Renewable Energy for the City of Marrakech's Bus Rapid Transit System. Terminal Evaluation Report

Report Cover Image
Evaluation Plan:
2017-2021, Morocco
Evaluation Type:
Final Project
Planned End Date:
07/2019
Completion Date:
09/2019
Status:
Completed
Management Response:
Yes
Evaluation Budget(US $):
20,000

Share

Document Type Language Size Status Downloads
Download document RFP 04-2018- Examen GEF BRT_Final_04-05-2018 Saliou-AN.docx tor French 123.62 KB Posted 231
Download document 5890_GEF 9567 - Rapport Evaluation Finale - 11-06-2019 incl annexes.pdf report English 974.83 KB Posted 545
Download document Présentation - COPIL Cloture Décembre 2018.pdf related-document French 3776.39 KB Posted 293
Title Renewable Energy for the City of Marrakech's Bus Rapid Transit System. Terminal Evaluation Report
Atlas Project Number: 00097409
Evaluation Plan: 2017-2021, Morocco
Evaluation Type: Final Project
Status: Completed
Completion Date: 09/2019
Planned End Date: 07/2019
Management Response: Yes
UNDP Signature Solution:
  • 1. Energy
Corporate Outcome and Output (UNDP Strategic Plan 2018-2021)
  • 1. Output 1.5.1 Solutions adopted to achieve universal access to clean, affordable and sustainable energy
SDG Goal
  • Goal 7. Ensure access to affordable, reliable, sustainable and modern energy for all
SDG Target
  • 7.1 By 2030, ensure universal access to affordable, reliable and modern energy services
Evaluation Budget(US $): 20,000
Source of Funding: Project budget, GEF
Evaluation Expenditure(US $): 20,000
Joint Programme: No
Joint Evaluation: Yes
  • Joint with Donors
  • Joint with Ministry of Environment Regional Direction of Environment
Evaluation Team members:
Name Title Email Nationality
Alexandre Borde International Consultant
GEF Evaluation: Yes
GEF Project Title: Renewable Energy for the City of Marrakech’s Bus Rapid Transit System
Evaluation Type: Terminal Evaluation
Focal Area: Climate Change
Project Type: MSP
GEF Phase: GEF-6
GEF Project ID: 9567
PIMS Number: 5890
Key Stakeholders: Ministry of Sustainable Development; Municipality, SIE
Countries: MOROCCO
Lessons
Findings
1.

3. Findings 3.1. Project design and formulation

3.1.1. Analysis of the results framework (Project logic/strategy; indicators) 

The project logical framework and the results logical framework are presented in the annex to this document.

The analysis is done component by component and focuses on the relevance, effectiveness, efficiency, impacts and sustainability of the actions undertaken, and on the ownership by the beneficiaries of the project results. The structure defined by the project document was robust. It was based on a logical division between a governance component (component 1), a technical component (component 2) and a capacity building component (component 3). This structure is quite traditional - it is often adopted by GEF-funded projects - and has the benefit of clarity to articulate and implement activities at different levels, in terms of national administrative substance and research. In recent years and replenishment cycles, the GEF has improved the guidelines for the development of SMART activities and indicators for the results framework. This makes it possible to establish this structure in a comprehensive way. The specific objective of the project was to “support the low-carbon integration of the Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) system implemented by the City of Marrakech through the installation of a 1 MW solar power plant based on High Concentration Photovoltaic (HCPV) technology”. The energy produced by the plant should help electric buses to present an integrated low-carbon transport system that can be replicated in other cities in Morocco. Both concrete and ambitious, this objective has the quality of being innovative and envisaging the dissemination of logic and technology across the country. The objective of the project was built upon a justified theory of change model which was developed in the Project Document(see the report). 

