Terminal Evaluation of Harnessing Youth’s Potential for Sustaining Peace in Uganda Project

Report Cover Image
Evaluation Plan:
2021-2025, Uganda
Evaluation Type:
Final Project
Planned End Date:
08/2021
Completion Date:
12/2021
Status:
Completed
Management Response:
No
Evaluation Budget(US $):
65,000

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Title Terminal Evaluation of Harnessing Youth’s Potential for Sustaining Peace in Uganda Project
Atlas Project Number: 00061509
Evaluation Plan: 2021-2025, Uganda
Evaluation Type: Final Project
Status: Completed
Completion Date: 12/2021
Planned End Date: 08/2021
Management Response: Yes
Focus Area:
  • 1. Resilience
  • 2. Others
Corporate Outcome and Output (UNDP Strategic Plan 2018-2021)
  • 1. Output 2.3.1 Data and risk-informed development policies, plans, systems and financing incorporate integrated and gender-responsive solutions to reduce disaster risks, enable climate change adaptation and mitigation, and prevent risk of conflict
SDG Goal
  • Goal 13. Take urgent action to combat climate change and its impacts
SDG Target
  • 13.1 Strengthen resilience and adaptive capacity to climate-related hazards and natural disasters in all countries
  • 13.2 Integrate climate change measures into national policies, strategies and planning
  • 13.a Implement the commitment undertaken by developed-country parties to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change to a goal of mobilizing jointly $100 billion annually by 2020 from all sources to address the needs of developing countries in the context of meaningful mitigation actions and transparency on implementation and fully operationalize the Green Climate Fund through its capitalization as soon as possible
Evaluation Budget(US $): 65,000
Source of Funding: Peace Building Fund
Evaluation Expenditure(US $): 65,000
Joint Programme: Yes
Joint Evaluation: Yes
  • Joint with UN Agencies
  • Joint with UNFPA, OHCHR
Evaluation Team members:
Name Title Email Nationality
Rhamz International rhamzmail1@gmail.com UGANDA
GEF Evaluation: No
Key Stakeholders: Office of the Prime Minister (OPM), CSOs, MDAs, donors
Countries: UGANDA
Lessons
1.

Best Practices and Lessons Learnt

  • Strikingly was the One UN working Together (UN inter-agency project, UNDP, UNFPA and OHCHR); despite the difference in the implementation approaches, hence, this proved the possibility of UN delivery as one: ‘UN agencies as One’.
  • Working with the existing structures of implementing stakeholders such as IRCU structures (District Interfaith Committees, Interfaith Action for Youth and Children, Youth of Faith for Peace- Yo4P and Regional Peace and Stability Forum), NDF, UHRC, RFPJ and traditional kingdoms in Buganda and Rwenzori region was a game changer.
  • Livelihoods for peace was vital to meaningfully engage young people, change of mind-set and trigger them for economic development instead of participating in violence.
  • Peace building as both software (values-mind-set changes) and hardware (livelihood) intervention. Peace building through sports and music reached more young people
  • The integration of ICT innovation and other non-conventional implementation strategies especially leveraging on key social media and other online platforms will continues even after the project lifecycle.
  • Due to COVID19, implementing partners innovatively created social media such as WhatsApp’s groups, use of radio and Television and small groups to reach young people with peace messages.

 

 

 


Findings
1.

Evaluation Results

The evaluation findings are structured according to the core evaluation criteria of project relevancy, coherence, effectiveness, efficiency, impact and sustainability.

Relevance of PBF to the Local Context of the Youth & Communities

  • A total of 420 youths answered the beneficiaries’ survey questionnaire. Participants were drawn from central region in the districts of Kampala (27%) and Wakiso (20%), and South western Uganda in the districts of Kasese (29%) and Bundibugyo (24%).
  • The evaluation revealed that the project was relevant and appropriate to the different groups of the youth in their gender diversities of whom 88% indicated that they have witnessed conflicts in their community.
  • Overall, the PBF project was relevant more especially its design to respond to the context of conflict; political and ethnic fragile conditions such as unemployment (74%), multiple ethnic groups (40%), multiple political grouping (31%) and elections as a trigger of violence (24%).  The project contributed to addressing the immediate basic needs of the male and female youths namely gainful employment, and turning the youth energies into positive livelihood activities and vocational skilling.
  • The project also bridged the gap between the community, law enforcement and security agencies. Through the training of police officers, youth leaders, Human Rights defenders and journalists on human rights issues, this greatly addressed the mistrust between law enforcement and security agencies and communities.

