Independent Country Programme Evaluation: Angola

Report Cover Image
Evaluation Plan:
2018-2021, Independent Evaluation Office
Evaluation Type:
ICPE/ADR
Planned End Date:
12/2018
Completion Date:
12/2018
Status:
Completed
Management Response:
Yes
Evaluation Budget(US $):
100,000

Share

Document Type Language Size Status Downloads
Download document Sumário Executivo- Angola.pdf summary Portuguese 249.97 KB Posted 289
Download document ICPE Angola Annexes.pdf related-document English 630.01 KB Posted 343
Download document ICPE Angola ToR_2018.pdf tor English 254.26 KB Posted 372
Download document ICPE_ANGOLA_2018.pdf report English 3301.82 KB Posted 721
Download document ICPE_ANGOLA_2018_Evaluation Brief.pdf related-document English 383.19 KB Posted 339
Title Independent Country Programme Evaluation: Angola
Atlas Project Number:
Evaluation Plan: 2018-2021, Independent Evaluation Office
Evaluation Type: ICPE/ADR
Status: Completed
Completion Date: 12/2018
Planned End Date: 12/2018
Management Response: Yes
Corporate Outcome and Output (UNDP Strategic Plan 2018-2021)
  • 1. Output 1.1.1 Capacities developed across the whole of government to integrate the 2030 Agenda, the Paris Agreement and other international agreements in development plans and budgets, and to analyse progress towards the SDGs, using innovative and data-driven solutions
  • 2. Output 1.1.2 Marginalised groups, particularly the poor, women, people with disabilities and displaced are empowered to gain universal access to basic services and financial and non-financial assets to build productive capacities and benefit from sustainable livelihoods and jobs
  • 3. Output 2.1.2 Capacities developed for progressive expansion of inclusive social protection systems
  • 4. Output 2.3.1 Data and risk-informed development policies, plans, systems and financing incorporate integrated and gender-responsive solutions to reduce disaster risks, enable climate change adaptation and mitigation, and prevent risk of conflict
Evaluation Budget(US $): 100,000
Source of Funding:
Evaluation Expenditure(US $): 56,400
Joint Programme: No
Joint Evaluation: No
Evaluation Team members:
Name Title Email Nationality
Cristina Rodrigues Consultant
Carlos Lopes Consultant
GEF Evaluation: No
Key Stakeholders:
Countries: ANGOLA
Lessons
Findings
1.

2.1 Inclusive growth and sustainable development

In its National Development Plan, the Government of Angola aims to promote growth and economic diversification, national business and job creation (including the integration of youth in active life); and reinforce the positioning of Angola in the regional and international context. In alignment with the Plan, one of the key UNPAF partnership areas focused on inclusive growth, economic diversification, production and job creation. UNDP was the only agency financially committed to this area ($6,326,000). According to its Country Programme Document, UNDP aimed to support Angola put in place and implement policies and strategies to promote inclusive and sustainable growth, leading to graduation from the least developed countries group. To achieve this, UNDP planned to support government efforts in economic diversification by taking a strategic, targeted approach to scalable livelihoods and entrepreneurship development. It planned to engage at the policy level and act as a broker, linking big investors with small producers, and developing skills to help people find opportunities in non-extractive sectors such as tourism and agro-business. Although this was expected to be accomplished in collaboration with the International Labour Organization (ILO), the African Development Bank (AfDB), the World Bank, and other partners, joint programmes or partnerships with these organizations were not implemented by UNDP. UNDP also intended to enable and facilitate inclusive and sustainable social protections; and strengthen national institutional systems, laws and policies for the equitable delivery of HIV and related services. Overall resources planned for this outcome were $28,261,741, which corresponds to 58 percent of the total planned resources. Expenditures from 2015 to 2017 were near $22 million, representing 58 percent of total programme expenditures. The execution rate reached 78 percent. The programme focused on two main areas of interventions: 1) sustainable and inclusive economic development, which represented 40 percent of this outcome; and 2) HIV/AIDS, which accounted for 60 percent of the resources. Under sustainable and inclusive economic development, UNDP worked on four key areas: i) support for graduation and achievement of the SDGs; ii)  support for small-scale productive activities; iii)   strengthening of public-private partnerships; and iv) support for vocational training. No SouthSouth and triangular cooperation partnerships were developed under this outcome. The sustainable and inclusive economic development interventions were expected to contribute to gender equality in a limited way (GEN1)13, and the HIV projects had gender equality included as a significant objective (GEN2).

Finding 1. UNDP has strategically positioned the organization by effectively raising awareness on the SDGs and helping Angola in its initial efforts to graduate from LDC status.

 


Tag: Inclusive economic growth HIV / AIDS Agenda 2030 SDG Integration Strategic Positioning Effectiveness Relevance Policy Advisory Technical Support

2.