The specific objective is formulated in such a way as to be verifiable supported by four indicators, each with a baseline and a target (presented in section 2.4 of this document). The first indicator is the “Extent of change in modern energy coverage by users and specific sectors”. The second one refers to the direct number of daily beneficiaries of lines L1 and L2 of the public bus system. The third indicator is related to tons of incremental CO2 equivalent avoided as a direct result of project activities. Finally, the last indicator matches km of high capacity public transport system (BRT) per 100 000 users. Indicators can be considered as “SMART” (specific, measurable, appropriate, realistic, and timebound), as they target a specific field and area of improvement (type of energy used, social improvement, pollution and infrastructure). They are measurable as they are indicators of progress; Achievable and Appropriate as each indicator has a specific responsible that will do it; Realistic as the four indicators are meaningful and important to the outcome; And time bound, as they are included in a time frame that specify when the results will be achieved. The project planned to achieve three outcomes presented in section 2.3 of this document. These results were accurate and realistic for the project. Each component and result was associated with indicators that provided clear monitoring and evaluation of the progress of activities to achieve these results (presented in section 2.4 of this document). Globally speaking, the proposed indicators are relevant and can be evaluated as SMART (specific, measurable, achievable, relevant and time-bound). The exact target for each indicator by the end of the project gives precise numbers .They clearly show all aspects to consider and to effectively measure the progress made.

3.1.2. Hypotheses and risks

In view of the technical risks associated with the PV solar power plant and its connection to the BRT system, four difficulties had been identified. They are recalled below: 1. Injection of electricity into the electric bus station 2. Depositing aerosols on the panels 3. Flood / storm period 4. Theft and malicious acts More fully, the assumptions and risks at the objective and outcome level had been established in the project document and are also recalled in the table below. Due to a good definition of the risks, and measures taken to anticipate them, the project was able to overcome these risks without difficulty. In addition, a Social and Environmental Risk Screening Procedure (SESP) was carried out during the formulation of the project document. It was noted that the project did not include major potential risks related to the principles: human rights, gender equality and empowerment of women, environmental sustainability, as well as standards: biodiversity conservation and sustainable management of natural resources, climate change mitigation and adaptation, health, safety and working conditions in the community, cultural heritage, displacement and resettlement, indigenous peoples, pollution prevention and resource efficiency. The conclusions of this document annexed to the project document have been taken into account.


Tag: Effectiveness Global Environment Facility fund Government Cost-sharing Monitoring and Evaluation Partnership Results-Based Management Risk Management Theory of Change

2.

3.1.5. Comparative advantage of the UNDP

UNDP’s comparative advantage in this project is in capacity development. It also has extensive experience working with the Moroccan government and municipalities and has therefore played a central role as a facilitator between the Moroccan agencies involved in the project. The UNDP country office, acting as the implementing agency for the GEF, has an operational institutional comparative advantage, based on its proven experience in managing GEF financial resources, developing projects and strategies to mitigate the effects of climate change and sustainable mobility. In addition, UNDP has an advantage in terms of its established responsibility to comply with all monitoring and evaluation requirements at the project level. UNDP has already supported other climate change mitigation projects and can therefore leverage its experience across the country. For example in Morocco, UNDP has been engaged in “Promoting the Development of Photovoltaic Pumping Systems for Irrigation”, “Energy Efficiency Codes in Residential Buildings and Energy Efficiency Improvement in Commercial and Hospital Buildings in Morocco” or “Market Development for Solar Water Heaters”. Around the world, UNDP is also supporting the development of other low carbon urban transport systems, for instance in the Philippines or in Bhutan.


Tag: Climate Change Adaptation Climate change governance Global Environment Facility fund Local Governance Operational Efficiency Programme Synergy Strategic Positioning Capacity Building

3.

