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Strategic Partnerships to Improve the Financial and Operational Sustainability of Protected Areas
Commissioning Unit: Botswana
Evaluation Plan: 2010-2014
Evaluation Type: Project
Completion Date: 12/2013
Unit Responsible for providing Management Response: Botswana
Documents Related to overall Management Response:
 
1. Recommendation: Staff in key positions, whose capacity and motivation for co-management has been built by the Project, should be maintained at current posts for longer periods. If this is not possible, then it is essential to ensure handover of skills and knowledge to successors. This applies to Government departments, such as DEA and DWNP. It also applies to the District Administration and to the Letlhakane Land Board.
Management Response: [Added: 2014/07/23]

UNDP has engaged the different government agencies on this issues, but it is to a great extent beyond UNDP. At individual project implementation levels, UNDP uses the practice of requesting the formal appointment/nomination of focal points for specific projects and initiatives that UNDP can liaise with on a daily and formal basis for reporting and other aspects of implementation. This approach has generally served projects/initiatives well as not only does it increase capacity building but also accountability levels.

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
No specific actions other than to continue to dialogue with Government counterparts on the matter.
[Added: 2014/07/23] [Last Updated: 2017/09/17]
UNDP CO at all levels, in particular portfolio managers and Senior Management 2014/12 Completed Dialogue with government is always on going with regards allocation of staff and resources to UNDP supported interventions. History
2. Recommendation: Government departments at national and local level should provide sufficient resources to stations and offices to sustain Outcomes.
Management Response: [Added: 2014/07/23]

Botswana follows centralized decision-making structures and in particular financial resources. Budget allocations from central to district levels is not necessarily based comprehensive assessment of needs at the local level. It is therefore usually challenging for district level decision-makers to have reasonable control over budgets and human resources allocations. Usually quotas for allocation of human and financial resources are set at headquarters level. Through UNDP-government projects, dialogue of these types of challenges and their implications on implementation of UNDP-government projects/initiatives are discussed. These issues are also discussed in fora such as meetings of the UNDAF Programme Steering Committees and Component Coordination Group meetings.

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
No specific actions other than to continue to dialogue with Government counterparts on the matter.
[Added: 2014/07/23] [Last Updated: 2017/09/17]
UNDP CO at all levels, in particular portfolio managers and Senior Management 2014/12 Completed Dialogue with government is always on going with regards allocation of staff and resources to UNDP supported interventions. History
3. Recommendation: It is helpful, and perhaps essential, to have a preparatory, parallel land use planning process (like MFMP) in any projects involving processes of change in management of natural resources.
Management Response: [Added: 2014/07/23]

This is noted. In fact almost all UNDP/GEF project promote this. The integrated land use planning process that the UNDP projects promote have been successful in facilitating multi-stakeholder dialogue on the use of land and other resources. While the outputs (land-use plans) might not necessarily be official used by government planning entities, the multi-stakeholder dialogue and in particular participation of different non-government entities in the planning process have proven very useful.

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
No specific action other than to continue promoting these local level processes that emphasise collaborative decision-making.
[Added: 2014/07/23] [Last Updated: 2017/09/17]
Environment Unit 2014/12 Completed so far 3 GEF/UNDP projects are supporting local land use planning in Central, NorthWest and Chobe Districts History
4. Recommendation: Monitoring and Evaluation should be a core function, with sufficient resources, and should be undertaken with a full LogFrame approach. The LogFrame should be reviewed at Project Inception and on an annual basis, and should play a full role in adaptive management.
Management Response: [Added: 2014/07/23]

UNDP/GEF project documents (PRODOCs) include a detailed M&E plan with a budget. Most projects, however, do not have enough resources to recruit a dedicated M&E officer. UNDP is, however, in the process of recruiting an in-house M&E officer who will support this function although this is not envisaged to make significant contributions to the M&E requirements of field projects as the person in question would already be responsible for supporting both the UNDP and the UNRCO in general. This, however, could be considered as part of Implementing Partner co-financing arrangements.

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
UNDP will begin dialogue with government IPs about the possibility of seconding officer to project to play the function/role of M&E officers.
[Added: 2014/07/23] [Last Updated: 2017/09/17]
Environment Unit 2014/12 Completed Dialogue with government is always on going with regards allocation of staff and resources to UNDP supported interventions to ensure delivery of outcomes. History
5. Recommendation: There should be a formal sustainability plan as part of Project activities. It could be drafted in the Project design but should be finalised in the final year of implementation. Important aspects to include are mechanisms to promote sustainability of Outcomes, leading towards Impacts.
Management Response: [Added: 2014/07/23]

Sustainability is one the key aspects of UNDP/GEF projects. However, this factor is not always well planned for during project implementation. UNDP will promote this aspect in the new projects and ensure that specific plans are drawn up to address this.

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
Promote the use of sustainability plans to chart a clear way forward beyond the life of the project.
[Added: 2014/07/23] [Last Updated: 2017/09/17]
Energy and Environment 2014/12 Completed Sustainability is a key component that is considered in all UNDP programme design processes. History
6. Recommendation: Although GEF projects aim to achieve Global Environmental Benefits, it is equally important to emphasize livelihoods targets.
Management Response: [Added: 2014/07/23]

Noted. Project design strives as much as possible to also emphasize benefits to local users.

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
No action required other than the emphasize promotion of benefit acquisition by local, especially marginalized groups in project implementation.
[Added: 2014/07/23] [Last Updated: 2017/09/17]
Energy and Environment Unit 2014/12 Completed promotion of benefit acquisition by local populations especially the marginalized groups is emphasized in all relevant programme design processes. History
7. Recommendation: In the project formulation process aiming at fundamental change, there is a strong need to examine the prospects for commitment, and coordination, by local/ national government and private sector to sustain both financial and human resources.
Management Response: [Added: 2014/07/23]

Noted. For UNDP/GEF projects, the Environment Unit is increasingly promoting the nomination of specific individuals with project partners to form part of Project Management Units. Co-financing is also key element that project continue to emphasize. In fact for one of the new UNDP/GEF projects, one of the implementing partners has identified a full-time officer to be formally attached to the project until its conclusion. This is seen as a demonstration of commitment by the Implementing Partner towards successful collaborative implementation of the project, and a good sign of commitment towards project outcomes.

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
No action required other than to continue to lobby government on the importance of demonstrating commitment and ownership towards joint implementation of projects.
[Added: 2014/07/23] [Last Updated: 2017/09/17]
Energy and Environment 2014/12 Completed The CO approves programme implementation upon clear commitment and ownership by national counterparts. History
8. Recommendation: Replication prospects need careful thought within Botswana and elsewhere; this project had many unique aspects which may not scale up directly, so appreciation of specific conditions is essential for modification of replication approaches.
Management Response: [Added: 2014/07/23]

Noted. This project did in fact significantly inform another Full Size Project (00087781) in another part of the country to pilot similar approaches of co-management that were piloted by this project. Some of the results and outputs of this project also formed a baseline for the project referred to. In this sense this project is regarded as a success. At a policy level, this project piloted a co-management approach to Protected Area management and this approach has not been adopted by the government entities tasked with protected area management and official made it part of the new Wildlife Conservation Policy currently being drafted.

Key Actions:

Key Action Responsible DueDate Status Comments Documents
Noted. UNDP Botswana is increasingly targeting replication and up-scaling aspects of programme design and implementation. The new programme strategy is to influence higher-level decision making at the policy level.
[Added: 2014/07/23] [Last Updated: 2017/09/17]
Energy and Environment, also whole CO 2014/12 Completed History

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