Final evaluation of the InTerDev project

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Evaluation Plan:
2016-2020, Kosovo
Evaluation Type:
Final Project
Planned End Date:
05/2017
Completion Date:
09/2017
Status:
Completed
Management Response:
Yes
Evaluation Budget(US $):
10,965

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Title Final evaluation of the InTerDev project
Atlas Project Number: 00071978
Evaluation Plan: 2016-2020, Kosovo
Evaluation Type: Final Project
Status: Completed
Completion Date: 09/2017
Planned End Date: 05/2017
Management Response: Yes
Focus Area:
  • 1. Poverty and MDG
  • 2. Others
Corporate Outcome and Output (UNDP Strategic Plan 2018-2021)
  • 1. Output 1.1. National and sub-national systems and institutions enabled to achieve structural transformation of productive capacities that are sustainable and employment - and livelihoods- intensive
Evaluation Budget(US $): 10,965
Source of Funding: 11266 - ADA
Evaluation Expenditure(US $): 13,212
Joint Programme: No
Joint Evaluation: No
Evaluation Team members:
Name Title Nationality
Krenar Loshi Local Consultant KOSOVO
GEF Evaluation: No
Key Stakeholders: Municipalities of Dragash and Strpce, Local Development Fund from Suhareka and project beneficiaries
Countries: KOSOVO
Lessons
1.

These are built around the key features of the project that need to be maintained in future phases or similar context:

Physical presence of the project through focal points in both benefiting municipalities has proven to be a great value added proposition to the project, securing not only effective and direct communication and follow-up with beneficiaries, but also an added quality assurance.

The present focus on practical training combining on-site advise, study visits, B2B exchanges, with involvement of local action groups have proven to be most beneficial approach to assisting the new farmers joining the scheme.

The current levels of municipal own contributions have proven to strengthen the local ownership and a clear value for money for benefiting municipalities, which paves the way for exploring opportunities for raising the municipal share, and also the share of farmers aiming at expansion.

Based on the feedback of evaluators and performance of the selected applicants, further adjustments should be made in the application form and evaluation grid and ensure continued monitoring of application procedures and tools related to LDF calls. Any knowledge gaps of potential beneficiaries leading to incomplete applications should be addressed through training to reduce the number of rejected applications.

There’s a need to maintain training on environmental issues including training session at the outset of the LDF calls, using extracts from successful and poorer applications as example.

The fore lessons learned are built around the key features of the project that need to be maintained in future phases or similar context:

Presence in the municipalities. Physical presence of the project through focal points in both benefiting municipalities has proven to be a great value added proposition to the project, securing not only effective and direct communication and follow-up with beneficiaries, but also an added quality assurance.

New farmers. The present focus on practical training combining on-site advise, study visits, B2B exchanges, with involvement of local action groups have proven to be most beneficial approach to assisting the new farmers joining the scheme.

Municipal contributions. The current levels of municipal contributions have proven strengthen the local ownership and a clear value for money for benefiting municipalities, which paves the way for exploring opportunities for raising the municipal share, and also the share of farmers aiming at expansion.

Continue monitoring of application procedures and tools related to LDF calls. Based on the feedback of evaluators and performance of the selected applicants, further adjustments should be made in the application form and evaluation grid. Any knowledge gaps of potential beneficiaries leading to incomplete applications should be addressed through training to reduce the number of rejected applications.

Maintain training on environmental issues including training session at the outset of the LDF calls, using extracts from successful and poorer applications as example.


Findings
1.

VI FINDINGS AND DATA ANALYSIS

6.1 RELEVANCE 

The project is highly relevant to the situational context, tackling key problems at the local level through the three components. It is well aligned with local and national strategies as well as UNDP/ADA priorities. It is evident that there is still a high demand to strengthen employability and support individuals at high risk of economic and social exclusion to the next level, facilitating the transition from survival based to business and market-oriented economic activities in the two municipalities. Seeking the balance between the expansion of the programme to cover new beneficiaries in the municipalities and supporting those already involved further, ET provides some recommendations on where the future support of the project should focus, building on the strengthened capacities of the stakeholders and proposing some adjustment in design. The project is linked clearly to ADA goals and strategies, UN MDGs and SDGs, and relevant national and local level strategies and plans, but this link needs to be strengthened and detailed in the project document as well. 


Tag: Relevance Local Governance Inclusive economic growth Jobs and Livelihoods SDG Integration

2.

6.2 EFFECTIVENESS

In general, the project has achieved all the results and the purpose set out. In the following, a short description is provided regarding each result. 

Result 1 - Capacity Development The project, during its first two years, delivered a comprehensive set of training measures. The targets were surpassed considerably in terms of number of people trained. It was possible to use saved funds for training representatives of local businesses, NGOs, associations and farmers in economic and rural development activities. The MTE discovered that although the trainings delivered were, as such, perceived of high quality, there appeared to be a training fatigue and achievement of results in terms of acquirement of new skills and knowledge and changes in attitude were not at the expected level. On the basis of MTE recommendations, further trainings were cancelled. It is worth emphasizing that learning by doing has been identified as an effective way of learning in the project. Collaboration between the stakeholders in the local action groups, study visits, and the monitoring and inspection visits in the field have been considered crucial in terms of strengthening of the capacities of the municipal staff and contributed to changes in attitudes. 


Tag: Agriculture co-operatives Effectiveness Knowledge management Jobs and Livelihoods Micro-credit Awareness raising Capacity Building Technical Support Civil Societies and NGOs

3.

6.2 EFFECTIVENESS (continuation)

Result 3 - Bottom-up approaches and local-level concertation for employment generation are operationalised at municipal level through Territorial Employment Pacts (TEPs).The log-frame as such does not include the detailed targets for each TEP activity separately. However, to have a better picture for the purposes of the evaluation, the team looked at the achievements under the TEP measures. With regard to the component 3 (TEPs), in general it can be said that implementation of TEPs has performed well. Several TEPs have performed better than foreseen in the target for example TEP1, TEP2 and TEP6. In Dragash/Dragaš the situation of social enterprises remains challenging while in Shtërpcë/Štrpce the biggest deviation was in the green jobs.Some beneficiaries were hesitant with the social enterprise concept at the beginning of the project, due to misunderstanding of the concept. The concept was thoroughly clarified and the functioning mechanism of the social enterprises explained which, according to the evidence gathered solved this issue. The social enterprise specialised in textiles faced several challenges in commercializing their production. The project provided an expert to support them with the market access. At the time of the evaluation the problem still persisted, further recommendations of the ET are made under Lessons Learned and Recommendations.


