Independent Country Programme Evaluation: Nigeria

Report Cover Image
Evaluation Plan:
2018-2021, Independent Evaluation Office
Evaluation Type:
ICPE/ADR
Planned End Date:
12/2021
Completion Date:
12/2021
Status:
Completed
Management Response:
Yes
Evaluation Budget(US $):
25,000

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Title Independent Country Programme Evaluation: Nigeria
Atlas Project Number: 95406,104159,14089,104256,92573,95680,82508,78891,86937,58226,101256,78979,84573,102601,88699,111076,100569,86990,67494,97077,56855,74071,36908,61066,78949,108936,107828
Evaluation Plan: 2018-2021, Independent Evaluation Office
Evaluation Type: ICPE/ADR
Status: Completed
Completion Date: 12/2021
Planned End Date: 12/2021
Management Response: Yes
Focus Area:
  • 1. Poverty
  • 2. Governance
  • 3. Sustainable
  • 4. Energy
  • 5. Others
Corporate Outcome and Output (UNDP Strategic Plan 2018-2021)
  • 1. Output 1.1.1 Capacities developed across the whole of government to integrate the 2030 Agenda, the Paris Agreement and other international agreements in development plans and budgets, and to analyse progress towards the SDGs, using innovative and data-driven solutions
  • 2. Output 1.1.2 Marginalised groups, particularly the poor, women, people with disabilities and displaced are empowered to gain universal access to basic services and financial and non-financial assets to build productive capacities and benefit from sustainable livelihoods and jobs
  • 3. Output 1.4.1 Solutions scaled up for sustainable management of natural resources, including sustainable commodities and green and inclusive value chains
  • 4. Output 1.5.1 Solutions adopted to achieve universal access to clean, affordable and sustainable energy
  • 5. Output 2.1.1 Low emission and climate resilient objectives addressed in national, sub-national and sectoral development plans and policies to promote economic diversification and green growth
  • 6. Output 2.1.2 Capacities developed for progressive expansion of inclusive social protection systems
  • 7. Output 2.2.2 Constitution-making, electoral and parliamentary processes and institutions strengthened to promote inclusion, transparency and accountability
  • 8. Output 2.2.3 Capacities, functions and financing of rule of law and national human rights institutions and systems strengthened to expand access to justice and combat discrimination, with a focus on women and other marginalised groups
  • 9. Output 3.1.1 Core government functions and inclusive basic services4 restored post-crisis for stabilisation, durable solutions to displacement and return to sustainable development pathways within the framework of national policies and priorities
  • 10. Output 3.2.1 National capacities strengthened for reintegration, reconciliation, peaceful management of conflict and prevention of violent extremism in response to national policies and priorities
SDG Target
  • 1.1 By 2030, eradicate extreme poverty for all people everywhere, currently measured as people living on less than $1.25 a day
  • 1.2 By 2030, reduce at least by half the proportion of men, women and children of all ages living in poverty in all its dimensions according to national definitions
  • 1.3 Implement nationally appropriate social protection systems and measures for all, including floors, and by 2030 achieve substantial coverage of the poor and the vulnerable
  • 1.4 By 2030, ensure that all men and women, in particular the poor and the vulnerable, have equal rights to economic resources, as well as access to basic services, ownership and control over land and other forms of property, inheritance, natural resources, appropriate new technology and financial services, including microfinance
  • 12.3 By 2030, halve per capita global food waste at the retail and consumer levels and reduce food losses along production and supply chains, including post-harvest losses
  • 12.4 By 2020, achieve the environmentally sound management of chemicals and all wastes throughout their life cycle, in accordance with agreed international frameworks, and significantly reduce their release to air, water and soil in order to minimize their adverse impacts on human health and the environment
  • 13.2 Integrate climate change measures into national policies, strategies and planning
  • 13.3 Improve education, awareness-raising and human and institutional capacity on climate change mitigation, adaptation, impact reduction and early warning
  • 13.a Implement the commitment undertaken by developed-country parties to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change to a goal of mobilizing jointly $100 billion annually by 2020 from all sources to address the needs of developing countries in the context of meaningful mitigation actions and transparency on implementation and fully operationalize the Green Climate Fund through its capitalization as soon as possible
  • 15.2 By 2020, promote the implementation of sustainable management of all types of forests, halt deforestation, restore degraded forests and substantially increase afforestation and reforestation globally
  • 15.9 By 2020, integrate ecosystem and biodiversity values into national and local planning, development processes, poverty reduction strategies and accounts
  • 16.1 Significantly reduce all forms of violence and related death rates everywhere
  • 16.3 Promote the rule of law at the national and international levels and ensure equal access to justice for all
  • 16.6 Develop effective, accountable and transparent institutions at all levels
  • 16.7 Ensure responsive, inclusive, participatory and representative decision-making at all levels
  • 16.a Strengthen relevant national institutions, including through international cooperation, for building capacity at all levels, in particular in developing countries, to prevent violence and combat terrorism and crime
  • 17.16 Enhance the Global Partnership for Sustainable Development, complemented by multi-stakeholder partnerships that mobilize and share knowledge, expertise, technology and financial resources, to support the achievement of the Sustainable Development Goals in all countries, in particular developing countries
  • 2.a Increase investment, including through enhanced international cooperation, in rural infrastructure, agricultural research and extension services, technology development and plant and livestock gene banks in order to enhance agricultural productive capacity in developing countries, in particular least developed countries
  • 2.c Adopt measures to ensure the proper functioning of food commodity markets and their derivatives and facilitate timely access to market information, including on food reserves, in order to help limit extreme food price volatility
  • 4.1 By 2030, ensure that all girls and boys complete free, equitable and quality primary and secondary education leading to relevant and effective learning outcomes
  • 7.1 By 2030, ensure universal access to affordable, reliable and modern energy services
  • 7.a By 2030, enhance international cooperation to facilitate access to clean energy research and technology, including renewable energy, energy efficiency and advanced and cleaner fossil-fuel technology, and promote investment in energy infrastructure and clean energy technology
  • 9.4 By 2030, upgrade infrastructure and retrofit industries to make them sustainable, with increased resource-use efficiency and greater adoption of clean and environmentally sound technologies and industrial processes, with all countries taking action in accordance with their respective capabilities
Evaluation Budget(US $): 25,000
Source of Funding:
Evaluation Expenditure(US $): 25,000
Joint Programme: No
Joint Evaluation: No
Evaluation Team members:
Name Title Nationality
Deqa I. Musa Lead Evaluator
Gedeon Djissa Associate Lead Evaluator
Onwuemele Andrew Evaluation Consultant
Omer Awan Evaluation Consultant
John Carter Evaluation Consultant
Komi Gligbe Evaluation Consultant
GEF Evaluation: No
Key Stakeholders:
Countries: NIGERIA
Lessons
Findings
Recommendations
1

