Terminal Evaluation – Removal of Barriers to Solar PV Power Generation

Report Cover Image
Evaluation Plan:
2017-2023, Mauritius
Evaluation Type:
Final Project
Planned End Date:
09/2017
Completion Date:
08/2017
Status:
Completed
Management Response:
Yes
Evaluation Budget(US $):
20,000

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Title Terminal Evaluation – Removal of Barriers to Solar PV Power Generation
Atlas Project Number: 00060842
Evaluation Plan: 2017-2023, Mauritius
Evaluation Type: Final Project
Status: Completed
Completion Date: 08/2017
Planned End Date: 09/2017
Management Response: Yes
Focus Area:
  • 1. Environment & Sustainable Development
  • 2. Others
Corporate Outcome and Output (UNDP Strategic Plan 2018-2021)
  • 1. Output 1.4. Scaled up action on climate change adaptation and mitigation across sectors which is funded and implemented
  • 2. Output 5.2. Effective institutional, legislative and policy frameworks in place to enhance the implementation of disaster and climate risk management measures at national and sub-national levels
SDG Goal
  • Goal 7. Ensure access to affordable, reliable, sustainable and modern energy for all
  • Goal 9. Build resilient infrastructure, promote inclusive and sustainable industrialization and foster innovation
SDG Target
  • 7.1 By 2030, ensure universal access to affordable, reliable and modern energy services
  • 7.2 By 2030, increase substantially the share of renewable energy in the global energy mix
  • 9.4 By 2030, upgrade infrastructure and retrofit industries to make them sustainable, with increased resource-use efficiency and greater adoption of clean and environmentally sound technologies and industrial processes, with all countries taking action in accordance with their respective capabilities
Evaluation Budget(US $): 20,000
Source of Funding: Project
Evaluation Expenditure(US $): 18,000
Joint Programme: No
Joint Evaluation: No
Evaluation Team members:
Name Title Nationality
Dr Adil Lari Team Leader
Wan COnsulting Local Consultant MOROCCO
GEF Evaluation: Yes
GEF Project Title: Removal of Barriers to Solar PV Power Generation in Mauritius, Rodrigues and the Outer Islands.
Evaluation Type: Terminal Evaluation
Focal Area: Climate Change
Project Type: FSP
GEF Phase: GEF-4
GEF Project ID: 00076772
PIMS Number: 4333
Key Stakeholders: Central Electricity Board, Ministry of Energy and Public Utilities, Mauritius Standards Bureau
Countries: MAURITIUS
Lessons
1.

 The project demonstrated several best practices which resulted in the successful implementation of the project that may be adopted for the formulation of other projects. Some of the best practices are: (a) a very effective public-private partnership in project development and implementation is a contributing factor to successful achievement of the project objectives. (b) Timely adaptive management measures undertaken during project implementation have avoided further implementation delays, and have taken advantage of opportunities arising that led to improved cost-efficiency, and/or offers solutions to a problem.   On the other hand, when planning future RE projects, selecting the most appropriate entity with the required level of expertise, know-how, experience and institutional authority is paramount for ensuring smooth and successful project implementation to achieve the planned outcomes.  This GEF project has effectively demonstrated the importance of this point.


Findings
1.

3. FINDINGS

3.1 Project Design / Formulation

The Project Document was designed with clearly defined objectives, outcomes, outputs, activities and milestones. The overall objective to implement at least 3MW of on-grid PV generation forms the clear basis for the subsequent supporting outcomes, outputs and activities. The intended outputs were designed to be goal-oriented and comfortably achievable within the four-year implementation timeframe The Project Document is concise and includes the required level of details. It addresses barriers and opportunities for larger uptake of grid connected solar PV in its different components and responds to the national requirements through an appropriate list of outcomes and outputs. The project objective, the 5 components of the project, the outcomes and outputs as mentioned in the Project Document are clear and practical.

