Support to Authority of Manpower

Report Cover Image
Evaluation Plan:
2015-2019, Kuwait
Evaluation Type:
Final Project
Planned End Date:
06/2017
Completion Date:
08/2017
Status:
Completed
Management Response:
Yes
Evaluation Budget(US $):
20,000

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Title Support to Authority of Manpower
Atlas Project Number: 00087622
Evaluation Plan: 2015-2019, Kuwait
Evaluation Type: Final Project
Status: Completed
Completion Date: 08/2017
Planned End Date: 06/2017
Management Response: Yes
Focus Area:
  • 1. Poverty and MDG
  • 2. Cross-cutting Development Issue
  • 3. Others
Corporate Outcome and Output (UNDP Strategic Plan 2014-2017)
  • 1. Output 2.2. Institutions and systems enabled to address awareness, prevention and enforcement of anti-corruption measures across sectors and stakeholders
Evaluation Budget(US $): 20,000
Source of Funding: Project fund
Evaluation Expenditure(US $): 28,000
Joint Programme: Yes
Joint Evaluation: Yes
  • Joint with UN Agencies
  • Joint with ILO and IOM
Evaluation Team members:
Name Title Email Nationality
GEF Evaluation: No
Key Stakeholders: Public Authority for Manpower, GSSCPD
Countries: KUWAIT
Lessons
1.

The principle limitation was the broad scope and uniqueness of the evaluation context and design. This project involved working with three UN agencies that begun implementation without clearly established procedures operational and otherwise. The program was thus experimental and posed a limitation. It required combining three agencies guidelines for outcome evaluation, having two separate contracts, involved greater scrutiny and problem solving on evaluation expectations and complexity and was conducted by one evaluator with no research assistance. The adaptive management approach taken by the project management has also set a new precedent and modality of assistance in NCC countries.

,

The principle limitation was the broad scope and uniqueness of the evaluation context and design. This project involved working with three UN agencies that begun implementation without clearly established procedures operational and otherwise. The program was thus experimental and posed a limitation. It required combining three agencies guidelines for outcome evaluation, having two separate contracts, involved greater scrutiny and problem solving on evaluation expectations and complexity and was conducted by one evaluator with no research assistance. The adaptive management approach taken by the project management has also set a new precedent and modality of assistance in NCC countries. .


Findings
1.

Principle findings in terms of relevance, efficiency, effectivness and sustainability.

Relevance (Highly Satisfactory)

  1. Finding: The joint United Nations UN program support has been highly relevant supporting the Kuwait’s National Development Plan directly and in relation to its international commitments. Priorities address the third outcome of the UN Country Program Document CPD 2015–2018, “Governance and institutional management are efficient, transparent, accessible, competitive and accountable”.
  2. Finding: While a transition plan was delivered and vetted, this project did not plan for the longer term capacity strengthening needs but rather had been designed as a contribution to a longer term  change effort that is assumed to be carried forward by the government partners i.e. to implement and carry forward the results.

Validity of design

  1. Finding: The program support is demand-based and highly relevant to the current development. The document was prepared quickly on request of the Minister of Labor and Social Affairs (MOSAL) by the United Nations UN agencies to provide the Public Authority for Manpower PAM with institutional strengthening support. As a quickly assembled document, it was timely in line with government’s current interest in keeping with efforts to support further system levels improvements, transparency and confinement of corruption.
  2. Finding: It has been designed with five separate (and interlinked) components each led (separate expected results and strategies per ProDoc) by a different UN agency based on its comparative advantages.
  3. Finding: The project document did not have a strong overarching (linking) theory of change, or predesigned mechanisms for inter-agency coordination and operational procedures, necessary for a new joint UN modality.
  4. Finding: The log frame was used as a management tool, but adaptive management was instituted by the Project Management Unit (PMU) and – Project Board to better suit the implementation context and the donor/beneficiary. Many inputs were creatively changed along the way and were adapted (see finding on adaptive management). In particular, activities in output 2.2 were changed during first Project Board meeting. Activities were changed during implementation and a key expected technical output, i.e. OSH profile, was dropped and changed to a collection of related OSH trainings. Activities were also changed to accommodate the needs for ISIC and ISCO revision and implementation.
  5. Finding: The program supports readiness of PAM, a newly established institution by law no. 109 for 2013, responsible for foreign labor and private sector labor. An important design assumption was that PAM had sufficient capacity to build capacity (in four sections), which was not always true. Other assumptions were that PMU would be empowered to manage/monitor the entire technical implementation for outcome level results. Others tested including that the UN joint program would be a perfectly effective modality for outcome level results; that PAM had sufficient capacity in its four section to anchor the capacity building and the technical work; that PAM did not need its leadership fully engaged in the Project Board for anchoring the results. These assumptions were tested and found to be needing further context .