Tag: Effectiveness Local Governance Knowledge management Policies & Procedures Jobs and Livelihoods

4.

6.2 EFFECTIVENESS 

Risk management: The project document identifies four main risks namely Economic and financial risks (covered under 6.3 Sustainability); risk of low participation of women and girls in project activities, risk of interference in the LDF selection process and the risk of elections (after election period) affecting commitment at the municipal level. Mitigation/management strategy was identified for each risk, building on presence of the project in the municipalities and governance structures and capacity building supported by the project. 

Findings/ recommendations of the MTE: Mid-term evaluation of was carried out at the end of 2015. Recommendations were provided for the remaining project duration. a) Renew the commitment - 2nd phase of the project. The project followed the recommendations. The ownership is of the municipalities is strong, also evidenced by the commitments in terms of own contribution during the project and also for the future. b) Rethink the training component. The project followed the recommendations and organized no more capacity building sessions under the component 1. One of the findings of the final evaluation is that in terms of staff training, learning by doing approach (eg. working groups such as LAG, field site visits, study visits) in collaboration with the project staff is an effective way of learning. c) Do not give up on Dragash/Dragaš Women in Business. Project has provided further support to the SE in developing a catalogue for their products and in matchmaking at many levels. However, despite of contacts with potential buyers no contracts have been established. One of the findings of the ET is that the members of the social enterprise are capable of producing traditional type of handicrafts also which could be an opportunity when connected to tourism. d) Conduct monitoring on expected impacts.


Tag: Effectiveness Gender Equality Women's Empowerment Local Governance Risk Management Inclusive economic growth Jobs and Livelihoods Data and Statistics

5.

6.3 SUSTAINABILITY

Elements contributing to the sustainability will be analysed through SWOT analysis, with an aim of turning potential weaknesses into strengths, and threats into opportunity. 

STRENGHTS contributing to project sustainabilityFunding from local municipals budgets. The project document clearly defines as a risk (medium probability, high impact) that “the municipal initiatives supported by the project might not secure sufficient funding from local municipal budgets in order to be self-sustainable at the end of the project”. As a mitigation measure, PD foresaw specific attention towards solutions for economic sustainability from the very beginning of the project, taking into account that some adjustments might be required in terms of how initiatives are designed and pursued. This risk has been monitored and reported throughout the project. The partner municipalities increased their own funding to the project for the year 2016. The municipality of Shtërpcë/Štrpce contributed EUR 30 000 in the 2nd half of the year 2016, with the purpose of supporting the upgrading rural microenterprises in raspberry farming through TEP action 1. The municipality of Dragash/Dragaš provided during the same period EUR 23 000 for the activities under TEP 1, namely cow breeding, milk production and raspberry farming. It is foreseen that 3000 EUR will be given in spring 2017 to the MNS by each municipality. In view of the second phase of the project, the municipalities have also committed to continue with their own funding contributions, and increase where possible. A crucial sustainability element is the presence of the project in municipalities, practice of conducting a site visit after the pre-selection. This, on the one hand, supports the sustainability as a quality control mechanism during the selection and implementation.


Tag: Efficiency Sustainability Government Cost-sharing Local Governance Operational Efficiency Ownership Partnership Coordination

6.

6.3 SUSTAINABILITY

Approach for achieving the results through coordination platforms. The approach of the project to strengthen institutional and individual capacities through fostering concertation between the local level stakeholders is, as such, a fundamental element in terms of sustainability of the process. Both LDF and TEP components are closely connected to the local action groups (LAG) as platforms for stakeholder participation, which have been considered, due to its practical approach, to be a very efficient way of strengthening individual and institutional capacities. For being a joint initiative, it is also building on combined skills and resources of the participating stakeholders, bringing this way tangible benefits to all parties involved. In fact, the initiated process related to TEPs and LDFs could probably be sustained to some extent by the key stakeholders. 

Well established funding mechanisms - LDF. As a part of institutional capacities, LDF as well established funding mechanisms has a high value in terms of sustainability of the process. There is an increasing interest of beneficiaries in the LDF funding and the beneficiaries have positive perception of the procedures. Quality of the applications has improved and continuous improvement based on the feedback on evaluators has helped to make improvements in the grant process, adjustments in the tools accordingly (discussed more under effectiveness).  


Tag: Efficiency Sustainability Resource mobilization Local Governance Partnership Inclusive economic growth Jobs and Livelihoods Coordination

7.

6.3 SUSTAINABILITY

Sustainability of the projects under the LDF and TEP component is well embedded in the selection process of the beneficiaries. For example, under the TEP 1, the candidates have to fulfil certain preconditions (number of cows, number of hives) in order to be eligible for a grant. Similarly, the LDF procedures require the beneficiary a certain level of co-funding, reimbursing the beneficiary once the action is completed. This procedure, as such, contributes to the sustainability of individual projects by engaging the beneficiary through the commitments. However, these criteria will be discussed from the social inclusion point of view under the chapter impact. The project needs to start in elaborating a clear exit strategy in certain segments of the project with gradual withdrawal of support to established local producers and focusing on new entrants only. The support to established producers should now be limited to strengthening of Associations and access to markets whereby municipalities and producers contribute with an increased own share at 50%, slowly moving to 100% coverage by producers themselves, municipalities and MAFRD grant schemes. 

OPPORTUNITIES: There are numerous opportunities that the project should now start exploring, ranging from increasing own municipal contributions in general and in certain segments of the project; bringing new donor and government funding into the expanded LDF-TEP grants scheme through strengthening collaboration with central level institutions and coordination with donors at Prishtinë/Priština level; utilizing the increased funding opportunities for social enterprises andstrengthening access to markets through strengthening and expansion of local producer’s associations. At the level of end individual beneficiaries associations are important elements of sustainability. They have potential to strengthen the service provision related to training and advisory at different segments of the value chain and are also crucial in terms of negotiating with potential buyers and sellers of agricultural inputs as well as for diffusion of new techniques and products”. Therefore it would be important to make a specific evaluation of farmers associations in terms of functioning/organization and economic potential.