Analysis of LFA/Results Framework (Project logic /strategy; Indicators) Log-Frame presented the indicators against the project objective at the aggregate level, for each of the five Outcomes of the project and for different Outputs of each of the Outcomes. The evaluators analyzed the intended project outcomes by using the “SMART” (Specific, Measureable, Achievable, Relevant, Timebound) approach and found them reasonable and appropriate. As an instrument for planning activities under the implementation framework defined in the Project Document, the logframe was adequate for reporting to GEF and for project management and reporting to UNDP. The logframe adequately facilitated the tracking of implementation targets for each year of project implementation and was thereby suited for the operational evaluation of project progress. Although indicators, targets and deadlines were defined in the logframe, several lacked a clear means for tracking progress and impact outside the project with definitive sources of validation in the market, such as external indicators and targets with which to track the real market uptake of PV technologies; numbers of applications for installations and bank loans, for example, from Government spending on RE programmes would have provided reliable indications of project progress with a clear link to the project’s CO2 ER targets. The project budget and co-financing levels were appropriate for the planned level of intervention. Responsible parties were clearly identified. 


Tag: Energy Effectiveness Relevance Results-Based Management Risk Management Theory of Change Technology

2.

3.1 Project Design / Formulation

Assumptions and Risks (continuation)

1 Regulatory: The putting in place of a fair and transparent project selection process, appropriate financial incentives and licensing regime for the targeted PV installations does not happen or is delayed; the establishment of an independent regulator is not established on a timely basis. 2 Political: There is some risk that the final (adopted) version Renewable Energy Master plan contravenes key assumptions or policy directives for this project 3 Institutional: Apprehension in some quarters in Rodrigues of the likelihood that it may not be covered under the project although mention is made in the project title and text. 4 Financial: Lack of commitment from private and public sector to invest in RE 5 Financial: The government does not agree to fund the proposed feed-in-tariffs at a level required for private sector developers to invest 6 Technical: Lack of technical information, knowledge and skills to design and implement on-grid PV projects. The risks outlined were logical and robust, whereby the strong uptake of solar PV in the public and private sectors was already evident by the delayed project start in 2014; under CEB’s initiative, and with the support of AFD and the international consultant Mercedes, many regulatory and technical issues had already been addressed and the implementation of small and medium scale PV installations through private sector investment was well under way. With CEB as leader and technical and regulatory competence, the project was able to accelerate a movement which was taken up enthusiastically by both public and private sectors


Tag: Energy Effectiveness Relevance Global Environment Facility fund Programme Synergy Programme/Project Design Risk Management

3.

3.1 Project Design / Formulation (Continuation)

Lessons from other relevant projects (e.g., same focal area) incorporated into project design (continuation)

A broader corporate initiative which should have had important linkages with this project is Deutsche Bank’s Global Energy Transfer Feed-in Tariffs (GET FiT) programme, an initiative launched in April 2010 to help facilitate the installation of Feed in Tariffs in developing countries. GET FiT looked to combine public financing with the experience of national and international partners to help address project development and remove financing barriers in developing countries. GET FiT was conceived in January 2010 when the United Nations Secretary General's Advisory Group on Energy and Climate Change (AGECC) invited Deutsche Bank Climate Change Advisors (DBCCA) to present new concepts to drive renewable energy investment in developing regions. DBCCA responded with GET FiT, a proposal designed to catalyze the private sector investment necessary to achieve the goals of renewable energy scale-up and energy access. The GET FiT research partnership included UNDP and they cooperated in various dialogue and research platforms to explore how public sector resources might be realistically mobilized to support renewable energy scale-up, and how GET FiT might be practically implemented. The FiT-related activities of the project were seen an excellent opportunity to apply best practices from GET FiT and mobilize additional resources and expertise. 


Tag: Energy Effectiveness Sustainability Private Sector Financing Knowledge management Partnership Programme Synergy Programme/Project Design Technical Support

4.

3.1 Project Design / Formulation (Continuation)

UNDP comparative advantage The project effectively builds on UNDP’s strong experience in Mauritius and Africa in promoting, designing and managing sustainable energy and environmental protection programmes in the RE sector, while strengthening the capacity of government institutions. UNDP involvement in Mauritius has included projects related to resource use including energy efficiency. The UNDP Country Office in Mauritius was active in ensuring quality assurance, transparency and due process, closely guiding and supporting the project management team to overcome bottlenecks and adopt appropriate adaptive management measures to achieve results. Staff and consultants were contracted according to the established Rules and Regulations of the United Nations and the financial transactions and procurement activities similarly followed due process and the same Rules and Regulations. 