UNDP should adopt a balanced mix of upstream and downstream interventions in the next country programme. UNDP has a unique role, through its broad portfolio, cross-cutting experiences and extensive partnership with Government, to examine and support policy analysis and implementation. UNDP should invest in a strategic review to reassess its positioning and programmatic offer, particularly in the governance and inclusive growth areas.

With official development assistance estimated at less than 2 percent of Nigeria’s GDP, the Government does not expect UNDP to provide project support, but rather effective models which the Government can scale up. There are many lessons that can be learned from UNDP policy experience in Nigeria. These need to be examined critically to determine where the barriers, constraints and causes are, to inform a strategic role for UNDP as it supports government programmes in the future. Policy analysis is very dependent on understanding the nature of partnerships, sector receptivity, how internal policy and agenda conflicts are resolved, and the costs and benefits of new policy directions. UNDP should be able to insert itself into and facilitate this kind of policy analysis, working with Government, civil society and the private sector as new policy directions emerge and are considered by the Government. UNDP should strengthen its policy analysis and advocacy capacity.

UNDP should better distinguish between federal and state support, identifying opportunities for strengthening the development planning of States with capacity gaps.

2

The importance of addressing institutional capacity to ensure a peaceful transition from fragility and conflict to a stronger social contract and economic growth cannot be overstated. UNDP is well positioned to enhance the effectiveness of its stabilization programmes and ensure linkages with medium-and long-term interventions.

Violent conflicts and crises shatter the capacity of core governance and rule of law systems and institutions to cope with, recover from and prevent future crises. Successful institutional transformation takes time as reforms are iterative. Recognizing institutional dynamics, UNDP should ensure that all relevant institutional and policy linkages are embedded, including core governance functions which are often the drivers of conflict.136 UNDP should broaden its collaboration with national agencies and bring on board relevant peacebuilding institutions, including the judiciary, security sector, think tanks and other government agencies with the constitutional mandate of peacebuilding, as well as traditional community mechanisms.

