Angola Country Programme Document Evaluation

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Evaluation Plan:
2020-2023, Angola
Evaluation Type:
Country Programme Evaluation
Planned End Date:
12/2021
Completion Date:
12/2021
Status:
Completed
Management Response:
Yes
Evaluation Budget(US $):
46,000

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Title Angola Country Programme Document Evaluation
Atlas Project Number: 00114883,00107331,00109627,00107733,00084488,00106463,00111123,00078044,00042722,00090310,00081003,00106462,00103650,00127117,00132575,00109372,00110554,00118832,00084491,00129365,00113029,00084416,00076670,00118881,00097226,00064743,00067184
Evaluation Plan: 2020-2023, Angola
Evaluation Type: Country Programme Evaluation
Status: Completed
Completion Date: 12/2021
Planned End Date: 12/2021
Management Response: Yes
Focus Area:
  • 1. Poverty
  • 2. Governance
  • 3. Resilience
  • 4. Sustainable
  • 5. Others
Corporate Outcome and Output (UNDP Strategic Plan 2018-2021)
  • 1. Output 1.1.1 Capacities developed across the whole of government to integrate the 2030 Agenda, the Paris Agreement and other international agreements in development plans and budgets, and to analyse progress towards the SDGs, using innovative and data-driven solutions
  • 2. Output 1.1.2 Marginalised groups, particularly the poor, women, people with disabilities and displaced are empowered to gain universal access to basic services and financial and non-financial assets to build productive capacities and benefit from sustainable livelihoods and jobs
  • 3. Output 1.2.1 Capacities at national and sub-national levels strengthened to promote inclusive local economic development and deliver basic services including HIV and related services
  • 4. Output 1.2.2 Enabling environment strengthened to expand public and private financing for the achievement of the SDGs
  • 5. Output 2.2.2 Constitution-making, electoral and parliamentary processes and institutions strengthened to promote inclusion, transparency and accountability
  • 6. Output 2.2.3 Capacities, functions and financing of rule of law and national human rights institutions and systems strengthened to expand access to justice and combat discrimination, with a focus on women and other marginalised groups
  • 7. Output 2.3.1 Data and risk-informed development policies, plans, systems and financing incorporate integrated and gender-responsive solutions to reduce disaster risks, enable climate change adaptation and mitigation, and prevent risk of conflict
  • 8. Output 2.4.1 Gender-responsive legal and regulatory frameworks, policies and institutions strengthened, and solutions adopted, to address conservation, sustainable use and equitable benefit sharing of natural resources, in line with international conventions and national legislation
  • 9. Output 3.1.1 Core government functions and inclusive basic services4 restored post-crisis for stabilisation, durable solutions to displacement and return to sustainable development pathways within the framework of national policies and priorities
  • 10. Output 3.3.1 Evidence-based assessment and planning tools and mechanisms applied to enable implementation of gender-sensitive and risk-informed prevention and preparedness to limit the impact of natural hazards and pandemics and promote peaceful, just and inclusive societies
  • 11. Output 3.4.1 Innovative nature-based and gender-responsive solutions developed, financed and applied for sustainable recovery
SDG Goal
  • Goal 1. End poverty in all its forms everywhere
  • Goal 11. Make cities and human settlements inclusive, safe, resilient and sustainable
  • Goal 13. Take urgent action to combat climate change and its impacts
  • Goal 14. Conserve and sustainably use the oceans, seas and marine resources for sustainable development
  • Goal 15. Protect, restore and promote sustainable use of terrestrial ecosystems, sustainably manage forests, combat desertification, and halt and reverse land degradation and halt biodiversity loss
  • Goal 16. Promote peaceful and inclusive societies for sustainable development, provide access to justice for all and build effective, accountable and inclusive institutions at all levels
  • Goal 17. Strengthen the means of implementation and revitalize the Global Partnership for Sustainable Development
  • Goal 2. End hunger, achieve food security and improved nutrition and promote sustainable agriculture
  • Goal 3. Ensure healthy lives and promote well-being for all at all ages
  • Goal 5. Achieve gender equality and empower all women and girls
SDG Target
  • 1.2 By 2030, reduce at least by half the proportion of men, women and children of all ages living in poverty in all its dimensions according to national definitions
  • 1.5 By 2030, build the resilience of the poor and those in vulnerable situations and reduce their exposure and vulnerability to climate-related extreme events and other economic, social and environmental shocks and disasters
  • 11.5 By 2030, significantly reduce the number of deaths and the number of people affected and substantially decrease the direct economic losses relative to global gross domestic product caused by disasters, including water-related disasters, with a focus on protecting the poor and people in vulnerable situations
  • 13.1 Strengthen resilience and adaptive capacity to climate-related hazards and natural disasters in all countries