Linkages between project and other interventions within the sector As mentioned earlier, the project effectively collaborated with other programmes and activities funded by AFD, World Bank, and the Reunion Island in the PV sector. Further, the project was implemented under the MEPU which was also directly responsible for implementing the UNDP-supported GEF-financed project “Removal of Barriers to Energy Efficiency and Energy Conservation in Buildings” implemented between 2009 and 2015. It was envisaged that a Energy Efficiency Renewable Energy Management Office would be established within MEPU to house both projects and facilitate the development, coordination and management of activities, synergies and further initiatives which would then continue beyond the lifetimes of the projects. 


Tag: Energy Effectiveness Efficiency Oversight Programme Synergy Programme/Project Design Project and Programme management Strategic Positioning

5.

3.2 Project Implementation

As noted above, the project start-up was seriously delayed by 30 months due to difficulties in the recruitment of the project manager. After 4 rounds of unsuccessful procurement rounds, the implementation arrangement was altered, so that the Central Electricity Board (CEB) became the responsible Implementation Partner (IP). The Project Management positions and responsibilities were then shared by 2 CEB staff on a part-time basis, and additional support staff was also provided to support them over time. During project implementation phase, with the increased demand under the SSDG scheme, a separate SSDG team of five staff was formed within CEB to handle the SSDG applications review and approval processes. Within CEB, the Project provided a platform for good partnership arrangements between other international donors and programmes (including the ADF and the WB), public institutions and the private sector. CEB became a champion for PV growth in Mauritius providing valuable technical inputs and a wide range of support services. International technical experts were brought on board to provide detailed best practice regarding technical, capacity building and contractual aspects. 

Adaptive management (changes to the project design and project outputs during implementation) Several major adaptive management measures were necessary during project implementation. Firstly, in February 2014, following 4 rounds of unsuccessful tendering for the position of Project Manager, it was decided that the responsibilities to implement the project should be delegated to CEB within MEPU. After a delay of almost 30 months between the date of signing of project document and the project inception meeting which was held in April 2014, it was necessary to review and revise the Log-Frame of the project to take into consideration the development stage of the solar PV sector in Mauritius. Some indicators, targets and outputs were revised and/or cancelled. For example, considering the PV installations which were already built and/or commissioned at the time, the overall project target of 3MW solar PV was revised and upgraded to 10MW to be installed by the end of 2015. In addition, output 2.5 for carbon finance trading potential was cancelled due to uncertainty of the Kyoto Protocol and the unfavorable carbon trading environment globally. The MTE reported five (5) 2MW PV farms were being implemented. It is to be noted that during the last quarter of 2016, during the project extension period, two of the selected PV farms (Fuel and La Gaulette) had to be cancelled due to non-compliance of the two selected firms to the terms and conditions of the agreements signed, in spite of a one-year extension. Three Agreements have meanwhile been signed by CEB under the MSDG programme and these are planned to be commissioned in 2018 and 2019. 


Tag: Energy Efficiency Human and Financial resources Project and Programme management Results-Based Management Theory of Change

6.

3.2 Project Implementation (continuation)

Partnership arrangements (with relevant stakeholders involved in the country/region) As the central hub for technical, management and political issues concerning energy generation and distribution, the CEB was able to coordinate the involvement of international donors (including the GEF, the WB and ADF), the government counterparts and the private sector participants. Through the promotion of activities and coordination of key stakeholders including government bodies, private sector and other international organizations active in the country, the CEB was able to efficiently augment the impact and results of the project and to avoid overlapping of efforts. It was generally appreciated that the achievements and successes realized through the synergy far exceeded the sum of what could have been achieved individually. Further, the project provided a platform for promoting good cross-ministerial coordination and collaboration. UNDP and CEB exercised timely and effective management actions and provided quality support to ensure the timely realization of project outputs and outcomes. 

