learning and knowledge management.

Management Response: [Added: 2022/01/29]

Agreed  
DRRF participates in all the coordination meetings/ conventions/ workshops of the Humanitarian Coordination Task Team (HCTT) actively. It also supports strengthening the disaster recovery capabilities of the GoB.  However, DRRF may work to create a disaster recovery platform focusing on “Humanitarian and development nexus” issues through knowledge sharing and peer learning initiatives. DRRF plans to revitalize the initiatives like promoting a common platform in the beneficiary selection process through digitalization. Resource allocation for recovery and developing nexus with development is quite scanty from the side of development partner - major advocacy is required from local to regional to global level. 

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
Digitalization of the beneficiary database to facilitate vulnerability and exposure analysis within UNDP projects
[Added: 2022/01/29] [Last Updated: 2022/08/28]
DRRF and other UN Projects 2022/11 Initiated Delayed due to non-availability of data. History
4. Recommendation:

DRRF should undertake projects/schemes in line with SFDRR and related SDGs for disaster risk reduction and mainstreaming DRR, gender equity, and justice, upholding the rights of persons with disability for which DRRF is accountable. 

Management Response: [Added: 2022/01/29]

Agreed. 
The project is linked with SDG 1, 3, 11, and 13 and  Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction 2015-2030 (SFDRR) and has already implemented several schemes related to the SDG and the SFDRR considering the risk reduction and mainstreaming DRR. A lot of DRRF’s operations emphasize the key  Sendai Framework for Action (SFA) targets particularly in the reduction of damage to critical infrastructure and disruption of basic services. DRRF has always targeted the most vulnerable in the beneficiary selection and remained vigilant in upholding the rights of persons with disability and gender equity issues. UNDP senior management will be keen on resource mobilization to promote this. 

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
Review M&E framework to incorporate outcomes and output level indicators to address SFA, SFDRR, and gender equality related issues
[Added: 2022/01/29]
DRRF Team and gender, M&E focal 2022/09 Not Initiated
5. Recommendation:

As a project working for strengthening the disaster recovery capabilities of the country, DRRF should soberly consider the new dimension of the recovery issues that arose due to the effect of the COVID 19 pandemic and should provide the necessary guidance to address this situation. Moreover, DRRF needs to complete several unfinished capacity-building related activities that will add value in achieving the intended outcomes and try to mobilize the remaining 56% of the targeted ‘Disaster Window Fund’. Considering these realities, an extension of the project is required, and the UNDP may go for an extension of 2-3 years.

Management Response: [Added: 2022/01/29]

Agreed.
Along with the traditional recovery practices, DRRF will address the multi-hazards-based recovery planning in a compounded disaster scenario considering the effect of prolonged COVID-19 pandemic and appeared disasters. Since a significant amount of USD 50 m Disaster Window also remains unfunded,   additional resources for a COVID-19 inclusive plan can be materialized through resource mobilization. Recommendation for DRRF’s extension is highly desirable. 

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
Take necessary steps for 2 years of DRRF extension
[Added: 2022/01/29] [Last Updated: 2022/06/25]
PAB members and DRRF Team 2022/09 Initiated The letter for approval has been shared with the Economic Relations Division (ERD), Ministry of Finance. History
6. Recommendation:

The DRRF integration with the UNDP program can be operationalized much better. In this regard, the project management team can include UNDP senior management in all aspects of the oversight, work planning through the project board and map out how the UNDP back-office services that might support results.

Management Response: [Added: 2022/01/29]

Agreed
All activities and priorities of DRRF are guided by the UNDP senior management and they provide continuous strategic and operational directives in all aspects of the DRRF’s engagement. DRRF frequently receives Sr. management’s guidance through quarterly progress reviewing meetings and consultations. DRRF Project Advisory Board (PAB) is Chaired by DRR, and ARR along with the Programme Analyst of R&IG Cluster continuously supervises all of DRRF works. 

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
Submission of Quarterly progress reports
[Added: 2022/01/29]
DRRF team, PM 2022/12 Initiated
Annual PAB meeting
[Added: 2022/01/29]
DRRF team, PM 2022/11 Initiated
7. Recommendation:

DRRF Risk Analysis including Social and Environmental Standards (Safeguards) should be done systematically. Interventions built on the learnings from other UNDP programmes are laudable as an alternative, but potential disasters, if any, must be identified with ‘build back better’ idea.

Management Response: [Added: 2022/01/29]

Agreed. 
As a part of emergency recovery activities, DRRF usually maintained Social and Environmental Standards (Safeguard) by considering the accountability, grievance and conflict resolutions, indigenous people’s issue, resource efficiency, community health, safety and security, and labor and working conditions in designing all interventions. DRRF team needs to enhance their capacity to conduct comprehensive Social and Environmental Standards (Safeguard).

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
Training on “Social and Environmental Standards Analysis”
[Added: 2022/01/29]
DRRF, Capacity Building Specialist 2022/09 Not Initiated
8. Recommendation:

In terms of DRRF's overall work on knowledge management, policy advocacy, and other learning; the facility can do much more by systemically planning and partnering for resourcing. It needs a stronger performance matrix for planning and monitoring  its work on the capacity building across the humanitarian response and in the development space it covers, such as leveraging technology e.g., digital cash transfer, capacity building of local NGOs and mapping disaster hotspots across the country. 