  • 14.4 By 2020, effectively regulate harvesting and end overfishing, illegal, unreported and unregulated fishing and destructive fishing practices and implement science-based management plans, in order to restore fish stocks in the shortest time feasible, at least to levels that can produce maximum sustainable yield as determined by their biological characteristics
  • 14.7 By 2030, increase the economic benefits to small island developing States and least developed countries from the sustainable use of marine resources, including through sustainable management of fisheries, aquaculture and tourism
  • 14.b Provide access for small-scale artisanal fishers to marine resources and markets
  • 15.1 By 2020, ensure the conservation, restoration and sustainable use of terrestrial and inland freshwater ecosystems and their services, in particular forests, wetlands, mountains and drylands, in line with obligations under international agreements
  • 15.5 Take urgent and significant action to reduce the degradation of natural habitats, halt the loss of biodiversity and, by 2020, protect and prevent the extinction of threatened species
  • 15.7 Take urgent action to end poaching and trafficking of protected species of flora and fauna and address both demand and supply of illegal wildlife products
  • 15.c Enhance global support for efforts to combat poaching and trafficking of protected species, including by increasing the capacity of local communities to pursue sustainable livelihood opportunities
  • 16.3 Promote the rule of law at the national and international levels and ensure equal access to justice for all
  • 16.4 By 2030, significantly reduce illicit financial and arms flows, strengthen the recovery and return of stolen assets and combat all forms of organized crime
  • 16.6 Develop effective, accountable and transparent institutions at all levels
  • 16.7 Ensure responsive, inclusive, participatory and representative decision-making at all levels
  • 16.a Strengthen relevant national institutions, including through international cooperation, for building capacity at all levels, in particular in developing countries, to prevent violence and combat terrorism and crime
  • 17.16 Enhance the Global Partnership for Sustainable Development, complemented by multi-stakeholder partnerships that mobilize and share knowledge, expertise, technology and financial resources, to support the achievement of the Sustainable Development Goals in all countries, in particular developing countries
  • 17.9 Enhance international support for implementing effective and targeted capacity-building in developing countries to support national plans to implement all the Sustainable Development Goals, including through North-South, South-South and triangular cooperation
  • 2.3 By 2030, double the agricultural productivity and incomes of small-scale food producers, in particular women, indigenous peoples, family farmers, pastoralists and fishers, including through secure and equal access to land, other productive resources and inputs, knowledge, financial services, markets and opportunities for value addition and non-farm employment
  • 3.3 By 2030, end the epidemics of AIDS, tuberculosis, malaria and neglected tropical diseases and combat hepatitis, water-borne diseases and other communicable diseases
  • 5.1 End all forms of discrimination against all women and girls everywhere
  • 5.5 Ensure women’s full and effective participation and equal opportunities for leadership at all levels of decision-making in political, economic and public life
Evaluation Budget(US $): 46,000
Source of Funding: IEO+CO
Evaluation Expenditure(US $): 26,000
Joint Programme: No
Joint Evaluation: No
Evaluation Team members:
Name Title Nationality
Ahmad Tijan Jallow International Consultant
Malaquias Tenente National Consultant
Ahmad Tijan Jallow International Consultant
Malaquias Tenente National Consultant
GEF Evaluation: No
Key Stakeholders: UNDP, UN, Government of Angola, CSOs, NGOs, Academia
Countries: ANGOLA
Lessons
1.
  1. The Covid 19 pandemic, despite its many adverse consequences has introduced new and innovative ways of working, that can be beneficially adopted in a post-Covid era. The new methods of work have the potential to cut down on operational costs, boost efficiency and enhance productivity in the workplace.
  2. UNDP’s traditional comparative advantage is to focus on supporting policy work upstream and building national capacity but with the new UNDP Strategic Plan it is also possible for UNDP to be more involved with down stream work at the pilot level and with these concrete results to upscale and influence the policy and strategic level. This is particularly important in a context of dwindling core resources and diminishing prospects for significant bilateral funding. However, to have meaningful impact on people, upstream policy work could be judiciously combined with carefully targeted downstream work. The Multi-Dimensional Poverty Index of Angola clearly shows that multidimensional poverty is highest at provincial level, and to fight poverty there needs to be decisive action at that level. The balance to strike will depend on the prevailing circumstances, notably, ability to secure the needed resources.
  3. The work done on multidimensional poverty in Angola demonstrates that UNDP, by introducing robust analytical policy tools such as this one, can potentially have great impact on development outcomes and can be a strong complement to implementing programmes and projects. 