Feedback from M&E activities used for adaptive management The actual project implementation period was effectively quite short, when one considers the 30-month delay at the project start. The Mid-Term Evaluation effectively took place only one year after the project inception in April 2014 and about 8 months before the planned project completion date of December 2015. As such, the Mid-term Evaluation which was conducted in May 2015 was the key M&E activity providing feedback for adaptive management. The MTE made 10 recommendations for the successful completion of the project. The TE mission reviewed these 10 recommendations and, except for recommendation 4 relating to Outreach activities, and recommendation 9 relating to solar mapping which are both well underway and about to be completed, all the recommendations have been completed. The evaluators’ assessment of the 10 recommendations of the MTE is presented in Annex 6. Further, M&E instruments such as the Annual PIR were carefully reviewed, discussed and acted upon at the Steering Committee meetings. In the 2 final years of the project, the Steering Committee met often and was pro-active in resolving any problems or delays in implementation 


Tag: Efficiency Monitoring and Evaluation Operational Efficiency Project and Programme management

7.

Monitoring and Evaluation Design at Entry and Implementation (*): Satisfactory The project document contained a Monitoring and Evaluation Plan and Budget that would be conducted in accordance with established UNDP and GEF policies and procedures. M&E activities, lead responsible parties, budget and timeframe were clearly identified in the Monitoring and Evaluation section of the project document. The project logframe contains detailed indicators of achievement, means of verification, and assumptions and risks that provide milestones for measuring project implementation progress and performance. The Project Inception Workshop took place in 2014. During project implementation, CEB as the Implementing Partner under MEPU, the EA, and UNDP CO undertook effective and timely monitoring activities through quarterly and annual progress reports (APRs) as well as the Project Implementation Reviews (PIRS) submitted by the project team to the Project Steering Committee. An independent mid-term evaluation of the project was carried out in April 2015. The Steering Committee met regularly and was informed of project progress. The Steering committee reviewed progress towards achievements and approved the Annual Work Plans and Budgets. The Terminal Evaluation Mission took place in Mauritius 26 February to 3 March 2017. The Monitoring and Evaluation has been adequately designed and implemented according to the GEF/UNDP practice and in line with the monitoring and evaluation plan described in the Project Document. Based on the above evaluation, the TE evaluators rate the Monitoring and Evaluation Design at Entry and Implementation as Satisfactory (S).


Tag: Effectiveness Efficiency Monitoring and Evaluation Project and Programme management

8.

Project Results

Overall results (attainment of objectives) (*): Highly Satisfactory As illustrated in Table 2 under the Executive Summary and reproduced below, the overall project objectives and outcomes have been generally met or exceeded, with the exception of two remaining outputs still to be completed before June 2017 (the solar map and the publication of knowledge products.) Total installed PV capacity realized under the project total 11.21MW, which is well above the original target of 3MW and exceeded the revised target put forward at the inception workshop in 2014. CEB has estimated 22.68 GWh of electricity have already been generated by PV installations commissioned under the project at the time of the TE in early March 2017. The direct GHG Emission Reduction is therefore estimated at 352,621 tons CO2eq considering the complete 20 year lifecycle of the PV installations. The overall project targets and results achieved are summarized in the Table 1 presented earlier under the Executive Summary.The PV Solar energy sector in Mauritius has clearly taken off, with a very effective public-private partnership catalyzed by the project. Private sector has shown a willingness to take proactive action and invest in PV and reduce Green House Gas emission. 604 household PV installations have been connected to grid under SSDG schemes, with total installed capacity of 4.21 MW. In addition, 3 PV farms with 2 MW capacity each have been realized under the MSDG scheme with total installed capacity of 5.6 MW, and 3 other entities with total installed capacity of 1.4 MW also benefitted from the FIT under the MSDG programme. Public sector investment in PV systems directly related to project activities is estimated at over 81 million USD; this includes the indirect loss of revenues to the Government resulting from exemptions of import duties and VAT. Further, about 20 solar PV suppliers (including engineers, sales staff, and technicians) are active on the islands. The future market prospect is generally seen as very good. CEB has plans for an additional 100MW PV installations before 2025 based on tenders already issued and its PV pipeline projects. Based on the review of all available information, the Overall Results are rated Highly Satisfactory. 