3.2. Project implementation

3.2.1. Adaptive management (changes in project design and project results during implementation)

The responsible parties demonstrated adaptability throughout the project. Thus, in November 2016, ADEREE announced that it now operates as an AMEE (Moroccan Energy Efficiency Agency). In terms of project management and operationalization, in the Steering Committee and in the partnership agreements, AMEE has retained the responsibilities initially assigned to ADEREE. In addition, one of the objectives of the project was the construction of a 1 MW HCPV solar park. After the launch of the call for tenders for the construction, it appeared that the budget provisioned was not sufficient. With all the stakeholders concerned, it was then decided to reduce the installed capacity in the first phase to 0.75 MW. Finally, due to the absence of a decree authorizing the feeding-in of solar electricity into the grid from small installations, numerous meetings have been held to find a solution. Finally, it was decided to connect the power plant to the power station of the bus line, i.e. in self-consumption.

3.2.2. Partnership agreements

At the end of the project, the plant is scheduled to start up as soon as ownership is transferred, as shown in the following diagram. The local company ALSA is responsible for the operation and management of the Marrakech BRT system. The TLDC, Transport Local Development Company, is responsible for the supervision and management of public transport. These partnerships have facilitated the implementation of project activities and have been of great help in achieving project results. Particularly the city of Marrakesh has been highly involved in the project implementation and financing, as foreseen in the partnership for this project. With the RADEEMA, cooperation with regard to the electricity operations and grid connection has been realized. RADEEMA and SIE have furthermore contributed to a feasibility study of the direct connection to the bus station, a system impact study, security devices and a Technical Monitoring Committee. SIE and JetEnergy have for instance supported the technical report of the project, JetEnergy has been the BOT contractor and the O&M system for the solar PV plant is 100% in place, with JetEnergy as the responsible party. The partnership with IRESEN enabled to developed green mobility competences in Morocco, and raise awareness with for instance dedicated events organized during COP-22 or the Green Mobility Forum organized on September 25, 2018 in Marrakech.


Tag: Energy Efficiency Global Environment Facility fund Government Cost-sharing Partnership Project and Programme management Country Government

4.

3.2.4. Monitoring and evaluation: design at entry and implementation

The monitoring and evaluation (M&E) system was undertaken in accordance with UNDP requirements, as set out in the UNDP programme and operations policies and procedures and the UNDP evaluation policy. The activities and the activities’ progress was monitored and recorded by the UNDP Country Office, with a sufficiently budgeted M&E plan by the DRE. The project results, described in the logical framework, have been subject to biannual and annual reviews to ensure the progress of the project, as well as bi-monthly progress reports. In addition, minutes were prepared for each meeting, which the evaluator was able to consult freely. Furthermore, the implementation statuses were reported to the project steering group.

The implementation of an M&E system was used to directly supervise several activities. This is rated as highly satisfactory. In fact, the M&E plan was well conceived and its articulation helped to monitor results and track progress toward achieving objectives. Also, the quality of the M&E plan implementation was very good as the plan was sufficiently budgeted and funded during both project preparation and implementation. The M&E system includes reports of very regular project team meetings, detailed progress reports, minutes of meetings with partners, evaluations and audits, minutes of technical and steering committee meetings. The monitoring plan for the indicators has also been carried out in a very satisfactory manner with the development of a system known as MRV for monitoring, reporting and verification within the meaning of the UNFCCC34. This exercise was done by mobilizing partners for data collection (reports, letters, meetings, emails). Also, monitoring indicators from the project document were very effective for measuring performance and objectives progress.

In addition to the display of the advancement of the activities, several recommendations were brought forward and recorded in the meeting’s minutes. These, as well as the bi-monthly progress reports allowed for the timely implementation of the project activities and quick discussion of arising issues. It needs to be mentioned, that in this M&E system, PIR self ratings were complete and very detailed. They are completely consistent with the terminal evaluation rating. In accordance with the expected results “3.1. Lessons learned, experiences and best practices related to the system are compiled and disseminated to other Moroccan cities” and “3.2. A communication and public awareness campaign for the use of the BRT system is being developed”, the project facilitated learning and allowed knowledge to be shared and widely disseminated to promote the capitalisation and replication of the project results. The role of the Project Board and UNDP in M&E activities was very crucial as they participated in the project planning and the implementation of the strategy. Monitoring responsibilities was given to the National Project Coordinator, which was responsible for regular monitoring of project results and risks; the Project Steering Committee ensured the project achieves the final objectives and desired results; and the Project Implementation Partner which had to provide any additional information necessary project reporting.