Coherence with Global and National Development agenda

  • The PBF was whole embedded in the globally SDGs especially SDG 16, the UNSCR 2250, UN Uganda programming agenda, UN Youth Strategy, UNSCR 1325 on women peace and security, the African Union's Agenda 2063, Aspiration 4, and Aspiration 6.
  • At a regional level, the East Africa Community (EAC) member states are committed to peace and security. Pillar 3.6 of the EAC Vision 2050.  
  • The project was well aligned to Uganda’s National Development Plan II 2015/16-2020/21 Strategic Intent on Inclusive Governance. As well as the new NDP III 020/21-2024/25, that highlights governance and Security Programme with the aim of improving adherence to the rule of law and capacity to contain prevailing and emerging security threats. The project also fits well within the Uganda Vision 2040 and the Peace, Recovery and Development Plan III.
  • The PBF project was customized to the Uganda National Youth Policy of 2016, UN Uganda Youth and Adolescent Strategy and Youth Livelihood Programme (YLP); to contribute to the promotion of equitable youth participation in decision-making processes at all levels.  It is one of the projects that has contributed to the achievement of the country’s development goal of peace and security, harmonious co-existence, creating of income and employment for the youthful population of Uganda.

 

 

Effectiveness of PBF Project

  • The evaluation revealed that the project achieved its intended objectives reflected in the realized outputs and outcomes despite the COVID 19 disruptions. For instance, the table below shows a sample of the indicators and their rate of achievement. It is good to note that the project surpassed its target for most of the indicators as displayed in this table as follows;

Outcomes & outputs

Performance Indicators

Indicator Baseline

End of project Indicator Target

Indicator Milestone

End of Project Evaluation Value

Evaluation Comment

Outcome 1: State and civil society actor decisionmaking processes are more inclusive and enable proactive participation of youth

 

Output 1.1

Capacity of selected government ministries and departments is enhanced to effectively mainstream youth issues in decision-making mechanisms

 

Indicator 1.1.1.1

Number of districts that undertake consultations with youth

0

3

3

4

133% achievement rate

Indicator 1.1.1.2

Number of target districts that integrate youth-interventions in their development plans and budgets

0

2

4

4

200% achievement rate

Indicator 1.1.1.3

Number of kingdoms that integrate youth issues in the strategic plans

2

5

 

8

160% achievement rate

Indicator 1.1.1.5

Assessment on youth inclusion in peacebuilding

0

1

 

1

100% achievement

Indicator 1.1.1.6

Number of fora promoting youth leadership and peacebuilding

2

4

4

16

400% achievement rate

Output 1.2 Youth pro-actively engage with leaders and elders and advocate for their own inclusion in peacebuilding processes and new peacebuilding initiatives

Indicator 1.2.1.1

Number of young people reached with peacebuilding information disaggregated by gender and age.

 

b) Number of Radio presenters engaged/trained

0

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

0

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

685,800

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

86

There is no project target, however the achievement was 685,800 more than the baseline values

 

 

There is no project target, however the achievement was 86 times more than the baseline values

Indicator 1.2.1.2

Number of EKNs conducted

 

2

 

8

400% achievement rate

Indicator 1.2.1.3

No of youth platforms supported

0

2

 

16

800% achievement rate

Indicator 1.2.1.4

No. of youth supported by the programme disaggregated by various levels at the national and sub national levels

 

250 cultural leaders and elders, 250 youth from cultural institutions, 200 youth outside of cultural institutions from elected youth structures, youth out of school and youth caught up in conflict situations, 360 technical and political leaders in the targeted sub counties and districts, 40 members of the district security team. Of these targeted groups, by consensus, at least 50% of targeted groups were female

No baseline value and project target to measure achievement rate.

