Darfur Livelihoods Recovery Project (output id 00098088)

Report Cover Image
Evaluation Plan:
2018-2021, Sudan
Evaluation Type:
Final Project
Planned End Date:
07/2018
Completion Date:
11/2018
Status:
Completed
Management Response:
Yes
Evaluation Budget(US $):
15,000

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Title Darfur Livelihoods Recovery Project (output id 00098088)
Atlas Project Number: 00046028
Evaluation Plan: 2018-2021, Sudan
Evaluation Type: Final Project
Status: Completed
Completion Date: 11/2018
Planned End Date: 07/2018
Management Response: Yes
Focus Area:
  • 1. Crisis Prevention & Recovery
  • 2. Others
Corporate Outcome and Output (UNDP Strategic Plan 2014-2017)
  • 1. Output 5.6. Mechanisms are enabled for consensus-building around contested priorities, and address specific tensions, through inclusive and peaceful processes
  • 2. Output 6.1. From the humanitarian phase after crisis, early economic revitalization generates jobs and other environmentally sustainable livelihoods opportunities for crisis affected men and women
  • 3. Output 6.4. Recovery processes reinforce social cohesion and trust and enable rapid return to sustainable development
SDG Goal
  • Goal 16. Promote peaceful and inclusive societies for sustainable development, provide access to justice for all and build effective, accountable and inclusive institutions at all levels
SDG Target
  • 16.1 Significantly reduce all forms of violence and related death rates everywhere
Evaluation Budget(US $): 15,000
Source of Funding: Donors Cost Sharing
Evaluation Expenditure(US $): 15,000
Joint Programme: No
Joint Evaluation: No
Evaluation Team members:
Name Title Email Nationality
Abdulgadir Turkawi National Consultant
GEF Evaluation: No
Key Stakeholders: Ministries of Finance, Ministry of Animal Resources and Fisheries, Ministry of Agriculture in the 5 states of Darfur, Implementing Partners
Countries: SUDAN
Comments:

Project final evaluation, added to the CO evaluation plan in 2018.

Lessons
Findings
1.

The project activities were implemented by national NGOs contracted through letters of agreements and Micro-Capital Grant Agreements detailing the activities
to be conducted for each of the project planned outputs. The LOA also specified the reporting (quarterly financial report, quarterly progress reports, and a final report after completion or termination of the activities) and other obligations.


Tag: Project and Programme management Civil Societies and NGOs

2.

OUTPUT 1: Livelihoods of IDPs, returnees and host community members improved through diversified income generation opportunities, increased value chain integration and local economic recovery;

The Project addressed the drivers of conflicts by enhancing the community participation and collective works that resulted in strong social cohesion between
the different components of the targeted communities. The project succeeded in targeting the needy and most vulnerable groups especially the returnees whose numbers are increasing and in dire need of livelihood support.

In achieving this output, the project successfully provided assistances and support to the returnees, IDPs and host communities to start and reestablish their livelihood which was negatively affected by the conflict.


Tag: Displaced People Vulnerable

3.

The vocational training conducted (carpentry, mobile repair, trading, electricity, food processing such as Yoghurt making etc) for the school drop outs and youth has already started to change the lives of the trainees and stabilize their livelihoods. The trainees in vocational training courses (3 months) established their own businesses soon after the trainings.

In Ardamata community in West Darfur, the carpentry shop trainee graduate is realising about SDG 5,000 per month just 4 months after establishing the business. The mobile repairer also opened a shop after the training and started to generate some income although there is need for additional support. A trainee graduate in electrification is making good income and is working in a hardware shop of electric appliances. These are a few of the very many success stories of the project in building skills and creating employment and income generating opportunities for other impoverished and vulnerable people who have for decades relied on humanitarian handouts. This evaluation notes that the project is contributing significantly to reducing humanitarian needs through its self-reliance focus.


Tag: Jobs and Livelihoods Poverty Alleviation Capacity Building

4.

The value chain interventions for some crops was the main thrust for the project. Many communities were trained and supported to improve their incomes through improved production, harvesting, storage and marketing. In South and North Darfur, the value chain for ground nuts production has improved the incomes of the beneficiaries. In South Darfur, production has increased tremendously because of the adoption of new cultural practices, and the quality has improved after training on methods for reducing or eliminating aflatoxins in their ground nuts. In North Darfur, Dareleslam community, the women producers succeeded in initiating a business of producing grounded and compressed ground nuts (foull mazloot) in a modern plastic container after training and receiving soaking and compressing machines from the project.