Tag: Challenges Sustainability Government Cost-sharing Donor relations Risk Management

8.

6.4 POTENTIAL FOR IMPACT AND GENDER 

POTENTIAL FOR IMPACT – GENERAL:

Institutional systems/mechanisms. At the institutional level the potential for impact builds on the platforms of collaboration that the project has supported for coordination of territorial employment pacts, local development funding and inter-municipal cooperation between the three municipalities. The project has strengthened considerably the institutional systems and mechanisms that support further capacity development at local level and promote sustainable and inclusive development. There is evidence that in both municipalities the TEP initiative has brought key stakeholders operating at the local level closer to each other and stakeholders deem the cooperation positively. Municipal employment offices (MLSW/EOs) coordinate closely with LAGs and VTC Prizren which has, for the time being, been the only VTC for the TEP2. In general it can be said that the approach in the TEP and LDF implementation, combined with field visits, study visits, exchanges, has proven to be an appropriate way of strengthening capacities. There is willingness to continue with cooperation at inter-municipal level, which is crucial to greater sustainability. There is also a lot of potential to further strengthen the LAGs through increased collaboration between Prishtinë/Priština and local level stakeholders and to strengthen the linkages to wider development initiatives and stakeholders in the territory as a framework for TEPs. This is also important in order to coordinate support along different value chains.There is evidence that many beneficiaries are analysing ways to take next step in the value chain. There are interests in purchasing equipment for processing, packing, storing different kind of products while some, unhappy with the prices paid by buyers, are planning how to get a better price to their products, possibly through joining action. This means there is a demand for increased support for current or potential associations. 


Tag: Impact Local Governance Partnership Inclusive economic growth Jobs and Livelihoods Micro-credit Capacity Building Coordination

9.

GENDER AND SOCIAL INCLUSION:

A degree of change could be observed with regard to marginalized and vulnerable population groups. When looking at the overall picture (project monitoring data) the direct beneficiaries of TEP actions TEP2 - TEP6 (vocational education, social enterprises, green jobs, wage subsidies) include women, minority members, PWDs or belonging to the age group 18-35, totally or with just a very few exceptions. This is also the case with TEP1 (raspberries) in Dragash/Dragaš. For the TEP1 measures targeting milk production households (Dragash/Dragaš) and TEP 1 in Shtërpcë/Štrpce as well as LDF grants, the proportion of the direct beneficiaries who do not belong to these categories is much bigger. It is worth noting however that there is also a set of other criteria affecting selection, but these were not looked at the individual level by the ET.

Participation of women and men. In the component 1, the majority of the participants in the trainings were men. This reflects the fact that the staffs in the two municipalities are dominated by men. In the component 2, the women participation is more evident, whereby 34.3 % of the direct LDF grant beneficiaries were women or groups of women (23 beneficiaries out of 67). These grants related to raspberry value chain (47 % of the total EUR), followed by livestock (30 % of the total EUR) and beekeeping (18 %). In Shtërpcë/Štrpce, 24.4 % of the grants were awarded to women, either individuals or groups (44.4 % of the beneficiaries were women taking into account the members of an association). In Dragash/Dragaš 13.6 % of the grant beneficiaries were women. In the component 3 (TEPs), similarly the women participation is evident, whereby 37.4 % of the direct beneficiaries of TEP measures were women, (161 out of 430 beneficiaries). In Shtërpcë/Štrpce the share of women of all TEP beneficiaries was 38.5 % (82 out of 213 beneficiaries) and in Dragash/Dragaš 36.4% (79 out of 217 beneficiaries). In both municipalities all participants of the TEP Action 4 measure (green jobs) were women. Apart from that, in Dragash/Dragaš all direct beneficiaries of the TEP5 (social enterprises, GDB) and TEP 6 (wage subsidy scheme) were women. A significant part of the jobs created by the TEP and LDF actions are jobs within the family. Women have naturally benefitted from the employment opportunities as family members and also as hired employees, especially in the case of raspberry farming. Besides the income, the project has empowered women; by helping them to prove that women can do it also, the perception of women has been improved within their communities in a relatively short time period, and also encouraging some of them to seek for business contacts, marketing their products and seeking support. 


Tag: Effectiveness Gender Equality Gender Mainstreaming Women's Empowerment Disabilities Inclusive economic growth Jobs and Livelihoods Data and Statistics Vulnerable Women and gilrs

10.

GENDER AND SOCIAL INCLUSION: (continuation)

Critical aspects in terms of participation of women and vulnerable groups: The findings show that several factors affected the participation of women and vulnerable groups in the project activities, such as:

Gender-sensitive value chains. At the design phase, gender-sensitive information was gathered on employment, social and cultural barriers that affect women’s participation in decision making and restrictions on mobility, closely connected to employment. The value chains that the project works with include textile sector, collection of non-wood forest products, medical and aromatic plants (where women are normally involved in harvesting and cleaning) and raspberry cultivation which are sectors where women are commonly employed. Furthermore, cow breeding is a family occupation and involvement of women can be identified in all stages of production (The value chain study 2016). The project also worked in tourism which is a very labour intensive sector. According to the value chain study, field visits in Shtërpcë/Štrpce show equal engagement of women and men in the tourism sector in general.


Tag: Effectiveness Impact Gender Equality Gender Mainstreaming Women's Empowerment Inclusive economic growth Jobs and Livelihoods Vulnerable Women and gilrs

11.

GENDER AND SOCIAL INCLUSION: (continuation)

Tackling gender roles. It is evident that three years is a short time for challenging the gender norms. One of the recommendations of the mid-term evaluation was to design specific actions that could challenge social values and norms related to gender. Although the plans for the remaining project period of the project were not change in this regards, it is worth mentioning that wide publicity was given to a change story of a woman welder who found employment after the vocational training offered by the project which is an excellent example of challenging the norms. 


Tag: Effectiveness Impact Gender Equality Women's Empowerment Local Governance Inclusive economic growth Jobs and Livelihoods Women and gilrs Youth

12.