Findings
1.

Finding 1: UNDP’s planned interventions under all the three outcomes of the CPD are judged to be highly relevant to national development priorities as reflected in the Angola NDP (2018-2022). They were also found to be closely aligned with the UNSDF (2018-2022), the UNDP Strategic Plan (2018-2021) and the UN SDGs.

 

Finding 2: UNDP is making appreciable contributions to the strengthening of national capacities to develop, implement and monitor strategies and programmes to end poverty, and foster integration of the SDGs into national policies and promote dialogue.

Finding 3: UNDP is successfully assisting the government of Angola to translate policies into concrete action for job creation, inclusive growth and strengthening of micro, small and medium-size enterprises (MSMEs). UNDP support for professional skills development, particularly for women and youth, as well as facilitating the involvement of the private sector in SDG implementation is of strategic value.

Finding 4: In its lead role as Principal Recipient of the Global Fund in Angola, UNDP has successfully helped mobilizeand managed substantial resources to strengthen capacities at national and local levels to deliver HIV and related services, including for people living with HIV, adolescent girls, young women, and key populations.

Finding 5: The partnership with GEF has enabled UNDP to mobilize substantial resources and make a strong contribution to the government of Angola’s quest to address climate change and environment and to manage the country’s natural resources, including transboundary ones, on a more sustainable basis.

 

Finding 6: With the support of UNDP, the government of Angola has improved capacities at national and provincial levels to address natural and human induced risk and adapt to climate change, through enhanced early warning capacities and putting in place appropriate disaster risk management plans and strategies.

 

Finding 7: UNDP is making a significant contribution to promoting governance, human rights and the rule of law in Angola. In particular, UNDP’s work is advancing participatory local governance, government anti-corruption efforts, human rights, the role of women in governance.

Finding 8: The UNDP CO had satisfactorily delivered programme resources despite the impact of Covid-19.

Finding 9: UNDP has made efforts to promote programme interlinkages and synergies, but the results have been modest, and efforts were not sufficiently systematic or consistent. Challenges to better programme integration were found within both UNDP and government.

Finding 10: UNDP interventions are accorded a high priority by government, and they are judged to have reasonable prospects for sustainability, but there are many associated risks.

Finding 11: UNDP has played a lead role in the UN system robust response to Covid 19 and provided critical support to government of Angola’s efforts to tackle the pandemic. UNDP has also successfully put in place several measures to assure safety of staff and programme continuity with the result that adverse consequences of Covid-19 on its programme were minimized.

 

Finding 12: UNDP has made progress in positioning gender institutionally within the CO, as well as integrating it at the specific programmatic level. However, evidence shows that more needs to be done as resources allocated are not sufficient and many actions are not sufficiently transformative.

 

Finding 13: Capacity development in all its three dimensions are being fully addressed under the country programme. However, policy support, training and skills development tend to dominate, as compared to support for organizational improvements.

Finding 14: The work of the Accelerator Facility is highly relevant as R&D and innovation are critical to address Angola’s development challenges, create jobs and render the economy more productive and competitive. The work of the facility is however, constrained by availability of limited resources.

Finding 15: UNDP Angola is a trusted partner of government, national stakeholders, and other development actors. The partnerships forged have facilitated UNDP’s work in the areas of advocacy, policy formulation, resource mobilization and programme delivery, hence enabling it to make important contributions to development outcomes in Angola. 

Finding 16: UNDP is making a strong contribution to supporting the overall work of the UN system through its contribution to the implementation of the UNSDF and through the strong partnerships it has forged with sister agencies at programmatic level.


Recommendations
1

Recommendation one:UNDP should maintain the current focus of the Country Programme going into the next country programming cycle. It is further recommended continues to grow its Governance work and to achieve this to deepen its new strategy to mainstream it into the other outcomes of the Country Programme – see reasons advanced under conclusion 4. The evaluation concurs with the decision to create a new outcome on health as this recognizes the reality already on the ground:  the Global Fund accounts for the lion’s share of the CO portfolio and it has autonomous management and reporting system and creating the health outcome justifiably recognizes the importance of the partnership with the Global Fund.