UNDP peacebuilding support should balance upstream and downstream initiatives to ensure sustainable development pathways. UNDP should also strengthen integrated programming internally and in partnership with other United Nations agencies. This can open opportunities for well-articulated area-based programming.

UNDP should develop a response plan to coordinate its interventions in the north-east. Given the large number of projects implemented in the region, and mounting humanitarian need, the need for a response plan to guide project design and implementation cannot be over-emphasized.

3

In the inclusive growth portfolio, UNDP should strengthen its role as an enabler of public-private partnerships, considering the size of the private sector in the economic development of Nigeria. This requires well-articulated strategies.

With 90 percent of Nigeria’s GDP delivered by the private sector, it is said that Nigeria’s development must be private sector led.137 UNDP support to livelihood and employment through skills development and job placement, especially for youth and women, was important. UNDP should leverage the national employment agenda (e.g., the National Employment Policy, the National Youth Policy and the National Digital Economy Policy and Strategy) to promote the crucial role of the private sector, ranging from micro-enterprises to multinational companies, in driving productivity, inclusive economic growth and job creation to help achieve the SDGs. UNDP should strengthen its strategic approach for advancing private sector partnerships and promoting the SDGs as a driver of business strategy, through a well-defined country office strategy.

Vocational skills development strategies should address the issue of insufficient training periods, and promote platforms with the private sector to connect trainees with job opportunities.

UNDP should also leverage private sector financing for COVID-19 recovery. Building on the momentum gained in the immediate response phase, and its work on national and local planning including the Integrated National Financing Framework and other SDG integration tools, UNDP is well positioned to support the Government on the integration of the socioeconomic pandemic recovery into the national development plan, to ensure that it does not overwhelm the public health system (like other diseases such as malaria). COVID-19 will not go away globally, and will continue to pose a threat. UNDP analytical work and COVID-19 policy briefs, as well as experiences from the cash transfer initiatives, should be leveraged to initiate and inform discussions with the Government and partners on reforming and strengthening the national social protection system.

4

UNDP needs to capitalize on those initiatives it has supported that have the broadest reach and impact in terms of climate change mitigation and community empowerment. In particular, these include renewable energy uptake and the reduction of deforestation. However, both of these have been constrained by a lack of policy support and political commitment. UNDP should map out the policies that would encourage the development of mini-grids in areas not well served by the current grid, to scale up the use of solar technology and development of community woodlots in State-owned forests, and reduce the rate of deforestation. Within the UNDP programme, both initiatives seem to have the most potential to reduce greenhouse gas emissions in Nigeria.

Policy barriers, or lack of appropriate policies to induce or encourage change, seem to have been factors in the lack of uptake of renewable energy and community woodlots. UNDP has supported both initiatives, which have been properly rooted with pilot studies and community awareness. Both have huge potential in Nigeria and need to be spurred to better outcomes (more locations in Nigeria and a much higher volume of users and operators). These two thrusts would help increase energy access in Nigeria, reduce GHG emissions associated with electricity production, and help reduce the rate of deforestation, while at the same time increasing habitat area for biodiversity conservation and opportunities for multi-crop/ multi-tier farming. There is a wealth of project experience that can inform this proposed study

5

To ensure the sustainability prospects of capacity-development interventions at community and institutional levels, particularly in the environment and peacebuilding and conflict-prevention programmes, UNDP should strengthen strategic linkages with relevant federal and state ministries to ensure adequate budgetary provisions to sustain results at the end of programme implementation.

Overall, the ownership of supported income-generating and institutional capacity-building initiatives, and by extension their sustainability, was not clear. UNDP should ensure that proposed interventions have clear sustainability strategies which are time-bound and linked to medium-term national and subnational programmes to create opportunities for budget allocations for project sustainability. Creating platforms and facilities and handing over to government ministries is good, but doing this without budget plans for sustainability after project closure is a major limitation on an exit strategy. Given the enormous challenges in government ministries, without appropriate exit strategies and government commitment at design phase, the facilities established cannot be sustained. UNDP should ensure a clear and tangible rationale and clarity on the strategic linkages of interventions.