SUSTAINABLE MANAGEMENT OF NATURAL RESOURCES:

The project has supported value chain analysis and implementation plan in both municipalities. For the municipality of Dragash/Dragaš, the recommendations include development of a detailed study for land utilization in order to analyse possibilities for expanding production with a specific focus on fodder, bee specific cultures, blackberry and strawberry. The detailed study would start by analysing the soil and seek to identify most suitable items for the specific area and based on the testing, the plan then proposes concrete measures for the area. The implementation plans further proposes development of study for an irrigation plan in both municipalities, in order to improve competitiveness of raspberry producers in the municipalities. The project has implemented capacity building measures related to agricultural best practices. These have included safe use of pesticides; rules and regulations for resource utilization within the national park, implementation of the municipal development plan (MDP) and training in tourism development focusing especially on rural tourism, traditional and healthy food and eco-tourism.


Tag: Environment Policy Green Economy Natural Resouce management Women's Empowerment Local Governance Inclusive economic growth Jobs and Livelihoods Women and gilrs

13.

SUSTAINABLE MANAGEMENT OF NATURAL RESOURCES:(continuation)

Rapid expansion of raspberry production is foreseen in the two municipalities. However, as irrigation (lack of) is an issue already now, the impact of the planned increase in the cultivation area needs to be thoroughly analyzed from environmental point of view as well. New irrigation systems might require significant landscape interventions that can affect the environment adversely, if not planned and implemented properly. Based on the summary evaluation report of the 3rd LDF call, there is still space for reflecting the environmental aspects more in the evaluation of applications. More detailed information is suggested in terms of measures related to waste water and manure management, ventilation and use of green list agricultural inputs to inform the evaluation. In addition, the fact that many applications still lack information on environmental topics, calls for further training on these topics. This can be done both as independent trainings and at the outset of the calls, using extracts from successful and poorer applications as example.


Tag: Environment Policy Green Economy Natural Resouce management Effectiveness Sustainability Local Governance Inclusive economic growth Jobs and Livelihoods

14.

6.5 EFFICIENCY

The management and quality assurance of UNDP has provided solid programme backstopping for the project, linked to regional and international experiences. The quality assurance has been provided by the UNDP Kosovo office, namely Programme Coordinator, Programme Analyst and Programme Assistant. Quality assurance has covered all stages of the project, focusing on the review of written outputs such as activity reports, progress reports and field monitoring. The quality assurance provided by the UNDP Programme team has covered also review of all written outputs from gender perspective. The Programme team has also conducted period monitoring visits. In addition, UNDP regional hub in Istanbul has also provided its technical expertise. 

The presence of the project in municipalities has ensured quick access and active cooperation ensuring higher institutional responsiveness. The field evaluation mission confirmed that the way in which the project is organized (project office in Prizren and municipal support project officers stationed in the municipality of Dragash/Dragaš and Shtërpcë/Štrpce), has been fundamental in terms of organizing project activities efficiently. In general, stakeholders and beneficiaries highly appreciated the communication with the project, and beneficiaries are seeking information from the MPSOs on a continuous basis. 


Tag: Efficiency Local Governance Human and Financial resources Project and Programme management Quality Assurance Inclusive economic growth Micro-credit Coordination

15.

6.5 EFFICIENCY (continuation)

Accumulated experience on TEPs. The accumulated experience of UNDP on the Territorial Employment Pacts, has contributed significantly to the efficiency of the project. The TEPs as such are replicable models that provide a general framework but are to be adjusted to each territory. TEPs in FushëKosovë/Kosovo Polje and Obiliq/Obilic municipalities have also supported youth and ethnic minorities and the profiling table, used for the selection of applicants in those projects, has been as a tool in the implementation of TEPs in Dragash/Dragaš and Shtërpcë/Štrpce. TEP process supported by the project builds, as such, on shared responsibilities and efficient use of skills and resources available in the region and in this way contributes to efficiency in project implementation as well as management efficiency beyond the project lifetime.


Tag: Efficiency Sustainability Local Governance Communication Knowledge management Jobs and Livelihoods

16.

6.6 STAKEHOLDERS, PARTNERSHIP STRATEGY

Multiple approach for coordinating the territorial employment pacts that the UNDP project has followed has, as such, implemented the commitments of Paris declaration. The fact that the TEPs are based on local partnerships and negotiated planning for strengthening the employability and job creation, has strongly contributed to the governance and to the implementation of those commitments at the local level. The local action groups (LAGs) play a key role in the coordination of TEPs and are also informed about the LDF processes. Apart from coordination at the component level, the key stakeholders are also contributing to the overall management through Board meetings. The involvement of both local and national partners in TEPs is an opportunity to increase collaboration between the local level stakeholders and local branches of line ministries. Municipal employment offices (MLSW/EOs) have been active partners throughout the project, coordinating closely with LAGs and VTCs, for example. The cooperation between the stakeholders in this partnership is deemed very positively and the contribution of UNDP to governance and collaboration at the regional level is recognized. There is evidence that, in addition to achievements within the project activities, closer collaboration between the stakeholders operating locally has increased awareness on the services provided by the employment offices and helped to find quick solutions for matching the offer and the demand. A crucial element of the partnership strategy has been knowledge dissemination at many levels, building on the existing capacities and knowledge in the territory. These exchanges have taken place at many levels with different target groups, taking advantage of the wide scope of the project. MDC Suharekë/Suva Reka has provided advise to the other two municipalities. Exchange of best practices has been promoted as a part of inter-municipal cooperation between Dragash/Dragaš and Shtërpcë/Štrpce, focusing on exchange of experiences on specific value chains (raspberries in Shtërpcë/Štrpce and dairy sector in Dragash/Dragaš). Also B2B events have been organized to enable networking between private sector stakeholders, current or potential.  At the same time, the project has built on synergies with other UNDP and ADA projects, using the LDF infrastructure (previously supported by ADA), TEP’s methodology and value chain analysis (previously implemented by UNDP ALMP, AfT and Biodiversity projects as well as HSTF in Fushë Kosovë/Kosovo Polje and Obiliq/Obilic project, as the one which piloted the TEPs. 


Tag: Effectiveness Relevance Local Governance Partnership Inclusive economic growth Jobs and Livelihoods Coordination

17.

