00090780 Capacity Development for Implementing Rio Conventions through Enhancing Incentive Mechanism for Sustainable Watershed/Land Management (CCCD) GEF Terminal Evaluation

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Evaluation Plan:
2021-2025, Indonesia
Evaluation Type:
Final Project
Planned End Date:
03/2021
Completion Date:
05/2021
Status:
Completed
Management Response:
Yes
Evaluation Budget(US $):
30,000

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Title 00090780 Capacity Development for Implementing Rio Conventions through Enhancing Incentive Mechanism for Sustainable Watershed/Land Management (CCCD) GEF Terminal Evaluation
Atlas Project Number: 00090780
Evaluation Plan: 2021-2025, Indonesia
Evaluation Type: Final Project
Status: Completed
Completion Date: 05/2021
Planned End Date: 03/2021
Management Response: Yes
UNDP Signature Solution:
  • 1. Resilience
  • 2. Sustainable
Corporate Outcome and Output (UNDP Strategic Plan 2018-2021)
  • 1. Output 1.4.1 Solutions scaled up for sustainable management of natural resources, including sustainable commodities and green and inclusive value chains
  • 2. Output 2.4.1 Gender-responsive legal and regulatory frameworks, policies and institutions strengthened, and solutions adopted, to address conservation, sustainable use and equitable benefit sharing of natural resources, in line with international conventions and national legislation
SDG Goal
  • Goal 12. Ensure sustainable consumption and production patterns
  • Goal 13. Take urgent action to combat climate change and its impacts
  • Goal 15. Protect, restore and promote sustainable use of terrestrial ecosystems, sustainably manage forests, combat desertification, and halt and reverse land degradation and halt biodiversity loss
SDG Target
  • 12.2 By 2030, achieve the sustainable management and efficient use of natural resources
  • 13.2 Integrate climate change measures into national policies, strategies and planning
  • 15.7 Take urgent action to end poaching and trafficking of protected species of flora and fauna and address both demand and supply of illegal wildlife products
Evaluation Budget(US $): 30,000
Source of Funding:
Evaluation Expenditure(US $): 14,000
Joint Programme: No
Joint Evaluation: No
Evaluation Team members:
Name Title Email Nationality
Giacomo Morello External Evaluator morelgiac@gmail.com
Bachtiar Wahyu Mutaqin External Evaluator mutaqin@ugm.ac.id
GEF Evaluation: Yes
GEF Project Title: 00090780 Capacity Development for Implementing Rio Conventions through Enhancing Incentive Mechanism for Sustainable Watershed/Land Management (CCCD)
Evaluation Type: Terminal Evaluation
Focal Area: Multifocal Areas
Project Type: MSP
GEF Phase: GEF-5
GEF Project ID: 5848
PIMS Number: 5224
Key Stakeholders:
Countries: INDONESIA
Lessons
1.

The present evaluation identified a lesson learned: building on the needs of communities, and promoting cross cutting issues revealed once again to be key for successful implementation of initiatives with rural communities. Direct and open communication with all stakeholders, development of tools and study with a serious scientific approach for knowledge generation; promotion of community participation; and application of generated knowledge to tailor relevant solutions are as well the main elements to promote rural development.


Findings
1.

Project design, visualized in the Results Framework, did not constitute neither an effective guidance tool for the implementation nor a useful tool for M&E purpose. The objective’s indicators were not SMART, outcomes did not present any indicators. Output’s indicators were the only ones available to track the project implementation.

The project design was as well very redundant. The formulation of objective, outcome and output was very similar. Although this occurrence, the overall idea of the project was clear: to lay down the groundwork for an improved implementation of the three Rio Convention, i.e. UNFCCC, UNCCCD and CBD, at country level.

The dimensions of income generation, gender equality and women’s empowerment, and livelihood benefits of the broader impact of the project are not captured at any level in the project design. The ProDoc did not provide any guidance on how to engage effectively during the project with relevant stakeholders.The implementation of the project did not envisage any change in its design, decided and formalized during sessions of the Project Board. No major adaptive management decisions were formalized.

The implementation focused on the achievement of output indicators. The Project Management Unit (PMU) led the implementation at field level successfully. Instead, MoEF led the process related to strengthening policy, legislative, and economic instruments. MoEF cofinancing was compliant with the initial commitment of the institution to the project. All work led by MoEF was neither monitored in the frame of the project nor reported in any documents.

Sustainable watershed management was at the centre of the project implementation, and, as such, it was promoted as a tool for replication in other areas of the country. The strengthening policy, legislative, and economic instruments happened outside of the project frame: activities were funded with other funds and not reported to UNDP. GEF funding was not relevant for the implementation of these activities.