6

Systematic and coherent guidance is required to adequately mainstream gender concerns into UNDP programmes and contribute to gender-responsive and gender-transformative changes.

UNDP should prioritize substantive gender mainstreaming in the next country programme, including specific standalone initiatives to advance women’s empowerment. As the primary partner of the Government for national development planning, and in collaboration with United Nations partners, UNDP should advocate for the adequate integration of a gender dimension (including women’s political participation) and rights-based approaches into existing policies and strategies at federal and state levels.

1. Recommendation:

UNDP should adopt a balanced mix of upstream and downstream interventions in the next country programme. UNDP has a unique role, through its broad portfolio, cross-cutting experiences and extensive partnership with Government, to examine and support policy analysis and implementation. UNDP should invest in a strategic review to reassess its positioning and programmatic offer, particularly in the governance and inclusive growth areas.

With official development assistance estimated at less than 2 percent of Nigeria’s GDP, the Government does not expect UNDP to provide project support, but rather effective models which the Government can scale up. There are many lessons that can be learned from UNDP policy experience in Nigeria. These need to be examined critically to determine where the barriers, constraints and causes are, to inform a strategic role for UNDP as it supports government programmes in the future. Policy analysis is very dependent on understanding the nature of partnerships, sector receptivity, how internal policy and agenda conflicts are resolved, and the costs and benefits of new policy directions. UNDP should be able to insert itself into and facilitate this kind of policy analysis, working with Government, civil society and the private sector as new policy directions emerge and are considered by the Government. UNDP should strengthen its policy analysis and advocacy capacity.

UNDP should better distinguish between federal and state support, identifying opportunities for strengthening the development planning of States with capacity gaps.

Management Response: [Added: 2022/03/03] [Last Updated: 2022/05/04]

Recommendation 1 Management response: Partially Agree

Key action(s)

Completion date

Responsible unit(s)

Tracking*

Comments

Status

(initiated, completed or no due date)

1.1 The Country Office, with support from Regional Bureau of Africa, conducted a capacity assessment in 2021 to review and re-assess UNDP’s positioning.    The outcomes of these assessments are being used to inform the design of  the new CPD particularly in the governance and inclusive growth area.

December 2022

1. UNDP Senior Management

2. Governance, Peace and Security Unit

3. Strategic Partnership &  Inclusive Growth Unit

4. Environment & Climate Change Unit

 

Initiated

1.2  The Country Office current CPD (2018-2022) will expire by December 2022.

Currently, the CO is developing the new CPD (2023-2027). The preparation of the new CPD will be informed by ICPE recommendations

December 2022

1. UNDP Senior Management

2. Governance, Peace and Security Unit

3. Strategic Partnership &  Inclusive Growth Unit

4. Environment & Climate Change Unit

 

Initiated

Key Actions:

2. Recommendation:

The importance of addressing institutional capacity to ensure a peaceful transition from fragility and conflict to a stronger social contract and economic growth cannot be overstated. UNDP is well positioned to enhance the effectiveness of its stabilization programmes and ensure linkages with medium-and long-term interventions.

Violent conflicts and crises shatter the capacity of core governance and rule of law systems and institutions to cope with, recover from and prevent future crises. Successful institutional transformation takes time as reforms are iterative. Recognizing institutional dynamics, UNDP should ensure that all relevant institutional and policy linkages are embedded, including core governance functions which are often the drivers of conflict.136 UNDP should broaden its collaboration with national agencies and bring on board relevant peacebuilding institutions, including the judiciary, security sector, think tanks and other government agencies with the constitutional mandate of peacebuilding, as well as traditional community mechanisms.

UNDP peacebuilding support should balance upstream and downstream initiatives to ensure sustainable development pathways. UNDP should also strengthen integrated programming internally and in partnership with other United Nations agencies. This can open opportunities for well-articulated area-based programming.

UNDP should develop a response plan to coordinate its interventions in the north-east. Given the large number of projects implemented in the region, and mounting humanitarian need, the need for a response plan to guide project design and implementation cannot be over-emphasized.