2

Recommendation two: UNDP should progressively consolidate the current trend of bolstering its work and presence in the provinces as more experience is gained. This move should build upon the work that Global Fund has started in Benguela and Cuanza Sul, as well as the FRESAN project being implemented in southern Angola. UNDP can use its new geographic focus for the Luanda-Huila corridor provinces to deepen this approach and can also continue to apply Governance and Decentralization elements in such a sub national approach which would then ultimately also influence the national policy and strategic level and if sufficiently successful, could be further replicated.

3

Recommendation three: UNDP should build upon and continue the work it has started on the portfolio approach and systems thinking exercise with SIU. This will enhance programme integration, amplify impact, and enhance efficiency and staff productivity.

4

Recommendation four: UNDP, in view of the promising prospects with cost-sharing and its likely role in helping implement Government of Angola loan agreements with partners (IFI in particular), should set up efficient and effective adequately resourced portfolio or project structures, provided sufficient resources are mobilized, to manage cost-sharing resources from government and multilateral financial institutions, and taking into account lessons learned from the UNDP/Global Fund Unit. Such a change can further create higher effectiveness and efficiency in HR, financial and procurement activities and ensure smooth and efficient operations with regards to the management of these resources. If successful, this can build trust and confidence of Government of Angola partners, which in turn could result in significant resources being entrusted to UNDP.

5

Recommendation five: UNDP should continue and consolidate its work on the national SDG platform by mainstreaming the SDGs into sector policies, strategies, and programmes. A solid start has already been made and, drawing in the private sector and civil society, creating a powerful platform for dialogue, advocacy, and joint action. This is an area that UNDP, as a convener and integrator, is traditionally good at.

6

Recommendation six: UNDP’s work on employment and the informal economy, which largely affects women, is a new and ground-breaking for the organization in Angola and should be continued. This work is likely to be a continuing policy priority for government despite the national elections to be held in 2022. In the next phase, UNDP should, in addition, place more emphasis on forging linkages and partnerships together with facilitating the mobilization of resources required to extend this work.

7

Recommendation seven: UNDP should accelerate measures underway to finalize setting up of the field structures, recruiting staff and putting in place the coordination mechanisms necessary for NFM3 grant implementation. Further strengthening of the PMU should be explored, provided sufficient resources would be made available from partners, with experienced programme and M&E staff to complement existing ones, as well as specialists in TB and Malaria. The latter should be placed within the respective national programmes for efficiency, effectiveness, and ownership.

    

8

Recommendation eight: UNDP should continue to invest in and work closely with national stakeholders and partners to broaden the social protection and social safety net system that has been put in place the government of Angola. Conclusion 1 has highlighted the fact that the poor and marginalized, including women, are an important constituency/beneficiary of UNDP’s work. Many derive their livelihoods from the informal economy and are poorly protected from major crisis. The social protection system remains fragmented and has been affected by a progressive reduction of budgeted expenditure in recent years. Existing social protection spending is weakly targeted and largely ineffective as it is mostly limited to specific groups (e.g., public sector retirees, war veterans) and does not reach most of those in need. Such a strengthened and expanded social protection system could be an invaluable tool to reduce poverty and other vulnerabilities.

9

Recommendation nine: UNDP should continue to support Angola’s efforts to sustainably manage her biodiversity and natural resources, not only from an environmental perspective but also from a human perspective related to livelihoods, as this could also be an important tool for economic diversification. Building upon support being provided on the climate change Strategy and revision of the NDC, UNDP should support efforts to mobilize domestic resources and try to mobilize funds for sustainable development to address climate change and environmental concerns. The CO should assist Angola deepen its efforts to make the transition to a low carbon growth pathway through top class technical policy support, drawing upon south-south cooperation and its global network.

10

Recommendation ten: UNDP should continue supporting the government of Angola’s Disaster Risk Management strategy, and work with government and other partners to ensure that resources to implement the strategy are prioritized in the national budget, and work to build capacities for resilience at provincial and community levels. 

11

Recommendation eleven: UNDP should, in view of the challenges of the governance funding landscape in Angola, be highly selective and choose a limited number of areas it will focus on, such as supporting: decentralization and working with provincial administrations and municipalities; elections provided that sufficient resources are available to manage various risks. Work on other areas should be done jointly with other units (e.g., women’s political participation (gender); participatory budgeting (poverty and inclusive growth)). Work on anti-corruption should be pursued in collaboration with other partners to minimize risks to UNDP’s reputation, and if these risks cannot be mitigated and managed, UNDP should consider discontinuing.