Tag: Energy Green Climate Green Economy Relevance Results-Based Management

9.

Effectiveness & Efficiency (*):

Highly Satisfactory/Satisfactory The high Effectiveness of the project strategy is evidenced by: • Over 10 MW solar PV capacity installed, far exceeding the original target of 3 MW. A further 100 MW is forecasted by 2025. • Cost-effectiveness demonstrated. The original target of 98400 tCO2eq has been surpassed by a factor of 3.6. The target of $20 GEF funding per tCO2 is thereby reduced to $5.7 GEF funding per tCO2 • Effective public-private partnership demonstrated. Sustainable private sector interest and investment in solar PV has been evident throughout the project. Private sector investment of $40 million is over double the original target. Government support in the form of FiT and tax exemptions further supports this trend. 

Based on the review of all available information, Effectiveness was rated Highly Satisfactory. The rating for project Efficiency is Satisfactory. This is supported by: • Quality inputs and collaboration from stakeholders and national and international technical experts at established funding level contributed to high cost-efficiency • High quality project results achieved in less than 3 years since implementation start-up in April 2014, less than the 4-year duration planned. As newly designated project manager, the CEB was able to bring its experience and technical expertise to the project and acted as the champion of solar PV in Mauritius. Further, CEB was able to act efficiently as a hub between different funding programmes, government bodies and the private sector. The international consultants Mercados were able to streamline the technical implementation of the project 


Tag: Energy Effectiveness Efficiency Sustainability Private Sector Financing Ownership Partnership

10.

Mainstreaming

The project addresses the UNDP priorities of clean and affordable energy, responsible consumption and production, climate action and sustainable cities and communities. Further, industry, innovation and infrastructure were supported as were decent work and economic growth

• Gender and Development During project implementation, due attention was given to including women participation in the various activities. The capacity building training on assessment of financial, economic and technical aspects of PV installations conducted by Mercados consultant included 7 professional women from various sectors. Since the solar PV sector is still in its infancy, women participation as technicians has not yet started. This is not surprising since, generally, there are few female technicians in the country, primarily due to family responsibilities. Nevertheless, this aspect will become much more widespread with the rapid expansion of the solar PV sector. 

Sustainability (*): Likely

Financial: GoM and UNDP has successfully applied to the Green Climate Fund for a 2-phase, 28 million USD follow-up project ‘Accelerating the transformational shift to a low-carbon economy in the Republic of Mauritius’ which was approved in December 2016. The new GCF project is directly linked to and builds upon the completed GEF project activities and results and is designed to include a broader spectrum of the public. The GCF project is a major success in terms of leveraged financing and post-project sustainability. Financial sustainability is rated Likely; Socio-politial: Market subsidies (including tax breaks and Feed in Tariff schemes) continue to play critical roles. These subsidies are less significant now than at the project start (procurement and installation costs have dropped some 30%, including the 15% VAT exemption, since the project start). It is very likely that these subsidies would be continued, given the Government’s long-term goal to reduce its dependency on fossil fuels, and the great interest and demand from the general population. Currently, with subsidies, the pay-back period is 6-8 years for domestic installations and 12-15 years for PV farms. Socio-political sustainability is rated Moderately Likely; Institutional framework and governance: The Government of Mauritius is very serious about RE, and has set up the Utility Regulatory Authority to help achieve this goal. GoM has already heavily invested in the solar PV sector, and will continue to do so in order to achieve its ambitious plan to significantly increase the PV energy distribution, as an important means to reduce its reliance on fossil fuels; the wind farming technology has proven to be less reliable within the context of Mauritius. Institutional framework and governance sustainability is rated Likely; Environmental The environmental benefits of solar PV is evident. It is a clean source of energy. The key environmental concern affecting the sustainability of PV installations is cyclones. Solar PV systems need to be robust to resist the strong winds and rains. Regulation, certification and labeling for quality control and safety can support resilience. Further, an affordable and reliableinsurance should be available to reduce risk. Environmental sustainability is rated Likely Based on the review of all available information, the project Sustainability is rated Likely