Tag: Agriculture Value Chain Capacity Building

5.

The gum Arabic society in Sileia community in West Darfur State was very active in making changes to their conditions after returning back. There are 23 groups in the locality, three of them are for women, most of them (18) are formed by the project in partnership with Siyag Charity Organisation (SCO) a NNGO. The groups participated in building the Gum Arabic center. The project also established a nursery, provided donkey carts, rehabilitated a well and repaired 6 hand pumps for the community. The groups succeeded in making fire lines 30 kilometres long in collaboration with the Ministry of Agriculture and Forestry National Corporation (FNC) and in getting lands for their members in addition to lands for future purposes.

It should be noted that the training and capacity building have resulted in improved social and economic conditions in the target communities. With some material support, the situation will definitely be more sustainable and will lead to peace and confidence building among the beneficiaries, and to more stable life in the targeted communities.


Tag: Project and Programme management Capacity Building

6.

The Savings and Lending Associations (SLA) are one of the most valuable interventions introduced by the project in most of the targeted communities. The membership was about 25 persons per group with over 70% women. The contributing shares varied between communities but ranged from SDG 5 to SDG 10 per week, collected and used for lending to members up to SDG 3,000 payable after a month with written commitment to repay on time. The collected money was used also for investment in crops trading. SLA need to be connected to microfinance and other financial institutions for them to be able to make high value investments where they will realize higher profits.

The project succeeded in introducing some innovative concepts and interventions carefully designed to meet the immediate and pressing needs of returnees. In Seleia in West Darfur State, most of the people fled to Tchad and other IDP camps in 2004 leaving back all their livelihood assets. Presently, only 30% of the population own some livestock.


Tag: Crop production Livestock Financial Inclusion

7.

OUTPUT 2: Community access to critical socio-economic infrastructure for value chain integration, conflict reduction and local economic recovery increased;

As indicated in the End of Phase Report, the project established 26 different infrastructures during the life of the project (2 dams, 19 hand pumps, 1 solar water
system, 1 Gum Arabic center, 2 Community centers and 1 Gum Arabic nursery and a number of well).

Infrastructures are key to settlement of the beneficiaries and the communities and strengthen the value chain activities which has tremendously improved the production and productivity of the various crops that will lead to increased households' incomes. In Katila, the construction of a 15 meters deep water well added positively to reducing the travel time for women in search of water.


Tag: Infrastructure Value Chain

8.

The construction of the women centers encouraged regular meetings of the women and this helped promote dialogue among different tribes apart from building trust.
The center was used also for the meetings of other community-based committees and consequently added to the peace building in the village.


Tag: Peace Building Promotion of dialogue Women and gilrs

9.

The partially rehabilitated dam in Malam Elwidya now act as resilience wall against the climate change and counter the effects of reduced rainfall in the area as it provides water for production throughout the year and protect farmer production during years of drought especially in the 2016 growing season.


Tag: Reconstruction

10.

The Gum Arabic center in Sileia West Darfur was completed. As anticipated by the beneficiaries, they were very enthusiastic that the center has made a difference in their gum Arabic business and they are using the center for training purposes and Association meetings.

Some honey producers in Kabum started to make business by making modern bee hives which are of less harm to the environment, prevent contamination with animal dung and saves the bees from being killed by fires. However, until now they make them only on demand due to the lack of sufficient funds to make them for the market. UNDP formed 10 new honey producers groups and trained them on making these modern hives in addition to training women of how to benefit from the wax which has helped vulnerable women to increase their household incomes.


Tag: Trade and Development Value Chain Capacity Building Youth

11.

Some honey producers in Kabum started to make business by making modern bee hives which are of less harm to the environment, prevent contamination with animal dung and saves the bees from being killed by fires. However, until now they make them only on demand due to the lack of sufficient funds to make them for the market. UNDP formed 10 new honey producers groups and trained them on making these modern hives in addition to training women of how to benefit from the wax which has helped vulnerable women to increase their household incomes.


Tag: Trade and Development Value Chain Vulnerable Women and gilrs Poverty Alleviation

12.

Nevertheless, access to the basic services such as education and health remain the major hurdle for the returnees and host communities. The services are either nonexistent, destroyed, ruined during the conflict period, or could not hold the additional number of people (returnees)joining the communities. The project, however, provided little assistance in this regard mainly because these services were beyond the scope of this project. The issue of access to the basic services need to be further investigated for possible linkages with other development partners.