Finding 2. UNDP was crucial to help sustain and increase the provision of antiretroviral treatments in Angola and help the national response to HIV/AIDS, through procurement of medication, advocacy and strengthening of national institutions, systems, laws and policies for the equitable delivery of HIV and related services.


Tag: Public administration reform HIV / AIDS Procurement Effectiveness Relevance Advocacy Technical Support

3.

Finding 3. UNDP has not sufficiently progressed with initiatives to mobilize the private sector on corporate social responsibility and to enable and facilitate inclusive and sustainable social protection aiming at livelihoods, professional training and local economies’ development, as initially committed, due to lack of resources and a proper partnership strategy.


Tag: Jobs and Livelihoods Human and Financial resources Partnership Private Sector Financing Effectiveness Efficiency Sustainability

4.

2.2 Democratic governance

In its NDP, the Government of Angola aimed to build a participatory and democratic society, guaranteeing fundamental liberties and rights and promoting civil society. It also aimed to ensure equal development and human security through the reform of the public sector and government decentralization. In line with the Plan, the UNPAF focused, on one hand, on good governance, participation, decentralization and democratic institutions, and on the other, on access to justice and human rights. As a response, UNDP planned in its CPD to support citizens’ participation, the modernization of public institutions, and the delivery of effective services at the local level based on good governance criteria. UNDP also aimed to work with several municipalities on a pilot basis, codifying lessons from participatory and effective governance for basic social service delivery, and then support the Government to scale up good practices. Work in extractive industries was expected to be linked with UNDP global and African regional initiatives to support a new mining code of Angola, expose the Ministry of Geology and Mines to international best practice in governing the mining sector, and support the capacity of the Ministry to manage the mining sector sustainably. Over time, UNDP planned to engage with local communities to ensure their greater voice in decision-making on extractive revenues management, allocation, and benefit sharing. Planned resources for this outcome were $5,232,412, which corresponds to 11 percent of total planned resources. Expenditures to date were near $3.7 million, representing 10 percent of the total programme expenditures. The execution rate reached 70 percent. All governance projects were expected to contribute to gender equality in a limited way (GEN1). 

 

Finding 4. Modestly but timely responding to the capacity development needs for election management, and maintaining the decentralization agenda and citizenship participation efforts, UNDP has strategically positioned the organization as a key partner of the Government for the coming cycle.

 


Tag: Capacity Building Civic Engagement Election Gender Equality Gender Mainstreaming Women's Empowerment Strategic Positioning Coherence Effectiveness Relevance UN Agencies

5.

Finding 5. Despite its importance for environmental protection, UNDP has not contributed to needed reform in the extractive industries sector as initially envisaged, because practices and management capacity on extractive industries were not among the Government’s priorities during the programme cycle.


Tag: Human rights Extractive Industries Relevance Country Government

6.

Finding 6. UNDP has successfully helped Angola in its efforts to improve human rights awareness and enable the capacity of justice and rule of law institutions and systems. It has contributed to strengthening the Ombudsman function in Angola strategically positioning UNDP to contribute to a new relevant area of work on anti-corruption. However, UNDP has had limited success in improving the delivery of services to the poorest and most marginalized.


Tag: Anti-corruption Human rights Justice system Local Governance Gender Equality Gender Mainstreaming Women's Empowerment Strategic Positioning Effectiveness Relevance Sustainability

7.

Finding 7. UNDP has made important contributions helping the Ministry of Women’s Affairs to implement gender policies at national and local levels and to improve capacities to collect, analyse and report on gender data.


Tag: Capacity Building Local Governance Gender Equality Gender Mainstreaming Gender-Based Violence Women's Empowerment SDG Integration Integration Programme Synergy Coherence Effectiveness Relevance Technical Support

8.

2.3 Environmental sustainability and disaster risk reduction

Angola’s ability to manage natural resources sustainably is challenged by weak institutional capacity, the need to work across sectors and the lack of a budget for the integration of environmental aspects. Translating the country’s commitments into action has been impeded by the lack of human and financial resources to adequately accomplish and sustain environmental management. The limited efforts regarding environmental protection have only reached 13 percent of the territory, having increased only 5 percent since the colonial era (prior to 1975). In addition, the 2015-2016 El Niño drought, which followed four previous years of consecutive droughts in southern Angola, resulted in significant food production losses affecting over 1.13 million people. The 2013-2017 National Development Plan focused on human and economic development and prioritized stability, growth and job creation. It did not highlight the environment as a key area. However, recent programmes and policies developed by the Ministry of the Environment and the Ministry of the Interior point to increased importance within the national policy framework. In line with this policy, the UNPAF identified inclusive and sustainable economic development as a key strategic partnership area and planned to support Angola in attaining integrated and sustainable management of natural resources and the environment. UNDP and IOM were the main agencies financially committed to the environment, climate change and DRR ($29.5 million and $5.5 million respectively), while other agencies, such as FAO, UN-Habitat and UN Environment Programme, were also expected to contribute. UNDP planned in its CPD to strengthen environmental sustainability through the improvement of energy and natural resources management, access to green technology and climate change strategies. Aiming to reduce multidimensional poverty, UNDP also planned to work on biodiversity and disaster risk reduction, which were not identified by the Government as national priorities. However, UNDP considered them relevant to reinforce the links between sustainable environment, disaster risk management and gender equality. Planned resources for this outcome were $13,554,910, which corresponds to 28 percent of total planned resources. Expenditures to date were of $10.7 million, representing 28 percent of the programme expenditures. The execution rate reached 79 percent. Although some of the oldest interventions (Iona national park, Hydrochlorofluorocarbon, and Environment Strategic Programme, all starting in 2012-2013) were not expected to contribute to gender equality (GEN0), gender integration improved slightly with the new initiatives on protected areas and climate resilience (GEN1). The DRR and energy/charcoal initiatives had gender equality included as a significant objective (GEN2).