Tag: Energy Effectiveness Impact Sustainability Gender Equality Gender Mainstreaming Women's Empowerment Integration Capacity Building

Recommendations
1

4.3 Actions to follow up or reinforce initial benefits from the project

Recommendation 1:  It is recommended that the few remaining project activities be completed as soon as possible, including the booklet for awareness campaign, SSDG and PV market review by Deloitte, early implementation of the Smart Grid Roadmap, and the operationalization of the solar mapping system.  For the latter, it is recommended to complete the installations of the pyranometers in Mauritius first, latest by the second quarter of 2017, then test and fine-tune the system if need be.  This will help reduce any technical or operational problems that could arise for the pyranometers in Rodrigues and Agalega.   

2

Recommendation 2: There should be increased quality control on PV panels at the point of import.  CEB/MEPU to request Ministry of Trade, Commerce and Consumer Protection (MTCCP) to declare importation of PV panels as controlled product and to establish acceptable certification standards.

3

Recommendation 3: Grid absorption capacity presently has limitations to meet the increased solar energy to be produced by future PV installations. CEB should fast-track the upgrading of its grid absorption capacity in order not to block the huge momentum in the PV market created under the project.

4

Recommendation 4:  During the TE Workshop with project stakeholders, the need for norms and standards for solar PV installation works, including mechanical mounting and electrical wiring, was strongly voiced.  While the electrical specifications are prescribed in the grid codes, the mechanical and electrical works and installations should be regulated and monitored, for quality controls, safety and ensuring that the installations can withstand cyclonic exposures. It is therefore recommended that MTCCP consider introducing a system of licensing of trained and certified PV installers, and their performance be tracked;  this necessarily requires putting in place a system of performance feedback from  end-users on PV installers contracted.  The performance record should be taken into consideration at the time of their license renewals. It may be envisaged to register independent PV Inspectors much in the way of the Machinery and Boiler Inspectors scheme.

5

Recommendation 5:  To maintain the uptake momentum of solar PV installations, it is recommended that all present fiscal incentives be maintained at least for the next 8 years to 2025, including but not limited to zero customs duty (including on partial shipments) and VAT on all solar PV components including their spare parts, and green energy investment tax relief. 

6

Recommendation 6:  MITD offers courses on solar PV installation and students benefit from on-site demonstration and hands-on practice.  It is recommendation that a 5 kW PV system be installed in Rodrigues for training and demonstration purposes so that students can have actual hands-on, practical experience in installing solar PV panels. 

7

Recommendation 7:  Presently, local insurers are sharing and re-insuring their risks with international insurers at high premium rates.   It is recommended that CEB/MEPU, MTCCP and the Association of Commercial Banks in Mauritius negotiate for a group insurance policy for all the solar PV owners - and even for all renewable energy installations – in order to benefit from economies of scale.    

8

Recommendation 8:  The performance data from solar PV installations and the grid would be of great value for analyzing and planning future market development.  It is recommended that data on actual PV generation and electricity use be cross-validated with the solar maps to be generated, to guide plans for future solar PV programmes.

9

Recommendation 9:  PV generation remains more expensive than conventional electricity generation, even with the drop in price of PV installations, at about 15% worldwide over the past years.  With the added removal of the 15% VAT by the government of Mauritius in 2016, in the Mauritian context, this comes to about 30% overall cost reduction for PV investors.  While the price differential between conventional generation and RE is decreasing, the price gap needs to be tracked. Tracking the differential will help determine the future of PV sector in Mauritius and to plan the extent of future funding necessary to close the gap between conventional generation and solar PV and other renewable energy technologies.

10

4.4 Proposals for future directions underlining main objectives The implementation of the recently approved GCF project will further stimulate the rapid growth of solar PV sector in Mauritius, Rodrigues and the outer islands. 