2.

Effectiveness (Highly Effective)

  1. Finding: The project support to PAM has been through but moderately effective in terms of amount of inputs and deliverables produced (capacity building and training, research and evidence-based policy, systems processes and per international labour standards- also see full analysis of deliverables in results section and highlighted in Annexes 3, 6, 12, 5) .
  2. Finding: Key results: The project delivered an intensive capacity development program and delivered overall training for 274 participants (including PAM staff, judges, and representatives of employers and workers organizations (tripartite approach to implementation) in a very short time(less than two years). It entailed a combination of learning through doing and participation in the planned technical research projects and sectoral assessment activities. 343 training opportunities were offered (some participants took more than one course) over 23 courses.  In total, 230 opportunities for 188 male participants, and 113 training opportunities for 86 female participants. The CB implementation approach involved tailored training and employing expert inputs on content and approaches from the respective UN agencies. In general, it is evidence based to state that the sum total of the training and CB had served to broadly sensitize the relevant stakeholders involved in the Labor sector as to the International Labour Standards. The needs and gaps unearthed and a set of deliverables produced during implementation can be further taken forward. The project led analysis included on the general staff readiness at PAM to lead sector’s work.
  3. Finding: The amount of capacity training delivered to the country on time (23 courses delivered to 274 participants -all see Annex 12 analysis of capacity building trainings). All planned activities were delivered and on time. The respective agencies had delivered the training as per their comparative advantages. For example, ILO delivered training on ILS and OSH, while UNDP delivered trainings on labour market reporting, and key performance indicators and IOM on labor migrant protection, research and shelter support work. Safety and protection are key inputs to having a comparative labour market for Kuwait, made up of almost 80 percent foreign workers. The commendable capacity development approach included tailoring activities for carrying forward the learning, including ILO led training of trainers program. The evidence points at times (noting that the CB by agency was not linked to overall project CB plan) to good practice in the approach to capacity strengthening. For example, the CB work with the PAM labour market research unit through an optimal learning by doing approach for sustaining the learning around a key product with the unit responsible to take it forward.
  4. Finding: Women were adequately included in the activities either as leads of sections receiving technical support or in trainings.  83 Women were trained.
  5. Finding: The high quality project management was a key factor in the experimental joint UN - PAM program delivery modality success especially considering the uniqueness of the UN modality and the readiness of PAM to implement and carry forward the expected results at the start of assistance (not definitive-observation as no baselines were established). The joint PMU work has been a commendable effort. PMU assured timely delivery of all outputs by partners’ close of project date and based on evaluation PAM has been readied for implementation of the deliverables. PMU, which led the program on a path of adaptive management, was professionally employed with counterparts at GSSCPD and the – Project Board to better meet the needs of fledgling institution PAM and to take on joint UN program support.
  6. Finding: The project implementation was given excellent guidance and oversight with commitment and follow up of the GSSCPD and Secretary General on the implementation of the project and sitting in each and every single board meeting. This guidance was a key factor in project support success.
  7. Finding: The program implementation begun before the outputs and strategies had been validated by the Project Board - and a Project Manager (PM) was on board (six months after ILO and IOM begun implementation). The first board meeting, is normally intended to validate the implementation roadmap and activities.  
  8. Finding: The project design and implementation approach focus on PAM’s institutional strengthening could have benefited from a more cross-sectoral perspective both in the original design and in implementation/ oversight. While the other relevant sectors were not included on the board or as explicit implement partners in the design, the PMU took risks and engaged important cross sectoral outreach but was not systematic. Examples are: 1) ISIC and ISCO revision and implementation were the PMU dealt with MGRP and CSB. 2) Developing the national referral mechanism for victims of human trafficking it included PAM, MOFA, and MOI.
  9. Finding: PMU and the -Project Board adopted an adaptive management to deliver the program outputs, consulting with the counterparts. - As a consequence, many favorable results were unplanned such as communications and/or knowledge management (based on the original document actual activities and budget). Many strategic communications were delivered and have served to position Kuwait nationally, regionally and internationally. In this sense, the project has been positioning Kuwait well. For instance, during the recent international meetings on labor Kuwait has been able to raise the evidence coming from this project in support of its experience toward standards. It has also been recognized in the IOM press and also UNDP global work as a good practice project.
  10. Finding: While the monitoring plan with expected outputs delivered by agencies (based on the ProDoc Agreement) was closely adhered to.  Partners lacked a coordinated strategic approach to result based monitoring. While approaches were good for input delivery, there was need for strategic approach to results monitoring around system wide change and policy. Lessons pointed to a need for a strong program framework, i.e. design with implementation strategies agreed between the partners and built in pre- implementation according to a timeline and benchmarked theory of change. The interagency coordination for technical level results monitoring was challenged. A design lesson for joint programmes is that the meetings needed programme representation from all three agencies and especially ILO. . Policy strategic level backstopping was provided, but limited to specific advisory services related to deliverables. While the project had excellent management and daily monitoring for tasks and for results monitoring, there was need for a mechanism, i.e. technical and policy result monitoring committee. More interagency technical coordination was needed for contributions of components to sector wide policy influence. The project needed and agreed joint monitoring strategy, oriented towards system strengthening aspects.
  11. That said the program capacity strengthening and deliverables have made a solid contribution and awareness of the needs for sector and has influenced standards. The success however is hinging on immediate follow up activities in order to deepen and sustain the capacity building (CB) and deliverables. This has been validated by Project Board members.
  12. Finding: The communications (unintended result) and capacity building from program support has been contributing to the positioning of Kuwait and supporting Kuwaiti participation in global and international debate concerning International Labour standards.