12

Recommendation twelve: UNDP should strengthen its work on gender and make it more transformative through the design and implementation of new initiatives that integrate poverty, governance and environment/climate change concerns with Gender issues. Gender mainstreaming has largely not resulted in the transformative results anticipated, partly because gender is often not a core objective of the programmes targeted. When new programmes, portfolios, and projects are developed therefore the recommendation is to more explicitly create explicit gender goals and results to be achieved within these initiatives. The initiative could be spearheaded by the Gender Focal Team set up in connection with the Gender Seal Award and its proposed work plan and activities. The work on gender should benefit from strengthened capacities and resources. The team would continue to support gender mainstreaming in other programme outcomes.

13

Recommendation thirteen: UNDP should strengthen its work on capacity development to ensure sustainable development and achieve sustained impact beyond training activities: for the office to further train programme staff on impact in capacity development and articulate this  strategic thinking in the new CPD that will have to be developed in 2022  to guide the work of the CO; provide resources from the core budget; and continue to track and assess the impact of capacity development activities undertaken by the CO in tools such as the ROAR and distill lessons learned and adopt strategies as more lessons are learned. This will ensure that resources for capacity development are targeted for maximum effect.

Management Response: [Added: 2022/01/31] [Last Updated: 2022/01/31]

Management Response: Fully accepted.

The current CPD maintains the link to the UNSDCF 2020-2022 outcome on governance. Moreover, the CO is considering governance as a cross-cutting element across all the interventions in its implementation of the current CPD and the plan is to take a similar approach for the next CPD in order to try to further grow resource mobilization of this portfolio.

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
Consider governance as a cross-cutting signature solution in the next CPD.
[Added: 2022/01/31]
RR, DRR, Heads of Programme Units. 2022/12 Initiated Already ongoing, already being implemented.
2. Recommendation:

Recommendation two: UNDP should progressively consolidate the current trend of bolstering its work and presence in the provinces as more experience is gained. This move should build upon the work that Global Fund has started in Benguela and Cuanza Sul, as well as the FRESAN project being implemented in southern Angola. UNDP can use its new geographic focus for the Luanda-Huila corridor provinces to deepen this approach and can also continue to apply Governance and Decentralization elements in such a sub national approach which would then ultimately also influence the national policy and strategic level and if sufficiently successful, could be further replicated.

Management Response: [Added: 2022/01/31] [Last Updated: 2022/01/31]

Management Response: Fully accepted.

This recommendation is aligned with the CO’s view. Already the CO has identified a geographic focus area for its priorities in Health and Employment/Diversification in the province corridor between Luanda and Huila and this work is well underway. Benguela and Kwanza Sul are key provinces for the implementation of the initiatives funded by the Global Fund. However, the evaluators do not consider how to consolidate the action in those provinces, what sectors or target groups should be included in this process, nor the resource mobilization strategy needed to achieve that.

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
The next CPD will apply Governance and Decentralization elements in such a sub national approach.
[Added: 2022/01/31]
RR, DRR, Head of Programme Units. 2023/12 Initiated CPD design process has started in the CO and will complete in 2023 when the new CPD is approved in the Executive Board. History
Management Response: [Added: 2022/01/31]

Management Response: Fully accepted.

The CO has already engaged with the SIU to promote the adoption of a portfolio approach, including systems thinking. The evaluators should have mentioned that this approach will also be considered in the development of the Integrated SDG Model, which UNDP is leading together with other UN agencies.

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
CO continues to promote the adoption of a portfolio approach, including systems thinking across all the CO.
[Added: 2022/01/31]
RR, DRR, Accelerator Lab, Head Poverty and Inclusive Growth Unit. 2022/12 Initiated Consider the portfolio approach in the elaboration of the next CPD, CO already is pilot office for portfolio approach globally and has received seed funding from UNDP HQ to pilot.
4. Recommendation:

Recommendation four: UNDP, in view of the promising prospects with cost-sharing and its likely role in helping implement Government of Angola loan agreements with partners (IFI in particular), should set up efficient and effective adequately resourced portfolio or project structures, provided sufficient resources are mobilized, to manage cost-sharing resources from government and multilateral financial institutions, and taking into account lessons learned from the UNDP/Global Fund Unit. Such a change can further create higher effectiveness and efficiency in HR, financial and procurement activities and ensure smooth and efficient operations with regards to the management of these resources. If successful, this can build trust and confidence of Government of Angola partners, which in turn could result in significant resources being entrusted to UNDP.