In fact, “project-level Monitoring & Evaluation was undertaken in compliance with UNDP requirements as outlined in the UNDP POPP and UNDP Evaluation Policy”. The UNPD Country Office worked and collaborated with the relevant stakeholders of the project to be sure that all UNDP M&E requirements are met. UNPD Country Office supported the National Project Coordinator as needed. In conclusion, the implementation of the M&E system has been highly satisfactory. The project was able to ensure a good follow-up of the activities, which made it possible to respect the schedule. Local consultants and the project management team provided frequent monitoring reports on implementation and activities. They were important efforts to know the progress of activities during the project period, as well as the budget allocation and integration of project indicators into the national M&E system.  This criterion is rated HS (highly satisfactory). 


Tag: Coherence Effectiveness Monitoring and Evaluation Programme/Project Design Results-Based Management Theory of Change Coordination

5.

3.3. Project results

The results of the project evaluation are based on stakeholder consultation and documentation review. In parallel to these consultations, the evaluation focused on the analysis of the results in the form of deliverables, based in particular on the project document and the reports of the economic, financial and technical studies carried out as part of the project. The section presents the evaluation results in their entirety and then by criteria.

3.3.1. Overall results (achievement of objectives) (*)

The final evaluation of the project shows that all the results were achieved on time. All that remains is to connect the power plant to the power bus station when the power plant is handed over. The activities were implemented effectively and produced highly satisfactory results. In addition, the project is very innovative and easy to disseminate and replicate in Marrakech or other cities. At the level of stakeholders, communication and impact, the project is also considered highly satisfactory. 

3.3.1.1. Evaluation of results and products

The tables below show the objectives set at the beginning of the project, and the degree of completion of these at the date of the evaluation, component by component.

Component 1 Component title: Integrated planning, capacity building and MRV systems for the low-carbon BRT system. (See table in the report)

Component 2 Title of the component: Commissioning of a 1 MW solar park to supply electrical BRTs (See table in the report)

Component 3 Title of the component: Knowledge Management and Outreach. (See table in the report)


Tag: Climate Change Adaptation Climate change governance Energy Effectiveness Impact Gender Equality Gender Mainstreaming Women's Empowerment Project and Programme management Results-Based Management Urbanization Data and Statistics SDG Integration

6.

3.3.1.2. Evaluation of other objectives and priorities (continuation)

Socio-economic benefits

The profitability of urban public transport is a key element for the city in a context of good use of public finances. The current urban public transport system is not economically viable. The increase in the utilization rate targeted by the project increases the sector’s added value and profitability, particularly with a reduction in the cost per kilometre. In addition, urban public transport acts as an accelerator of economic activity. Consequently, the increase in the utilization rate strengthens the city’s economic vitality. In addition, the system contributes significantly to reducing traffic jams, unproductive hours, etc. and thus generates indirect socio-economic benefits.


Tag: Energy Effectiveness Global Environment Facility fund Government Cost-sharing Knowledge management Partnership Capacity Building Inclusive economic growth Technology Urbanization South-South Cooperation

7.