Indicator 1.2.1.6

Number of social change entrepreneurs reached

 

0

4

105 hairdressing (103F: 02M); 106 Tailoring (99F:07M); 101Welding (09F:92M); 98 Carpentry (13F:85M) Making a total of 224F:186M; 71 male boda boda riders (motorcycle taxis); 48 female street market vendors; 51 male mechanics/taxi operators

Over 100% achievement rate

Indicator 1.2.1.7

Number of artists, musicians, celebrities reached

0

20

 

57

285% achievement rate

Indicator 1.2.1.9

Number of youths reached through sports activities

0

50

 

1000

Project achieved 950 more than the set target

Indicator 1.2.1.10

Number of young leaders trained

0

50

 

260

Project achieved 210 more than the set target

Output 1.3 Selected government and civil society actors promote youth participation in political and peacebuilding processes

Indicator 1.3.1.1

Mentorship platform established

 

4

 

4

100% achievement rate

Indicator 1.3.1.3

Number of developments plans integrated with youth issues

 

 

4

4

100% achievement rate

Indicator 1.3.1.4

Number of cultural institutions supported

 

 

8

8

100% achievement rate

Indicator 1.3.1.5

number of strategic engagements with government, to include youth issues in the draft National Peace Policy

 

 

2

1

50% achievement rate

Indicator 1.3.1.6

Number of capacity building activities organized and implemented

 

 

10

10

100% achievement rate

Indicator 1.3.1.7

Number of youth-led Organisations trained

 

4

5

5

125% achievement rate

Outcome 2: Mistrust between law enforcement and security agencies and communities is reduced by enhancing the strict application of human rights standards

 

Output 2.1

Capacity building is provided for law enforcement and security agencies on human rights standards in their operations engaging the youth

Indicator 2.1.1.1

 Number of law enforcement and security agencies staff trained on human rights standards

 

 

72 (22 women:50 men)

 

No baseline and target value to measure achievement rate

Output 2.2

The effectiveness of a monitoring, reporting and advocacy framework for human rights violations in law enforcement operations aimed at engaging the youth is strengthened

Indicator 2.2.1.1

No. of High-level meetings to address human rights situation of the youth

 

 

2

2

No baseline and target value to measure achievement

Indicator 2.2.1.2

Number of CSOs and youth organizations trained to monitor, report, raise and advocate on human rights concerns related to youth issues

 

 

 

84 (50 women; 34 men)

No baseline and target value to measure achievement rate

  • The multi-dimensional strategy of the PBF project approach; with cultural, religious, political and economic empowerment of youth is one such model commendable that needs to be duplicated, and contextually modified to enhance peace building and conflict resolution within and among communities in Uganda. This was the most appropriate implementation approaches to achieving the project outcomes in comparison with other alternative approaches such as national elder’s forum and the Interparty Organisation for Dialogue (IPOD), which are highly centralised with limited reach to the community and most vulnerable youth and women.
  • Youth were engaged through various strategies namely community level mediation: cultural, religious and political leaders dialogue (94%), generation for generation conversations (57%), cultural events (25%), Religious events (43%), and community dialogues with political and security officers (75%) and media engagement (69%).
  • There was proactive engagement of national, community, and local platforms and structures including; youth leadership (64%) at all level of the 4 project districts, religious leaders (64%) and local government (60%) as the main centers of influence and youth engagement.
  • Young people were also engaged through mentorship programs and sports for peace (76%) (Buganda County football cup tournament), livelihood projects (86%), Civic competence and empowerment seminar (24%), local radio talk show (45%), orally person to person engagement (35%), Television (15%) and social media (10%), Information Education and Communication (IEC) materials (6%) and newspapers (2%).