6.7 THEORY OF CHANGE, MONITORING AND EVALUATION

THEORY OF CHANGE: 

According to the MTE, based on the discussions and analysis an implicit ToC was developed and validated during the field work phase in 2015. It was emphasized that the project purpose encapsulates the ToC, namely by “creating or strengthening individual and institutional capacities, the project fosters economic empowerment and increases the number of quality of jobs in the two municipalities”. As part of the final evaluation, the ToC of the project was analysed against the interviews and documentary evidence, adjusting it accordingly (Picture 4). As such, the objective of the project has been changed to include income generation and employment, with the specific focus on individuals at the risk of social and economic exclusion. In addition, the result 2 was reformulated by specifying that market positioning and productivity is achieved through the funding mechanism and targeted services which aim at improving the market positioning and productivity of local micro and small enterprises, including farmers. Consequently, the strengthened market positioning and productivity of local MSEs and employability of individuals was included at the purpose level. 


Tag: Effectiveness Efficiency Local Governance Theory of Change Jobs and Livelihoods Women and gilrs Youth

18.

6.7 THEORY OF CHANGE, MONITORING AND EVALUATION - THEORY OF CHANGE: (continuation)

The project refers both to job creation and formalization, however in order to measures the contribution to the UNDP Outcome 2, “decent job” needs to be defined and reflected in the monitoring indicators. In the current project, the capacity building is a component of its own. To clarify the division between the components and make the monitoring of the progress easier, the training under the 1st component could be focused on the beneficiary and partner institutions in the future while the components 2 and 3 would include the training targeted to final beneficiaries (of LDF grants and TEP measures). Regarding the components 2 and 3, at the moment both the LDF and TEP1 deal with milk value chain, raspberry value chain and beekeeping, Also the TEP3 focuses on jams and juices. Within the TEP1, multiple actions have been coordinated to target specific segments of the value chain (inputs, production, collection) such as is the case with milk collection in Opojë/Opolje and Gorë/Gora regions (TEP1 A and B). In the longer run, the division of roles between the components 2 (LDF) and 3 (TEP) could be further articulated within the value chains. One alternative to develop the division of roles in the future could be to target and connect each instrument more clearly to a certain segment of the value chain or to specific socio-economic situation of the applicant. Within the TEPs, clustering of measures into 2-3 entities would make the coordination and monitoring of actions easier. 


Tag: Local Governance Results-Based Management Theory of Change Inclusive economic growth Jobs and Livelihoods Capacity Building

19.

MONITORING AND EVALUATION:

From the point of the view of the monitoring and evaluation, this is a very complex project due to the vast number of sub-projects within the components 2 and 3. Simultaneously with monitoring of the progress against the expected results, it is also crucial to monitor the achievement of the higher level goals on income and employment generation, with a specific focus on individuals at risk of economic and social exclusion. 


Tag: Effectiveness Impact Monitoring and Evaluation Results-Based Management Theory of Change Jobs and Livelihoods

20.

MONITORING AND EVALUATION:(continuation)

EPs and log-frame. At the results level the indicators do not reflect the full range of measures taken under the TEP measures and therefore does not use the full potential in terms of monitoring achievements with different target groups, in quantity and quality. The municipal TEP contractsinclude a number of specific targets (such as “farmer group established”, “increase in the number of farming MEs with 5 or more milking cows” (eligibility for subsidies) or specific targets related to the social enterprises). These aspects have been referred to in all project progress report but an effort should be made to reflect a limited number of indicators from the TEP measures in the log frame or, alternatively, including the follow-up of TEP indicators in the progress reports as tables. 


Tag: Effectiveness Efficiency Monitoring and Evaluation Results-Based Management Inclusive economic growth Jobs and Livelihoods

Recommendations
1

Develop clear exit strategy

The present focus on individual/household level, with gradual withdrawal of support to established local producers and focusing on new entrants only. The support to established producers should now be limited to strengthening of Associations and access to markets whereby municipalities and producers contribute with an increased own share at 50%. 

2

Evaluation of farmer’s associations in terms of functioning/organization and economic potential

3

Clustering of TEP actions and delivery of trainings across components

In the future under 2-3 entities would make monitoring easier. Furthermore, monitoring could become easier also by placing the training for end-beneficiaries under the components 2 and 3 while including only the training for the institutions under the component 1. 

4

Deepen cooperation with central level Institutions (MLSW, MAFRD), as well as with locally based tourist vendors, events, fairs and festivals, tourism associations, ARDA East, LYACs, etc. on the local and regional level.

The project needs to strengthen further the network with locally based tourist vendors, events, fairs and festivals, tourism associations, ARDA East, LYACs, etc., all important for promotion and marketing of Sharri region products. For monitoring purposes, consider adding an age group for young people up to 24 years. For monitoring, be specific when defining concepts such as decent job/formalization/job creation. In connection with collaboration with MLSW, further strengthen the collaboration to improve to statistics related to employment at the local level, for the purposes of targeting the measures and monitoring. 

5

Maintain training on environmental issues

6

Enhance donor coordination to strengthen the linkages to wider development initiatives in the territory as a framework for TEPs and to further develop coordination on other segments of the selected value chains

7

Further analyze and develop possibilities of collaboration with other vocational training centers

8

Marketing and commercialization measures to enhance marketing and commercialization segment (branding, identification of markets, sales agents with social entrepreneur background, product licensing and certification, including through tourism) with minimum co-financing municipality/expanding farmers minimum 50%. As well as introduce inter-municipal cooperation initiatives aimed at commercialization, quality assurance and branding of Sharri products; cross- municipal enterprises; sponsoring events and festivals (as facilitator) for example DokuFest and NgomeFest in Prizren, and similar.

9

Neighbour to neighbour know-how focusing on women and interethnic collaboration were possible, primarily targeting those neighbours who have not been able to join the scheme. Successful grant beneficiary should be expected to assist non-successful neighbour as a good principle, on a voluntary basis and possibly a rewarding mechanism developed for such assistance. This would contribute to much needed economic collaboration behaviour at the community level, leading to stronger communities of producers and stronger market position. 

10

Consider organizing mid-calls or sub-calls within the same call with modified criteria, targeting specific neighbour to neighbour assistance activities (e.g. women to women and interethnic neighbour to neighbour assistance activities). This could help to challenge cultural and social gender norms and values

11

Individual purchases instead of group purchases. For cost-efficiency purposes, group purchases have been promoted were possible. However, the feedback from the beneficiary’s side regarding the purchases shows that in some cases the beneficiaries would like to be more closely involved in the selection and acquisition process of agricultural and breeding inputs in order to guarantee that the products are meeting exactly their expectations. In case of group purchase involve representation of farmers to ensure greater compatibility of acquired inputs.