3.

SUSTAINABILITY (Rating: Likely)

  1. Finding: The program has excellent potential for longer term development impacts but risks institutional sustainability. The project was over ambitious in scope and in the absence of concrete PAM baseline, budget and timeline for anchoring the systems work with leadership and this presents a risk and needs quick follow-up. The program support is highly relevant and meeting a unique period of change for the labor sector and civil service reforms in Kuwait. PAM will amalgamate with MGRP in the near future, becoming responsible for the entire Kuwaiti labor force. This new merger is strategic for longer-term comprehensive approach to labor management and will play an important role in the current development plan of the government of Kuwait. The program support has good scale-up potential as public service will embarked on a more progressive business model for the entire labour system- a unique window of opportunity for efficiency and effectiveness. Program sustainability is at risk in the absence of immediate follow-up to consolidate and provide clear recommendations on the business processes started and to carry forward the learning.
  2. Finding: For economic sustainability, the project requires resources and direction from leadership in planning. A possible entry may be through the commitment of the counterpart agency, GSSCPD, to provide continued support - with the context of national development planning. Enhancement of PAM’s development is directly supporting the national development plan

4.

Efficiency (Highly Efficient)

  1. Finding: The joint UN modality was experimental, with learning during implementation. In general, it was a good modality to capture the comparative advantages of the UN agencies. The implementation approach with three UN agencies, each with its own management arrangements and mixed modalities, has presented many lessons learned, which should be further documented to produce a simple standard operating procedure for UN joint programs in Kuwait and the region. It would be appropriate to do a case study and SOPs for joint implementation in a NCC country as the broad guidelines for the UN joint in this case do not apply. This experience of having a one UN project modality is reflecting the growing UN global push to implement through an UNDAF approach. In this case, many lessons have been learned around one UN approaches for demonstrate results that can be applied in future on UN projects. The central learnings include importance of standard operating procedures,   good roadmap and theory of change, project management of the highest quality,  all agencies representation on the project board (for guiding strategy and adaptive management to results),    designating technical leadership for overall oversight of the end goal and putting in place mechanisms for technical coordination.
  2. Finding: The project delivered all agreed planned deliverables on time and has been cost effective as per implementation and overall expected results. The program was in line with agreed plans and adaptation of activities based on the Project Board decisions and annual planning. The value for money is considerably high when considering the amount of strategic and targeted deliverables and expertise delivered

Recommendations
1

The evalutor has segmented the recoomendations into three groups (recommnedations for the General Secretariart of the Supreme Council of Planning and Development, recommendations for the implementing partner itself being the Public Authoriy of Manpower, and Recommnedations for the UN Agencies involved with the project).