Management Response: [Added: 2022/01/31]

Management Response: Fully accepted.

UNDP acknowledges  growing development financing role of IFI’s in in Angola’s context partially due to the lack of fiscal space to finance the shifting of the country’s development paradigm. The country is scheduled to attain middle-income status in 2024 while official development assistance and concessional financing are declining. IFI financing is leading to increased government cost sharing to fund effective programme implementation in country reflecting strong national ownership and leadership. For the last two years UNDP has been positioning itself to help the government to design and implement large-scale initiatives in health, employment, and environment. The CO Resource Mobilization Strategy is demonstrating UNDP adaptive ability in engaging in new thematic areas to stay relevant in the Country and the office will be trying with newly mobilized funds to suitably fund project management structures for these IFI mobilized resources taking into account lessons learned from the GF programme team.

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
As part of the CO Resource Mobilization Strategy for IFI’s ensure project funding for adequately staffed project management structures.
[Added: 2022/01/31]
RR, DRR and Programme Team leaders RBM Team, Teams Leads Programme Units, Team Leaders Operations Units. 2022/12 Initiated Currently these project management structures are being included into mayor new IFI funded pipeline initiatives for BADEA and EIB.
5. Recommendation:

Recommendation five: UNDP should continue and consolidate its work on the national SDG platform by mainstreaming the SDGs into sector policies, strategies, and programmes. A solid start has already been made and, drawing in the private sector and civil society, creating a powerful platform for dialogue, advocacy, and joint action. This is an area that UNDP, as a convener and integrator, is traditionally good at.

Management Response: [Added: 2022/01/31]

Management Response: Fully accepted.

UNDP has built strong partnerships with Governments at national level and now increasingly subnational levels for implementation of the SDGs, bolstered by its principal comparative advantages and integrator role. UNDP will continue to collaborate with the UN family on mainstreaming, accelerating and policy support to help the country to deliver on its SDG ambition.

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
In collaboration with UN agencies support the government to establish the iSDG model for the country as basis for its development strategies such as the next National Development Plan and Ministerial strategies.
[Added: 2022/01/31]
RR, DRR, Country Economist. 2022/12 Initiated History
6. Recommendation:

Recommendation six: UNDP’s work on employment and the informal economy, which largely affects women, is a new and ground-breaking for the organization in Angola and should be continued. This work is likely to be a continuing policy priority for government despite the national elections to be held in 2022. In the next phase, UNDP should, in addition, place more emphasis on forging linkages and partnerships together with facilitating the mobilization of resources required to extend this work.

Management Response: [Added: 2022/01/31]

Management Response: Fully accepted.

The country office has promoted initiatives with a focus on income generation, skills development, and employment.  The CO will continue to pursue inclusive growth initiatives that integrate individuals equally into society, allowing everyone to take advantage of the benefits of growth, and enabling excluded communities those in informal sector to claim their rights. The UNDP business model will experience continuing adaptation to respond to the needs of the country and to stay abreast of changes in the development sector architecture and financing.

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
Monitoring and evaluation of the UNDP project to support the government programme on the informal economy (PREI).
[Added: 2022/01/31]
Head of Inclusive Growth and Sustainable Development. 2022/12 Initiated
Promoting social dialogue with key stakeholders to learn lessons from the implementation of the PREI and strengthen the transition strategy from the informal to the formal economy.
[Added: 2022/01/31]
Head of Inclusive Growth and Sustainable Development. 2022/12 Initiated
7. Recommendation:

Recommendation seven: UNDP should accelerate measures underway to finalize setting up of the field structures, recruiting staff and putting in place the coordination mechanisms necessary for NFM3 grant implementation. Further strengthening of the PMU should be explored, provided sufficient resources would be made available from partners, with experienced programme and M&E staff to complement existing ones, as well as specialists in TB and Malaria. The latter should be placed within the respective national programmes for efficiency, effectiveness, and ownership.

    

Management Response: [Added: 2022/01/31]

Management Response: Partially accepted.

It should be noted that the current PMU was sufficient and adequate for previous Global Fund financed projects. Plans to increase the capacities of the PMU were already considered in the current funding which also is implementing a national subnational strategy. The current NFM3 period has expanded its resources - almost five fold - resulting in a need to reconsider capacities and team size. The PMU is a unit with a specific purpose within UNDP hence it should foster relations with the national disease programmes for programmes delivery, augment ownership and effectiveness of activities and resources utilization.