12

Introduce a reserved budget line for 100 % grants for valid cases fulfilling the criteria(to be applied in certain cases), making it clear and transparent at the outset of the call. 

13

Open door policy . Introduce a mechanism to facilitate those who cannot articulate the complaint in writing (applications), whereby the complaint can be filled orally. Probably hosted at the municipal project office. On the basis of the feedback received, the municipal project support office could prepare a list of Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ), and submit it to LDF to support information sessions that could possibly be organized after each call.

14

Translated contracts with beneficiaries. Contracts (LDF) with farmers need to be translated in the three languages. 

15

Abolish additional points given for own-contributions above 10% under the LDF in order to ensure that farmers in less financially favourable position are not discriminated.

16

Reduce support for expansion of business/farms and focus on new and small farmers joining the scheme

1. Recommendation:

Develop clear exit strategy

The present focus on individual/household level, with gradual withdrawal of support to established local producers and focusing on new entrants only. The support to established producers should now be limited to strengthening of Associations and access to markets whereby municipalities and producers contribute with an increased own share at 50%. 

Management Response: [Added: 2017/09/06] [Last Updated: 2021/01/18]

A valid point. In the INTERDEV phase 2, the project foresees a development of an exit strategy as one dedicated activity. Funds have been also set aside in the budget for the development of the exit strategy. It will be developed jointly with the municipal LAGs to ensure that all needs of municipalities are addressed, leading to sustainability of the project and future complementary interventions led by the municipalities themselves. In this regard, mechanisms and products done by the project and the LAGs will be embedded in the exit strategy

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
Develop a clear and sustainable exit strategy for InTerDev
[Added: 2017/09/06] [Last Updated: 2020/04/16]
Project Staff 2020/03 Completed The issue was addressed during the second phase of the project, Funds were allocated, local municipal institutions and Local Action Groups were involved and consulted History
2. Recommendation:

Evaluation of farmer’s associations in terms of functioning/organization and economic potential

Management Response: [Added: 2017/09/06] [Last Updated: 2021/01/18]

The project team supports the development of associations throughout the project, both under the LDF and the TEP components. In INTERDEV 2, the project will consider different set of evaluation criteria for associations to benefit from grant schemes, and will also assess the potential of associations in the area in terms of economic development under other project service lines (value chains development, TEP support).

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
Set specific criteria and evaluation measures for associations under the project grant schemes.
[Added: 2017/09/06] [Last Updated: 2020/01/03]
Project Staff 2019/12 Completed In the last and final LDF call (2019) the grant scheme was modified by creating conditions for the association to become eligible potential applicants for the scheme. Consequently the evaluation criteria also was modified accordingly. History
Assess the potential of associations and eventual support to them under the various service lines of the project (value chains development, TEPs, etc.)
[Added: 2017/09/06] [Last Updated: 2020/01/03]
Project Staff 2019/12 Completed The monitoring visits were conducted regularly. Unfortunately no specific sustainable cases could be taken as an example showcasing the value chains and TEPs, since the project was mainly even during the phase was supporting small holder farmers and family business initiatives History
3. Recommendation:

Clustering of TEP actions and delivery of trainings across components

In the future under 2-3 entities would make monitoring easier. Furthermore, monitoring could become easier also by placing the training for end-beneficiaries under the components 2 and 3 while including only the training for the institutions under the component 1. 

Management Response: [Added: 2017/09/06] [Last Updated: 2021/01/18]

The INTERDEV2 project does indeed envisage clustering TEP actions more closely, with a set of key actions: active labour market measures, grants and advisory services, social entrepreneurship, and organic farming. The actual design of the TEPs will take this into consideration. However, different target groups and evaluation/selection mechanisms may justify a separate division of the TEP actions.

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
Design TEPs with effective and efficient clustering of actions in mind, so as to ease delivery of the actions and the subsequent monitoring.
[Added: 2017/09/06] [Last Updated: 2017/09/18]
Project Staff 2017/12 Completed History
Deliver training for end – beneficiaries under the components 2 and 3 while only the training for institutions under component 1.
[Added: 2017/09/06] [Last Updated: 2021/01/06]
Project Staff 2020/12 Completed The training packages were provided during the phase 2 of the project History
4. Recommendation:

Deepen cooperation with central level Institutions (MLSW, MAFRD), as well as with locally based tourist vendors, events, fairs and festivals, tourism associations, ARDA East, LYACs, etc. on the local and regional level.

The project needs to strengthen further the network with locally based tourist vendors, events, fairs and festivals, tourism associations, ARDA East, LYACs, etc., all important for promotion and marketing of Sharri region products. For monitoring purposes, consider adding an age group for young people up to 24 years. For monitoring, be specific when defining concepts such as decent job/formalization/job creation. In connection with collaboration with MLSW, further strengthen the collaboration to improve to statistics related to employment at the local level, for the purposes of targeting the measures and monitoring. 

Management Response: [Added: 2017/09/06] [Last Updated: 2021/01/18]

Indeed, a further cooperation and more linkages to the central institutions is necessary for the project, also with the view of incorporating the TEP methodology as a means of local economic development into national or local policies. Moreover, effective coordination and collaboration among local-level actors is essential for a good delivery of the project activities and the following desired impact. Therefore, the project will focus heavily on both these aspects of cooperation.

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
Deepen further the cooperation with MLSW and MAFRD and other central level institutions, namely with Kosovo Chamber of Commerce, MCYS, and CYAC as well as with MESP/AEP through dedicated meetings, coordination platforms, visibility, and other events
[Added: 2017/09/06] [Last Updated: 2020/01/03]
Programme Staff 2019/12 Completed Close cooperation happened during second phase with all the relevant stakeholders at local and central level. History
Strengthen further the network with locally based tourist vendors, events, fairs and festivals, tourism associations, ARDA East, LYACs, etc., all important for promotion and marketing of Sharr/Šar region products. (value chains development support, funding of fairs, coordination mechanisms)
[Added: 2017/09/06] [Last Updated: 2020/01/03]
Project Staff 2019/12 Completed Close cooperation was ensured during second phase with all the relevant associations, farmers, communities, participation in fairs and festivals etc History
Work with MLSW and KAS on improving statistics on employment, particularly on the local level
[Added: 2017/09/06] [Last Updated: 2020/01/03]
Project Staff 2019/12 Completed The project ensured that municipal employment offices gained the skill to enrich their databases on employment. History
5. Recommendation:

Maintain training on environmental issues

Management Response: [Added: 2017/09/06] [Last Updated: 2021/01/18]

Environmental elements of agriculture, eco-profit approach, biodiversity protection and other are embedded in the INTERDEV 2. The project will pay special attention on mainstreaming environmental considerations throughout the activities, either through dedicated trainings, awareness campaigns, sharing of best practices and more.