Access to water was considered by the project where one well was rehabilitated and powered by solar in Darelsalam community of North Darfur, and 18 hand pumps repaired in the four States. Nevertheless, still the quality and quantity of water are vital issues in many communities in Darfur that need to be addressed. The cost for one barrel of water in Malam Elwidyan villages was SDG 15 which was too much for a poor family. Climate change leading to reduction of rainfall and frequent dry spells resulted in drying out of many surface wells especially in North Darfur. Therefore, such support need to be scaled up.


Tag: Water resources Reconstruction

13.

As a way of improving sustainability of the established water points, 6 mechanics were trained on hand pump maintenance and repairs in Abudawi community in
Central Darfur. Maintenance kits were also provided to these trained community members.

Capacity building was one of the activities perfectly implemented by the project. All trainings were in line with the project design and followed the basic principles of adult learning where a lot of practicals were part of the trainings and visual aids. The training and capacity building curricula depended on the comparative advantage of the respective States with respect to the value chain and the actual needs of the communities ((sometimes based on action plans as prescribed in the Community Environmental Action Planning (CEAP). Generally, participants interviewed indicated that the training was very useful and have helped them gain essential skills.


Tag: Jobs and Livelihoods Capacity Building

14.

OUTPUT 3: Institutions and mechanisms for peace building, social cohesion and management of natural resource related conflicts restored and strengthened;

The End of Phase Report indicated that 18 new Community Based Reconciliation Mechanisms (CBRMs) were formed and are now functional in the target locations (target was 10). In addition, Seven Community Development Committees (CDCs) were established with the participation of women, youth and different livelihood groups. The project conducted six conflict management trainings for CBOs focused on natural resource conflicts, negotiation and mediation skills, data collection, and incident monitoring and reporting. Two peace conferences were organized through which two inter-tribal peace agreements were facilitated on natural resources use and access between farmers and pastoralists resolved. One intertribal meeting was held in Joghana village after a conflict had occurred between Masalit tribe and Reziegat in Gereida locality which resulted in the peaceful resolution of a lingering conflict between the Masalit and Reziegat).
Monitoring survey indicate that 94% of the people reported increased access to CBRMs whilst 98% of the people think conflicts have dwindled in their communities". Field interviews held during this evaluation confirmed these same facts on ground.


Tag: Monitoring and Evaluation Oversight Capacity Building Women and gilrs

15.

The proper management of the natural resources around the village was noticed and the conflicts over the natural resources have dramatically reduced as people now believe in the committees formed and understood their rights and duties for the natural resources management. Reduction of conflicts and tensions among farmers for farm boundaries and between farmers and the agro-pastoralists were reduced.

According to a quick impact study conducted at the end of the project, 98% of community members reported a decrease and deterioration in natural resource-related conflicts. The conflicts were around agricultural land, pastures and water resources and these conflicts significantly declined due to the presence of the different community committees.

The project introduced the concept of Community Environmental Action Plans which was a participatory process through which communities planned, implemented and monitored specific activities in a way that preserved the environment and natural resources. Climate change resulting in reduction of rainfall and increasing competition over the land and water resources coupled with the increasing number of returnees in some communities, necessitated the need for natural resources management as a force for peace and stability. The project supported the beneficiaries to adapt to negative effects of the climate change by activities such as diversification of livelihood activities, introduction of climate–adapted varieties of crops for rainfed and irrigated agriculture, rehabilitation of dams and water sources, application of solar systems to ensure the flow of water for irrigation and drinking.


Tag: Climate Change Adaptation Natural Resouce management Peace Building Promotion of dialogue

16.

Gender and other cross-cutting issues are notably considered by the project in all its interventions. Most of the producers’ associations were either with women representation or entirely composed of women as the cases in the ground nuts producers’ associations in South and North Darfur States and the leather manufacturing society in Nyala, South Darfur where we found the associations composed mostly of women with few males. The gum arabic association in West Darfur and the agricultural producers’ association in Central Darfur included considerable number of women as well.


Tag: Gender Equality Women's Empowerment

17.