3.3.2. Relevance

The relevance of the project is obvious, as solar PV technology seems to be adapted to the Marrakech context, all the more so when this is coupled with clean urban transport. The desire to extend the project to other bus lines is the best demonstration of this. This should be achieved by increasing the supply of renewable energy installations to 5.7 MWp. This project can therefore be considered as an important first step because of its relevance. This is an important demonstration pilot to replicate the project. The relevance was also verified with regard to the need to clarify the legal aspects during the implementation phase of the project. Legal provisions allowing small and medium-sized renewable energy installations to successfully feed electricity into the grid were missing. The construction of the solar park proved that it was urgent to take these legal aspects into account: the project served as a case study for the creation of a National Electricity Regulatory Agency (ANRE) and the appointment of a General Directorate. This project led to a request to fill this gap with the formulation of a decree so that it would be possible for a small power plant to feed electricity into the grid managed by RADEEMA.


Tag: Climate Change Adaptation Climate change governance Energy Green Economy Relevance Global Environment Facility fund Public administration reform Urbanization

8.

3.3.3. Effectiveness and efficiency

This part of the evaluation examines the effectiveness and efficiency of the expenditures and financial means used to achieve the desired results. One of the objectives of the project was the construction of a 1 MWp solar park. However, after the call for tenders for the construction of the plant was launched, it became clear that the budget provisioned was not sufficient to cope with this size. With all the stakeholders concerned, it was decided to reduce the installed capacity in the first phase to 0.75 MWp. The Marrakech solar photovoltaic plant covers an area of 3ha, with a total installed capacity of 1MWp, of which 0.75 MWp is installed, i.e. approximately 3900 polycrystalline photovoltaic panels in series with a rotary solar radiation monitoring system. The efficiency of these expenditures is considered satisfactory to very satisfactory: the construction and commissioning of a 0.75 MW solar farm has been successful. The photovoltaic solar power plant will be connected to the electric bus station in November 2018, at the time of the transfer of ownership: the agreement is ready. The management of GEF funds has been very efficient. In addition, the municipality and other cofinancing partners also contributed financially to the project with USD 55,473,683 in cash co-financing from the city of Marrakech and USD 700,000 in parallel co-financing in kind. This is considered very satisfactory, with strong national ownership and high efficiency.

The efficiency in terms of the use of the financial resources is based on the information presented in 3.2.3. Project financing.These financial results show that the total expenditure of 1 319 879,18 US$ after the three years is almost exactly the total GEF grant of 1 319 863,00 US$ for the project. However, in 2017, the financial resources were not as efficiently allocated (rate: 63.590%). Furthermore, the detailed comparison of the AWP budget and the actual expenditure per project component demonstrates that for component 1 and for the Project Management Unit (PMU), the expenditure was significantly below the planned budget. Still, when one considers the successful realisation of the project’s components, as elaborated in the chapters above, the efficiency of the project’s budget use can be evaluated as satisfactory. There have been numerous communication and public awareness campaigns on the use of the BRT and the solar power plant in the city of Marrakech. The city is also very transparent about the projects, which can be found on the city’s official website. As regards component 3 of the project, a seminar and round table were organised with representatives of municipalities (Marrakech and the periphery), regional and local authorities. The project was also discussed and brought to the attention of the public through a meeting on sustainable development projects in the Marrakech Safi region, at Wilaya headquarters, as well as through the visit of the solar power plant of several international and national delegations. The COP22 and the “Photovoltaïca International Renewable Energy Exhibition & Conference” in Marrakech also drew the attention of the many participants to this project. On the basis of this important communication effort, it will be possible in the future to raise even more awareness on the replicability of the project.This criterion is rated HS (highly satisfactory).


Tag: Effectiveness Efficiency Global Environment Facility fund Government Cost-sharing Communication Ownership

9.

3.3.5. Sustainability

The economic model of the Marrakech BRT system already demonstrates that it is sustainable. It is expected to be even more so with the connection of the plant to the electric bus station. The municipality has established a sustainable transport financial strategy for the development and operationalisation of four BRT lines. The operating and maintenance costs increase from 3.51 MAD (per person per trip, for diesel buses) to 3.1 MAD for electric buses. The upgrading of electric buses (3 new BRT lines) will further reduce operating and maintenance costs per passenger and increase the sustainability of the project; projections estimate operating and maintenance costs per person and per trip at 1.96 MAD. The operation and management of the electric buses of the Marrakech BRT system, alongside the operation of diesel buses, is handled by ALSA until 2019, the year in which the concessions will be reallocated following a call for tenders. The financial sustainability is thus noted L (likely).