Management Response: [Added: 2022/03/03] [Last Updated: 2022/05/04]

 

Recommendation 2 Management response: Agreed

Key action(s)

Completion date

Responsible unit(s)

Tracking

Comments

Status (initiated, completed or no due date)

2.1 UNDP will engage a Third-Party Monitoring and Evaluation team to review the management (planning, implementation, monitoring and coordination) of the stabilization and early recovery portfolio in the north-east

December 2022

1. UNDP Senior Management

2. UNDP North-East Team

This will also be supported by the Evaluation of UNDP north-east Early Recovery Programme

Not started

2.2 The recommendations from the Third-Party Monitoring and Assessment will be used to enhance effective linkage into the medium and long-term peace and development interventions

December 2023

1. UNDP Senior Management

2. UNDP North-East Team

 

Not started

Key Actions:

3. Recommendation:

In the inclusive growth portfolio, UNDP should strengthen its role as an enabler of public-private partnerships, considering the size of the private sector in the economic development of Nigeria. This requires well-articulated strategies.

With 90 percent of Nigeria’s GDP delivered by the private sector, it is said that Nigeria’s development must be private sector led.137 UNDP support to livelihood and employment through skills development and job placement, especially for youth and women, was important. UNDP should leverage the national employment agenda (e.g., the National Employment Policy, the National Youth Policy and the National Digital Economy Policy and Strategy) to promote the crucial role of the private sector, ranging from micro-enterprises to multinational companies, in driving productivity, inclusive economic growth and job creation to help achieve the SDGs. UNDP should strengthen its strategic approach for advancing private sector partnerships and promoting the SDGs as a driver of business strategy, through a well-defined country office strategy.

Vocational skills development strategies should address the issue of insufficient training periods, and promote platforms with the private sector to connect trainees with job opportunities.

UNDP should also leverage private sector financing for COVID-19 recovery. Building on the momentum gained in the immediate response phase, and its work on national and local planning including the Integrated National Financing Framework and other SDG integration tools, UNDP is well positioned to support the Government on the integration of the socioeconomic pandemic recovery into the national development plan, to ensure that it does not overwhelm the public health system (like other diseases such as malaria). COVID-19 will not go away globally, and will continue to pose a threat. UNDP analytical work and COVID-19 policy briefs, as well as experiences from the cash transfer initiatives, should be leveraged to initiate and inform discussions with the Government and partners on reforming and strengthening the national social protection system.

Management Response: [Added: 2022/03/03] [Last Updated: 2022/05/04]

 

Recommendation 3 Management response: Agreed

Key action(s)

Completion date

Responsible unit(s)

Tracking

Comments

Status (initiated, completed or no due date)

3.1 UNDP will commission a private sector assessment to understand the employment and partnership dynamics in Nigeria towards providing the right mix of skills for the labour market, job sustainability  and livelihood pathways for key and vulnerable populations.  

December 2023

 

 

 

1. UNDP Senior Management

2. Strategic Partnership &  Inclusive Growth Unit

 

 

Not started

3.2  UNDP will strengthen its quality assurance during Annual Work Plan (AWP) preparation for all programmes that have vocational training components to ensure quality training coupled with sufficient training period and promote platforms together with the private sector to connect trainees with job opportunities.

 

December 2024

1. UNDP Senior Management

2. Strategic Partnership &  Inclusive Growth Unit

 

Initiated

Key Actions:

4. Recommendation:

UNDP needs to capitalize on those initiatives it has supported that have the broadest reach and impact in terms of climate change mitigation and community empowerment. In particular, these include renewable energy uptake and the reduction of deforestation. However, both of these have been constrained by a lack of policy support and political commitment. UNDP should map out the policies that would encourage the development of mini-grids in areas not well served by the current grid, to scale up the use of solar technology and development of community woodlots in State-owned forests, and reduce the rate of deforestation. Within the UNDP programme, both initiatives seem to have the most potential to reduce greenhouse gas emissions in Nigeria.