Project Efficiency

  • The evaluation positively appraised the clarity of the project design with clear result areas translated itself to the field implementation approaches, implemented within the required time, resources and efforts.
  • The project however did not conduct a baseline study against which the partner targets would benchmark. This deprived the project an opportunity to have a solid learning to guide indicator and target setting as well as form a basis for the selection of the beneficiaries.
  • The project costed a total budget of $2,487,750, UNDP as the lead UN Agency received $1,537,500 (60%), UNFPA $505,000 (22%) and OHCHR received $430,000 (18%) of the funds. The project funds were efficiently utilized with UNDP, UNFPA and OHCHR delivering 100%, 100% and 74% respectively and overall at 96%. However, OHCHR experienced major delays with a myriad of implementation challenges most due to the outbreak of the COVID19 pandemic. Some implementing partners also reported the delayed disbursements of project funds yet with limited timeframe to implement the project activities.

 

 Project Impact/outcomes

  • The project enhanced knowledge management and knowledge sharing, for example it supported the printing and publication of Wakiso District Human Rights Committee First Annual Human Rights Report 2020, and publication of a Rapid Assessment Report on Youth and Peacebuilding in Uganda 2020 by UNFPA among others.
  • There was reported increased youth and women engagement and involvement in political discussions and electoral processes, including in the previous national and local government elections 2021, e.g. more youth were elected in the local council elections of 2021 in Kasese District.
  • Within the community, there was reported increasing level of mutual respect and mutual existence amidst the multi-ethnic settings esp. in Rwenzori region which has had historical ethnic conflict; increased messaging on peace building e.g. the 2021 Peace Day under the #PEACEDAY2021, MalalaUG ft Jaffer under the Harnessing Youth's Potential Project calls upon young people to center their world sharing #peace in a song titled peace lover, see link for the song https://t.co/hzMtOsSR9x.
  • Under Outcome 2; Mistrust between law enforcement and security agencies and communities is reduced by enhancing the strict application of human rights standards; there was a series of technical capacity/trainings on human rights offered to UHRC, security agencies, Wakiso district Human Rights committee, media personnel, political leaders and religious leaders. There was also institutional infrastructural support through provision of ICT equipment’s (laptops, computers, printers among others) to enhance communication, advocacy and engagement of stakeholders on human rights issues and peace building.

 

Sustainability

  • PBF project attested to the high-level cooperation and integration of project activities among the UN agencies (UNDP, UNFPA and OHCHR). Hence, the PBF project is a model example of UN delivery as one: ‘UN agencies as One’
  • The implementation approach was tailored to the community cultural, religious and political structures that are vital for easy project buy-in, public legitimacy, trust and confidence for participation in project activities, and subsequent sustainability of the project outcomes.
  • Formalization of youth livelihood informal groups will enhance the sustainability of the results
  • Involvement of district local governments – to take up the skills groups, youth peace chapters, vocational youth skilling centers, and dialogue platforms enhance ownership and continued political and technical support.

 

 


Recommendations
1
  • 1. Future joint UN agencies project implementation should agree on the uniform implementation approach to create harmony among stakeholders.
2
  1. Future peace building programming should cater for a long period of time like at least five years.
3

3. Peace building and conflict resolution projects should continue to tap into young peoples` passions and talents; strengthening investment in youth talents for sustainable peace e.g. football for peace, music for peace and other talents that are within the natural endowments of young people.

4
  • Because peace and stability and governance are a national duty of the government, there is need to advocate for the government to prioritize all processes of peace building and good governance at local levels going beyond legislation and policy formulation to engage the communities (local solutions for peace) in peace building through multi-sectoral approach including periodic monitoring of these processes.
5
  • There is a serious appeal from CSOs for government to commission constitutional review to ensure smooth and peaceful transition of power at the national and local government levels. The reforms in the legal regime should cater for strong institutions and accountabilities for peace building to ensure certainty for leadership in “the Uganda we want”.
6

5. There is a serious appeal from CSOs for government to commission constitutional review to ensure smooth and peaceful transition of power at the national and local government levels. The reforms in the legal regime should cater for strong institutions and accountabilities for peace building to ensure certainty for leadership in “the Uganda we want”.

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