 

Finding 8. UNDP helped national and provincial disaster risk reduction institutions to implement the national contingency plan. It has also supported the preparation of DRR plans in eight provinces. However, the sustainability of results is uncertain since DRR has yet to be considered in the budgeting process to ensure resources are adequately allocated.


Tag: Local Governance Disaster Risk Reduction Gender Equality Gender Mainstreaming Effectiveness Efficiency Relevance Sustainability

9.

Finding 9. UNDP has successfully contributed to increasing government awareness on disaster risk reduction, particularly in the case of emergencies such as the recurrent El Niño drought. UNDP added most value through a ‘whole of government’ and ‘whole of society’ approach, sharing international experience and providing institutional capacity-building at national and subnational levels. However, an effective resource mobilization strategy is still lacking to ensure the sustainability of results.


Tag: Capacity Building Local Governance Disaster Risk Reduction Resource mobilization Effectiveness Efficiency Sustainability Advocacy

10.

Finding 10. UNDP support to the creation and capacity-building of demining management institutions was relevant in the previous cycle. Even though there are still challenges that continue to impede agricultural development and UNDP is contributing to link mine action with the SDGs, the national institutions are now better equipped to take the work forward without as much engagement from UNDP.


Tag: Capacity Building Mine Action SDG Integration Effectiveness Relevance Sustainability Agriculture

11.

Finding 11. UNDP contributed to important efforts of expanding protected areas in Angola and has strategically positioned itself as a key partner in building a legal framework and policies for the environment, and for capacity-building to integrate environment into national development programmes and plans.


Tag: Capacity Building Integration Strategic Positioning Protected Areas Coherence Effectiveness Relevance

12.

Finding 12. UNDP support to access environment funding has been crucial and effectively contributed to increased awareness on environmental issues in Angola. However, UNDP’s dependency on growing GEF funding has limited UNDP’s flexibility to look for other sources of funding.


Tag: Human and Financial resources Project and Programme management Strategic Positioning Biodiversity Blue Economy Energy Protected Areas Global Environment Facility fund Effectiveness Efficiency Relevance Bilateral partners Private Sector UN Agencies

13.

Finding 13. Important challenges remain for UNDP to contribute more strategically to environmental sustainability and disaster risk reduction with improved partnerships, gender mainstreaming, efficiency, programmatic integration and leveraging synergies with other areas.


Tag: Inclusive economic growth Jobs and Livelihoods Disaster Risk Reduction Gender Equality Gender Mainstreaming Women's Empowerment Change Management Integration Partnership Programme Synergy Energy Efficiency Relevance Sustainability Country Government UN Agencies

14.

2.4 Key additional factors affecting UNDP’s performance and sustainability of results

Finding 14. Adequate theories of change are missing to better integrate the contributions of the different areas with proper systems thinking to ensure effective and sustainable advances to transformational change, national ownership and learning for improved effectiveness.


Tag: Integration Programme Synergy Risk Management Theory of Change Effectiveness Relevance Sustainability Civil Societies and NGOs Country Government International Financial Institutions Private Sector UN Agencies

15.

Finding 15. UNDP has provided insufficient attention to knowledge management and learning to improve results. It has not leveraged evaluations sufficiently and South-South and triangular cooperation approaches remained mostly limited.


Tag: Social Protection Human rights Justice system Local Governance Disaster Risk Reduction Gender Equality Gender Mainstreaming Knowledge management Monitoring and Evaluation Results-Based Management Coherence Effectiveness Relevance South-South Cooperation

16.

Finding 16. Although most of UNDP interventions target women, the achievement of gender equality and women’s empowerment is not an explicit objective. It is not promoted in a significant and consistent way based on sound gender analysis. There is limited gender capacity in the country office and much reliance on one single focal point, despite the existence of a gender focal team and previous training provided to staff.