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
Continued strengthening of the Global Fund PMU with the recruitment of qualified and appropriate human resources.
[Added: 2022/01/31]
The Programme Coordinator – Global Fund project. 2022/07 Initiated
8. Recommendation:

Recommendation eight: UNDP should continue to invest in and work closely with national stakeholders and partners to broaden the social protection and social safety net system that has been put in place the government of Angola. Conclusion 1 has highlighted the fact that the poor and marginalized, including women, are an important constituency/beneficiary of UNDP’s work. Many derive their livelihoods from the informal economy and are poorly protected from major crisis. The social protection system remains fragmented and has been affected by a progressive reduction of budgeted expenditure in recent years. Existing social protection spending is weakly targeted and largely ineffective as it is mostly limited to specific groups (e.g., public sector retirees, war veterans) and does not reach most of those in need. Such a strengthened and expanded social protection system could be an invaluable tool to reduce poverty and other vulnerabilities.

Management Response: [Added: 2022/01/31]

Management Response: Partially accepted.

This recommendation seems more like a description of the social protection system in Angola. It does not help guide the CO to change its programmes to strengthen social protection and furthermore it has to be recognized that UNICEF, ILO and the World Bank have already started realizing various initiatives in the field. UNDP’s niche area lies more in employment generation, diversification of the economy and the items mentioned in recommendation nr 6. In summary, the CO has no comparative advantage on social protection. With this in mind as the CO increases its portfolio it can most certainly advocate for social protection measures and try to find linkages with its own niche area of growth without specifically mobilizing resources for this area.

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
Within the UNDP support to the Government programme on the informal economy, the CO will promote the advocacy on the extension of social protection to the informal workers.
[Added: 2022/01/31]
Economist and Head of Inclusive Growth and Sustainable Development. 2022/12 Initiated
9. Recommendation:

Recommendation nine: UNDP should continue to support Angola’s efforts to sustainably manage her biodiversity and natural resources, not only from an environmental perspective but also from a human perspective related to livelihoods, as this could also be an important tool for economic diversification. Building upon support being provided on the climate change Strategy and revision of the NDC, UNDP should support efforts to mobilize domestic resources and try to mobilize funds for sustainable development to address climate change and environmental concerns. The CO should assist Angola deepen its efforts to make the transition to a low carbon growth pathway through top class technical policy support, drawing upon south-south cooperation and its global network.

Management Response: [Added: 2022/01/31]

Management Response: Fully accepted.

CO environment portfolio currently is focused substantially on matters pertaining to address government priorities on environment broadly, more specifically on biodiversity conservation by strengthening and expanding the protected areas system in Angola. While doing so, these projects are also looking into exploring alternative livelihoods sources for communities living within the PA systems (e.g. creation of beekeeping and honey production associations and its associated value chains to formal markets). On the other hand, the portfolio is also strong in addressing climate change impacts in both angles, adaptation, and mitigation. Such investments are reflected at both upstream (policy level) and downstream (community-based interventions) to ensure complementarity and completeness of UNDP support to climate agenda. The evaluator is right on the need to seek necessary effort to mobilize domestic resources, this will also create enabling conditions for the portfolio to explore areas currently underfunded such as for exemple. waste management, which is being revamped for future programming starting with Persistent Organic Pollutants under the Stockholm Convention.

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
Continued climate policy support actions through Climate Promise program initiatives.
[Added: 2022/01/31]
RR, DRR, Head of Env.& Disaster Risk Reduction unit 2022/12 Initiated
Resource mobilization (domestic and international) to address emerging needs as part of the NDC ambitions on conditional measures for adaptation and mitigation priorities.
[Added: 2022/01/31]
RR, DRR, Head of Env.& Disaster Risk Reduction unit 2022/12 Initiated
10. Recommendation:

Recommendation ten: UNDP should continue supporting the government of Angola’s Disaster Risk Management strategy, and work with government and other partners to ensure that resources to implement the strategy are prioritized in the national budget, and work to build capacities for resilience at provincial and community levels. 

Management Response: [Added: 2022/01/31]

Management Response: Fully accepted.

Currently under FRESAN project UNDP is leading the implementation of the DRM strategy in 3 target provinces of Namibe, Huila and Cunene. Lessons from these provinces are being captured by the National Civil Protection Commission and will inform similar initiatives in other provinces facing similar challenges. The FRESAN project is also expected to work with the Ministry of Finance, to ensure that national DRM priorities are reflected into national budgeting processes. The CO will continue its longstanding work with National Civil Protection Commission in resource mobilization effort to support the country in building resilience at both levels’ community/municipal/provincial and national.