Policy barriers, or lack of appropriate policies to induce or encourage change, seem to have been factors in the lack of uptake of renewable energy and community woodlots. UNDP has supported both initiatives, which have been properly rooted with pilot studies and community awareness. Both have huge potential in Nigeria and need to be spurred to better outcomes (more locations in Nigeria and a much higher volume of users and operators). These two thrusts would help increase energy access in Nigeria, reduce GHG emissions associated with electricity production, and help reduce the rate of deforestation, while at the same time increasing habitat area for biodiversity conservation and opportunities for multi-crop/ multi-tier farming. There is a wealth of project experience that can inform this proposed study

Management Response: [Added: 2022/03/03] [Last Updated: 2022/05/04]

Recommendation 4 Management response: Agreed

Key action(s)

Completion date

Responsible unit(s)

Tracking

Comments

Status (initiated, completed or no due date)

4.1 UNDP will balance  upstream and downstream actions, scale up best practices and consolidate lessons learnt under the current CPD for future programming under the new CPD (2023-2027)

December 2022

1. UNDP Senior Management

2. Environment & Climate Change Unit

 

Initiated

Key Actions:

5. Recommendation:

To ensure the sustainability prospects of capacity-development interventions at community and institutional levels, particularly in the environment and peacebuilding and conflict-prevention programmes, UNDP should strengthen strategic linkages with relevant federal and state ministries to ensure adequate budgetary provisions to sustain results at the end of programme implementation.

Overall, the ownership of supported income-generating and institutional capacity-building initiatives, and by extension their sustainability, was not clear. UNDP should ensure that proposed interventions have clear sustainability strategies which are time-bound and linked to medium-term national and subnational programmes to create opportunities for budget allocations for project sustainability. Creating platforms and facilities and handing over to government ministries is good, but doing this without budget plans for sustainability after project closure is a major limitation on an exit strategy. Given the enormous challenges in government ministries, without appropriate exit strategies and government commitment at design phase, the facilities established cannot be sustained. UNDP should ensure a clear and tangible rationale and clarity on the strategic linkages of interventions.

Management Response: [Added: 2022/03/03] [Last Updated: 2022/05/04]

Recommendation 5 Management response: Partially Agree

Key action(s)

Completion date

Responsible unit(s)

Tracking

Comments

Status (initiated, completed or no due date)

5.1 UNDP’s project development template requires that every project needs to develop exit and sustainability strategy. In this regard, UNDP will revisit existing sustainability and exit strategies in projects through quarterly and annual review in collaboration with Government

 

December 2023

1. UNDP Senior Management

 

2. Governance, Peace and Security Unit.

 

Initiated

5.2 To ensure sustainability of UNDP’s catalytic interventions, the Country Office will closely monitor projects in close collaboration with Federal and State Governments through organizing Local Project Appraisal Committee meetings, project board meetings, joint project monitoring missions, review meetings, and spot check visits especially focusing on sustainability.

December 2027

1. UNDP Senior Management

 

2. Governance, Peace and Security Team

 

Initiated

Key Actions:

6. Recommendation:

Systematic and coherent guidance is required to adequately mainstream gender concerns into UNDP programmes and contribute to gender-responsive and gender-transformative changes.

UNDP should prioritize substantive gender mainstreaming in the next country programme, including specific standalone initiatives to advance women’s empowerment. As the primary partner of the Government for national development planning, and in collaboration with United Nations partners, UNDP should advocate for the adequate integration of a gender dimension (including women’s political participation) and rights-based approaches into existing policies and strategies at federal and state levels.

Management Response: [Added: 2022/03/03] [Last Updated: 2022/05/04]

Recommendation 6 Management response: Agreed

Key action(s)

Completion date

Responsible unit(s)

Tracking

Comments

Status (initiated, completed or no due date)

6.1 UNDP will ensure gender mainstreaming in its new CPD (2023-2027). In addition, UNDP will continue to strengthen gender responsiveness of its  projects, programmes, project proposals, concept notes and other policy documents through organizing strategic gender relevant meetings, trainings and learning missions in Nigeria. While supporting UNDP standalone gender interventions (gender equality and women empowerment projects)

 

December 2027

1. UNDP Senior Management

2. Governance, Peace and Security Unit

3. Strategic Partnership &  Inclusive Growth Unit

4. Environment & Climate Change Unit

UNDP Gender Focal Manager will support this action

Initiated

6.2 UNDP to advocate for adequate integration of a gender dimension (including  financial   inclusion, women’s full participation  in politics, power structures and decision making) and rights-based approaches in existing policies and strategies at all levels.

December 2027

1. UNDP Senior Management

2. Governance, Peace and Security Unit

3. Strategic Partnership &  Inclusive Growth Unit

4. Environment & Climate Change Unit

UNDP Gender Focal Manager will support this action

Initiated

 

Key Actions:

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