The design of the Project was characterized by a short duration as a recovery project and future projects should be more longer-term with a minimum of 4 years. Nevertheless, the project involved various project stakeholders in the implementation of the activities during the implementation period and this helped in improving the sustainability of the project interventions. The State Ministries of Agriculture, the Ministries of Youth, Ministries of Social Welfare, the Agricultural Research Corporation, the Forestry National Corporation, and the Range and Pasture Department were fully aware and participated in the delivery of the services such as the provision of improved seeds and seedlings, follow up of the vocational and other training activities, and the provision of extension services. Elements of sustainability were strong in this project, however, still the institutional arrangements, frameworks and capacities necessary to ensure the sustainability of interventions still required further strengthening.

The project had some limitations in the coverage and inclusion as per the limited funding and duration. The coverage was about 16,000 direct beneficiaries. Nine (9) different activities on value chain (ground nuts, sesame, karkade (Hibiscus), gum Arabic), and the provision of vocational were key in improving the livelihoods of theses returnees.

It could be confidently said that the project management was efficient and adequate in achieving the objectives of the project through close following up the implementation processes.


Tag: Sustainability Programme/Project Design Project and Programme management

18.

Relevance

The Darfur conundrum started some decades ago but came to the surface with the eruption of the armed conflicts between the Darfur rebellions and the government in 2003. Since then, the Darfur region suffered from insecurity and massive displacement of the population to IDP camps where more than 2 million people were displaced. The IDPs lost their assets and all means of their livelihood including livestock, land and other household and personal belongings. The camps are mostly for relief and emergency assistance where food and other necessities are provided free. This although saved lives and helped in meeting the basic living requirements, it created dependency pattern of life among the IDPs.


Tag: Relevance Displaced People

19.

The Poverty Reduction Strategy Paper suggested that "Efforts to foster national reconciliation, integrate the internally displaced people (IDPs) and refugees into viable communities and sustainable livelihood, and adopt inclusive governance institutions, will be essential for building peace, security and shared economic growth". The five-year Economic Reform (2015-2019) also call for improving the economic conditions and living standards of all the population. The DLRP was, therefore, very relevant to the government plans and strategies of instituting peace and improving the living conditions of the various groups of the population.

The conflict in Darfur affected all the targets of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) especially those related to poverty, education and enrollment rates, health and population dynamics, sustainable agriculture and food security, rural employment and environmental aspects.

Therefore, the project was relevant to the Sudan Context and in line with the major national and international human needs. The project was also relevant and aligned with the UNDAF expected outcome 1 and 8 in Sudan.


Tag: Relevance Poverty Reduction SDG Integration Displaced People Refugees

20.

As mentioned, the project was also in line with the Darfur Joint Assessment Mission which was a precursor to the Darfur Development Strategy (DDS) and various parties have now embarked on a process to identify key early recovery and long-term reconstruction and development needs for Darfur".

The project was in line with the Doha Document for Peace in Darfur (DDPD) which highlighted that “IDPs, returning refugees and all victims of conflict shall enjoy, in full equality, the same rights and freedoms as do other persons in Sudan under national law and international legal instruments to which Sudan is party”.


Tag: Relevance Human rights

21.

The project was targeting returnees and vulnerable host community members who are the right beneficiaries as evidenced by the observations and discussions in the communities and individuals who told their experiences and situations before, during and after the conflicts. The project succeeded in establishing a model of delivering the needed livelihood mechanisms and activities that should be replicated and adopted to other communities.


Tag: Relevance Post Conflict

22.

Efficiency

The project was managed by a thin staff level within UNDP and the implementation processes heavily relied on the national and international NGOs who were implementing partners. There was a management board which provided oversight and State Level Technical Coordination Committee for the project. The two committees held meetings to review the work progress and approve the budgets and work plans.

Working with National NGOs during the implementation of the project activities proved to be effective in delivering the right outputs. They have the expertise in dealing with the communities and in implementing innovative packages. However, still, their capacities and capability need to be improved for more effective and decent outcomes.


Tag: Efficiency Oversight Project and Programme management Civil Societies and NGOs

23.

The project as one of the components of the Darfur Livelihoods Programme has increased efficiency in delivering the set outputs to the beneficiaries as exemplified by the increase in the value of ground nut value chain and the SLA groups. In Katila, South Darfur, the ground nut productivity increased from 7 sacks per feddan to more than 12 sacks per feddan as a result of the increased efficiency in using the recommended agricultural practices. The SLA groups in Gereida managed to purchase ground nuts at SDG 450 per sack and sold it for SDG 630 per sack after just one month; and trainees in vocational training courses in North and West Darfur States managed to establish businesses after the training.