Tag: Capacity Building Gender Equality Gender Mainstreaming Women's Empowerment SDG Integration Knowledge management Effectiveness Relevance Sustainability

17.

Finding 17. The decline in core resources had an impact on the size of the CO team and UNDP’s negotiation power with the Government. Noncore resources have increased, mostly from vertical funds, but the lack of an effective resources mobilization strategy to diversify funding sources, attract private sector and government cost-sharing resources have constrained the country office’s capacity to better contribute results.


Tag: Business Model Change Management Human and Financial resources Procurement Global Climate Fund Global Environment Facility fund Government Cost-sharing Private Sector Financing Resource mobilization Vertical Trust Funds Challenges Effectiveness Efficiency Sustainability UN Agencies UN Country Team

Recommendations
1

As the country progresses to middle-income status, UNDP should renew its visibility and relevance and better leverage its comparative advantage as a broker and an integrator of efforts in Angola to implement the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development.

 UNDP has the challenge and the opportunity to better capitalize on its strategic position and make more significant and sustainable contributions to Angola’s development challenges by promoting more of ‘whole of government’ and ‘whole of society’ approaches, increasing the provision of knowledge services and policy advice, especially through South-South and triangular cooperation, and actively diversifying its partnerships with other UN agencies and IFIs, and those who have a voice in the country through joint programmes.

2

UNDP should develop a long-term vision and clear theories of change ensuring integration among thematic areas, to better build synergies, avoid piecemeal initiatives and ensure the achievement of more significant and sustainable results. UNDP should be less ambitious and more realistic and focused in accordance with its limited resources, looking for synergies across thematic areas and partnerships with strategic partners that can add to UNDP’s resources and ensure continuation of efforts and sustainability of results. It should particularly aim to systematically integrate youth, gender and green jobs creation in all areas of the programme. In the area of environmental sustainability, for example, UNDP should link improvement of protected areas management and on energy and climate change projects with green jobs creation and youth employability to promote economic diversification and decrease rural migration. The small-scale livelihood support initiatives should be avoided unless properly integrated with natural resources management and other areas, bringing adequate partners.

3

UNDP should develop staffing capacities to increasingly focus its efforts on upstream interventions where UNDP may have a clearer added value given its decreasing core regular resources. Downstream interventions should be more limited to innovative pilot projects with adequate risk mitigation and exit strategies aligned with committed national partnerships to ensure improved chances for sustainability. Given its limited core regular resources, it will be important for UNDP to focus on policy advice and analysis strategically tailored to the national context. UNDP should support areas where it can make the most difference and withdraw from areas where other development partners or national institutions are better positioned with more significant human and financial resources, such as extractive industries and mining. Downstream efforts must be more selective and have clear and monitored sustainability strategies.

4

UNDP should develop a human resources strategy to better address the needs and challenges of the programme and agencies services and reassess the resource mobilization strategy of the office to diversify its sources of funds more effectively. Given its decreasing core regular resources and dependence on vertical funds, UNDP needs to augment its staffing and improve its current capacities to better engage with the private sector, IFIs and government cost-sharing as a source of co-financing.

5

UNDP should also address the lack of staff capacities and incentives to adequately integrate gender with proper strategic thinking on how to bring about change in equality and women’s empowerment. Capacities for better gender analyses are needed to more adequately identify and address the specific needs of different genders and particular groups such as youth, which should be integrated across all outcomes.

1. Recommendation:

As the country progresses to middle-income status, UNDP should renew its visibility and relevance and better leverage its comparative advantage as a broker and an integrator of efforts in Angola to implement the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development.

 UNDP has the challenge and the opportunity to better capitalize on its strategic position and make more significant and sustainable contributions to Angola’s development challenges by promoting more of ‘whole of government’ and ‘whole of society’ approaches, increasing the provision of knowledge services and policy advice, especially through South-South and triangular cooperation, and actively diversifying its partnerships with other UN agencies and IFIs, and those who have a voice in the country through joint programmes.

Management Response: [Added: 2018/12/12] [Last Updated: 2020/06/07]

Partially agreed.

The eighteen findings of the Independent Country Office Evaluation provide a range of examples of UNDP Angola relevance and leveraging of its comparative advantage with very limited core resources in a middle-income country. The fact that the Government of Angola, non-state actors and funding partners have pointed at UNDP to manage significant resources of vertical funds, amounting to more than ten times the value of core resources, also speaks to the value addition seen on the side of the Government and partners.

 To continuously increase visibility, relevance and leverage comparative advantage, UNDP will aim to increase the provision of knowledge services and policy advice through its partnerships with Angola academia, with the National Institute of Statistics as well as through South-South/triangular cooperation. UNDP will work in enhancing its network with IFIs as well as with other UN agencies to achieve the expected results.