Tag: Energy Green Economy Efficiency Sustainability Global Environment Facility fund Knowledge management Operational Efficiency Ownership Technology

10.

3.3.6. Impact

The project’s impact in terms of CO2 emissions avoided is significant, with an estimated 8.6% reduction in GHG emissions compared to the baseline scenario. Indeed, the transportation sector is a major source of GHG emissions. The introduction of the 10 electric BRTs reduces the annual consumption of diesel and therefore reduces emissions from diesel fuel combustion by 1,003 tonnes of CO2, representing a 9% reduction in total public transport bus emissions before the introduction of electric BRTs.

In total, the GHG emission reductions from the introduction of electric BRTs powered by the solar power plant are estimated at 952 tonnes CO2, or about 8.6% of total public transport emissions by bus before the introduction of electric BRTs. The extension of the project, which provides for the mobilisation of 48 electrical BRTs, including 44 online and 4 in reserve, to satisfy all passenger traffic on the 4 lines by 2030, and which plans to install a solar installation with a capacity of 5.7 MWp, will further reduce GHG emissions. The project’s greenhouse gas reduction potential is linked to the reduction in diesel consumption, resulting in a gain of 37,866 tonnes of CO2, and to the transition from two-wheeled vehicles to public bus transport by improving the quality of public transport service. To this end, the total GHG emission reductions from the road transport sector after the scaling up of the BRT project is estimated at 372,226 tonnes of CO2.

As for air quality, it should be mentioned that Marrakech is not a highly industrialized city. The problem of air pollution in Marrakech is linked to transport with a negative impact on the respiratory tract. Results from air quality monitoring stations have revealed some exceedances, including NOx, PM10 and ozone. The BRT electric system powered from the solar power plant reduces the number of diesel buses used to provide public transport for citizens, particularly on high-traffic density roads, thus leading to a significant improvement in air quality. In 2017, the 10 electric buses on Line 1 Massira travelled 936,069 kilometres. This reduces the pollution caused by diesel buses. Translated into economic impacts on health, the amount is 0.5 million MAD38. The extension of the project will further improve air quality in the city of Marrakech. 

The improvement of the bus public transport system in Marrakech is already beginning to direct citizens to the BRTs, which offer a multitude of advantages, including accessibility, comfort, speed and punctuality, which remains a determining factor and sought by the majority of public transport users. This shift towards electric BRTs increases the modal share of this mode of transport, indirectly leading to a reduction in the use rate of other modes, in particular passenger cars and two-wheelers. Noise pollution will therefore be reduced, particularly on the main traffic routes within the city, which are currently marked by considerable noise pollution.


Tag: Energy Renewable energy Impact

Recommendations
1

Ensure that at the end of the project, the solar power plant is commissioned and supplies the electric bus station.

2

Transfer of ownership to the municipality of Marrakech in accordance with the agreemet prepared for the occasion.

3

Proposals for future directions and the Scaling up of the project.

4

4.1.4. Best and worst practices in addressing issues of relevance, performance and success

The main lessons learned from the project are as follows:

× In the Moroccan context of a rapidly evolving energy sector, it is important to ensure that a small or medium-sized solar power plant can be connected to the grid or bus station (directly) from the planning and project development phase (provide sustainable solutions to cope with legal and institutional conditions);

× The integration of the gender approach into all project activities, actions, publications and purchases has had a catalytic effect, especially for a project with a significant social dimension;

× Adopting an effective communication policy from the beginning of the project has been very beneficial, following a participatory approach.  