Recoomendations for the General Secretariat of the Supreme Council of Planning and Development (GSSCPD):

  1. It is necessary to bring the UN agencies together with decision-makers, including the Minister of Labor and Social Affairs, the four undersecretaries of PAM and GSSCPD stakeholders, to discuss the report and to consider the transition plan and the open-ended nature of deliverables i.e. business process, data, and policy implications. The fact the PAM was recently established with an organizational and leadership structure being set, created a significant barrier to anchor the program support strategies and now threatens sustainability.  The work must be firmly anchored / integrated into PAM change and enhancement processes. At times work was ongoing for which leadership was needed to link it to ongoing projects i.e. IT and data automation project. Discussion needs to take place and leadership designated in PAM to take the deliverables forward. GSSCPD might like to take into considerations the findings and lessons learned for future follow up. This includes:
  • Support to PAM to take forward the law review and the project lessons in relation to the planned merger with civil service commission and MGRP, - the lessons concerning business processes, change management and institutional development;
  • The need for systems interoperability and for labor sector information management, labor law and increasing cross-sectoral coherence and coordination in the labor sector.
  • The capacity building and deliverables might now be deepened, taken forward and implemented

Public Authority for Manpower (PAM)

  1. To develop KPIs for the remaining PAM sectors; and complete and publish to users.
  2. To complete the national OSH profile within the protection sector.
  3. To take forward the work on ISIC and ISCO classification and alignment on the national level, following up the UNDP/IOM joint support on how to support PAM and MGRP to adopt ISIC Rev4 (instead of the currently used ISIC Rev2) and ISCO-08 (instead of the currently used ISCO-68 at PAM and MGRP). The task helped begin the process of addressing systematic challenges at the national level, including the lack of a unified classification system, the absence of a national plan to provide strategic directions to key stakeholders into concerted efforts towards adoption and implementation of the standard classifications and assigning ownership for each stakeholder and the overlap and duplication of efforts among various entities (PAM, Ministry of Commerce and Industry, MGRP), mainly in the implementation of the standards. The Ministry of Commerce and Industry is the ultimate owner of the implementation of the new ISIC Rev.4 standards; however, until now the full implementation has not taken place. PAM had been reportedly struggling with the urgency of implementation of the new standards and integration with the Ministry while it is still using the old standards to register and renew business licences. The recommendations for this key piece of work are to establish a central repository for all classifications on the national level, develop a central Meta data service managed by the Central Statistical Bureau (CSB) and establish a national committee formed by key stakeholders to oversee the full implementation of the standards.
  4. To follow-up work on the business process maps, needed for remaining sectors only to be completed. Work on labor sector Governance model.
  5. To follow-up the work on PAM Human Resource Management and structure in line with the assessment and reports.

 

United Nations

  1. All agencies led by UNDP develop a standard operating procedure and case study for joint project implementation.
  2. UN agencies must create a technical oversight team between all three agencies around a single results monitoring plan in future activities.
  1. Undertake a post-project capacity impact study in one year.
  • While the 23 courses were generally evaluated and assessed by participants as beneficial and have served to increase their awareness and skills, there is still a need for a comprehensive review for impact over time towards outcome level results. A post project capacity assessment may be done to consider the training for impacts over time, i.e. one year/months post-implementation. An analysis of the 23 training activities delivered by the UN agencies is provided in questions on effectiveness, and a matrix (Annex 12).
  1. ILO is to work with PAM on OSH to undertake the profiling not completed under this stage.
  2. UNDP/ ILO to develop a strategy for training the trainers follow-up and capacity leveraging at PAM. Bridge capacity training work can be provided to consolidate and continue, for instance to develop a capacity deepening plan at PAM and to begin the training of trainers work with focal point delegated responsibility within PAM to implement this.
  3. IOM to generate a case study on its work with PAM -government shelter for foreign labour in Kuwait for further positioning.
  4. IOM to provide its thoughts on the labour estimation system and how it can be enhanced based on process manuals developed.
  5. UNDP provide final accounting statement and refund the overcharge of GMS to the GSSCPD when the CDR and PDRs of all UN accounts can be settled in 4 months from now.

 

1. Recommendation:

The evalutor has segmented the recoomendations into three groups (recommnedations for the General Secretariart of the Supreme Council of Planning and Development, recommendations for the implementing partner itself being the Public Authoriy of Manpower, and Recommnedations for the UN Agencies involved with the project).

Recoomendations for the General Secretariat of the Supreme Council of Planning and Development (GSSCPD):

  1. It is necessary to bring the UN agencies together with decision-makers, including the Minister of Labor and Social Affairs, the four undersecretaries of PAM and GSSCPD stakeholders, to discuss the report and to consider the transition plan and the open-ended nature of deliverables i.e. business process, data, and policy implications. The fact the PAM was recently established with an organizational and leadership structure being set, created a significant barrier to anchor the program support strategies and now threatens sustainability.  The work must be firmly anchored / integrated into PAM change and enhancement processes. At times work was ongoing for which leadership was needed to link it to ongoing projects i.e. IT and data automation project. Discussion needs to take place and leadership designated in PAM to take the deliverables forward. GSSCPD might like to take into considerations the findings and lessons learned for future follow up. This includes:
  • Support to PAM to take forward the law review and the project lessons in relation to the planned merger with civil service commission and MGRP, - the lessons concerning business processes, change management and institutional development;
  • The need for systems interoperability and for labor sector information management, labor law and increasing cross-sectoral coherence and coordination in the labor sector.
  • The capacity building and deliverables might now be deepened, taken forward and implemented