Through the principles established in UNDP’s Strategic Plan 2018-2021, the establishment of country platforms on the SDGs will address the need to have more ‘whole-of-government’ and ‘whole-of-society’ approaches. UNDP will continue assisting the Government with the implementation of the $475 million Droughts Recovery Framework (DRF) 2018-2022, an innovative investment platform for resilience, through strategic partnering, as well as programming and implementation support.

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
1.1. Signing of MOU with Angolan National Universities and National Institute of Statistics to develop knowledge
[Added: 2018/12/18] [Last Updated: 2019/07/16]
Economics Unit, Sustainable Development Unit, Senior Management 2018/12 Completed MOU - UNDP&INE; MOU - UNDP&UCAN; MOU - UNDP&ULA History
1.2. Enhance UNDP engagement in substantive policy dialogues with different partners (the Government, CSOs, academia, private sector, international cooperation).
[Added: 2018/12/18] [Last Updated: 2019/01/11]
Economics Unit, Sustainable Development Unit, Senior Management 2018/12 Completed Ongoing actions to have substantive dialogue about inequality in Africa and key recommendations. Ongoing dialogues and work with INE and academia for preparing a series of presentations and dialogues around the SDGs in general and SDGs 1, 10, 13-15, 16 in particular. History
1.3. In-depth review of possibilities of enhancing partnerships with Directorate of Economy of the Ministry of Economy, Ministry of Labour, among others, and UNDP partnership.
[Added: 2018/12/18] [Last Updated: 2020/02/14]
Economics Unit, Sustainable Development Unit, Senior Management 2019/12 Completed UNDP positioned itself as lead advisor to the Angolan Government regarding its National Development Plan 2018-2022 with substantive technical assistance and advocacy around SDGs mainstreaming and acceleration. This country's first participatory process, opening the 2019 state budget preparation to the public, follows three years engagement of UNDP in support. UNDP held with Government and Parliament, substantive dialogues and shared budgetary and multidimensional poverty analysis on Angola UNDP in partnership with the International Policy Center for Inclusive Growth provided technical support to the Executive Office of the Angolan President to review effectiveness of 36 social national programs to end poverty. With technical assistance from OPHI and support from UNDP The National Bureau statistics (INE) was able to elaborate the composition Multidimensional Poverty Index (M-MPI) of Angola’s 164 municipalities using data from the General Population and Housing Census (2014 Census). In addition, all CPD events held with Ministry of Economy and Planning fully engagement and validation, including in 3th of October 2019, RR UNDP Angola, Henrik Larsen met with Dr Manuel Neto da Costa to discuss many topics, especially on new programmatic areas to develop in partnership with MEP, under CPD 2020-2022. History
1.4. Support mobilization of resources for full implementation of DRF.
[Added: 2018/12/18] [Last Updated: 2020/02/14]
Programme Management Team of the country office 2019/12 Completed The UN led by UNDP provided policy and technical support to the National Civil Protection Commission (CNPC) throughout the process of updating and approving the Droughts Resilience Framework (DRF) 2018-22 for the southern provinces, realizing One UN support to drought response and resilience-building. UNDP’s integrator support to the National Civil Protection Commission (CNPC) produced updated version of the 5-year Droughts Resilience Framework (DRF) for the southern provinces with a new budget of $ 1.2 billion, revised from original $ 475 mm, reflecting on the increased needs captured by 9 sectors from 2019 drought affecting over 2 million people. Meanwhile, in part based on UNDP’s policy advice on DRF to CNPC and the President’s Office, the government reportedly allocated $ 400 mm to water sector investment in the two provinces of Cunene and Namibe. Furthermore, in response to the President’s request, duly considering UNDP’s advice, the World Bank prepared a comprehensive investment package of $ 550 mm for approval in early 2020, addressing structural issues identified under DRF. These government and the Bank contribution are bringing the level of financing the DRF budget to 87%. History
2. Recommendation:

UNDP should develop a long-term vision and clear theories of change ensuring integration among thematic areas, to better build synergies, avoid piecemeal initiatives and ensure the achievement of more significant and sustainable results. UNDP should be less ambitious and more realistic and focused in accordance with its limited resources, looking for synergies across thematic areas and partnerships with strategic partners that can add to UNDP’s resources and ensure continuation of efforts and sustainability of results. It should particularly aim to systematically integrate youth, gender and green jobs creation in all areas of the programme. In the area of environmental sustainability, for example, UNDP should link improvement of protected areas management and on energy and climate change projects with green jobs creation and youth employability to promote economic diversification and decrease rural migration. The small-scale livelihood support initiatives should be avoided unless properly integrated with natural resources management and other areas, bringing adequate partners.

Management Response: [Added: 2018/12/12] [Last Updated: 2020/06/07]

 Agreed.