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
Deliver trainings and other capacity development sessions on environmental considerations of farming and agricultural production, particularly under TEPs, but also for the LDF grantees and other actors in the relevant value chains
[Added: 2017/09/06] [Last Updated: 2017/09/18]
Project Staff 2019/12 Completed History
Organize awareness campaigns, sharing of best practices, and visibility elements on environmental impact of agriculture, biodiversity protection, and more.
[Added: 2017/09/06] [Last Updated: 2020/01/03]
Project Staff 2019/12 Completed In every activity the approach related to environment protection there was highly considered and was included.as cross cutting element wherever applicable. History
6. Recommendation:

Enhance donor coordination to strengthen the linkages to wider development initiatives in the territory as a framework for TEPs and to further develop coordination on other segments of the selected value chains

Management Response: [Added: 2017/09/06] [Last Updated: 2021/01/18]

Donor coordination and complementarity of activities is essential in the framework of the TEPs. The project will reinvigorate a platform for local level collaboration and coordination to maximize impact and eliminate overlapping. 

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
Organize a sharing platform with other donors in the partner areas, sharing experiences, synergizing activities and eliminating overlapping.
[Added: 2017/09/06] [Last Updated: 2020/01/03]
Project Staff 2019/12 Completed The project served as an organizer for the meetings related to rural and agriculture development in the region with other donor funded projects. History
7. Recommendation:

Further analyze and develop possibilities of collaboration with other vocational training centers

Management Response: [Added: 2017/09/06] [Last Updated: 2021/01/18]

Collaboration with the VTCs of MLSW is essential in the framework of the TEPs, in particular under the almps and other skills development actions. Depending on the design of the various TEP actions and the demand for skills in the partner areas, the project team will further develop possibilities of collaboration with other Vocational training centres who offer skills development courses.

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
Depending on the design of the TEP actions, develop collaboration with the vocational training centres of Gjilan/Gnjilane and Ferizaj/Uroševac, also coming from the fact that an additional municipality in the south-east region of Kosovo is part of the project’s second phase (Viti/Vitina Municipality). This will depend on the vocational profiles available in the VTCs and the demand in the partner municipalities.
[Added: 2017/09/06] [Last Updated: 2017/09/18]
Project Staff 2019/12 Completed History
8. Recommendation:

Marketing and commercialization measures to enhance marketing and commercialization segment (branding, identification of markets, sales agents with social entrepreneur background, product licensing and certification, including through tourism) with minimum co-financing municipality/expanding farmers minimum 50%. As well as introduce inter-municipal cooperation initiatives aimed at commercialization, quality assurance and branding of Sharri products; cross- municipal enterprises; sponsoring events and festivals (as facilitator) for example DokuFest and NgomeFest in Prizren, and similar.

Management Response: [Added: 2017/09/06] [Last Updated: 2021/01/18]

The project will introduce measures to enhance marketing and commercialization segment (such as branding, identification of markets, sales agents with social entrepreneur background, product licensing and certification, including through tourism) in order to maximize the valorisation of the territory and improve the access of producers to markets and value chains. Moreover, further development of value chains, business-to-business networking, branding on the regional level are all embedded in the phade 2 of the project.

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
Explore options to facilitate inter-municipal cooperation initiatives aiming at commercialization, quality assurance and branding of Sharr/ Šar products, cross-municipal enterprises, as well as sponsoring events and festivals, e.g. Regional Gastronomic Fairs, Cultural events, DokuFest, NgomFest in Prizren and similar
[Added: 2017/09/06] [Last Updated: 2020/01/03]
Project Staff 2019/12 Completed All the selected producers/farmers were introduced with branding and marketing activities and are potential and have strengthened their linkages across partner municipalities. History
9. Recommendation:

Neighbour to neighbour know-how focusing on women and interethnic collaboration were possible, primarily targeting those neighbours who have not been able to join the scheme. Successful grant beneficiary should be expected to assist non-successful neighbour as a good principle, on a voluntary basis and possibly a rewarding mechanism developed for such assistance. This would contribute to much needed economic collaboration behaviour at the community level, leading to stronger communities of producers and stronger market position. 

Management Response: [Added: 2017/09/06] [Last Updated: 2021/01/18]

A multiplier effect of the project’s activities whereby the impact trickles down to households that have not been direct beneficiaries of the project is desired (through creation of additional jobs, stronger local markets, etc.). The project indeed should focus on facilitating neighbour exchanges and collaboration as appropriate to maximize the impact of the interventions. 

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
Introduce measures to enhance neighbour to neighbour exchange (knowledge, experience, share of the new seedlings, etc.). This may be through village meetings, sharing of best practices, measures of positive deviance, and other mechanisms.
[Added: 2017/09/06] [Last Updated: 2020/01/03]
Project Staff 2019/12 Completed in every LDF grant scheme and TEP action implemented neighbors of beneficiaries had high possibility to learn and practice the know how techniques, so the knowledge was extended and enabled to them. History
10. Recommendation:

Consider organizing mid-calls or sub-calls within the same call with modified criteria, targeting specific neighbour to neighbour assistance activities (e.g. women to women and interethnic neighbour to neighbour assistance activities). This could help to challenge cultural and social gender norms and values

Management Response: [Added: 2017/09/06] [Last Updated: 2021/01/18]

The project team will consider organizing mid-calls or sub-calls within the same call under the Phase 2 of the project. However, these calls for grant applications or expressions of interest require a heavy work load from the project team as well as additional resources in evaluation of the calls. This may hinder the effectiveness of these calls, also taking into account the agriculture season, procurement costs possibly rising, and more.