4.5 Best and worst practices in addressing issues relating to relevance, performance and success The project demonstrated several best practices which resulted in the successful implementation of the project that may be adopted for the formulation of other projects. Some of the best practices are: (a) a very effective public-private partnership in project development and implementation is a contributing factor to successful achievement of the project objectives. (b) Timely adaptive management measures undertaken during project implementation have avoided further implementation delays, and have taken advantage of opportunities arising that led to improved cost-efficiency, and/or offers solutions to a problem. On the other hand, when planning future RE projects, selecting the most appropriate entity with the required level of expertise, know-how, experience and institutional authority is paramount for ensuring smooth and successful project implementation to achieve the planned outcomes. This GEF project has effectively demonstrated the importance of this point. 

1. Recommendation:

4.3 Actions to follow up or reinforce initial benefits from the project

Recommendation 1:  It is recommended that the few remaining project activities be completed as soon as possible, including the booklet for awareness campaign, SSDG and PV market review by Deloitte, early implementation of the Smart Grid Roadmap, and the operationalization of the solar mapping system.  For the latter, it is recommended to complete the installations of the pyranometers in Mauritius first, latest by the second quarter of 2017, then test and fine-tune the system if need be.  This will help reduce any technical or operational problems that could arise for the pyranometers in Rodrigues and Agalega.   

Management Response: [Added: 2017/10/23] [Last Updated: 2021/01/18]

In general, we agree with this recommendation. Work is under way to comply

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
Completion of Smart Grid Road Map
[Added: 2017/11/30] [Last Updated: 2021/03/30]
CEB 2018/12 Completed Roadmap already submitted History
The SSDG and PV market review to be completed by the consultants. UNDP have already provided comments on the draft deliverables
[Added: 2017/11/30] [Last Updated: 2021/03/30]
Deloitte, CEB 2018/12 Completed Market review completed History
2. Recommendation:

Recommendation 2: There should be increased quality control on PV panels at the point of import.  CEB/MEPU to request Ministry of Trade, Commerce and Consumer Protection (MTCCP) to declare importation of PV panels as controlled product and to establish acceptable certification standards.

Management Response: [Added: 2017/10/23] [Last Updated: 2021/01/18]

Management agrees with the recommendation and same will be communicated to the CEB/MEPU. In addition, with the balance of cost sharing funds, the possibility of a small assignment on this issue can be considered.

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
Inform the CEB of the recommendation.
[Added: 2017/11/30]
Satyajeet Ramchurn 2017/11 Completed The CEB has been informed by email of the recommendation, as well as by circulation of the Terminal Evaluation report
3. Recommendation:

Recommendation 3: Grid absorption capacity presently has limitations to meet the increased solar energy to be produced by future PV installations. CEB should fast-track the upgrading of its grid absorption capacity in order not to block the huge momentum in the PV market created under the project.

Management Response: [Added: 2017/10/23] [Last Updated: 2021/01/18]

Management agrees with the recommendation which is being implemented under the GCF project.

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
Launch tenders for Battery Energy Storage system
[Added: 2017/11/30]
CEB 2017/10 Completed
4. Recommendation:

Recommendation 4:  During the TE Workshop with project stakeholders, the need for norms and standards for solar PV installation works, including mechanical mounting and electrical wiring, was strongly voiced.  While the electrical specifications are prescribed in the grid codes, the mechanical and electrical works and installations should be regulated and monitored, for quality controls, safety and ensuring that the installations can withstand cyclonic exposures. It is therefore recommended that MTCCP consider introducing a system of licensing of trained and certified PV installers, and their performance be tracked;  this necessarily requires putting in place a system of performance feedback from  end-users on PV installers contracted.  The performance record should be taken into consideration at the time of their license renewals. It may be envisaged to register independent PV Inspectors much in the way of the Machinery and Boiler Inspectors scheme.

Management Response: [Added: 2017/10/23] [Last Updated: 2021/01/18]

Management agrees with the recommendation. To be taken up under Recommendation 2 above.

Key Actions:

5. Recommendation:

Recommendation 5:  To maintain the uptake momentum of solar PV installations, it is recommended that all present fiscal incentives be maintained at least for the next 8 years to 2025, including but not limited to zero customs duty (including on partial shipments) and VAT on all solar PV components including their spare parts, and green energy investment tax relief. 

Management Response: [Added: 2017/10/23] [Last Updated: 2021/01/18]

Management agrees with the recommendation and will communicate same to the Government of Mauritius.