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
Resource mobilization (domestic and international) for effective implementation of the DRM strategy.
[Added: 2022/01/31]
RR, DRR, Head of Env.&DRR unit 2023/07 Initiated
Capacity development of Civil Protection Officials on DRM through partnerships with ITC-ILO and South-South cooperation.
[Added: 2022/01/31]
Head of Env.&DRR unit, FRESAN PMU. 2022/12 Initiated
11. Recommendation:

Recommendation eleven: UNDP should, in view of the challenges of the governance funding landscape in Angola, be highly selective and choose a limited number of areas it will focus on, such as supporting: decentralization and working with provincial administrations and municipalities; elections provided that sufficient resources are available to manage various risks. Work on other areas should be done jointly with other units (e.g., women’s political participation (gender); participatory budgeting (poverty and inclusive growth)). Work on anti-corruption should be pursued in collaboration with other partners to minimize risks to UNDP’s reputation, and if these risks cannot be mitigated and managed, UNDP should consider discontinuing.

Management Response: [Added: 2022/01/31]

Management Response:  Fully accepted.

Limited funding opportunities for the governance portfolio are acknowledged. While maintaining some degree of policy/upstream engagement may prove strategic for UNDP positioning in the long run it is agreed that down stream initiatives and localization of governance interventions in accordance with Angola’s decentralization agenda and CO’s geo-strategy. However, the evaluators do not advise on how the CO could bridge the funding gap in governance.

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
Articulate governance as a crosscutting signature solution in the next CPD and develop interventions embedded in the CO’s programmatic priorities and geo-targeting for strategic resource mobilization.
[Added: 2022/01/31]
RR, DRR, Head of Governance Unit. 2023/12 Initiated
12. Recommendation:

Recommendation twelve: UNDP should strengthen its work on gender and make it more transformative through the design and implementation of new initiatives that integrate poverty, governance and environment/climate change concerns with Gender issues. Gender mainstreaming has largely not resulted in the transformative results anticipated, partly because gender is often not a core objective of the programmes targeted. When new programmes, portfolios, and projects are developed therefore the recommendation is to more explicitly create explicit gender goals and results to be achieved within these initiatives. The initiative could be spearheaded by the Gender Focal Team set up in connection with the Gender Seal Award and its proposed work plan and activities. The work on gender should benefit from strengthened capacities and resources. The team would continue to support gender mainstreaming in other programme outcomes.

Management Response: [Added: 2022/01/31]

Management Response: Fully accepted.

The CO´s views the inclusion of gender equality and women empowerment as an important  cross-cutting theme across all the CO portfolios and will strive to identify in new projects these explicit gender goals as part of the project results. The CO has already made a start with the process to obtain a UNDP corporate Gender Seal Award which includes this work.

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
The CO will move forward with the changes needed to obtain the Gender Seal and as part of this include Gender specific results into its new projects.
[Added: 2022/01/31]
RR, DRR, Heads of Programme Unit, Gender Officer. 2022/12 Initiated The process to apply for the Gender Seal is ongoing.
The inclusion of gender marker will be further strengthened in the design of new project.
[Added: 2022/01/31]
RR, DRR, Heads of Programme Unit, Gender Officer. 2022/12 Initiated The process to apply for the Gender Seal is ongoing.
13. Recommendation:

Recommendation thirteen: UNDP should strengthen its work on capacity development to ensure sustainable development and achieve sustained impact beyond training activities: for the office to further train programme staff on impact in capacity development and articulate this  strategic thinking in the new CPD that will have to be developed in 2022  to guide the work of the CO; provide resources from the core budget; and continue to track and assess the impact of capacity development activities undertaken by the CO in tools such as the ROAR and distill lessons learned and adopt strategies as more lessons are learned. This will ensure that resources for capacity development are targeted for maximum effect.

Management Response: [Added: 2022/01/31]

The CO will undertake further training of its staff on Capacity Development and Sustainable Development and will be including the strategic vision for Capacity Development into its new CPD and mobilize funding for Capacity Development as part of its pipeline projects. UNDP will continue to report on Capacity Development through its corporate tools like for example the yearly ROAR reporting process.

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
Implement staff capacity development and articulate this strategic thinking in the new CPD that will have to be developed in 2022.
[Added: 2022/01/31]
RR, DRR, Heads of Programme Unit, HR Unit, RBM and Communications Unit. 2023/12 Initiated

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