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
Explore options and modalities to organize mid-calls and sub-calls with modified criteria, targeting specific neighbour to neighbour assistance activities (e.g. women to women and inter-ethnic neighbour to neighbour assistance activities).
[Added: 2017/09/06] [Last Updated: 2017/09/18]
Project Staff 2018/12 Completed History
11. Recommendation:

Individual purchases instead of group purchases. For cost-efficiency purposes, group purchases have been promoted were possible. However, the feedback from the beneficiary’s side regarding the purchases shows that in some cases the beneficiaries would like to be more closely involved in the selection and acquisition process of agricultural and breeding inputs in order to guarantee that the products are meeting exactly their expectations. In case of group purchase involve representation of farmers to ensure greater compatibility of acquired inputs.

Management Response: [Added: 2017/09/06] [Last Updated: 2021/01/18]

Group purchases of agricultural inputs under the LDF grant scheme was requested by the donor as means of lowering procurement costs and effectivizing delivery. However, taking into account the feedback received from the beneficiaries, the project will explore further what would be the best mechanism of purchasing, either through groups or on an individual basis, in close collaboration with the end-beneficiaries

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
If group purchasing required as per donor’s request, involve representation of farmers to ensure greater compatibility of acquired inputs
[Added: 2017/09/06] [Last Updated: 2020/01/03]
Project Staff 2019/12 Completed The recommendation was fully implemented and per donor requirements History
Explore options of sub-group purchases – clustering of purchasing various inputs based on beneficiary feedback and preference, allowing for more tailored, yet effective and efficient procurement.
[Added: 2017/09/06] [Last Updated: 2020/01/03]
Project Staff 2019/12 Completed Whenever applicable for the group purchasing the team implemented it accordingly. History
12. Recommendation:

Introduce a reserved budget line for 100 % grants for valid cases fulfilling the criteria(to be applied in certain cases), making it clear and transparent at the outset of the call. 

Management Response: [Added: 2017/09/06] [Last Updated: 2021/01/18]

The project will introduce a reserved budget line for 100 % grants for valid cases fulfilling the predefined criteria. These 100% grants are dedicated to households living in extreme poverty, or in dire need of socioeconomic support. However, detailed assessment of this situation and subsequent award of the 100% grant must be well documented and justified, to prevent any misuse of this exception or complaints from other beneficiaries.

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
In close coordination with LDF, introduce a reserved budget line for 100 % grants for valid cases fulfilling the criteria of extreme poverty or need (to be applied in certain cases), making it clear and transparent at the outset of the call.
[Added: 2017/09/06] [Last Updated: 2020/01/03]
Project Staff 2019/12 Completed Whenever there were social cases during the grant schemes the project team ensured 100% of grant delivery with in kind contribution. History
13. Recommendation:

Open door policy . Introduce a mechanism to facilitate those who cannot articulate the complaint in writing (applications), whereby the complaint can be filled orally. Probably hosted at the municipal project office. On the basis of the feedback received, the municipal project support office could prepare a list of Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ), and submit it to LDF to support information sessions that could possibly be organized after each call.

Management Response: [Added: 2017/09/06] [Last Updated: 2021/01/18]

UNDP operates a stakeholder response mechanism in order to capture and address feedback and potential complaints from end-beneficiaries. This mechanism is operated online. However, as suggested, the project will introduce a mechanism to facilitate complaints for those who cannot articulate the complaint in writing (applications), whereby the complaint can be filled orally.

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
Establish a complaint response mechanism in the municipal offices, capturing any potential complaints or general feedback locally. This will be done in an anonymous, confidential way and documented.
[Added: 2017/09/06] [Last Updated: 2020/01/03]
Project Staff 2019/12 Completed The complaining mechanisms are functioanl in each partner municipality as discussed and agreed with the stakeholders (as agreed in the project board meetings) History
On the basis of the feedback received, prepare a list of Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ), and submit it to LDF to support information sessions that could possibly be organized after each call, as well as keep these lists available for distribution in the municipal offices.
[Added: 2017/09/06] [Last Updated: 2020/01/03]
Project Staff 2019/12 Completed This has been implemented with each grant scheme call with LDF. History
14. Recommendation:

Translated contracts with beneficiaries. Contracts (LDF) with farmers need to be translated in the three languages. 

Management Response: [Added: 2017/09/06] [Last Updated: 2021/01/18]

The Contracts under the LDF with farmers will be translated in the three languages by the Project team as suggested.

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
Complete the contracts translated into local languages needed for the grant beneficiaries to understand the content. These will then be used for the subsequent calls throughout the project duration.
[Added: 2017/09/06] [Last Updated: 2017/09/18]
Project Staff 2017/12 Completed The project team will send for translation and will ensure quality of translation in local languages for the LDF grant beneficiaries. History
15. Recommendation:

Abolish additional points given for own-contributions above 10% under the LDF in order to ensure that farmers in less financially favourable position are not discriminated.

Management Response: [Added: 2017/09/06] [Last Updated: 2021/01/18]

The project team in close coordination with LDF will ensure to abolish additional points given for own-contributions above 10% in the LDF scheme. This may negatively affect the farmers who are in a less favourable socioeconomic situation, who are at the same time the ones the project wants to reach the most. 

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
Eliminate additional points given for own-contributions above 10% of the total sum for applicants, in order to ensure that farmers in less financially favourable position are not discriminated.
[Added: 2017/09/06] [Last Updated: 2020/01/03]
Project Staff 2019/12 Completed Implemented and applied in grant schemes calls. History
16. Recommendation:

Reduce support for expansion of business/farms and focus on new and small farmers joining the scheme

Management Response: [Added: 2017/09/06] [Last Updated: 2021/01/18]

The project team will start to slowly reduce the support for expansion of existing businesses/farms and hand it over to Municipalities to lead with it. The project will explore the best ways to balance the support to existing and established smallholder farmers with new farmers who have not been supported.  

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
Explore modalities to reduce support for expansion of business/farms, which is to be slowly handed over to municipalities to coordinate on their own (the next level), and focus on new and smallholder farmers joining the scheme.
[Added: 2017/09/06] [Last Updated: 2020/01/03]
Project Staff 2019/12 Completed The recommendation was addressed throughout the schemes and all open calls, whenever possible. History

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