The project was effective in achieving its outputs. The intervention resulted to be sustainable and replicable. This is due prevalently to the work done at the district level in collaboration with local stakeholders, i.e., public authorities, communities, CBOs, and a private company.

Sustainability at the national level is not fully assessable. Due to the lack of reporting on outcome 1, the TE Team could not coordinate with the PMU interviews with stakeholders who participate in the process.

Although gender issues were not captured in the project design, the CCCD project promoted gender equality by contributing to the improvement of the standard of living and increasing income by agricultural products innovation and artisanal home production, and by supporting the women's participation in sustainable management of natural resources.

Job creation and income generation, reforestation, promotion of climate change adaptation and mitigation measured, and capacity development of local communities and local authorities were key issues addressed at the district level.


Recommendations
1

Project design should avoid redundancies within and amongst different hierarchical levels of the Result Framework, i.e., objective, outcomes, and outputs. A redundant Result Framework does not allow an effective project management and impedes the identification of relevant changes promoted/induced by projects. Indicators of objectives, outcomes, and outputs should capture different changes produced by the project under consideration. Outputs refer to changes under almost the full control of the project management. i.e., what the project actually does, while outcomes and objectives capture changes to which the project contributes to. It is then important, that the team in charge of writing project documents include both thematic specialists and M&E specialists. The two kinds of expertise are important to get to a project design that later can guide the implementation towards its goals

2

During the project design phase or during the inception phase of a project, it is important to get to a common agreement on what are the roles of each project partner. Agreements and decisions should be put in writing, archived, and reported to donors. In this way, a higher level of transparency and accountability is ensured

3

Whenever it is possible, test the micro watershed approach with relevant modifications, to contexts where the private sector has a predominant role, both as an actor of economic development and as a land degradation driver. Indeed, matching economic and social development with the conservation of the environment is the main aspiration of the Rio Conventions (UNFCCC, UNCCD, and CBD). A new collaboration between the two institutions may be the right occasion to do that.

1. Recommendation:

Project design should avoid redundancies within and amongst different hierarchical levels of the Result Framework, i.e., objective, outcomes, and outputs. A redundant Result Framework does not allow an effective project management and impedes the identification of relevant changes promoted/induced by projects. Indicators of objectives, outcomes, and outputs should capture different changes produced by the project under consideration. Outputs refer to changes under almost the full control of the project management. i.e., what the project actually does, while outcomes and objectives capture changes to which the project contributes to. It is then important, that the team in charge of writing project documents include both thematic specialists and M&E specialists. The two kinds of expertise are important to get to a project design that later can guide the implementation towards its goals

Management Response: [Added: 2021/07/22]

M&E specialist consultant for the new projects will be working during the formulation of UNDP initiatives together with the main project designer or something similar few working days for a M&E specialist will be allocated to revise the M&E components of the project design.

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
UNDP and MoEF to follow the GEF guidance on the development of Project Document, especially on the development of Project Results Framework
[Added: 2021/07/22]
UNDP CO and MoEF 2022/06 Initiated
UNDP and MoEF will hire the thematic specialist, and also the M&E specialist. Regarding the redundancies within the Results Framework, it is hierarchily related within one outcomes into outputs, as guided by GEF
[Added: 2021/07/22]
UNDP CO and MoEF 2022/06 Initiated
2. Recommendation:

During the project design phase or during the inception phase of a project, it is important to get to a common agreement on what are the roles of each project partner. Agreements and decisions should be put in writing, archived, and reported to donors. In this way, a higher level of transparency and accountability is ensured

Management Response: [Added: 2021/07/22]

A checklist (for the new project formulation or project inception phase) will be developed in order to make sure that roles of project partners are clearly defined already during project formulation (and therefore reflected in the ProDoc) or project inception phase (and therefore reflected in the Inception Report).

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
UNDP and MoEF to develop the project organization structure including project partners roles and it should be approved by the project IP (MoEF). All agreements and decisions need to be well archived and reported to donors
[Added: 2021/07/22]
UNDP Co and MoEF 2022/06 Initiated
3. Recommendation:

Whenever it is possible, test the micro watershed approach with relevant modifications, to contexts where the private sector has a predominant role, both as an actor of economic development and as a land degradation driver. Indeed, matching economic and social development with the conservation of the environment is the main aspiration of the Rio Conventions (UNFCCC, UNCCD, and CBD). A new collaboration between the two institutions may be the right occasion to do that.

Management Response: [Added: 2021/07/22]

UNDP and MoEF to  test the micro watershed approach with relevant modifications, to contexts where the private sector has a predominant role, both as an actor of economic development and as a land degradation driver

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
UNDP and MoEF will test the micro watershed approach in context where private sector has a great incidence is a choice of the Government of Indonesia (MoE), which may be supported by UNDP
[Added: 2021/07/22]
UNDP CO and MoEF 2022/06 Initiated

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