For the replication of the project, the prospects are promising, not only in Marrakech, but also in Morocco and more broadly on the African continent. It is recommended to use this pilot project as a catalyst to carry out similar pilot projects in other African cities.

1. Recommendation:

Ensure that at the end of the project, the solar power plant is commissioned and supplies the electric bus station.

Management Response: [Added: 2019/10/31] [Last Updated: 2020/11/18]

The solar power plant is now commissioned and supplies the eletric bus station.

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
1.1 Ensure commissioning of the solar power.
[Added: 2019/10/31] [Last Updated: 2020/11/24]
Project Management team 2019/03 Completed The solar power plant is now commissioned and supplies the electric bus station History
2. Recommendation:

Transfer of ownership to the municipality of Marrakech in accordance with the agreemet prepared for the occasion.

Management Response: [Added: 2019/10/31] [Last Updated: 2020/11/18]

The agreement will be signed at the closing ceremony planned in December 2019. 

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
2.1 Signature of the transfer agreement of the solar power between the Secretary of state in Charge of Sustainable Development and the municipality of Marrakech
[Added: 2019/10/31] [Last Updated: 2020/11/24]
Project Management team 2021/06 Initiated Le conseil d’administration de la ville de Marrakech tenu début décembre 2019 a entériné la décision de signer l’accord avec le Département de l’Environnement pour recevoir et gérer la station solaire. L’accord de transfert de ladite station devait être signée lors d’une cérémonie présidée par le Ministre de l’Energie des Mines et de l’Environnement, le Wali et le Président de la Commune. La cérémonie n’a pas eu lieu en raison du COVID19. Elle sera reportée au 1er semestre 2021 History
3. Recommendation:

Proposals for future directions and the Scaling up of the project.

Management Response: [Added: 2019/10/31] [Last Updated: 2020/11/18]

A concept note for the GEF Impact Program 

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
Develop concept notes to seek new funding from international donors for scaling up the project. 
[Added: 2019/10/31] [Last Updated: 2019/12/02]
Project Maagement Team 2019/07 Completed A concept note for the GEF Impact Program “Sustainable Cities” has been formulated for “Strengthening Marrakech’s sustainable development through innovative planning and financing” and approved by the GEFSEC. We are now developing the Child project concept. History
4. Recommendation:

4.1.4. Best and worst practices in addressing issues of relevance, performance and success

The main lessons learned from the project are as follows:

× In the Moroccan context of a rapidly evolving energy sector, it is important to ensure that a small or medium-sized solar power plant can be connected to the grid or bus station (directly) from the planning and project development phase (provide sustainable solutions to cope with legal and institutional conditions);

× The integration of the gender approach into all project activities, actions, publications and purchases has had a catalytic effect, especially for a project with a significant social dimension;

× Adopting an effective communication policy from the beginning of the project has been very beneficial, following a participatory approach.  

For the replication of the project, the prospects are promising, not only in Marrakech, but also in Morocco and more broadly on the African continent. It is recommended to use this pilot project as a catalyst to carry out similar pilot projects in other African cities.

Management Response: [Added: 2020/11/17] [Last Updated: 2020/11/26]

Ensure the sharing of the good experience of this relevant project with other cities.

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
Ensure the sharing of the good experience of this relevant project with other cities, notably in the African countries.
[Added: 2020/11/24] [Last Updated: 2020/11/26]
UNDP 2020/01 Completed The Marrakech sustainable city impact program is supported by the global program (coordinated by UNEP) which offers a platform for the exchange and sharing of good practices and experiences between 9 countries (Morocco, China, India, Indonesia, Rowanda, Brezil, Costa rica, Argentina, Sierra Leone) and 24 cities around the world. History

Latest Evaluations

Contact us

1 UN Plaza
DC1-20th Floor
New York, NY 10017
Tel. +1 646 781 4200
Fax. +1 646 781 4213
erc.support@undp.org