For the next CPD cycle (2019-2023), UNDP will adopt a theory of change in line with the national challenges and priorities expressed in the National Development Plan (2018-2022) and in UNPAF (2019-2022) that will promote a nexus between the areas of inclusive growth, governance and environment and resilience. Drawing on its global reach, convening experience and partnerships with the Government, United Nations organizations, the private sector, civil society and local communities, UNDP will provide policy, technical and implementation support to address these interrelated dimensions in a coherent and sustainable manner.

Given that UNDP Angola is embarking on a new programme cycle, under development in 2018/2019, the country office will first observe key recommendation from UN assessment on country prioritization of agenda for Angola and development finance landscape in Angola to further understand how the United Nations’ next cycle of engagement in Angola could best be financed and implemented. This analysis will help to better contextualize and situate the country office’s resource mobilization, thematic focus and foster strategic partnerships in a broader implementation framework, considering diversified means of generating finance (Government and IFIs), adapt UNDP’s business model to today’s country’s needs and by maximizing the efficiency of the UNDP core resources. For example, GEF funding will represent a catalytic investment to leverage national resources for the replication of transformative outcomes, with crucial linkages with private sector development on renewable energy technology project and with governance on illegal wild trade projects. The results of this nexus intervention will reinforce the strategic, lead-agency engagement of UNDP in the areas of governance, equitable economic growth and sustainable development.

Responding further to the recommendation for strengthening focus on, and integration of, youth, gender and green jobs, UNDP is initiating a study on supply-demand of skills aimed at supping youth employment, including green jobs, within the framework of the Resilience Plan for the 1.2 million people affected by the impact of El Nino.

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
2.1. Conduct theory of change training for all staff.
[Added: 2018/12/19]
Country office 2018/05 Completed
2.2. Develop a theory of change for programmatic areas interventions in the next CPD and UNDAF.
[Added: 2018/12/19] [Last Updated: 2019/01/11]
Programme Management Team of the country office. 2018/10 Completed History
2.3. Implement capacity-building activities for newly recruited or assigned rangers and support them with equipment and infrastructure as a measure of green job creation.
[Added: 2018/12/19] [Last Updated: 2020/02/14]
Programme Management Team of the country office 2019/12 Completed To sustain the program beyond the end of the project, 42 technicians from the Institute of Forest Development (IDF) and MINAMB from 6 provinces received training in SFM. Support was provided to the National Institute for Biodiversity and Protected Areas (INBAC) by providing three National Park with ranger posts, water, radio systems, and management plans, thereby increasing biodiversity conservation capacity. INBAC received a GIS lab with new GIS maps and databases of all protected areas and 9 technicians (5 female) received GIS training. Particularly successful was the engagement of charcoal dependent communities in Huambo and Kwanza Sul, identified through a participatory process, by university and NGO partners with support from the responsible government agency IDF, and the rehabilitation of wells in Cunene province by an NGO with involvement of the provincial secretariate of water and energy and the local communities. History
2.4 CO prioritization workshop with key stakeholders held.
[Added: 2018/12/19] [Last Updated: 2019/07/16]
Programme Management Team of the country office 2019/02 Completed Consulta pública sobre a proposta do Programa do PNUD para Angola 2020-2022. History
2.5. Include capacity-building of technicians in renewable energy technology in GEF6 Renewable Energy project, and integrate GEF projects in broader UNDP interventions including private sector development, green jobs and livelihood development.
[Added: 2018/12/19] [Last Updated: 2020/02/14]
Programme Management Team of the country office 2019/12 Completed A project proposal for increasing access to renewable energy in SE Angola has been designed (but not yet approved) and UNDP's financial and policy derisking (DREI) methodology has been used to analyze Angola's investment climate for renewable energy technology. Communities in 2 provinces (Huambo and Cuanza Sul) and government technicians from 6 provinces were trained in community based forest management and sustainability in the charcoal value chain, strengthening in the process the forestry faculty of José Eduardo dos Santos University in Huambo as the leading center in community based forestry in the country. UNDP supported the well-attended sessions of the revitalized Committee for Climate Change and Biodiversity which had been dormant for years, and is supporting the ongoing revision of Angola's INDCs in compliance with its obligation under the Paris agreement of 2015. UNDP is also supporting the establishment of a greenhouse gas emissions baseline from forestry and land use change (LULUCF), development of a monitoring-reporting-verification methodology for the NDCs, as well as the related capacity building. History
2.6. UNDP partnership with ILO and national partners for study on labour demand and supply within the framework of the Resilience Plan, with key finding and specific recommendations.
[Added: 2018/12/19] [Last Updated: 2020/02/14]
Sustainable Development Unit, Economics Unit, Senior Management 2019/12 Completed UNDP in joint partnership with ILO and University Mandume carried out the skill supply and demand study in Huila province in order to measure qualification and mismatch of young people in employment and generate evidence for policy makers in vocational training sector. History
3. Recommendation:

UNDP should develop staffing capacities to increasingly focus its efforts on upstream interventions where UNDP may have a clearer added value given its decreasing core regular resources. Downstream interventions should be more limited to innovative pilot projects with adequate risk mitigation and exit strategies aligned with committed national partnerships to ensure improved chances for sustainability. Given its limited core regular resources, it will be important for UNDP to focus on policy advice and analysis strategically tailored to the national context. UNDP should support areas where it can make the most difference and withdraw from areas where other development partners or national institutions are better positioned with more significant human and financial resources, such as extractive industries and mining. Downstream efforts must be more selective and have clear and monitored sustainability strategies.