Public Authority for Manpower (PAM)

  1. To develop KPIs for the remaining PAM sectors; and complete and publish to users.
  2. To complete the national OSH profile within the protection sector.
  3. To take forward the work on ISIC and ISCO classification and alignment on the national level, following up the UNDP/IOM joint support on how to support PAM and MGRP to adopt ISIC Rev4 (instead of the currently used ISIC Rev2) and ISCO-08 (instead of the currently used ISCO-68 at PAM and MGRP). The task helped begin the process of addressing systematic challenges at the national level, including the lack of a unified classification system, the absence of a national plan to provide strategic directions to key stakeholders into concerted efforts towards adoption and implementation of the standard classifications and assigning ownership for each stakeholder and the overlap and duplication of efforts among various entities (PAM, Ministry of Commerce and Industry, MGRP), mainly in the implementation of the standards. The Ministry of Commerce and Industry is the ultimate owner of the implementation of the new ISIC Rev.4 standards; however, until now the full implementation has not taken place. PAM had been reportedly struggling with the urgency of implementation of the new standards and integration with the Ministry while it is still using the old standards to register and renew business licences. The recommendations for this key piece of work are to establish a central repository for all classifications on the national level, develop a central Meta data service managed by the Central Statistical Bureau (CSB) and establish a national committee formed by key stakeholders to oversee the full implementation of the standards.
  4. To follow-up work on the business process maps, needed for remaining sectors only to be completed. Work on labor sector Governance model.
  5. To follow-up the work on PAM Human Resource Management and structure in line with the assessment and reports.

 

United Nations

  1. All agencies led by UNDP develop a standard operating procedure and case study for joint project implementation.
  2. UN agencies must create a technical oversight team between all three agencies around a single results monitoring plan in future activities.
  1. Undertake a post-project capacity impact study in one year.
  • While the 23 courses were generally evaluated and assessed by participants as beneficial and have served to increase their awareness and skills, there is still a need for a comprehensive review for impact over time towards outcome level results. A post project capacity assessment may be done to consider the training for impacts over time, i.e. one year/months post-implementation. An analysis of the 23 training activities delivered by the UN agencies is provided in questions on effectiveness, and a matrix (Annex 12).
  1. ILO is to work with PAM on OSH to undertake the profiling not completed under this stage.
  2. UNDP/ ILO to develop a strategy for training the trainers follow-up and capacity leveraging at PAM. Bridge capacity training work can be provided to consolidate and continue, for instance to develop a capacity deepening plan at PAM and to begin the training of trainers work with focal point delegated responsibility within PAM to implement this.
  3. IOM to generate a case study on its work with PAM -government shelter for foreign labour in Kuwait for further positioning.
  4. IOM to provide its thoughts on the labour estimation system and how it can be enhanced based on process manuals developed.
  5. UNDP provide final accounting statement and refund the overcharge of GMS to the GSSCPD when the CDR and PDRs of all UN accounts can be settled in 4 months from now.

 

Management Response: [Added: 2017/12/13]

The final recommendations were discussed during the closure meeting of the project in September, 2017, in presence of GSSCPD, PAM, and representatives of participating UN agencies. Recommendations for GSSCPD will be mainstreamed for future projects within the Kuwait National Development Plan and Kuwait Vision 2035.

Recommendations for the Public Authority of Manpower has been included in their startegic plan, and task forces has been created with other govenment agencies in order to carry on with the activities initiated originally by the project.

Regarding the recommendations for the invloved UN Agencies please note following management responses:

1- Lessons learned were documented and shared with all programme and project staff to guide future activities, including reporting mechnisms and coordination over finances.

2- A potential project is in the pipeline between ILO and MOSAL as an outcome of this project on laws related to occupational health and safety.

3- UNDP will mange final accounting statements upon finanacial closure of the project by end of 2017.

4- IOM has submitted needed manuals and held a dissemination session to target unclarities, and sessions were endorsed by PAM with full satisfaction.

It is also to be noted that the CPAP will end in 2018 with a one year extension till the end of 2018, and there no forseens to have another proejct with PAM.

 

 

 

 

 

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