Tag: Efficiency Jobs and Livelihoods

24.

The project targets were realistically set with a remarkable planning process and these targets were exceeded in many activities under the three outputs before the end of the project which means that realistic targets were set, and that the implementation was efficient. One NGO (War Child Canada) in West Darfur attributed that to the increase in the exchange rate during the implementation period that allowed them to reach more beneficiaries with the same level of resources.


Tag: Efficiency Civil Societies and NGOs

25.

In more than one output indicator, targets were exceeded denoting efficient implementation processes given the limited budget, well thought out planning and budgeting processes. For instance, and according to End of Phase Report 79% of the target households had their livelihood assets increased 24 months from project inception exceeding a target of 70%. Number of SLA associations formed was 13 against a target of 12 and the number of value chain related producer groups /associations established /reactivated reached was 19 compared to a target of 15 groups with more than 80% women members. The targeted beneficiaries increased their net annual incomes by 256% over the project period from $758 in 2015 to average $1,946 by end of 2017 through production, processing and marketing of honey, groundnuts, sorghum, sesame, hides and skins, hibiscus, vegetables and other off-farm income generation activities.


Tag: Efficiency Value Chain

26.

Considering the short duration of the project (2 years), timing in delivering the outputs was very crucial if some early outcomes are to be achieved. Most of the outputs came across were delivered in time although some were delivered towards the end of the project which outcomes could not be assessed during this evaluation. Some NNGOs also expressed that if the funding constraint was solved, the performance will be better especially timely achievements.

The quantity of outputs achieved during the two years as mentioned above is exceptionally outstanding with the limited funding. This reveals that with good planning and follow up, projects can achieve their stated objectives and the expected results if the timing was well managed.


Tag: Efficiency Service delivery

27.

Ownership of the process

The objective of the project was to improve self-reliance and resilience of conflict affected population in Darfur. People interviewed feel that this project enhanced community ownership through the community planning processes, the establishment of the CDCs, CBRMs, producer groups, management committees who are responsible for maintaining the dividends of the project. The formation of the community-based institutions, the leadership of the national NGOs and the level of participation added to the feeling of community ownership. As well, involvement, contribution and participation of Government was evident. Notably, the Ministry of Agriculture, Ministry of Finance, Forest National Corporation and El Fsher research Station were the key government counterparts to this project.

Community participation and contrition was strong in this project. Some interventions such as the vocational training and the livestock restocking inevitably led to the creation of senses of ownership for the beneficiaries. The community contribution for the construction of the infrastructures was the most satisfying way of building sense of ownership among the beneficiaries. The contribution of the Gum Arabic groups in the construction of the Gum Arabic Center reached to more the SDG 38,000, about 20% of the total cost of the center. Some contributions were recorded in the construction of the community center and the women farm in Darelsalam. The farmers in Malemelwidyan expressed their readiness in the cleaning and de-silting of the dam.


Tag: Livestock Ownership Infrastructure Jobs and Livelihoods Civil Societies and NGOs

28.

Effectiveness

The project outputs were successfully implemented for all the activities under the value chain and other interventions. The immediate outcomes were reached or exceeded. The UNDAF (2013-2017) states that ‘’People in Sudan, with special attention to youth, women and populations in need, have improved opportunities for decent work and sustainable livelihoods and are better protected from external shocks, thereby reducing was also considered’’.

The outreach for the intended beneficiaries was presently more than 16,000 beneficiaries, most of them are females (53%). However, this represent only about 2% of the total population in the targeted communities and about 18% of the targeted population of IDPs who still rely on humanitarian aid. The figures showed that still more population was in need and more needy people need to be targeted in future. The project reached 35 communities in 24 localities in the four States of Darfur which again represented less than half of the communities in the States. However, considering the budget available and the cost of operating in insecure environments, this is considered optimum and highly effective.


Tag: Effectiveness Efficiency Value Chain Women and gilrs Youth

29.

The project succeeded in having differentiated effects on the various levels of the community groups. The project layout of interventions called for inclusion of all types of groups as males, females, youth, tribal groupings and settlement structures. For instance, the value chain for some crops such as ground nuts and hibiscus was accomplished by only females while other interventions as gum Arabic (as the case for the gum Arabic society in Seleia of West Darfur) required both sexes, while vocational training targeted male youth at this stage.