Management Response: [Added: 2018/12/12] [Last Updated: 2020/06/07]

Agreed.

The current programme of UNDP Angola is predominantly policy-oriented, and the country office programme staff and professional project staff are mainly engaged in upstream activities. 2017 and 2018 learning activities, including e.g. the bi-weekly Thursday@Three learning sessions, have focused on capacity for policy functions.

Reflecting the recommendation, the UNDP country office will further support Angola in dealing with the development challenges identified in the National Development Plan 2018-2022. The UNDP country strategy for managing human resources will be elaborated through a process of feedback from sta? through consultations (including with the Sta? Council), and network discussions that is truly owned by the sta?, provide a better work–life balance, and responds to individual career development, CO talent management, reassignment processes and provisions for sta? training and retooling. Increased emphasis will be given to ensure fewer, more focused projects.

Assistance from the UNDP regional bureau and other country offices will be key to helping the Angola country office learn from the experiences of other countries that have recently graduated from the LDC status.

 This will require preparing the country office for even more upstream policy work and gradually scaling up government financing, private sector and other innovative co-financing (such as implementation of World Bank/African Development Bank and IFAD loans) for downstream work. With focus interdependence and integration of issues and projects UNDP country presence and capacities are more effective when tailored to the needs of the country Service lines about recognizing the diversity of the UNDP funding streams and management requirements. 

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
3.1 Establish policy role a core element of learning plan for 2018 and 2019 with strategy based on feedback of needs of staff.
[Added: 2018/12/19] [Last Updated: 2020/02/17]
HR, Management Team of the country office 2020/02 Completed CO learning plan was designed and approved for the CO. History
3.2 Evaluation of the actual learning planning.
[Added: 2018/12/19] [Last Updated: 2020/02/17]
HR, Management Team of the country office 2020/02 Completed In this plan special focus was on completion of the mandatory courses by those who had not yet completed all, 2 staff members completed the LDP1 course and one the CLE course. 7 group learning events took place in 2018. For 2019 13 group learning events took place. See attached 2019 group learning events document. History
3.3 Establish clear country strategy for managing human resources that could capture and absorb well-qualified and promising talents from UNDP internship programme for young graduates.
[Added: 2018/12/19] [Last Updated: 2020/02/17]
HR, Management Team of the country office 2020/02 Completed From 2018 to 2019 the office provided 25 internships. From this number three have been recruited as UNV for UNDP, one has been recruited by RCO on an IC contract, and two have been recruited as UNV for UNICEF. History
4. Recommendation:

UNDP should develop a human resources strategy to better address the needs and challenges of the programme and agencies services and reassess the resource mobilization strategy of the office to diversify its sources of funds more effectively. Given its decreasing core regular resources and dependence on vertical funds, UNDP needs to augment its staffing and improve its current capacities to better engage with the private sector, IFIs and government cost-sharing as a source of co-financing.

Management Response: [Added: 2018/12/12] [Last Updated: 2020/06/07]

Agreed.

UNDP Angola entered the first Government financing agreement in 2016 and has in the period 2016-2018 signed and implemented a number of agreements with IFIs. As part of the Collaborative Partnership and Resource Mobilization Strategy, an Action Plan for increasing Government Cost-Sharing/Direct Financing has been established, based on experience with the Ministry of Health. With regard to the IFIs, new opportunities are being sought that will scale-up UNDP’s experience of support to agri-business and value chain development as well support to environmental protection which are of specific interest to the Government, IFIs and UNDP. Human resources are continuously being invested to make this transformation happen.