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
Inform the CEB of the recommendation
[Added: 2017/11/30]
Satyajeet Ramchurn 2017/11 Completed
6. Recommendation:

Recommendation 6:  MITD offers courses on solar PV installation and students benefit from on-site demonstration and hands-on practice.  It is recommendation that a 5 kW PV system be installed in Rodrigues for training and demonstration purposes so that students can have actual hands-on, practical experience in installing solar PV panels. 

Management Response: [Added: 2017/10/23] [Last Updated: 2021/01/18]

This recommendation has been implemented at MITD Le Choux in Rodrigues.

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
A PV system has been installed at MITD Le Choux in Rodrigues
[Added: 2017/11/30]
CEB 2017/08 Completed
7. Recommendation:

Recommendation 7:  Presently, local insurers are sharing and re-insuring their risks with international insurers at high premium rates.   It is recommended that CEB/MEPU, MTCCP and the Association of Commercial Banks in Mauritius negotiate for a group insurance policy for all the solar PV owners - and even for all renewable energy installations – in order to benefit from economies of scale.    

Management Response: [Added: 2017/10/23] [Last Updated: 2021/01/18]

This recommendation will be transmitted to the parties concerned. However, it is difficult to implement owing to the varying interests of the stakeholders concerned.

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
Inform the CEB of the recommendation
[Added: 2017/11/30]
Satyajeet Ramchurn 2017/11 Completed
8. Recommendation:

Recommendation 8:  The performance data from solar PV installations and the grid would be of great value for analyzing and planning future market development.  It is recommended that data on actual PV generation and electricity use be cross-validated with the solar maps to be generated, to guide plans for future solar PV programmes.

Management Response: [Added: 2017/10/23] [Last Updated: 2021/01/18]

Management agrees with this recommendation. The exercise is ongoing at corporate level by the CEB since the solar map is now operational. - solarmap.uom.ac.mu

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
Inform the CEB of the recommendation.
[Added: 2017/11/30]
Satyajeet Ramchurn 2017/11 Completed
9. Recommendation:

Recommendation 9:  PV generation remains more expensive than conventional electricity generation, even with the drop in price of PV installations, at about 15% worldwide over the past years.  With the added removal of the 15% VAT by the government of Mauritius in 2016, in the Mauritian context, this comes to about 30% overall cost reduction for PV investors.  While the price differential between conventional generation and RE is decreasing, the price gap needs to be tracked. Tracking the differential will help determine the future of PV sector in Mauritius and to plan the extent of future funding necessary to close the gap between conventional generation and solar PV and other renewable energy technologies.

Management Response: [Added: 2017/10/23] [Last Updated: 2021/01/18]

Management takes note of the recommendation which can be passed on to the relevant stakeholders namely the CEB and the Mauritius Renewable Energy Agency which has the mandate for the tracking of RE prices and promoting implementation thereof.

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
Inform the CEB and the Mauritius Renewable Energy Agency of the recommendation
[Added: 2017/11/30]
Satyajeet Ramchurn 2017/11 Completed
10. Recommendation:

4.4 Proposals for future directions underlining main objectives The implementation of the recently approved GCF project will further stimulate the rapid growth of solar PV sector in Mauritius, Rodrigues and the outer islands. 

4.5 Best and worst practices in addressing issues relating to relevance, performance and success The project demonstrated several best practices which resulted in the successful implementation of the project that may be adopted for the formulation of other projects. Some of the best practices are: (a) a very effective public-private partnership in project development and implementation is a contributing factor to successful achievement of the project objectives. (b) Timely adaptive management measures undertaken during project implementation have avoided further implementation delays, and have taken advantage of opportunities arising that led to improved cost-efficiency, and/or offers solutions to a problem. On the other hand, when planning future RE projects, selecting the most appropriate entity with the required level of expertise, know-how, experience and institutional authority is paramount for ensuring smooth and successful project implementation to achieve the planned outcomes. This GEF project has effectively demonstrated the importance of this point. 

Management Response: [Added: 2021/01/09] [Last Updated: 2021/01/18]

Key Actions:

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