One of the outstanding achievements of the project was the formation of community-based institutions such as the CDCs and CBRMs. These committees composed, mostly intentionally, of the various tribes in the community resulting in concrete social cohesion and solidarity in the community as the case in Malam Alwidyan community in North Darfur where the committees was comprised of different tribes in the village, including females and youth from the six villages. The one feddan annual allocation also accounted for the returnees and the IDPs from other areas who were settling in the area.


Tag: Effectiveness Project and Programme management Poverty Reduction Value Chain Women and gilrs Youth

30.

Sustainability

The project formed community-based institutions and the CDCs and CBRMs Joint Management Committees (JMCs) and SLAs. The SLA committees were registered with the States Ministry of Social Welfare which provided continuous administrative support even after the end of the project.

The project was an integral part of the programme board which was the overarching mechanism for all the projects focusing on livelihoods in Darfur. At the State level, the project was a core member of the State Technical Committee where government departments were represented.


Tag: Sustainability Oversight

31.

The exit strategy for this project started right from the onset by working closely with State and Non-State actors who would assume responsibility for the sustenance of services provided. The project has been working closely with the government institutions such as the State Ministries of Agriculture and Livestock, with institutions such as the Agricultural Research Stations and Forestry Departments, and with international and national NGOs who will continue with the activities after the project pulled out. The aims of building the capacities of and partnership with the communities and the relevant institutions have been also to enable them to continue delivering services even after the closing out of the project. The exit strategy for this project also "emphasized on linkages as a process to lead clients to access services from other service providers and or from other private sector sources".

The communities and the national institutions need more intensive capacity building, need institutional support, and stronger coordination mechanisms. Some of the community institutions were recently registered by the States authorities, which will negatively affect the sustainability of the interventions if not properly supported by government. The coordination of the State ministries with the implementing NGOs still required further strengthening.


Tag: Coordination Civil Societies and NGOs Partnership Capacity Building National Institutions

32.

One example from the field which showed that sustainability is possible upon the exit of the project support with good planning and effective communication and contacts was that of Silea locality. UNDP and Siyag Charity Organization(NNGO) managed to receive 200 plots of houses lands to be distributed to the gum Arabic groups' members. In addition, they succeeded in being allocated 8,000 square meters of land for their future projects related to Gum Arabic. This shows great success in managing to settle their members and looking to the future.

The factors beyond UNDP's control that influenced the outcomes were the following:

  • The security situation at some locations limited the close monitoring of the activities. For many locations, the missions were accompanied by security personnel which distracted the communities and the teams from doing their work in liberty.
  • The limited funding of the project precluded the project from proper coverage of the needy communities, reduced the quantity of outputs to be delivered and reduced the level of capacity building and needed infrastructures.
  • The limited technical capacity, staffing and equipping and mobility provisions of the NNGOs.

Tag: Sustainability Human and Financial resources Security

33.

Still the national institutions now show the required technical capacity and leadership to ensure the sustainability of the interventions. They however, show and express some commitments that may be fictitious in reality. There is no foreseen action or ability for scaling up the activities.

The national institutions portray no sufficient financial or workable capacities for sustaining the outcomes of the project. Some basic technical capacity was available but need more consolidation if the activities are to continue or scaled up. The NNGOs, even if they have the financial and technical capacities, will not and could not continue working without support from donors for some time.

The project activities are replicable and scalable as they met the communities’ incessant needs for recovering their livelihood. The activities proved that the beneficiaries have the capacity to improve their standard of living and improve their livelihood and wellbeing by such small, quick- tangible interventions.


Tag: Sustainability Human and Financial resources Capacity Building National Institutions

Recommendations
1

Evaluation Recommendation or Issue 1:

UNDP should place more emphasis on improving NNGO and local government counterpart capacities.

2

Evaluation Recommendation or Issue 2:

Village Loans and Savings Associations are beneficial but limited and need to expand and continue in all communities

3

Evaluation Recommendation or Issue 3:

Rehabilitation/construction of the schools, health posts and other community assets should be considered for any future projects.

4

Evaluation Recommendation or Issue 4:

Need to further strengthen partnerships with the private sector with the view of attracting capacity and resources for value addition, market access and additional investment as part of their CSRs.

5

Evaluation Recommendation or Issue 5:

Water provision through hand pumps or borehole water stations should be expanded since this proved to be a viable intervention for the project under evaluation.