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
4.1. CO IFI and partnership development strategy and Action Plan developed and approved.
[Added: 2018/12/19] [Last Updated: 2020/02/14]
Programme Management Team of the country office 2020/12 Initiated Engagement with IFIs especially with AfDB, World Bank and IFAD has permitted the CO completed its Country's Partnership Strategy 2019-2022[[E64]].. The financial agreement with the Angola Government signed with in value of $5.300.000.00 for UNDP to strengthen procurement capacities in health sector from 2019-2021. History
4.2. Review with IFIs and other cooperation partners their prospect research pipeline to determine, according to the UNDP mandate in which UNDP could engage as substantive partner.
[Added: 2018/12/19]
Economics Unit, Sustainable Development Unit, Senior Management 2018/09 Completed To start revision now in September 2018-onward.
4.3. New agreement with the Ministry of Health to be signed for the 2018-2022 period.
[Added: 2018/12/19] [Last Updated: 2019/01/11]
Programme Management Team of the country office 2018/11 Completed History
4.4. Implementation and follow-up of RM Strategy.
[Added: 2018/12/19] [Last Updated: 2020/02/14]
Programme Management Team of the country office 2019/12 Completed The GEF approved and CEO endorsed a medium sized project for creation of Angola's first marine protected area, with $1.7 million of funding over 4 years. Long, but effective negotiation, resulted in the contribution of EUR 3 million from EU to the new 4-year DRM project, as part of EUR 65 million resilience programme supported by the EU. Two new full-size GEF projects were submitted and reviewed by the GEF, with only some administrative questions of implementation pending for final approve: one project on illegal wildlife trade and human-wildlife conflict ($4.1 million), and one project on promoting renewable energy access ($3.54 million). Government has also formally requested UNDP to develop a full-size proposal to the GEF about persistent organic pollutants, but ongoing discussions within the GEF about the use of remaining funds (e.g. national or regional projects) have meant that work on the proposal had to be delayed until the GEF has provided clarity on options. UNDP was able to expand its health portfolio thanks to a series of successful resource mobilisation efforts. 3 new Financing Agreements were signed with the INLS ($5.3 million, 2 billion AOA, and the Ministry of Health ($1.2 million, $8 million. UNDP was invited by the Global Fund to expand its Principal Recipient role to include the malaria and TB grants from 2020 onwards. A joint UNAIDS/UNDP funding proposal for 70,000 USD was approved under UNAIDS "Business Unusual" track. History
5. Recommendation:

UNDP should also address the lack of staff capacities and incentives to adequately integrate gender with proper strategic thinking on how to bring about change in equality and women’s empowerment. Capacities for better gender analyses are needed to more adequately identify and address the specific needs of different genders and particular groups such as youth, which should be integrated across all outcomes.

Management Response: [Added: 2018/12/12] [Last Updated: 2020/06/07]

UNDP is committed to addressing the gender-related development challenges facing Angola by continuing the strong gender mainstreaming focus in UNDP’s environment and livelihoods work, in the health sector in relation particularly to HIV and AIDS and other associated diseases, and on upstream policy interventions and advice to the Government, while at the same time continuing capacity development on women’s equality and empowerment including the performance against gender markers. These engagements will be supported by improving gender awareness in programming of the internal UNDP staff, improving the specialized competences of the Gender Officer through involvement in UNDP institutional and other gender trainings and by strengthening the country office’s analytical work on cross-cutting gender issues and policy.

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
5.4 Ensure that office Gender Strategy and an Action Plan are in place and aligned with the next CPD cycle.
[Added: 2018/12/19] [Last Updated: 2020/02/14]
Programme Management Team of the country office 2020/06 Overdue-Initiated The Gender Focal Group is in place. CO Gender Strategy and AP will be developed in 2020 after an in house gender self-assessment. History
5.1. Improve gender mainstreaming in programming in the next CPD cycle.
[Added: 2018/12/19] [Last Updated: 2020/02/14]
Programme Management Team of the country office 2019/12 Completed - Gender Equality & Women’s Empowerment is mainstreamed in CO CPD 2020-2022. The current CO CPD has specific outputs and indicators. - CPD section on Program and Risk Management: “A human resources strategy will be developed and implemented, including in support of gender mainstreaming within the country office…” History
5.2. Continue upstream policy support and advice, and downstream gender empowerment interventions.
[Added: 2018/12/19] [Last Updated: 2020/02/14]
Programme Management Team of the country office 2020/02 Completed In January 2020, in partnership with Group of Parliamentary Women, 50 women form 8 different provinces, with potential to became candidates or mobilizers for the Local Gov elections planned for 2020, were trained on Women and Transformative Leaderships to Local Gov”. As in the AWP 2020 with MASFAMU – UNDP will support the revision of the Gender Policy Action Plan History
5.3 Accelerate support to sex disaggregated data and gender statistics to strengthen linkages between gender equality, women’s empowerment and development policy and programmes.
[Added: 2018/12/19] [Last Updated: 2020/02/14]
Programme Management Team of the country office 2019/12 Completed A mission took place in December 2019, regarding the development of an Action Plan to implement the national System of Gender Indicator. The proposal of national gender indicators was discussed in December 2019, with INE delegate organs. A final of 150 gender indicators was approved. The development of the NSIG is part of the AWP 2020 with MASFAMU. History

Latest Evaluations

Contact us

1 UN Plaza
DC1-20th Floor
New York, NY 10017
Tel. +1 646 781 4200
Fax. +1 646 781 4213
erc.support@undp.org