Management Response: [Added: 2022/01/29]

Agreed.
The project considers developing a performance matrix for planning and monitoring in the next project phase.

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
Develop a performance matrix for planning and monitoring
[Added: 2022/01/29]
DRRF Team, M&E and Capacity Building Specialist 2023/03 Not Initiated
9. Recommendation:

Based on the need for more streamlining with the UNDP processes in protracted emergencies as to not overwhelm the procurement, SOPs (e.g., SOPS for procurement) and stand-by short-term support are needed.

Management Response: [Added: 2022/01/29]

Agreed.
DRRF usually takes support from the UNDP procurement unit for necessary procurement related to different interventions. However, the project has already faced some challenges in emergency procurements, and it is difficult to follow the standard procurement protocol during an emergency. DRRF may consult the UNDP POPP in preparing a guideline for emergency procurement.     

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
Guideline for procurement during emergency
[Added: 2022/01/29] [Last Updated: 2022/08/28]
Procurement unit and DRRF team 2022/11 Initiated Consultation with POPP is ongoing for preparation of the guideline. History
10. Recommendation:

To address a profound weak part of DRRF, UNDP management can augment the monitoring, communication and learning skills of DRRF. DRRF team can review capacities at UNDP and map out where it can move staff to do more effective monitoring and support the creation of knowledge and project ideas that might be shared broadly based on the emergencies to development space. A third party monitor as the  office is thinking might be instituted as well.

Management Response: [Added: 2022/01/29]

Agreed
A third-party monitor would not be feasible until the new DRRF phase is designed. However, DRRF will develop the Country Surge team and will map out the available staff from other UNDP programmes  or may engage consultants for a limited period.  

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
Develop Country Surge team
[Added: 2022/01/29] [Last Updated: 2022/06/25]
DRRF and CO 2022/10 Initiated History
11. Recommendation:

The DRRF partnership strategy needs to be revisited. Better partnering means giving visibility and inclusion to the partners. This will require inclusive DRRF activity work planning and monitoring and a learning plan for humanitarian actors and government with measures.

Management Response: [Added: 2022/01/29]

Agreed.
DRRF maintains a partnership with a group of stakeholders already defined in the Project Document. The major partners of DRRF are the Ministry of Disaster Management and Relief (MoDMR), Department of Disaster Management (DDM),  Office of Refugee Relief and Repatriation Commissioner (RRRC),  National Resilience Programme (NRP), Humanitarian Coordination Task Team (HCTT), Shelter Clusters, Early Recovery Cluster, Inter-sectoral Coordination Group (ISCG), etc. Besides, DRRF also maintains a partnership with several local NGOs for project implementation. Effective partnerships with several organizations have already helped to achieve many good results. Due to the recent COVID pandemic, many new issues have already come up in disaster recovery. The new partnership will require addressing these issues efficiently. DRRF will conduct a stockholder analysis, capacity building of partners, and awareness building should be implemented.

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
Map a stockholder’s capacity building needs, prepare a learning plan for humanitarian actors and government
[Added: 2022/01/29] [Last Updated: 2022/06/25]
DRRF Team 2022/09 Not Initiated History
12. Recommendation:

More donor resources for core capacity building and support activities, particularly UNDP work on early recovery, KM, and commutations. Though the development partners (DPs) interest comes first, UNDP/ DRRF should continue interactions with the DPs to spend their money to other disaster-affected areas.

Management Response: [Added: 2022/01/29]

Agreed. 
DRRF will take the opportunity to mobilize the remaining 56% of the ‘Disaster Window Fund’ based on the requirements. A resource mobilization plan will be prepared in this regard. Related discussions and actions have already been added under the ‘Recommendation 5’.

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
Resource Mobilization: Start-up’s funding to support COVID-19 vulnerable families (MOFCOM China)
[Added: 2022/01/29]
DRRF Team 2022/12 Initiated
13. Recommendation:

DRRF must focus its renewed capacity development and partnering plan on an exit strategy to 2025 when Bangladesh becomes a mid-level developed country.

Management Response: [Added: 2022/01/29]

Agreed.
DRRF will address the issue in its new project design phase or any no-cost extension after 2022. An exit strategy will largely depend on renewed capacity development and through developing new partnerships to support sustainable LDC graduation. 

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
Conduct a capacity development needs assessment to support sustainable LDC graduation
[Added: 2022/01/29]
DRRF Team 2022/11 Not Initiated
14. Recommendation:

DRRF should continue with gender mainstreaming exploring the potentiality of women’s power to work along with men, e.g., cash for work, with equal wages in post-disaster early recovery period with proper attention to both ecologically and fiscally sustainable.  

Management Response: [Added: 2022/01/29]

Agreed.
Addressing the gendered vulnerability is an important programmatic approach of DRRF. In the beneficiary’s selection, DRRF usually considers 60% of female beneficiaries and emphasizes the ‘Female-Headed Households (FHHs)’. DRRF already supported 20,000 FHHs in the last two years and provided emergency employment opportunities to 4109 disadvantaged females. DRRF has already ensured equal wages in the emergency employment supports however a review on gender analysis on DRRF’s output level result and action plan can be planned to address the issue further.

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
Conduct a gender analysis on DRRF’s output level result(s) and suggest action plan
[Added: 2022/01/29]
DRRF Team with support from CO Gender specialist 2022/09 Not Initiated

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