6

Evaluation Recommendation or Issue 6:

Promotion of value chains should be enhanced and expanded since the current phase has witnessed significant income changes at community level.

1. Recommendation:

Evaluation Recommendation or Issue 1:

UNDP should place more emphasis on improving NNGO and local government counterpart capacities.

Management Response: [Added: 2018/11/26] [Last Updated: 2020/12/26]

Management response plan:

The project next project phase will place emphasis on providing resources for institutional capacity building of local institutions including for additional staffing and training of staff as well as provision of relevant materials and equipment.

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
1. Incorporate institutional capacity building component into the next phase of the project and allocate resources for it.
[Added: 2018/11/26] [Last Updated: 2019/05/12]
DLRP/PBSC 2019/04 Completed institutional capacity building component has been incorporated into the new phase of the project. it is agreed and included within the project document. History
2. Recommendation:

Evaluation Recommendation or Issue 2:

Village Loans and Savings Associations are beneficial but limited and need to expand and continue in all communities

Management Response: [Added: 2018/11/26] [Last Updated: 2020/12/26]

Management response plan:

Include VLSAs into the next project design and ensure they are established in every target villages as part of an overall move to promote Microfinance access.

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
1. Incorporate VSLA into the new project design.
[Added: 2018/11/26] [Last Updated: 2019/05/12]
DLRP/PBSC 2019/04 Completed VSLA agreed and incorporated within the new project document. History
3. Recommendation:

Evaluation Recommendation or Issue 3:

Rehabilitation/construction of the schools, health posts and other community assets should be considered for any future projects.

Management Response: [Added: 2018/11/26] [Last Updated: 2020/12/26]

Management response plan:

As this is not the key mandate of UNDP, the Project will liaise with other UN agencies, NGOs and programmes to complement efforts.

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
1. UNDP will liaise with other agencies to assist on elements that are outside the scope of the project to complement efforts.
[Added: 2018/11/26] [Last Updated: 2019/06/17]
DLRP/PBSC 2019/05 Completed UNDP completed the scope of the new project document and decided to continue liaison with WHO and UNICEF for assist on elements outside the scope of the project, which could be addressed by other agencies. History
4. Recommendation:

Evaluation Recommendation or Issue 4:

Need to further strengthen partnerships with the private sector with the view of attracting capacity and resources for value addition, market access and additional investment as part of their CSRs.

Management Response: [Added: 2018/11/26] [Last Updated: 2020/12/26]

Management response plan:

This component will be included in the next phase of the project. Initial discussions have already taken place between UNDP and several private sector players. Additional pitching exercise will be embarked within the year ahead of the start of the next phase.

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
1. Hold further negotiation meetings with SAMIL and DAL Group Companies on Groundnuts, livestock and Honey Value Chain
[Added: 2018/11/26] [Last Updated: 2019/05/12]
DLRP/PBSC 2019/04 Completed MOU has been signed with DAL Group History
2. Embark on call for applications and pitching exercise with private sector to pitch and select future partners.
[Added: 2018/11/26] [Last Updated: 2019/06/17]
DLRP/PBSC 2019/05 Completed It is completed with DAL private sector, there is already MOU now is ready and under implementation (over 100,000 USD has been invested so far). Another MOU is under preparation with another private sector. History
5. Recommendation:

Evaluation Recommendation or Issue 5:

Water provision through hand pumps or borehole water stations should be expanded since this proved to be a viable intervention for the project under evaluation.

Management Response: [Added: 2018/11/26] [Last Updated: 2020/12/26]

Management response plan:

This component will be included in the next phase of the project.

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
1. Incorporate development of water resources for human, livestock consumption and irrigation into next phase of the project.
[Added: 2018/11/26] [Last Updated: 2019/06/17]
DLRP/PBSC 2019/05 Completed Water component has been incorporated in the new project document and the budget for the water component has been doubled (twice). History
6. Recommendation:

Evaluation Recommendation or Issue 6:

Promotion of value chains should be enhanced and expanded since the current phase has witnessed significant income changes at community level.

Management Response: [Added: 2018/11/26] [Last Updated: 2020/12/26]

Management response plan:

This component will be contuned and included in the next phase of the project as well.

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
1. Increase Value Chain components into next phase of the Project.
[Added: 2018/11/26] [Last Updated: 2019/05/12]
DLRP/PBSC 2019/04 Completed Value Chain components has been considered in the new phase design. History

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